US20090144638A1 - Automatic increasing of capacity of a virtual space in a virtual world - Google Patents

Automatic increasing of capacity of a virtual space in a virtual world Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US20090144638A1
US20090144638A1 US11947829 US94782907A US2009144638A1 US 20090144638 A1 US20090144638 A1 US 20090144638A1 US 11947829 US11947829 US 11947829 US 94782907 A US94782907 A US 94782907A US 2009144638 A1 US2009144638 A1 US 2009144638A1
Authority
US
Grant status
Application
Patent type
Prior art keywords
virtual space
capacity
virtual
avatars
avatar
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Granted
Application number
US11947829
Other versions
US8127235B2 (en )
Inventor
Peter F. Haggar
Brian R. Bokor
Daniel E. House
II William B. Nicol
Andrew B. Smith
Luis J. Ostdiek
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
Activision Publishing Inc
Original Assignee
International Business Machines Corp
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date

Links

Images

Classifications

    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04LTRANSMISSION OF DIGITAL INFORMATION, e.g. TELEGRAPHIC COMMUNICATION
    • H04L43/00Arrangements for monitoring or testing packet switching networks
    • H04L43/16Arrangements for monitoring or testing packet switching networks using threshold monitoring
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63FCARD, BOARD, OR ROULETTE GAMES; INDOOR GAMES USING SMALL MOVING PLAYING BODIES; VIDEO GAMES; GAMES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • A63F13/00Video games, i.e. games using an electronically generated display having two or more dimensions
    • A63F13/12Video games, i.e. games using an electronically generated display having two or more dimensions involving interaction between a plurality of game devices, e.g. transmisison or distribution systems
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63FCARD, BOARD, OR ROULETTE GAMES; INDOOR GAMES USING SMALL MOVING PLAYING BODIES; VIDEO GAMES; GAMES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • A63F13/00Video games, i.e. games using an electronically generated display having two or more dimensions
    • A63F13/30Interconnection arrangements between game servers and game devices; Interconnection arrangements between game devices; Interconnection arrangements between game servers
    • A63F13/35Details of game servers
    • A63F13/358Adapting the game course according to the network or server load, e.g. for reducing latency due to different connection speeds between clients
    • GPHYSICS
    • G06COMPUTING; CALCULATING; COUNTING
    • G06NCOMPUTER SYSTEMS BASED ON SPECIFIC COMPUTATIONAL MODELS
    • G06N3/00Computer systems based on biological models
    • G06N3/004Artificial life, i.e. computers simulating life
    • G06N3/006Artificial life, i.e. computers simulating life based on simulated virtual individual or collective life forms, e.g. single "avatar", social simulations, virtual worlds
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04LTRANSMISSION OF DIGITAL INFORMATION, e.g. TELEGRAPHIC COMMUNICATION
    • H04L47/00Traffic regulation in packet switching networks
    • H04L47/70Admission control or resource allocation
    • H04L47/82Miscellaneous aspects
    • H04L47/822Collecting or measuring resource availability data
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04LTRANSMISSION OF DIGITAL INFORMATION, e.g. TELEGRAPHIC COMMUNICATION
    • H04L67/00Network-specific arrangements or communication protocols supporting networked applications
    • H04L67/38Protocols for telewriting; Protocols for networked simulations, virtual reality or games
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63FCARD, BOARD, OR ROULETTE GAMES; INDOOR GAMES USING SMALL MOVING PLAYING BODIES; VIDEO GAMES; GAMES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • A63F2300/00Features of games using an electronically generated display having two or more dimensions, e.g. on a television screen, showing representations related to the game
    • A63F2300/50Features of games using an electronically generated display having two or more dimensions, e.g. on a television screen, showing representations related to the game characterized by details of game servers
    • A63F2300/53Features of games using an electronically generated display having two or more dimensions, e.g. on a television screen, showing representations related to the game characterized by details of game servers details of basic data processing
    • A63F2300/534Features of games using an electronically generated display having two or more dimensions, e.g. on a television screen, showing representations related to the game characterized by details of game servers details of basic data processing for network load management, e.g. bandwidth optimization, latency reduction
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63FCARD, BOARD, OR ROULETTE GAMES; INDOOR GAMES USING SMALL MOVING PLAYING BODIES; VIDEO GAMES; GAMES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • A63F2300/00Features of games using an electronically generated display having two or more dimensions, e.g. on a television screen, showing representations related to the game
    • A63F2300/50Features of games using an electronically generated display having two or more dimensions, e.g. on a television screen, showing representations related to the game characterized by details of game servers
    • A63F2300/55Details of game data or player data management
    • A63F2300/5526Game data structure
    • A63F2300/5533Game data structure using program state or machine event data, e.g. server keeps track of the state of multiple players on in a multiple player game
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63FCARD, BOARD, OR ROULETTE GAMES; INDOOR GAMES USING SMALL MOVING PLAYING BODIES; VIDEO GAMES; GAMES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • A63F2300/00Features of games using an electronically generated display having two or more dimensions, e.g. on a television screen, showing representations related to the game
    • A63F2300/50Features of games using an electronically generated display having two or more dimensions, e.g. on a television screen, showing representations related to the game characterized by details of game servers
    • A63F2300/55Details of game data or player data management
    • A63F2300/5546Details of game data or player data management using player registration data, e.g. identification, account, preferences, game history
    • A63F2300/5553Details of game data or player data management using player registration data, e.g. identification, account, preferences, game history user representation in the game field, e.g. avatar
    • GPHYSICS
    • G06COMPUTING; CALCULATING; COUNTING
    • G06FELECTRIC DIGITAL DATA PROCESSING
    • G06F3/00Input arrangements for transferring data to be processed into a form capable of being handled by the computer; Output arrangements for transferring data from processing unit to output unit, e.g. interface arrangements
    • G06F3/01Input arrangements or combined input and output arrangements for interaction between user and computer
    • G06F3/048Interaction techniques based on graphical user interfaces [GUI]
    • G06F3/0481Interaction techniques based on graphical user interfaces [GUI] based on specific properties of the displayed interaction object or a metaphor-based environment, e.g. interaction with desktop elements like windows or icons, or assisted by a cursor's changing behaviour or appearance
    • G06F3/04815Interaction with three-dimensional environments, e.g. control of viewpoint to navigate in the environment
    • GPHYSICS
    • G06COMPUTING; CALCULATING; COUNTING
    • G06FELECTRIC DIGITAL DATA PROCESSING
    • G06F3/00Input arrangements for transferring data to be processed into a form capable of being handled by the computer; Output arrangements for transferring data from processing unit to output unit, e.g. interface arrangements
    • G06F3/01Input arrangements or combined input and output arrangements for interaction between user and computer
    • G06F3/048Interaction techniques based on graphical user interfaces [GUI]
    • G06F3/0481Interaction techniques based on graphical user interfaces [GUI] based on specific properties of the displayed interaction object or a metaphor-based environment, e.g. interaction with desktop elements like windows or icons, or assisted by a cursor's changing behaviour or appearance
    • G06F3/04817Interaction techniques based on graphical user interfaces [GUI] based on specific properties of the displayed interaction object or a metaphor-based environment, e.g. interaction with desktop elements like windows or icons, or assisted by a cursor's changing behaviour or appearance using icons
    • GPHYSICS
    • G06COMPUTING; CALCULATING; COUNTING
    • G06FELECTRIC DIGITAL DATA PROCESSING
    • G06F3/00Input arrangements for transferring data to be processed into a form capable of being handled by the computer; Output arrangements for transferring data from processing unit to output unit, e.g. interface arrangements
    • G06F3/06Digital input from or digital output to record carriers, e.g. RAID, emulated record carriers, networked record carriers
    • G06F3/0601Dedicated interfaces to storage systems
    • G06F3/0628Dedicated interfaces to storage systems making use of a particular technique
    • G06F3/0629Configuration or reconfiguration of storage systems
    • G06F3/0631Configuration or reconfiguration of storage systems by allocating resources to storage systems
    • GPHYSICS
    • G06COMPUTING; CALCULATING; COUNTING
    • G06FELECTRIC DIGITAL DATA PROCESSING
    • G06F3/00Input arrangements for transferring data to be processed into a form capable of being handled by the computer; Output arrangements for transferring data from processing unit to output unit, e.g. interface arrangements
    • G06F3/06Digital input from or digital output to record carriers, e.g. RAID, emulated record carriers, networked record carriers
    • G06F3/0601Dedicated interfaces to storage systems
    • G06F3/0628Dedicated interfaces to storage systems making use of a particular technique
    • G06F3/0646Horizontal data movement in storage systems, i.e. moving data in between storage devices or systems
    • G06F3/065Replication mechanisms
    • GPHYSICS
    • G06COMPUTING; CALCULATING; COUNTING
    • G06FELECTRIC DIGITAL DATA PROCESSING
    • G06F9/00Arrangements for program control, e.g. control units
    • G06F9/06Arrangements for program control, e.g. control units using stored programs, i.e. using an internal store of processing equipment to receive or retain programs
    • G06F9/46Multiprogramming arrangements
    • G06F9/50Allocation of resources, e.g. of the central processing unit [CPU]
    • G06F9/5005Allocation of resources, e.g. of the central processing unit [CPU] to service a request
    • G06F9/5011Allocation of resources, e.g. of the central processing unit [CPU] to service a request the resources being hardware resources other than CPUs, Servers and Terminals

Abstract

A system and method for automatically increasing a capacity of a virtual space in a virtual world. It is determined if an allowable number of avatars are currently in the virtual space, and a capacity of the virtual space is increased when the allowable number of avatars are currently in the virtual space. The capacity of the virtual space may be increased by spawning a replicate new virtual space. The capacity of the virtual space may also be increased by expanding a size of the virtual space. The virtual space may include any type of virtual space such as for example, a store, a business, an arena, a building, a land area, a room, etc. The allowable number of avatars may be a maximum avatar capacity for the virtual space, or may be an ideal avatar capacity for the virtual space.

Description

    BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • The present invention is related to virtual space in a virtual world, and more specifically to automatic increasing of capacity of a virtual space in a virtual world.
  • Virtual reality (VR) worlds bring the best of online and real-world brick and mortar to many scenarios, for example shopping. In the brick and mortar worlds, shopping has both a social and a visually immersive experience. Two dimensional (2D) shopping web sites are convenient (e.g., they do not require traveling to a physical location) and scalable to 1,000s of users by a hosting server. However, they lack that social and visual experience of brick and mortar. Today three dimensional (3D) web sites combine the convenience of online shopping with the social and the visual benefits of brick and mortar. However, they suffer from the scalability issue of brick and mortar.
  • Current virtual worlds, (e.g., Second Life), differ from traditional 2D web sites in many ways. One way is that if you are looking at a page on the Circuit City® web site, you don't know if you are the only one looking at that page or if there are thousands or perhaps tens of thousands of other users looking at that page at the same time. In virtual worlds, to see something you must be in a particular location to view it. When there are too many avatars in a particular location at the same time, it creates congestion not just for the user who has to attempt to move around all the other avatars, but also for the server that is running that particular virtual space in the virtual world. Therefore, if someone is running a store in a virtual world, they may only want to allow a certain number of avatars in at a time to facilitate a good shopping and user experience as well as control the load on the server running that store. However, a problem exists in that if the store is full, the next avatar desiring access to the store has to be turned away. Currently, one solution to this problem is that when a virtual world store effectively closes, the avatar is put on a waiting list to enter. This is unacceptable to users who will not want to be denied.
  • BRIEF SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • According to one aspect of the present invention, a method for automatically increasing a capacity of a virtual space in a virtual world that includes detecting an attempt by an avatar to enter a virtual space in a virtual world, determining if an allowable number of avatars are currently in the virtual space, and increasing a capacity of the virtual space when the allowable number of avatars are currently in the virtual space.
  • According to another aspect of the present invention, a method for automatically increasing a capacity of a virtual space in a virtual world that includes determining if an allowable number of avatars are currently in the virtual space, and increasing a capacity of the virtual space when the allowable number of avatars are currently in the virtual space.
  • According to a further aspect of the present invention, a system for automatically increasing a capacity of a virtual space in a virtual world includes a server, one or more workstations, and a network interconnecting the server and one or more workstations, wherein the server hosts a virtual world allowing a user at the one or more workstations to control an avatar in the virtual world to access a virtual space, the server detecting an attempt by an avatar to enter the virtual space in the virtual world, determining if an allowable number of avatars are currently in the virtual space, and increasing a capacity of the virtual space when the allowable number of avatars are currently in the virtual space.
  • According to a still further aspect of the present invention, a computer program product comprising a computer useable medium having computer useable program code embodied therewith, the computer useable program code comprising computer useable program code configured to detect an attempt by an avatar to enter a virtual space in a virtual world, computer useable program code configured to determine if an allowable number of avatars are currently in the virtual space, and computer useable program code configured to increase a capacity of the virtual space when the allowable number of avatars are currently in the virtual space.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • The present invention is further described in the detailed description which follows in reference to the noted plurality of drawings by way of non-limiting examples of embodiments of the present invention in which like reference numerals represent similar parts throughout the several views of the drawings and wherein:
  • FIG. 1 is a diagram of system for automatically increasing a capacity of a virtual space in a virtual world according to an example embodiment of the present invention;
  • FIG. 2 is a diagram of virtual environment for automatically increasing a capacity of a virtual space in a virtual world according to an example embodiment of the present invention;
  • FIG. 3 is a diagram of increasing a capacity of a virtual space by spawning a replicate new virtual space according to an example embodiment of the present invention;
  • FIG. 4 is a diagram of increasing a capacity of a virtual space by expanding a size of the virtual space according to an example embodiment of the present invention;
  • FIG. 5 is a flowchart of a process for increasing a capacity of a virtual space in a virtual world according to an example embodiment of the present invention;
  • FIG. 6 is a flowchart of increasing a capacity of a virtual space by spawning a replicate new virtual space according to an example embodiment of the present invention;
  • FIG. 7 is a flowchart of a process for increasing a capacity of a virtual space by expanding a physical size of the virtual space according to an example embodiment of the present invention;
  • FIG. 8 is a flowchart of a process for defining virtual space settings according to an example embodiment of the present invention; and
  • FIG. 9 is a flowchart of a process for setting an avatar capacity limit for automatic increase in capacity according to an example embodiment of the present invention.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION
  • As will be appreciated by one of skill in the art, the present invention may be embodied as a method, system, computer program product, or a combination of the foregoing. Accordingly, the present invention may take the form of an entirely hardware embodiment, an entirely software embodiment (including firmware, resident software, micro-code, etc.) or an embodiment combining software and hardware aspects that may generally be referred to herein as a “system.” Furthermore, the present invention may take the form of a computer program product on a computer-usable storage medium having computer-usable program code embodied in the medium.
  • Any suitable computer usable or computer readable medium may be utilized. The computer usable or computer readable medium may be, for example but not limited to, an electronic, magnetic, optical, electromagnetic, infrared, or semiconductor system, apparatus, device, or propagation medium. More specific examples (a non-exhaustive list) of the computer readable medium would include the following: an electrical connection having one or more wires; a tangible medium such as a portable computer diskette, a hard disk, a random access memory (RAM), a read-only memory (ROM), an erasable programmable read-only memory (EPROM or Flash memory), a compact disc read-only memory (CD-ROM), or other tangible optical or magnetic storage device; or transmission media such as those supporting the Internet or an intranet. Note that the computer usable or computer readable medium could even be paper or another suitable medium upon which the program is printed, as the program can be electronically captured, via, for instance, optical scanning of the paper or other medium, then compiled, interpreted, or otherwise processed in a suitable manner, if necessary, and then stored in a computer memory.
  • In the context of this document, a computer usable or computer readable medium may be any medium that can contain, store, communicate, propagate, or transport the program for use by or in connection with the instruction execution system, platform, apparatus, or device. The computer usable medium may include a propagated data signal with the computer-usable program code embodied therewith, either in baseband or as part of a carrier wave. The computer usable program code may be transmitted using any appropriate medium, including but not limited to the Internet, wireline, optical fiber cable, radio frequency (RF) or other means.
  • Computer program code for carrying out operations of the present invention may be written in an object oriented, scripted or unscripted programming language such as Java, Perl, Smalltalk, C++ or the like. However, the computer program code for carrying out operations of the present invention may also be written in conventional procedural programming languages, such as the “C” programming language or similar programming languages.
  • The present invention is described below with reference to flowchart illustrations and/or block diagrams of methods, apparatus (systems) and computer program products according to embodiments of the invention. It will be understood that each block of the flowchart illustrations and/or block diagrams, and combinations of blocks in the flowchart illustrations and/or block diagrams, can be implemented by computer program instructions. These computer program instructions may be provided to a processor of a general purpose computer, special purpose computer, or other programmable data processing apparatus to produce a machine, such that the instructions, which execute via the processor of the computer or other programmable data processing apparatus, create means for implementing the functions/acts specified in the flowchart and/or block diagram block or blocks.
  • These computer program instructions may also be stored in a computer-readable memory that can direct a computer or other programmable data processing apparatus to function in a particular manner, such that the instructions stored in the computer readable memory produce an article of manufacture including instruction means which implement the function/act specified in the flowchart and/or block diagram block or blocks.
  • The computer program instructions may also be loaded onto a computer or other programmable data processing apparatus to cause a series of operations to be performed on the computer or other programmable apparatus to produce a computer implemented process such that the instructions which execute on the computer or other programmable apparatus provide steps for implementing the functions/acts specified in the flowchart and/or block diagram block or blocks. Alternatively, computer program implemented steps or acts may be combined with operator or human implemented steps or acts in order to carry out an embodiment of the invention.
  • Embodiments according to the present invention relate to automatically increasing a capacity of a virtual space in a virtual world allowing avatars to enter that would otherwise be put on hold until space is available or denied entry and turned away. A virtual space may be any type or form of virtual space in a virtual world, such as, for example, a store, a business, an arena, a building, a land area, an open space, a room, etc. When an avatar attempts to enter a virtual space in a virtual world, it is determined if an allowable number of avatars are currently in the virtual space and if so, a capacity of the virtual space may be automatically increased. Thus the avatar desiring entry is not turned away or denied.
  • Owners or managers of a virtual space in a virtual world may set a threshold for the number of avatars that are allowed in the virtual space at any given time to limit overcrowding. A threshold number of allowed avatars may be related to a number for an ideal avatar capacity for the virtual space or may be related to a number for a maximum avatar capacity for the virtual space. The threshold number of avatars may be set based on any one of a variety of factors such as, for example, how large the area is (e.g., the larger the area the more avatars it can hold at one time and still have a positive user experience), how large the server capacity is that is hosting the virtual space in the virtual world, etc. Even if more avatars can fit into the “physical” size of a virtual space area, it may be desired to limit the number of avatars in a virtual space on a given server. For example, if a threshold limit of allowable avatars is set to twenty, when a twenty-first avatar attempts to enter the virtual space, embodiments according to the present invention dynamically increase a capacity of the virtual space in the virtual world.
  • The virtual space may be automatically increased by dynamically spawning a replicate virtual space or by expanding the physical size of the area of the virtual space. If a replicate virtual space is spawned, this may occur on another partition on the same server hosting the original virtual space or on a different server. Once the new avatar enters a spawned replicate virtual space, initially, the avatar may be alone in the new virtual space while the original virtual space may still be at capacity or at the desired threshold of allowable avatars. Thus, embodiments according to the present invention allow an owner or manager of a virtual space to provide access to avatars without having to turn an avatar away or allow an unlimited number of avatars into the virtual space and have the avatars, or users controlling the avatars, frustrated by a less than desirable experience due to overcrowding in the virtual space.
  • According to embodiments of the present invention, a manager or owner of a virtual space may define various settings for the virtual space related to avatar access and/or increasing a capacity of the virtual space. A virtual space may have associated settings such as, for example, a maximum avatar capacity for the virtual space, an ideal avatar capacity for the virtual space, a limit on a number of replicate new virtual spaces that may be spawned from the virtual space, a limit on an expansion of a physical size of the virtual space, etc. The capacity for the virtual space may be automatically increased based on an ideal avatar capacity for the virtual space being reached or a maximum avatar capacity for the virtual space being reached, or any other type criteria or setting.
  • FIG. 1 shows a diagram of system for automatically increasing a capacity of a virtual space in a virtual world according to an example embodiment of the present invention. The system 100 may include a server 101 and one or more workstations 102 where the server 101 and the one or more workstations 102 may be interconnected to a network 103. Although one server 101 is shown, there may be multiple servers connected to the network 103 and accessible by the one or more workstations 102. The server 101 may host the virtual environment 105 and also contain a controller 104 and storage 106. Therefore, a user at a workstation 102 may access the virtual environment 105 hosted on the server 101 and control an avatar in the virtual environment 105 to access a virtual space. An owner or supplier of the service, the item, the event or the virtual space may also access the virtual world or environment 105, hosted on the server 101, via one or more workstations 102 and control an avatar to provide or restrict access to the virtual space. The server 101 may detect an attempt by an avatar to enter a virtual space in the virtual world, determine if an allowable number of avatars are currently in the virtual space, and increase a capacity of the virtual space when the number of allowable avatars is currently in the virtual space.
  • FIG. 2 shows a diagram of virtual environment for automatically increasing a capacity of a virtual space in a virtual world according to an example embodiment of the present invention. In the virtual environment/world 200 there may exist an environment containing buildings, stores, trees, cars, people (represented by avatars) and any other items that currently exist in the real world. For example, a virtual world may contain virtual businesses, stores, venues, or other virtual spaces 201, 202, 203 that allow an avatar 204 access to a virtual space.
  • In this example embodiment, a user may desire to control an avatar 204 to access a virtual space in a virtual world such as, for example, “Electronix Town” 201 to shop for electronics, “Haggar Menswear” 202 to shop for clothing, “Ferdes Amphitheatre” 203 to attend a music or cultural event, etc. The avatar may also desire access to any other types of virtual spaces such as, for example, any type of store, business, arena, building, land area, room, etc. As noted previously, once an attempt by an avatar to enter a virtual space in the virtual world is detected, it may be determined if an allowable number of avatars are currently in the virtual space, and a capacity of the virtual space may be increased when the allowable number of avatars are currently already in the virtual space. For example, if an avatar 204 desires to enter the virtual space “Electronix Town” 201 to shop for electronics, if it is determined that the “Electronix Town” store 201 already has an allowable number of avatars in the store, a capacity of the “Electronix Town” 201 store may be increased, this allowing the avatar 204 to access the store. The capacity of the virtual space may be increased by spawning a replicate new “Electronix Town” virtual space, or by expanding a size of the “Electronix Town” 201 virtual space.
  • FIG. 3 shows a diagram of increasing a capacity of a virtual space by spawning a replicate new virtual space according to an example embodiment of the present invention. The diagram shows a virtual space 301 that has a number of avatars 302 in the virtual space 301. In this example embodiment, twenty avatars are shown in the virtual space 301, however, embodiments according to the present invention are not limited to any specific number of avatars being in a virtual space. In this example embodiment, the number of avatars in the virtual space is at an allowable number of avatars where it may be desired that no more avatars be allowed into the virtual space 301. When a new avatar 303 (i.e., twenty-first avatar) desires access to the virtual space 301, the capacity of the virtual space 301 may be automatically increased by spawning a replicate new virtual space 304. Therefore, the new avatar 303 (i.e, twenty-first avatar) may then access and enter the newly spawned replicate virtual space 304. The replicate virtual space 304 may be identical and provide the same resources, services, etc. as the original virtual space 301. Should some avatars 302 leave the original virtual space 301 and other new avatars desire entry to the virtual space 301, they may be given access to the original virtual space 301 or to the newly spawned replicate virtual space 304. The newly spawned replicate virtual space 304 may reside on a same server as that hosting the original virtual space 301 or on a different server.
  • FIG. 4 shows a diagram of increasing a capacity of a virtual space by expanding a size of the virtual space according to an example embodiment of the present invention. The diagram shows a virtual space 401 that has a number of avatars 402 in the virtual space 401. In this example embodiment, twenty avatars are shown in the virtual space 401, however, embodiments according to the present invention are not limited to any specific number of avatars being in a virtual space. In this example embodiment, the number of avatars in the virtual space is at an allowable number of avatars where it may be desired that no more avatars be allowed into the virtual space 401. When a new avatar 403 desires access to the virtual space 401, since the virtual space 401 currently has an allowable number of avatars in the virtual space 401, a capacity of the virtual space 401 may be increased by a expanding a physical size of the virtual space 401 as shown in the expanded virtual space 404 with increased physical space. The new avatar 403 may then be allowed to enter the expanded virtual space 404 with increased physical space along with the avatars 402 in the original virtual space 401.
  • FIG. 5 shows a flowchart of a process for increasing a capacity of a virtual space in a virtual world according to an example embodiment of the present invention. In the process 500, in block 501 a new avatar attempts to enter a virtual space. In block 502, it may be determined if an allowable number of avatars currently exist in the virtual space and if not, in block 503 a new avatar desiring entry into the virtual space may be allowed entry into the virtual space. If it is determined that the allowable number of avatars currently exist in the virtual space, then in block 504, a capacity of the virtual space may be increased. In block 505, the new avatar desiring entry into the virtual space may be allowed to enter the increased capacity virtual space.
  • FIG. 6 shows a flowchart of increasing a capacity of a virtual space by spawning a replicate new virtual space according to an example embodiment of the present invention. In the process 600, in block 601, a new avatar may attempt to enter a virtual space. In block 602 it may be determined if an allowable number of avatars already currently exist in the virtual space and if not, in block 603 the new avatar may be allowed to enter the virtual space. If it is determined that an allowable number of avatars currently exist in the virtual space, in block 604, a replicate new virtual space may be automatically spawned from the original virtual space. Then in block 605, the new avatar may be allowed entry into the replicate new virtual space.
  • FIG. 7 shows a flowchart of a process for increasing a capacity of a virtual space by expanding a physical size of the virtual space according to an example embodiment of the present invention. In the process 700, in block 701, a new avatar may desire entry into a virtual space. In block 702, it may be determined if an allowable number of avatars already currently exist in the virtual space and if not, in block 703, the new avatar may be allowed to enter the virtual space. If it is determined that an allowable number of avatars already currently exist in the virtual space, in block 704, a physical size of the virtual space may be automatically expanded. Then in block 705, the new avatar may be allowed to enter the expanded virtual space.
  • FIG. 8 shows a flowchart of a process for defining virtual space settings according to an example embodiment of the present invention. In the process 800, in block 801, it may be desired to define settings for a virtual space. In block 802 it may be determined if it is desired to set a maximum allowable avatar capacity value for the virtual space and if not, the process ends. If it is desired to set a maximum allowable avatar capacity for the virtual space, in block 803, a value for a maximum number of avatars allowed to enter the virtual space may be set.
  • In block 804 it may be determined if it is desired to set a limit on a number of spawned replicate new virtual spaces and if not, the process ends. If it is desired to set a limit on a number of spawned replicate new virtual spaces, in block 805, a maximum number of allowable replicates of the virtual space may be set. In block 806 it may be determined if an ideal allowable capacity of avatars in a virtual space is desired to be set and if not, the process ends. If an ideal allowable capacity of avatars in a virtual space is desired to be set, in block 807, a value for a number of avatars ideal for the virtual space may be set. In block 808, it may be determined if it is desired to set a limit on a physical size expansion of the virtual space and if not, the process ends. If it is desired to set a limit on an expansion of the physical size of the virtual space, then in block 809 a maximum expansion size for the virtual space may be set.
  • FIG. 9 shows a flowchart of a process for setting an avatar capacity limit for automatic increase in capacity according to an example embodiment of the present invention. In the process 900, in block 901, it may be desired to set an avatar capacity limit that initiates an automatic increase in capacity for the virtual space. In block 902, it may be determined if an ideal avatar capacity limit is desired to be set and if so, in block 903, an automatic increase in the capacity of the virtual space may occur when the number of avatars desiring access to the virtual space exceeds an ideal capacity. If it is not desired to set an ideal avatar capacity, in block 904 it may be determined if it is desired to set a maximum avatar capacity limit and if not the process ends. If it is desired to set a maximum avatar capacity, then in block 905, a capacity of the virtual space may be automatically increased when a number of avatars desiring access to the virtual space exceed a maximum capacity of the virtual space.
  • The flowcharts and block diagrams in the Figures illustrate the architecture, functionality, and operation of possible implementations of systems, methods and computer program products according to various embodiments of the present invention. In this regard, each block in the flowchart or block diagrams may represent a module, segment, or portion of code, which comprises one or more executable instructions for implementing the specified logical function(s). It should also be noted that, in some alternative implementations, the functions noted in the block may occur out of the order noted in the figures. For example, two blocks shown in succession may, in fact, be executed substantially concurrently, or the blocks may sometimes be executed in the reverse order, depending upon the functionality involved. It will also be noted that each block of the block diagrams and/or flowchart illustration, and combinations of blocks in the block diagrams and/or flowchart illustration, can be implemented by special purpose hardware-based systems which perform the specified functions or acts, or combinations of special purpose hardware and computer instructions.
  • The terminology used herein is for the purpose of describing particular embodiments only and is not intended to be limiting of the invention. As used herein, the singular forms “a”, “an” and “the” are intended to include the plural forms as well, unless the context clearly indicates otherwise. It will be further understood that the terms “comprises” and/or “comprising,” when used in this specification, specify the presence of stated features, integers, steps, operations, elements, and/or components, but do not preclude the presence or addition of one or more other features, integers, steps, operations, elements, components, and/or groups thereof.
  • Although specific embodiments have been illustrated and described herein, those of ordinary skill in the art appreciate that any arrangement which is calculated to achieve the same purpose may be substituted for the specific embodiments shown and that the invention has other applications in other environments. This application is intended to cover any adaptations or variations of the present invention. The following claims are in no way intended to limit the scope of the invention to the specific embodiments described herein.

Claims (20)

  1. 1. A method for automatically increasing a capacity of a virtual space in a virtual world comprising:
    detecting an attempt by an avatar to enter a virtual space in a virtual world;
    determining if an allowable number of avatars are currently in the virtual space; and
    increasing a capacity of the virtual space when the allowable number of avatars are currently in the virtual space.
  2. 2. The method according to claim 1, further comprising allowing the avatar to enter the increased capacity of the virtual space.
  3. 3. The method according to claim 1, further comprising increasing the capacity of the virtual space by spawning a replicate new virtual space.
  4. 4. The method according to claim 3, further comprising setting a limit on the number of the replicate new virtual spaces that can be spawned.
  5. 5. The method according to claim 1, further comprising increasing the capacity of the virtual space by expanding a size of the virtual space.
  6. 6. The method according to claim 5, further comprising setting a limit on the expansion of the size of the virtual space.
  7. 7. The method according to claim 1, the virtual space comprising one of a store, a business, an arena, a building, a land area, or a room.
  8. 8. The method according to claim 1, further comprising setting the allowable number of avatars for the virtual space.
  9. 9. The method according to claim 1, further comprising setting the allowable number of avatars for the virtual space by at least one of an owner of the virtual space or a manager of the virtual space.
  10. 10. The method according to claim 1, further comprising the allowable number of avatars comprising a maximum avatar capacity for the virtual space.
  11. 11. The method according to claim 1, further comprising the allowable number of avatars comprising an ideal avatar capacity for the virtual space.
  12. 12. The method according to claim 1, further comprising defining at least one setting for the virtual space, the at least one setting comprising at least one of a maximum avatar capacity for the virtual space, an ideal avatar capacity for the virtual space, a limit on a number of replicate new virtual spaces that can be spawned from the virtual space, or a limit on an expansion of a size of the virtual space.
  13. 13. The method according to claim 1, further comprising the virtual space residing on a server and the increased capacity of the virtual space residing on the server.
  14. 14. The method according to claim 1, further comprising the virtual space residing on a server and the increased capacity of the virtual space residing on a second server.
  15. 15. A method for automatically increasing a capacity of a virtual space in a virtual world comprising:
    determining if an allowable number of avatars are currently in the virtual space; and
    increasing a capacity of the virtual space when the allowable number of avatars are currently in the virtual space.
  16. 16. The method according to claim 15, further comprising increasing the capacity of the virtual space by spawning a replicate new virtual space.
  17. 17. The method according to claim 15, further comprising increasing the capacity of the virtual space by expanding a size of the virtual space.
  18. 18. The method according to claim 15, the virtual space comprising one of a store, a business, an arena, a building, a land area, or a room.
  19. 19. The method according to claim 15, further comprising the allowable number of avatars comprising a maximum avatar capacity for the virtual space.
  20. 20. The method according to claim 15, further comprising the allowable number of avatars comprising an ideal avatar capacity for the virtual space.
US11947829 2007-11-30 2007-11-30 Automatic increasing of capacity of a virtual space in a virtual world Active 2029-11-03 US8127235B2 (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US11947829 US8127235B2 (en) 2007-11-30 2007-11-30 Automatic increasing of capacity of a virtual space in a virtual world

Applications Claiming Priority (3)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US11947829 US8127235B2 (en) 2007-11-30 2007-11-30 Automatic increasing of capacity of a virtual space in a virtual world
US13341255 US9152914B2 (en) 2007-11-30 2011-12-30 Automatic increasing of capacity of a virtual space in a virtual world
US14875270 US20160164769A1 (en) 2007-11-30 2015-10-05 Automatic increasing of capacity of a virtual space in a virtual world

Related Child Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US13341255 Continuation US9152914B2 (en) 2007-11-30 2011-12-30 Automatic increasing of capacity of a virtual space in a virtual world

Publications (2)

Publication Number Publication Date
US20090144638A1 true true US20090144638A1 (en) 2009-06-04
US8127235B2 US8127235B2 (en) 2012-02-28

Family

ID=40677037

Family Applications (3)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US11947829 Active 2029-11-03 US8127235B2 (en) 2007-11-30 2007-11-30 Automatic increasing of capacity of a virtual space in a virtual world
US13341255 Active 2029-07-31 US9152914B2 (en) 2007-11-30 2011-12-30 Automatic increasing of capacity of a virtual space in a virtual world
US14875270 Pending US20160164769A1 (en) 2007-11-30 2015-10-05 Automatic increasing of capacity of a virtual space in a virtual world

Family Applications After (2)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US13341255 Active 2029-07-31 US9152914B2 (en) 2007-11-30 2011-12-30 Automatic increasing of capacity of a virtual space in a virtual world
US14875270 Pending US20160164769A1 (en) 2007-11-30 2015-10-05 Automatic increasing of capacity of a virtual space in a virtual world

Country Status (1)

Country Link
US (3) US8127235B2 (en)

Cited By (16)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20090267938A1 (en) * 2008-04-25 2009-10-29 Nicol Ii Wiliam B Three-dimensional (3d) virtual world wormholes
US20100169799A1 (en) * 2008-12-30 2010-07-01 Nortel Networks Limited Method and Apparatus for Enabling Presentations to Large Numbers of Users in a Virtual Environment
US20100180214A1 (en) * 2009-01-14 2010-07-15 International Business Machines Corporation Predatory Behavior Detection and Alert in Virtual Worlds Based on Spatial and Temporal Criteria
US20100227682A1 (en) * 2009-03-04 2010-09-09 Microsoft Corporation Awarding of avatar items in video game environment
US20110055734A1 (en) * 2009-08-31 2011-03-03 Ganz System and method for limiting the number of characters displayed in a common area
US20110165939A1 (en) * 2010-01-05 2011-07-07 Ganz Method and system for providing a 3d activity in a virtual presentation
US20120026177A1 (en) * 2010-08-02 2012-02-02 International Business Machines Corporation Resizing objects in regions of virtual universes
US8458209B2 (en) 2010-08-24 2013-06-04 International Business Machines Corporation Virtual world query response system
US8719730B2 (en) 2010-04-23 2014-05-06 Ganz Radial user interface and system for a virtual world game
US20140129342A1 (en) * 2012-11-06 2014-05-08 Apple Inc. Dynamically adjusting invitational content placement opportunities in interactive environments
EP2745892A1 (en) * 2012-12-21 2014-06-25 Dassault Systèmes Partition of a 3D scene into a plurality of zones processed by a computing resource
US8790183B2 (en) 2011-02-15 2014-07-29 Ganz Arcade in a virtual world with reward
US9022868B2 (en) 2011-02-10 2015-05-05 Ganz Method and system for creating a virtual world where user-controlled characters interact with non-player characters
CN104769539A (en) * 2012-08-28 2015-07-08 Glowbl公司 Graphical user interface, method, computer program and corresponding storage medium
US20150220452A1 (en) * 2014-01-31 2015-08-06 Lsi Corporation System, Method and Computer-Readable Medium for Dynamically Mapping a Non-Volatile Memory Store
US9378296B2 (en) 2010-08-24 2016-06-28 International Business Machines Corporation Virtual world construction

Families Citing this family (11)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US9015322B2 (en) * 2008-12-30 2015-04-21 Avaya Inc. Access to resources in a virtual environment
US9310955B2 (en) 2012-04-11 2016-04-12 Myriata, Inc. System and method for generating a virtual tour within a virtual environment
US9563902B2 (en) 2012-04-11 2017-02-07 Myriata, Inc. System and method for transporting a virtual avatar within multiple virtual environments
US20130271457A1 (en) * 2012-04-11 2013-10-17 Myriata, Inc. System and method for displaying an object within a virtual environment
US9047690B2 (en) 2012-04-11 2015-06-02 Myriata, Inc. System and method for facilitating creation of a rich virtual environment
US9229759B2 (en) * 2012-10-17 2016-01-05 Microsoft Technology Licensing, Llc Virtual machine provisioning using replicated containers
US20140125698A1 (en) * 2012-11-05 2014-05-08 Stephen Latta Mixed-reality arena
US10137376B2 (en) 2012-12-31 2018-11-27 Activision Publishing, Inc. System and method for creating and streaming augmented game sessions
US10118099B2 (en) 2014-12-16 2018-11-06 Activision Publishing, Inc. System and method for transparently styling non-player characters in a multiplayer video game
US10099140B2 (en) 2015-10-08 2018-10-16 Activision Publishing, Inc. System and method for generating personalized messaging campaigns for video game players
US10055880B2 (en) 2016-12-06 2018-08-21 Activision Publishing, Inc. Methods and systems to modify a two dimensional facial image to increase dimensional depth and generate a facial image that appears three dimensional

Citations (11)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20020015003A1 (en) * 2000-08-07 2002-02-07 Masami Kato Virtual space system structured by plural user terminals and server device
US6772195B1 (en) * 1999-10-29 2004-08-03 Electronic Arts, Inc. Chat clusters for a virtual world application
US6985937B1 (en) * 2000-05-11 2006-01-10 Ensim Corporation Dynamically modifying the resources of a virtual server
US20080059972A1 (en) * 2006-08-31 2008-03-06 Bmc Software, Inc. Automated Capacity Provisioning Method Using Historical Performance Data
US7386799B1 (en) * 2002-11-21 2008-06-10 Forterra Systems, Inc. Cinematic techniques in avatar-centric communication during a multi-user online simulation
US20090077158A1 (en) * 2007-09-17 2009-03-19 Areae, Inc. System and method for embedding a view of a virtual space in a banner ad and enabling user interaction with the virtual space within the banner ad
US20090077475A1 (en) * 2007-09-17 2009-03-19 Areae, Inc. System for providing virtual spaces with separate places and/or acoustic areas
US7509369B1 (en) * 2001-07-11 2009-03-24 Swsoft Holdings, Ltd. Balancing shared servers in virtual environments
US20090089157A1 (en) * 2007-09-27 2009-04-02 Rajesh Narayanan Method and apparatus for controlling an avatar's landing zone in a virtual environment
US7587492B2 (en) * 2005-07-29 2009-09-08 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. Dynamic performance management for virtual servers
US7814154B1 (en) * 2007-06-26 2010-10-12 Qurio Holdings, Inc. Message transformations in a distributed virtual world

Patent Citations (11)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US6772195B1 (en) * 1999-10-29 2004-08-03 Electronic Arts, Inc. Chat clusters for a virtual world application
US6985937B1 (en) * 2000-05-11 2006-01-10 Ensim Corporation Dynamically modifying the resources of a virtual server
US20020015003A1 (en) * 2000-08-07 2002-02-07 Masami Kato Virtual space system structured by plural user terminals and server device
US7509369B1 (en) * 2001-07-11 2009-03-24 Swsoft Holdings, Ltd. Balancing shared servers in virtual environments
US7386799B1 (en) * 2002-11-21 2008-06-10 Forterra Systems, Inc. Cinematic techniques in avatar-centric communication during a multi-user online simulation
US7587492B2 (en) * 2005-07-29 2009-09-08 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. Dynamic performance management for virtual servers
US20080059972A1 (en) * 2006-08-31 2008-03-06 Bmc Software, Inc. Automated Capacity Provisioning Method Using Historical Performance Data
US7814154B1 (en) * 2007-06-26 2010-10-12 Qurio Holdings, Inc. Message transformations in a distributed virtual world
US20090077158A1 (en) * 2007-09-17 2009-03-19 Areae, Inc. System and method for embedding a view of a virtual space in a banner ad and enabling user interaction with the virtual space within the banner ad
US20090077475A1 (en) * 2007-09-17 2009-03-19 Areae, Inc. System for providing virtual spaces with separate places and/or acoustic areas
US20090089157A1 (en) * 2007-09-27 2009-04-02 Rajesh Narayanan Method and apparatus for controlling an avatar's landing zone in a virtual environment

Cited By (28)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US8659623B2 (en) * 2008-04-25 2014-02-25 International Business Machines Corporation Three-dimensional (3D) virtual world wormholes
US20090267938A1 (en) * 2008-04-25 2009-10-29 Nicol Ii Wiliam B Three-dimensional (3d) virtual world wormholes
US20100169799A1 (en) * 2008-12-30 2010-07-01 Nortel Networks Limited Method and Apparatus for Enabling Presentations to Large Numbers of Users in a Virtual Environment
US20100180214A1 (en) * 2009-01-14 2010-07-15 International Business Machines Corporation Predatory Behavior Detection and Alert in Virtual Worlds Based on Spatial and Temporal Criteria
US8239776B2 (en) * 2009-01-14 2012-08-07 International Business Machines Corporation Behavior detection and alert in virtual worlds based on spatial and temporal criteria
US20100227682A1 (en) * 2009-03-04 2010-09-09 Microsoft Corporation Awarding of avatar items in video game environment
US20110201423A1 (en) * 2009-08-31 2011-08-18 Ganz System and method for limiting the number of characters displayed in a common area
WO2011022841A1 (en) * 2009-08-31 2011-03-03 Ganz System and method for limiting the number of characters displayed in a common area
US9403089B2 (en) 2009-08-31 2016-08-02 Ganz System and method for limiting the number of characters displayed in a common area
US20110055734A1 (en) * 2009-08-31 2011-03-03 Ganz System and method for limiting the number of characters displayed in a common area
US8458602B2 (en) * 2009-08-31 2013-06-04 Ganz System and method for limiting the number of characters displayed in a common area
US20110165939A1 (en) * 2010-01-05 2011-07-07 Ganz Method and system for providing a 3d activity in a virtual presentation
US9050534B2 (en) 2010-04-23 2015-06-09 Ganz Achievements for a virtual world game
US8719730B2 (en) 2010-04-23 2014-05-06 Ganz Radial user interface and system for a virtual world game
US20120026177A1 (en) * 2010-08-02 2012-02-02 International Business Machines Corporation Resizing objects in regions of virtual universes
US9024977B2 (en) * 2010-08-02 2015-05-05 International Business Machines Corporation Resizing objects in regions of virtual universes
US8458209B2 (en) 2010-08-24 2013-06-04 International Business Machines Corporation Virtual world query response system
US9378296B2 (en) 2010-08-24 2016-06-28 International Business Machines Corporation Virtual world construction
US9022868B2 (en) 2011-02-10 2015-05-05 Ganz Method and system for creating a virtual world where user-controlled characters interact with non-player characters
US8790183B2 (en) 2011-02-15 2014-07-29 Ganz Arcade in a virtual world with reward
US20150256501A1 (en) * 2012-08-28 2015-09-10 Glowbl Graphical User Interface, Method, Computer Program and Corresponding Storage Medium
CN104769539A (en) * 2012-08-28 2015-07-08 Glowbl公司 Graphical user interface, method, computer program and corresponding storage medium
US20140129342A1 (en) * 2012-11-06 2014-05-08 Apple Inc. Dynamically adjusting invitational content placement opportunities in interactive environments
CN103971416A (en) * 2012-12-21 2014-08-06 达索系统公司 Partition of a 3D scene into a plurality of zones processed by a computing resource
JP2014123368A (en) * 2012-12-21 2014-07-03 Dassault Systemes Partition of 3d scene into plural zones processed by computing resource
EP2745892A1 (en) * 2012-12-21 2014-06-25 Dassault Systèmes Partition of a 3D scene into a plurality of zones processed by a computing resource
US9454842B2 (en) 2012-12-21 2016-09-27 Dassault Systemes Partition of a 3D scene into a plurality of zones processed by a computing resource
US20150220452A1 (en) * 2014-01-31 2015-08-06 Lsi Corporation System, Method and Computer-Readable Medium for Dynamically Mapping a Non-Volatile Memory Store

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date Type
US9152914B2 (en) 2015-10-06 grant
US8127235B2 (en) 2012-02-28 grant
US20120124189A1 (en) 2012-05-17 application
US20160164769A1 (en) 2016-06-09 application

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
Benford et al. Managing mutual awareness in collaborative virtual environments
US20100146085A1 (en) Realtime kernel
US20090241037A1 (en) Inclusion of Web Content in a Virtual Environment
US20080256607A1 (en) Extensible and programmable multi-tenant service architecture
US20080134056A1 (en) Computer Simulation Method With User-Defined Transportation And Layout
US20100169799A1 (en) Method and Apparatus for Enabling Presentations to Large Numbers of Users in a Virtual Environment
Broll Interacting in distributed collaborative virtual environments
US20100050092A1 (en) Content Sharing and Instant Messaging
US20080104223A1 (en) Plug-in accelerator
US7925703B2 (en) Graphical interactive interface for immersive online communities
US20100304860A1 (en) Game Execution Environments
US20110185286A1 (en) Web browser interface for spatial communication environments
US20070203980A1 (en) Subsystem-scoping architecture for breakout rooms in a virtual space
US20090254842A1 (en) Interfacing with a spatial virtual communication environment
US20090288007A1 (en) Spatial interfaces for realtime networked communications
US20120246582A1 (en) Interfacing with a spatial virtual communications environment
US20140258450A1 (en) Automated desktop placement
US20160043901A1 (en) Graceful scaling in software driven networks
US8150941B2 (en) Networked computer system for communicating and operating in a virtual reality environment
US20110055135A1 (en) Deferred Teleportation or Relocation in Virtual Worlds
US20110055267A1 (en) Virtual Universe Rendering Based on Prioritized Metadata Terms
US20120254858A1 (en) Creating virtual areas for realtime communications
US20160042014A1 (en) Distributed database in software driven networks
US20130024785A1 (en) Communicating between a virtual area and a physical space
US20090327219A1 (en) Cloning Objects in a Virtual Universe

Legal Events

Date Code Title Description
AS Assignment

Owner name: INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS MACHINES CORPORATION, NEW Y

Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNORS:HAGGAR, PETER F.;BOKOR, BRIAN R.;HOUSE, DANIEL E.;AND OTHERS;REEL/FRAME:020179/0127

Effective date: 20071126

AS Assignment

Owner name: ACTIVISION PUBLISHING, INC., CALIFORNIA

Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS MACHINES CORPORATION;REEL/FRAME:029900/0285

Effective date: 20121231

AS Assignment

Owner name: BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., TEXAS

Free format text: SECURITY AGREEMENT;ASSIGNOR:ACTIVISION PUBLISHING, INC.;REEL/FRAME:032240/0257

Effective date: 20140131

FPAY Fee payment

Year of fee payment: 4

AS Assignment

Owner name: ACTIVISION ENTERTAINMENT HOLDINGS, INC., CALIFORNI

Free format text: RELEASE BY SECURED PARTY;ASSIGNOR:BANK OF AMERICA, N.A.;REEL/FRAME:040381/0487

Effective date: 20161014

Owner name: ACTIVISION PUBLISHING, INC., CALIFORNIA

Free format text: RELEASE BY SECURED PARTY;ASSIGNOR:BANK OF AMERICA, N.A.;REEL/FRAME:040381/0487

Effective date: 20161014

Owner name: ACTIVISION BLIZZARD INC., CALIFORNIA

Free format text: RELEASE BY SECURED PARTY;ASSIGNOR:BANK OF AMERICA, N.A.;REEL/FRAME:040381/0487

Effective date: 20161014

Owner name: BLIZZARD ENTERTAINMENT, INC., CALIFORNIA

Free format text: RELEASE BY SECURED PARTY;ASSIGNOR:BANK OF AMERICA, N.A.;REEL/FRAME:040381/0487

Effective date: 20161014