US20090156089A1 - Simulated Animal - Google Patents

Simulated Animal Download PDF

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Publication number
US20090156089A1
US20090156089A1 US12333015 US33301508A US2009156089A1 US 20090156089 A1 US20090156089 A1 US 20090156089A1 US 12333015 US12333015 US 12333015 US 33301508 A US33301508 A US 33301508A US 2009156089 A1 US2009156089 A1 US 2009156089A1
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Prior art keywords
internal device
simulated animal
configured
simulated
animal
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Abandoned
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US12333015
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Vivian D. Hoard
Larry Efird Jacobs
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CATNAP KITTIES Inc
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CATNAP KITTIES Inc
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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63HTOYS, e.g. TOPS, DOLLS, HOOPS, BUILDING BLOCKS
    • A63H13/00Toy figures with self-moving parts, with or without movement of the toy as a whole
    • A63H13/02Toy figures with self-moving parts, with or without movement of the toy as a whole imitating natural actions, e.g. catching a mouse by a cat, the kicking of an animal
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63HTOYS, e.g. TOPS, DOLLS, HOOPS, BUILDING BLOCKS
    • A63H3/00Dolls
    • A63H3/001Dolls simulating physiological processes, e.g. heartbeat, breathing or fever
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63HTOYS, e.g. TOPS, DOLLS, HOOPS, BUILDING BLOCKS
    • A63H3/00Dolls
    • A63H3/02Dolls made of fabrics or stuffed
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63HTOYS, e.g. TOPS, DOLLS, HOOPS, BUILDING BLOCKS
    • A63H3/00Dolls
    • A63H3/28Arrangements of sound-producing means in dolls; Means in dolls for producing sounds
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63HTOYS, e.g. TOPS, DOLLS, HOOPS, BUILDING BLOCKS
    • A63H5/00Musical or noise- producing devices for additional toy effects other than acoustical

Abstract

A simulated animal is disclosed. The simulated animal may contain an internal device that allows the simulated animal to imitate the sounds and vibrations of an actual animal. The internal device may employ oscillators and weighted cones to imitate an animal, such as a cat and its purr. The simulated animal may be user adjustable, allowing the user to adjust volume, vibration intensity, heat levels, etc. Control of the animal may be through physical controls, such as switches, or wireless/remote controls.

Description

    CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS
  • This application claims the benefit of U.S. provisional patent application No. 61/012,853, filed Dec. 11, 2007, which is incorporated by reference herein in its entirety.
  • FIELD OF TECHNOLOGY
  • This invention relates to a simulated animal that may be used as a toy or for therapeutic purposes.
  • BACKGROUND
  • Many children and adults find that holding and petting an animal, such as a cat, helps soothe and relax them, and may help them to fall asleep. The sensation of a warm cat purring and breathing softly may provide comfort and solace for a child who has difficulty falling asleep. This sensation may also be helpful to patients recovering from trauma or injury, providing them with assistance in relaxing, or to anyone who has trouble falling asleep. Such a sensation may even substitute for sleep medications, providing a natural and non-chemical way to ease into a night of slumber.
  • However, there are many responsibilities and costs involved in maintaining a pet. People who enjoy the effects of holding a pet may not want to take care of a live animal. The costs of feeding and taking the pet to the veterinarian may be prohibitive for some. Parents may not wish to feed and clean up after a cat or a dog. Also, the pet may not cooperate with a person, particularly a child, who is not asleep or may not want to stay with a child or an adult for long periods of time while the child or adult sleeps. Moreover, the potential pet owner, or someone who lives with the potential pet owner, may be allergic to pets. The potential pet owner may be prohibited from owning a pet by legal restrictions, such as lease clauses, or may simply not be home enough due to travel or work to provide the proper care for a pet.
  • Artificial pets are available on the market today. There are stuffed animals with no mechanisms or moving parts. There are toy animals with internal mechanisms and motors, but these generally have hard outer bodies or exaggerated movements. Neither stuffed animals nor mechanized animals provide the comforting sensation provided by an actual pet. Therefore, they are not useful for comforting one who is having difficulty falling asleep.
  • Therefore, what is needed in the art is substitute for a pet that can provide the calming and relaxing qualities that a real pet can provide, without the attendant costs and responsibilities of an actual pet. It is thus the purpose of the present invention to provide a simulated pet that can provide the relaxing and calming sensation that a real pet can provide, without requiring the maintenance and cost of a real pet.
  • SUMMARY
  • A simulated animal is described herein. The simulated animal may be constructed of any material and may or may not closely resemble an actual animal. The simulated animal may contain an internal device that assists in the simulation. The internal device may create sounds and/or vibrations that resemble those of an actual animal, such as a cat. The sounds and vibrations may be created through the use of coupled oscillators and a weighted cone. The configuration and/or operation of the simulated animal may be user adjustable, such as volume, heat level, vibration intensity, etc. Automatic adjustment may also be configured on the simulated animal, such as light detection that results in increasing or decreasing the volume of the internal device within the simulated animal.
  • These and other features and advantages of various exemplary embodiments of a simulated animal according to this disclosure are described in, or are apparent from, the following detailed description of various exemplary embodiments of the this subject matter.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • Various exemplary embodiments of this invention will be described in detail, with reference to the following figures, wherein like numerals represent like elements, and wherein:
  • FIG. 1 is a drawing of an exemplary, non-limiting embodiment of the present disclosure illustrating a simulated cat.
  • FIG. 2 is a drawing of an exemplary, non-limiting embodiment of an internal device that may be used in an embodiment of a simulated animal.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF ILLUSTRATIVE EMBODIMENTS
  • The present invention is described herein in reference to several specific embodiments. For example, one embodiment of the present subject matter discussed herein is a simulated cat. However, it will be understood by those skilled in the art that various changes in form and detail may be made without departing from the scope of the present invention as set forth in the following claims. For example, simulated dogs, bears, pigs, birds, fish, horses, unicorns, cows, or any other animal, imaginary or real, may be constructed to embody aspects of the present disclosure without departing from the scope and spirit of the present subject matter. Moreover, the present subject matter may be contained in non-animal embodiments. Furthermore, although elements of the invention may be described or claimed in the singular, the plural is contemplated unless limitation to the singular is explicitly stated.
  • An exemplary, non-limiting embodiment is illustrated in FIG. 1. In this embodiment, the present subject matter may take the form of simulated cat 100, with a soft fur exterior 110 which is similar to that of a live cat. Exterior 110 may be composed of natural or synthetic fibers, or any combination thereof. Exterior 110 may be any color, including natural colors and combinations of colors that are typically seen on cats and/or other animals, or novelty colors, such as pink or blue, which may be attractive to some users, such as small children.
  • Exterior 110 of simulated cat 100 may include all the external features of a real cat, such as four articulated legs and an articulated tail. Alternatively, exterior 110 may be constructed to look like a sleeping cat, with simulated legs and tail attached to the body or otherwise made to appear to be present, but not be articulated. In another embodiment, the tail may be wrapped around the portion of exterior 110 where the legs would normally be found, simulating a sleeping cat curled up into a ball with the tail covering all or a portion of the legs. The shape of exterior 110 may be designed to improve the “cuddliness” of the simulated pet, by being a shape which is easier to grasp and hold in the arms while sleeping.
  • Exterior 110 may be of any size that assists in furthering the purpose of the present disclosure. In one embodiment, exterior 110 is life size, with simulated cat 100 being the approximately the same size as a typical cat. This embodiment may be desirable for those wanting a normal size pet substitute. In another embodiment, exterior 110 may be smaller than a normal cat. Such an embodiment may be preferable to small children, being easier for them to hold and cuddle, or may serve as a novelty item. A small embodiment may also be preferable for a travel-friendly version of the present disclosure, and may be more useful when the embodiment is to be packed in a suitcase or carried in a vehicle. In yet another embodiment, exterior 110 is larger than a normal cat, and may be as large as desired. This embodiment may be useful as a novelty item, or may be used to simulate a tiger or lion, or other similarly large animal. A larger embodiment may also be preferred by adult users of the embodiment. Any and all sizes of simulated animal are contemplated as within the scope of the present disclosure.
  • Simulated cat 100 may have a head 120 which appears very realistic, and may have open or closed eyes. Alternatively, head 120 may have articulated eyes that both open and close, and the eyes may change position based on the position of simulated cat 100. In another embodiment, simulated cat 100 may have a toy-like head that is not particularly lifelike. This embodiment may be preferable to users who do not want a simulated animal that is too lifelike. A more toy-like head may also be preferable to children.
  • The simulated cat may be stuffed with fiber, poly-fiber material, foam, memory foam, or any combination of these or any other material that provides a soft feel when the simulated cat is squeezed, yet provides enough support to simulate the feel of a live cat. The stuffing material may be heat conductive, so that when the simulated cat is held, it absorbs the holder's body heat and becomes warm, further simulating a live animal. The stuffing material may be of any material that creates the desired amount of weight that will properly simulate a pet. Alternatively, a heavier stuffing material may be combined with a softer, lighter stuffing material to create the desired weight while retaining softness.
  • In one embodiment, exterior 110 has an opening 130 which leads to an internal cavity 140. Opening 130 may be sealed by any means which allows access to cavity 140 as needed to install and maintain internal device 150 (discussed in more detail below.) Such means may include Velcro®, a zipper, one or more buttons, one or more snaps, or any other means which seal and keep sealed opening 130 during normal use of the embodiment. In one embodiment, the opening is constructed such that it is disguised or camouflaged and is not readily apparent when observing or handling the embodiment.
  • Cavity 140 may be of any size or shape which allows the embodiment to function as described by the present disclosure. In one embodiment, the cavity is located in the center of simulated cat 100, thus making internal device 150 within cavity 140 harder to feel when the embodiment is grasped. The use of an effective stuffing as described above may also help keep the contours of internal device 150 undetectable from the user. Cavity 140 may be of any shape that furthers the purposes of the present subject matter. In one embodiment, the cavity is of a size and shape that is just larger than internal device 150, thereby enabling internal device 150 to be fully effective by maximizing the amount of contact that the exterior of internal device 150 has with the interior of simulated cat 100. In another embodiment, cavity 140 is located such that the weight of simulated cat 100, including internal device 150, is evenly distributed throughout simulated cat 100. In yet another alternative, cavity 140 is located in the chest area of simulated cat 100, between the front legs, so that the purring effects produced by internal device 150 originate in the same anatomical area of simulated cat 100 as they would in a real cat. In still yet another alternative, if constraints of the shape and size of simulated cat 100 require locating cavity 140 such that the weight of simulated cat 100 is not evenly distributed, additional stuffing material may be placed in appropriate sections of simulated cat 100 to create a more balanced weight distribution.
  • In one embodiment, internal device 150 provides a vibrating motion, simulating a purring sensation in simulated cat 100. In another embodiment, internal device 150 may provide sounds which simulate a cat's purr. In yet another embodiment, sounds and vibration are combined and both are produced by internal device 150. Alternatively, purring sounds may be produced as an inherent function of the production of purring vibrations. In another embodiment, internal device 150 produces an expanding and contracting motion, simulating the breathing of a live animal. With this motion, internal device 150 may also produce sounds that simulate breathing. In one embodiment, a dog may be simulated and the dog's panting may be simulated by internal device 150. In a dog embodiment, internal device 150 may be coupled to a mechanical means which produces the effect of a simulated dog tail wagging. Internal device 150 may produce other movements, vibrations, or sounds that may be helpful in assisting a user in falling asleep or effective in simulating a live animal. In yet another embodiment, internal device 150 may produce heat, simulating the body heat of a live animal. Any, all, or any combination of these functions may be performed by internal device 150 and are within the scope and spirit of the present subject matter. More details regarding one embodiment of internal device 150 are discussed herein in regard to FIG. 2.
  • In one embodiment, a simulated animal, such as simulated cat 100, may have an input port, such as port 160. Port 160 may be connected to internal device 150 through connection 162. Port 160 may be located in location that facilitates use and helps reduce its visibility, such as in the foot of a simulated animal. Connection 162 may be any connection that is capable of effectively transporting input or output to internal device 150, including wired and wireless connectivity means. Port 160 may be any port capable of accepting a connector and/or connection means to perform a specific function. For example, port 160 may accept connector 186 of power cord 180. Power cord 180 maybe used, when connected to port 160, to provide power to internal device 150. In one embodiment, power cord 180 may be used to provide power to rechargeable batteries contained within, or otherwise connected to, internal device 150. Power cord 180 may include a plug 182 that may connect to standard power sockets of any type, and cord 184 that may connect plug 182 to connector 186.
  • In another embodiment, simulated cat 100 may have other ports or means of detecting and/or accepting input from outside simulated cat 100. Simulated cat 100 may have detector 190, which maybe connected to internal device 150 through connection 192. Connection 192 may be any connection that is capable of effectively transporting input or output to internal device 150, including wired and wireless connectivity means. Detector 190 may be any type of detection means capable of detecting any input. For example, detector 190 may be a photodetector or photosensor capable of detecting light levels on the exterior of simulated cat 100. Such information may be communicated to internal device 150 which may use the light level information to adjust its settings or take other actions. Alternatively, detector 190 may be a device capable of detecting audible input, such as a microphone, that detects noise levels, voice commands, speech, or any other audible input. Such input may be passed to internal device 150, with or without intermediate processing, which may use the input to adjust its settings or take other actions. Any other input and/or output detection means and methods are contemplated as within the scope of the present disclosure.
  • FIG. 2 illustrates a non-limiting exemplary embodiment of internal device 200 that may be included in an embodiment of simulated cat 100. For example, internal device 150 of FIG. 1 may be an internal device of the type illustrated in FIG. 2. Internal device 200 may be constructed of any combination of components and materials such that the herein described functionality is achieved. Internal device 200 may include electronics and/or mechanical parts. Internal device 200 may be constructed with outer housing 210 that facilitates the effects that it is designed to produce. For example, outer housing 210 may be constructed of a firm, pliable, heat conductive material which facilitates the transmission of vibrations and heat to the body of a simulated animal such as simulated cat 100. In other embodiments, outer housing 210 may be constructed of any material capable of containing the components of internal device 200.
  • Internal device 200 may have a control component 215. Control component 215 may be any collection of circuits, wiring, microchips, programmable arrays, microchips, or any other means that may be used to control electronic and/or mechanical devices. Control component 215 may control all, or some, of the other components that may be configured inside or external to internal device 200. Control component 215 may be connected directly, communicatively, indirectly, etc., to the other component it controls. In an alternative embodiment, control component 215 is not present in internal device 200, and control functions are integrated into the individual components or not present. Embodiments with and without control component 215 are contemplated. For figure clarity, all the possible connections of the components within and external to internal device 200 are not illustrated in FIG. 2. However, all such connections, and any possible connection of components and devices that may be configured in internal device 200 are contemplated as within the scope of the present disclosure.
  • Internal device 200 may be configured with power switch 220. Power switch 220 may control the flow of electrical power or activation of mechanical power in the device directly, or indirectly, such as by causing control component 215 to control the flow of electrical power or activation of mechanical power. Power switch 220 may be accessible from the exterior of internal device 200, including from a remote location. For example, power switch 220 may be located such that it is easily accessible from the exterior of simulated cat 100. Actuation of control 222 may operate power switch 220. Power switch 220 may be a manual on/off switch as typically found on electronic devices, or it may be a detector or other input that operates power switch 220 through the use of light, sound, voice commands, touch sensitivity, or any other operation means. All such embodiments are contemplated.
  • Internal device 200 may be configured with timer 235. Timer 235 may be any effective means of controlling power or component activation within internal device 200 based on time, such as an electronic timer or an oscillator, or any other type or means of timing the operation of a component. In some embodiments it may be desirable to operate one or more of the components of internal device 200 for only a set amount of time, for example, to preserve battery life. The activation of power through power switch 220 may activate timer 235, which then cuts the power to one or more components of internal device 200 after a predetermined amount of time. The amount of time that timer 235 runs before cutting off power may be preset or preconfigured at the time of manufacture of internal device 200
  • Alternatively, the amount of time that timer 235 runs before cutting off power may be user-adjustable, in one embodiment through the activation of control 236. For example, timer 235 may be configured to allow power to the components of internal device 200 to flow for 15 minutes, and thereafter cut power to the components. In some embodiments, this may be the amount of time that has been determined to be adequate to allow a user to fall asleep. In other embodiments, a user may adjust the amount of time that timer 235 allows power to the components of internal device 200, for example, from one to twenty minutes. In still other embodiments, as user may adjust the amount of time from zero minutes, such that power is never sent to the components of internal device 200, to an infinite amount of time, such that timer 235 never cuts power to the components. Any amount of time may be set for timer 235, and timer 235 may be deactivated, in one embodiment by operating control 236. All such embodiments are contemplated as within the scope of the present disclosure.
  • Internal device 200 may include motion detector 225. Motion detector 225 may communicate with other components, such as timer 235. Motion detector 225 may be configured to reset time 235 when motion is detected. For example, a user may be having difficulty falling asleep and may toss and turn. Rather than cutting power to the components of internal device 200 after the predetermined time set on timer 235, when the user rolls over or moves, motion detector 225 may reset timer 235 so that the components of internal device 200 continue to operate until the user falls asleep. In one embodiment, motion detector 225 may reactivate components when motion is detected. For example, if a user has been asleep for a time period longer than the time configured on timer 235, power may have been cut off to the components of internal device 200. The user may then wake up and desire to use the simulated animal to assist in falling back to sleep. Motion detector 225 may detect the motion of the waking user and reactivate the components of internal device 200. Motion detector 225 may also reactivate timer 235 so that after the configured time has elapsed, the components are again deactivated. Any other use or configuration of motion detector 225 is contemplated as within the scope of the present disclosure.
  • Internal device 200 may be configured with power source 230. Power source 230 may be one or more batteries and associated circuitry, hardware, or other means of extracting power from the batteries and providing it to the components of internal device 200. Such batteries may be typical disposable batteries or rechargeable batteries. Power source 230 may configured in internal device 200, or internal device 200 may be configured within a simulated animal, in such a manner as to facilitate the ease of battery replacement.
  • In another embodiment, power source 230 may contain rechargeable batteries that can be recharged without being removed from internal device 200. For example, power may be provided to power source 230 through port 232. Port 232 may be located on internal device 200, or it may be located on the exterior of a simulated animal, such as port 160 of FIG. 1. In some embodiments, an output may be configured that provides an indication of a low battery condition, such as an audible alert or a light, or an indication of the status of battery charge, etc.
  • In another embodiment, port 232 may receive alternating current and power source 230 may convert the alternating current to direct current, or may otherwise use alternating current to provide power to components. Alternatively, port 232 may be a wireless port or a port capable of receiving power through proximity to a power source rather than a direct connection to a power source. Any other type of port or any other means of transporting power to power source 230 is contemplated.
  • Power source 230 maybe connected to any or all of the components within internal device 200 in order to provide them with power. Alternatively, power source 230 may provide power to a subset of components, and one or more of the components that receive power directly from power source 230 may transmit power to other components. All such configurations are contemplated as within the scope of the present disclosure.
  • In one embodiment, internal device 200 is configured with a purr component 240. Purr component 240 may be constructed of any type or number of devices, components, and/or materials that effectively simulate the purr of an animal such as a cat. In one alternative, purr component 240 includes first oscillator 242. First oscillator 242 may be configured to generate an audible sound when activated, either directly or through connection to another device or component. First oscillator 242 may be coupled to second oscillator 244 to produce a purring effect. Other components may be included in the coupled oscillators 242 and 244 to assist or otherwise manipulate the output of the oscillators 242 and 244. For example, capacitors may be used to process or shape the sounds or signals generated by coupled oscillators 242 and 244 so that it more closely resembles a purr or other sound effect. Any combination of circuitry, components, devices, or other means may be used to generate or manipulate the sounds created by purr component 240, and all such means are contemplated as within the scope of the present disclosure.
  • Because the output generated by the coupled oscillators 242 and 244 may be electrical in nature, too low in volume to hear, or otherwise inaudible, coupled oscillators 242 and 244 may be coupled to cone 246. Cone 246 may be constructed similarly to an audio speaker cone, may be one or more components of an audio speaker, or may be an entire audio speaker. Alternatively, cone 246 may be constructed or configured in any other way such that it assists in making the output of coupled oscillators 242 and 244 audible or amplifies the output of coupled oscillators 242 and 244. Cone 246 may be constructed of any material, components, or combination of materials and/or components that facilitate this function. All such constructions are contemplated as within the scope of the present disclosure.
  • Coupled to, or otherwise configured with, cone 246 may be weights 247 a and 247 b. Weights 247 a and 247 b may add mass to cone 246 and/or purr component 240 such that when cone 246 moves in response to the output of coupled oscillators 242 and 244, it creates through the assistance of weights 247 a and 247 b a detectable vibration. Weights 247 a and 247 b may be composed of any effective material that facilitates the amplification of the vibrations of cone 246. In one embodiment, weights 247 a and 247 b are constructed of a non-ferrous material, such as brass, to avoid interaction with any magnets that may be associated with cone 246. Weights 247 a and 247 b may also be a single weight, or more than two weights. Weights 247 a and 247 b may be of any shape, size, mass, or dimension, including a ring shape specifically designed to couple with the shape of cone 246. Any weighting mechanism or means may be used in conjunction with cone 246 and/or any other component of purr component 240 and/or internal device 200, and all such embodiments are contemplated.
  • In some embodiments, internal device 200 may be configured with additional features, such as auxiliary component 250. Auxiliary component 250 may generate heat which may give a simulated animal containing internal device 200 a realistic simulation of body heat. In another embodiment, auxiliary component 250 may, when located on a pliable exterior wall of internal device 200 or when located outside of outer housing 210, be configured to produce an expansion and contraction effect, thus imitating the breathing motions of an animal. Alternatively, auxiliary component 250 may play recorded music, speech, or other sounds. A simulated animal and/or an internal device, such as simulated cat 100 or internal devices 150 and 200, may contain several components such as auxiliary component 250. Any number and type of components are contemplated. It is also contemplated that several internal devices may be configured in a simulated animal, and that individual components may be configured in a simulated animal such that they are not contained in a singular internal device as described herein. All such embodiments are contemplated as within the scope of the present disclosure.
  • In one embodiment, input may be provided to purr component 240 and/or internal device 200 through port 249. Such input may be physical manipulation of a control attached to port 249 directly or indirectly, such as a knob or switch. Such input may also be the detection of light, sound, or heat levels. Port 249 may also be, or be connected to, a touch sensitive input that detects contact by a finger or other body part. Such input may be used to alter the configuration or operation of purr component 240. For example, port 249 may be attached to volume control 248, which may be connected, directly or indirectly, to any of oscillators 242 or 244, cone 246, or any other component of purr component 240. Volume control 248 may directly control, or transmit directions controlling, the output of the various components such that it affects the volume of the output.
  • In one embodiment, port 249 may be configured to receive input indicating light levels, and may increase the volume when light levels are high and lower the volume when light levels are low. This may be desirable if a louder purr is desired during the day and a quieter purr is desired in the evening. Volume control 248 may also control the amount and intensity of vibration created by cone 246 and weights 247 a and 247 b. Alternatively, volume control 248 may activate the components of purr component 240 and/or internal device 200 responsive to receiving input reflecting light, sound, or heat levels, or other conditions. For example, articulated eyes may be configured to shut in the dark. In another alternative, purr component 240 and/or internal device 200 may be coupled with a sound detector to detect a certain noise or voice which would then activate the components of purr component 240 and/or internal device 200. Voice detection components and circuitry may be integrated into purr component 240 and/or internal device 200, or be coupled therewith, such that purr component 240 and/or internal device 200 can learn the sounds of a user's voice and respond accordingly. Any other control of any other component through any effective means is contemplated as within the scope of the present disclosure.
  • Other controls may be configured on internal device 200, or may be communicatively connected to internal device 200. Such controls may be adjusted and/or manipulated by the user of a simulated animal, such as simulated cat 100. For example, if internal device 200 produces sound by any means, volume control accessible to the user may be configured. If internal device 200 produces mechanical effects by any means, the intensity of the effects may be adjustable by the user. If internal device 200 produces heat, the temperature may be adjustable by the user. In some embodiments, such adjustments may be made on a device such as internal devices 150 or 200 through opening 130. Alternatively, controls may be integrated into a simulated animal such as simulated cat 100 and accessible from the exterior, either directly, or placed in an enclosure easily accessible to a user, such as under a flap of material or on a collar.
  • In alternate embodiments, other means of control may be provided, such as wired or wireless remote control, voice controls, etc. For example, internal device 200 may be controlled by a remote control. The remote control may communicate with device 200 using any known remote control technology, including infrared, radio signals, and sound waves. Such a remote control may control any of the possible functions of internal device 150 described herein in regard to any of the various embodiments disclosed.
  • In other embodiments, internal device 200, components of internal device 200, and/or other components may be configured in an simulated animal that communicate with other object or devices to perform tasks. For example, if, in one embodiment, timer 235 is configured to stop operation of one or more components after a predetermined period of time, timer 235 may also be configured to send a signal, such as a radio frequency signal, or instruct another device to send such as signal, that will activate a lighting device and shut off or turn on a light. Alternatively, a signal may be sent from a simulated animal or component configured therein that powers on or off other appliances, devices, etc. Alternatively, such signals may instruct devices to alter other conditions. For example, volume control on a stereo, radio, or other audio component may be adjusted. Other types of signals, wired or wireless, and other instructions sent from simulated animal are contemplated as within the scope of the present disclosure.
  • While the simulated animal has been described in connection with the various embodiments of the various figures, it is to be understood that other similar embodiments can be used or modifications and additions can be made to the described embodiments without deviating from the described systems and methods. Therefore, simulated animals such as those described herein should not be limited to any single embodiment, but rather should be construed in breadth and scope in accordance with the appended claims.

Claims (17)

  1. 1. A simulated animal, comprising:
    an enclosure;
    a filling within the enclosure; and
    an internal device configured to simulate at least one aspect of an animal, wherein the internal device comprises a sound generating mechanism coupled with a mechanical vibration mechanism.
  2. 2. The simulated animal of claim 1, wherein the internal device further comprises a timer communicatively connected to the sound generating mechanism coupled with the mechanical vibration mechanism, wherein the timer is configured to operate the sound generating mechanism coupled with the mechanical vibration mechanism for a predetermined amount of time.
  3. 3. The simulated animal of claim 2, wherein the simulated animal further comprises an external control communicatively connected to the internal device, and wherein the predetermined amount of time is set by the external control.
  4. 4. The simulated animal of claim 1, further comprising a motion detection component communicatively connected to the internal device.
  5. 5. The simulated animal of claim 4, wherein the motion detection component is configured to transmit a signal to the internal device upon detection of motion, and wherein the internal device is further configured to activate at least one component responsive to the signal.
  6. 6. The simulated animal of claim 4, wherein the internal device further comprises:
    a timer communicatively connected to the motion detection component and the sound generating mechanism coupled with the mechanical vibration mechanism,
    wherein the timer is configured to operate the sound generating mechanism coupled with the mechanical vibration mechanism for a predetermined amount of time, and
    wherein the motion detection component is configured to reset the timer responsive to detecting motion.
  7. 7. The simulated animal of claim 1, wherein the internal device further comprises a heating component.
  8. 8. The simulated animal of claim 1, wherein the sound generating mechanism comprises at least one oscillator coupled with a cone.
  9. 9. The simulated animal of claim 8, wherein the sound generating mechanism comprises a first oscillator coupled to a second oscillator, wherein the second oscillator is coupled to the cone, and wherein the second oscillator is configured to modulate the output of the first oscillator.
  10. 10. The simulated animal of claim 8, wherein the mechanical vibration mechanism comprises at least one weight coupled to the cone.
  11. 11. The simulated animal of claim 10, wherein the at least one weight is ring-shaped.
  12. 12. The simulated animal of claim 1, wherein the internal device further comprises an internal power source, wherein the internal power source comprises a rechargeable battery configured to be recharged without removal from the internal device.
  13. 13. The simulated animal of claim 12, wherein the simulated animal further comprises an input port connected to the internal power source, wherein the input port is configured to receive a power cord connected to an external power source.
  14. 14. The simulated animal of claim 12, wherein the simulated animal further comprises an external indicator connected to the internal power source, wherein the internal power source is configured to activate the external indicator when a power level of the rechargeable battery falls below a predetermined threshold.
  15. 15. The simulated animal of claim 14, wherein the external indicator is configured to generate an audible alarm when activated by the internal power source.
  16. 16. The simulated animal of claim 14, wherein the external indicator is configured to generate a visible light when activated by the internal power source.
  17. 17. The simulated animal of claim 12, wherein the simulated animal further comprises an external indicator connected to the internal power source, wherein the internal power source is configured to communicate to the external indicator a power level of the rechargeable battery.
US12333015 2007-12-11 2008-12-11 Simulated Animal Abandoned US20090156089A1 (en)

Priority Applications (2)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
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US12333015 US20090156089A1 (en) 2007-12-11 2008-12-11 Simulated Animal

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CN103961196A (en) * 2014-04-29 2014-08-06 赵英 Simulation device for simulating mother and infant care
US20160310855A1 (en) * 2014-05-21 2016-10-27 Tencent Technology (Shenzhen) Company Limited An interactive doll and a method to control the same
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CN104800951A (en) * 2015-05-03 2015-07-29 陆勤芳 Multi-functional baby soothing sleep device
US10111405B2 (en) * 2016-02-15 2018-10-30 Ron Levi Videos for pets and methods for the creation thereof

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