US20090101516A1 - Methods and apparatus for the synthesis of useful compounds - Google Patents

Methods and apparatus for the synthesis of useful compounds Download PDF

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US20090101516A1
US20090101516A1 US12212948 US21294808A US2009101516A1 US 20090101516 A1 US20090101516 A1 US 20090101516A1 US 12212948 US12212948 US 12212948 US 21294808 A US21294808 A US 21294808A US 2009101516 A1 US2009101516 A1 US 2009101516A1
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method according
catalyst
catalytic cell
oxygen
oms
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Steven Lawrence Suib
Boxun Hu
Victor Stancovski
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University of Connecticut
Catelectric Corp
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University of Connecticut
Catelectric Corp
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    • HELECTRICITY
    • H01BASIC ELECTRIC ELEMENTS
    • H01MPROCESSES OR MEANS, e.g. BATTERIES, FOR THE DIRECT CONVERSION OF CHEMICAL INTO ELECTRICAL ENERGY
    • H01M4/00Electrodes
    • H01M4/86Inert electrodes with catalytic activity, e.g. for fuel cells
    • H01M4/8605Porous electrodes
    • H01M4/8621Porous electrodes containing only metallic or ceramic material, e.g. made by sintering or sputtering
    • CCHEMISTRY; METALLURGY
    • C07ORGANIC CHEMISTRY
    • C07CACYCLIC OR CARBOCYCLIC COMPOUNDS
    • C07C45/00Preparation of compounds having >C = O groups bound only to carbon or hydrogen atoms; Preparation of chelates of such compounds
    • C07C45/27Preparation of compounds having >C = O groups bound only to carbon or hydrogen atoms; Preparation of chelates of such compounds by oxidation
    • C07C45/32Preparation of compounds having >C = O groups bound only to carbon or hydrogen atoms; Preparation of chelates of such compounds by oxidation with molecular oxygen
    • C07C45/33Preparation of compounds having >C = O groups bound only to carbon or hydrogen atoms; Preparation of chelates of such compounds by oxidation with molecular oxygen of CHx-moieties
    • C07C45/34Preparation of compounds having >C = O groups bound only to carbon or hydrogen atoms; Preparation of chelates of such compounds by oxidation with molecular oxygen of CHx-moieties in unsaturated compounds
    • C07C45/36Preparation of compounds having >C = O groups bound only to carbon or hydrogen atoms; Preparation of chelates of such compounds by oxidation with molecular oxygen of CHx-moieties in unsaturated compounds in compounds containing six-membered aromatic rings
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H01BASIC ELECTRIC ELEMENTS
    • H01MPROCESSES OR MEANS, e.g. BATTERIES, FOR THE DIRECT CONVERSION OF CHEMICAL INTO ELECTRICAL ENERGY
    • H01M4/00Electrodes
    • H01M4/86Inert electrodes with catalytic activity, e.g. for fuel cells
    • H01M4/90Selection of catalytic material
    • H01M4/9016Oxides, hydroxides or oxygenated metallic salts

Abstract

The present invention relates to methods and apparatus for activation of a low reactivity, non-polar chemical compound. In one example embodiment, the method comprises introducing the low reactivity chemical compound to a catalyst. At least one of (a) an oxidizing agent or a reducing agent and (b) a polar compound is provided to the catalyst and the chemical compound. An alternating current is applied to the catalyst to produce an activation reaction in the chemical compound. This activation reaction produces a useful product. The present invention also relates to a method for oxidizing aromatic compounds by electrocatalysis to oxidized products.

Description

  • This application claims the benefit of U.S. provisional patent application No. 60/994,854 filed on Sep. 20, 2007, which is incorporated herein and made a part hereof by reference for all purposes as if set forth in its entirety.
  • BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • The present invention relates to methods and apparatus for the activation of a low reactivity, non-polar chemical compound. More specifically, the present invention relates to process for the synthesis of useful compounds from non-polar compounds such as carbon dioxide and the like. The present invention also relates to a method for oxidizing aromatic compounds to oxidized products by electrocatalysis.
  • The chemical reduction of carbon dioxide using molecular hydrogen is not thermodynamically viable. However, the possibility to use activated hydrogen-containing compounds for the preparation of useful products from carbon dioxide is intriguing.
  • Some catalysts, e.g., transition metal complexes, have been shown to catalyze the reduction of carbon dioxide via hydride complexes, in which the origin of the activated hydrogen is water. Such reactions result usually in a partial reduction of carbon dioxide to carbon monoxide. However, the possibility of the further reduction to formaldehyde, methanol and/or methane is potentially very significant. Such reduction products are particularly important in chemical manufacture (formaldehyde and methanol), as well as fuels (methanol and methane). [see, e.g., “Thermodynamic, Kinetic and Product Considerations in Carbon Dioxide Reactivity”, F. R. Keene, Chapter 1 in monograph “Electrochemical and Electrocatalytic Reactions of Carbon Dioxide” (B. P. Sullivan, K. Krist, and H. E. Guard, eds.); Elsevier (Amsterdam), 1993].
  • In particular, formaldehyde and its derivatives serve a wide variety of end uses such as for plastics and coatings. Formaldehyde is considered one of the world's most important industrial and research chemicals, owing to the vast number of chemical reactions it can participate in.
  • As formaldehyde polymerizes readily in the presence of minute amounts of impurities, the commercial forms usually available comprise:
  • the polymer form, which can be reversibly converted to a monomer by the reaction of heat or an acid:

  • H—(OCH2—)—n—OH
  • the cyclic trimeric form, called trioxane; and
  • the aqueous solution in which over 99 of formaldehyde is present as hydrate or a mixture of oxymethylene glycol oligomers.
  • It would be advantageous to provide methods and apparatus for activation of a low reactivity, non-polar chemical compound. In particular, it would be advantageous to provide methods and apparatus for the reduction of carbon dioxide without the need to use molecular hydrogen. It would be further advantageous to enable the reduction of carbon dioxide using water or steam as the source of hydrogen. It would also be advantageous to enable the oxidation or reduction of aromatic compounds such as benzene and its derivatives to derivative compounds, such as acetophenone, a phenol, cyclohexane, or other benzene derivatives. Another advantageous possibility is to provide the capability of achieving a further reduction of formaldehyde-derived polymers to higher molecular mass alcohols and to olefins.
  • The methods and apparatus of the present invention provide the foregoing and other advantages.
  • SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • The present invention relates to methods and apparatus for activation of a low reactivity, non-polar chemical compound. In one example embodiment, the method comprises introducing the low reactivity chemical compound to a catalyst. At least one of (a) an oxidizing agent or a reducing agent, and (b) a polar compound is provided to the catalyst and the chemical compound. An alternating current is applied to the catalyst to produce an activation reaction in the chemical compound. This activation reaction produces a useful product.
  • The activation reaction may comprise one of a reduction or an oxidation reaction. The polar compound may comprise one of water or steam. One of ammonia, nitric oxide, carbon monoxide, methane, or the like may be added to the water or steam.
  • In another example embodiment, the polar compound may comprise one of water, ammonia, nitric oxide, and carbon monoxide. Those skilled in the art will appreciate that other polar compounds may be used with the present invention.
  • In a further example embodiment, the chemical compound and the at least one of the oxidizing agent or the reducing agent and the polar compound may be introduced into a chamber containing the catalyst.
  • In one example embodiment, the low reactivity chemical compound may comprise CO2. In such an embodiment, the useful product may comprise formaldehyde in at least one of a monomeric and a polymeric form. In other example embodiments, the useful product may comprise at least one of an aldehyde, trioxane, ethane, ethylene, formaldehyde, and paraformaldehyde. The useful products may contain at least one of carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen. Still further, the useful products may comprise at least one of an alcohol compound and an olefin.
  • In a further example embodiment, the chemical compound may comprise an aromatic compound.
  • The aromatic compound may comprise benzene or a benzene derivative. In such an embodiment, a reducing agent such as hydrogen may be provided to the catalyst and the aromatic compound, and the useful product may comprise cyclohexane or a benzene derivative. Alternatively, an oxidizing agent such as oxygen may be provided to the catalyst and the aromatic compound, and the useful product may comprise at least one of acetophenone, a phenol, or a benzene derivative.
  • The catalyst may comprise one of a precious metal, a semi-conducting oxide, a semi-conducting cermet, and a varistor. Examples of catalysts that may be used with the present invention include, but are not limited to catalysts comprising platinum, platinum black, rhodium, rhodium black, palladium, palladium black, silver, manganese oxide, a manganese oxide derivative, molybdenum oxide, a molybdenum oxide derivative, iron oxide, an iron oxide derivative, cerium oxide, a cerium oxide derivative, titanium oxide, doped titanium oxide and related compounds, cobalt oxide, rhodium oxide, zinc oxide, and the like.
  • In one example embodiment, the catalyst may comprise a catalyst layer applied to a porous ceramic substrate. The catalyst layer may be supported by a layer of a solid electrolyte. The solid electrolyte layer may be one of a continuous layer or a discontinuous layer. The solid electrolyte may comprise one of stabilized zirconia (stabilized with, e.g., gadolinium oxide, samarium oxide, lanthanum oxide, ytterbium oxide, yttrium oxide or other adequate materials known to those skilled in the art), Nafion, other hydrogen ion conducting materials, beta aluminas, or the like
  • The alternating current may be applied across a three-phase boundary at an interface between the catalyst and the solid electrolyte layer. In order to apply the alternating current to the catalyst layer, three electrodes may be provided. For example, a reference electrode may be applied to the solid electrolyte layer, a counter electrode may be applied between the catalyst and the solid electrolyte layer, and a working electrode may be applied to the catalyst layer.
  • In a further example embodiment, a polarization impedance of the supported catalyst layer may be monitored. The polarization impedance may be controlled by varying the alternating current, enabling optimization of the activation reaction.
  • In addition, a controlled oxygen partial pressure environment may be provided at a level of the supported catalyst layer. The partial pressure of the oxygen at a level of the catalyst layer may be monitored. The monitoring of the partial pressure of the oxygen may comprise monitoring an interfacial impedance of the supported catalyst layer. The partial pressure of oxygen at a level of the catalyst layer may then be determined as a function of the interfacial impedance. Alternately, the polarization impedance of the supported catalyst layer may be monitored, and the partial pressure of oxygen at the level of the catalyst layer may be determined as a function of the monitored polarization impedance.
  • In addition, a momentary value of the alternating current may be determined as a function of the monitored polarization impedance.
  • The amount of the at least one of the oxidizing agent, the reducing agent, and the polar compound provided may be controlled in order to optimize the activation reaction. Further, a ratio of an amount of the chemical compound to an amount of the at least one of the oxidizing agent, the reducing agent, and the polar compound provided may be controlled in order to optimize the activation reaction.
  • In a further example embodiment, heat may be applied to the catalyst in order to optimize the activation reaction.
  • The present invention also generally includes a method for activation of a chemical compound. The chemical compound is introduced to a catalyst. An oxidizing agent or a reducing agent is provided to the catalyst and the chemical compound. An alternating current is applied to the catalyst to produce an activation reaction in the chemical compound. This activation reaction produces a useful product. For example, the chemical compound may comprise a polar compound and the oxidizing or reducing agent may comprise a polar reactant or a nonpolar reactant. Additionally, the chemical compound may comprise a nonpolar chemical compound and the oxidizing or reducing agent may comprise a polar reactant or a nonpolar reactant.
  • The present invention also encompasses apparatus for activation of a low reactivity, non-polar chemical compound which can be used to carry out the various embodiments of the methods discussed above. The apparatus may comprise a catalyst, a means for introducing the low reactivity chemical compound to the catalyst, a means for providing at least one of (a) an oxidizing agent or a reducing agent, and (b) a polar compound to the catalyst and the chemical compound, and means for applying an alternating current to the catalyst to produce an activation reaction in the chemical compound, such that the activation reaction produces a useful product.
  • The present invention also relates to a method for oxidizing chemical compounds to oxidized products by electrocatalysis comprising: providing a catalytic cell, applying a polarized current or voltage to the catalytic cell and passing a gaseous stream of air or oxygen or a mixture of oxygen and one or more inert gases and the compound to be oxidized over the catalytic cell.
  • The present invention also relates to a method for oxidizing aromatic compounds to oxidized products by electrocatalysis comprising the steps of: providing a catalytic cell comprising a cryptomelane-type manganese oxide octahedral molecular sieve (OMS-2); applying a polarized current or voltage to the catalytic cell; and passing a gaseous stream of air or oxygen or a mixture of oxygen and one or more inert gases and the aromatic compound to be oxidized over the catalytic cell.
  • In one embodiment the catalytic cell comprises a working electrode comprising a substrate having a manganese oxide octahedral molecular sieve catalyst (OMS-2) thereon; a counter electrode and a reference electrode.
  • In further embodiment the OMS-2 contains nano-metal particles.
  • In further embodiment the metal contained in the OMS-2 having nano-metal particles is chosen from the group consisting of Ni2+, Zn2+, Co2+, Cu2+, Fe2+, Fe3+, V4+, V5+, Ti4+, Ti3+, Cr3+, Cr2+, Co3+, Cu1+, Ce3+, Ce4+, La3+, Na+, K+, Ba2+, Y3+, Z4+, Li+, Sr2+.
  • In a further embodiment the OMS-2 containing nano-metal particles is Pt-OMS-2.
  • In a further embodiment the substrate having manganese oxide octahedral molecular sieve catalyst (OMS-2) is a porous material preferably having a pore size of 5-20 mesh.
  • Preferably the porous substrate is Corning Honeycomb Cordierite®, yttrium stabilized zirconium, CeO2 or HfO2.
  • In a further embodiment the catalytic cell comprises a working electrode comprising silver or platinum gauze supported by an insulated pad, the working electrode in contact with the substrate, the substrate having a cryptomelane-type manganese oxide octahedral molecular sieve catalyst thereon (preferably Pt-OMS-2). The counter electrode is a silver or platinum wire and the reference electrode is a silver or platinum wire.
  • In a further embodiment the catalytic cell is heated to a temperature of between about 25° and about 900° C., preferably between about 100° and about 450° C.
  • In further embodiment the oxidation is accomplished at a pressure of about 1 atm to about 2 atm.
  • In a further embodiment the gaseous stream further comprises CO2 and water vapor alone or in combination.
  • In a further embodiment the aromatic compound is a derivative of benzene, preferably the aromatic compound is benzene and the oxidized product is acetophenone.
  • The present invention also relates to a method for oxidizing aromatic compounds to oxidized product by electrocatalysis comprising the steps of: providing a catalytic cell comprising a metal oxide chosen from the group consisting of CuOx, Ni Ox, ZnO and VOx (wherein x is an integer from 1-4; applying a polarized current or voltage to the catalytic cell; and passing a gaseous stream of air or oxygen or a mixture of oxygen and one or more inert gases and the aromatic compound to be oxidized over the catalytic cell.
  • In another embodiment the catalytic cell is heated to a temperature of about between about 25° C. and about 900° C. preferably between about 100° C. and about 450° C.
  • In another embodiment the oxidation is accomplished at a pressure of about 1 atm to about 2 atm.
  • In another embodiment the gaseous stream further comprises CO2 and water vapor alone or in combination.
  • In another embodiment the aromatic compound is a derivative of benzene.
  • In another embodiment the aromatic compound is benzene and the oxidized product is acetophenone.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • The present invention will hereinafter be described in conjunction with the appended drawing figures, wherein like reference numerals denote like elements, and:
  • FIG. 1 shows an example embodiment of an apparatus in accordance with the present invention;
  • FIG. 2 shows a further example embodiment of an apparatus in accordance with the present invention;
  • FIG. 3 shows an example embodiment of an electrode arrangement in accordance with the present invention;
  • FIG. 4 shows NMR analysis results for the output achieved with one example embodiment of the present invention;
  • FIG. 5 shows NMR analysis results for the output achieved with a further example embodiment of the present invention;
  • FIGS. 6 and 7 show scanning electron microscopy images of the catalyst assembly at different resolutions, respectively, in accordance with an example embodiment of the invention;
  • FIG. 8 shows an NMR spectrum for the output achieved with a further example embodiment of the present invention;
  • FIG. 9 shows a polarization Bode spectrum from one example embodiment of the present invention;
  • FIG. 10 shows a single frequency EIS (Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy) spectrum from one example embodiment of the present invention;
  • FIG. 11 shows a further example embodiment of an apparatus in accordance with the present invention;
  • FIG. 12 shows GC-MS results of oxidation of benzene;
  • FIG. 13 shows MS of peak 3 (Acetophenone) of GCMS of FIG. 12; and
  • FIG. 14 shows MS of peak 3 (p-methylacetophenone) of GCMS of FIG. 12.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION
  • The ensuing detailed description provides exemplary embodiments only, and is not intended to limit the scope, applicability, or configuration of the invention. Rather, the ensuing detailed description of the exemplary embodiments will provide those skilled in the art with an enabling description for implementing an embodiment of the invention. It should be understood that various changes may be made in the function and arrangement of elements without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention as set forth in the appended claims.
  • The present invention is the product of a joint research agreement between Catelectric Corp. (Catelectric) and The University of Connecticut and relates to methods and apparatus for activation of a low reactivity, non-polar chemical compound in order to produce useful products. In particular, the present invention relates to methods and apparatus for the preparation of useful products, such as, e.g., paraformaldehyde, via the activation (e.g., reduction or oxidation) of carbon dioxide, using water as the source of hydrogen. However, as will be explained in detail below, the present invention is not limited to such reactions and products. The reaction is activated via the DECAN™ process developed by Catelectric. The DECAN™ process is described in Catelectric's U.S. Pat. No. 7,325,392 issued on Feb. 5, 2008 and entitled “Control Systems for Catalytic Processes” and in Catelectric's pending in U.S. patent application Ser. No. 11/588,113 filed on Oct. 25, 2006 entitled “Methods and Apparatus for Controlling Catalytic Processes, Including Catalyst Regeneration and Soot Elimination” (published as 2007/0095673), both of which are incorporated herein and made a part hereof by reference.
  • The present invention relates to methods and apparatus for activation of a low reactivity, non-polar chemical compound. FIG. 1 shows an example embodiment of an apparatus 10 for activation of a low reactivity, non-polar chemical compound. A low reactivity chemical compound 12 is introduced to a catalyst (e.g., catalyst layer 14). The catalyst layer 14 may be supported on a support 16. At least one of (a) an oxidizing agent or a reducing agent 19, and (b) a polar compound 18 is provided to the catalyst 14 and the chemical compound 12. An alternating current (e.g., from current/voltage source 20) is applied to the catalyst 14 to produce an activation reaction in the chemical compound 12. This activation reaction produces a useful product. The present invention also relates to the oxidation of aromatic compounds preferably benzene and its derivatives by electrocatalysis. The term aromatic compound refers to an aryl or heteroaryl compound. An aryl compound refers to a mono, bi or tricyclic aromatic C6-C14 carbocycle, which can be optionally substituted by 1 to 5 substituents. Examples include but are not limited to benzene, toluene, biphenyl phenol, xylene, and napthalene. Heteroaryl refers to a C2-C14 mono, bi or tricyclic ring (optionally substituted with 1-5 substituents, which may be the same or different) containing 1 to 5 heteroatoms in the ring independently chosen from O, S, N and NR1 where R1 is C1-C6 alkyl or H. Examples include but are not limited to pyridine, indole thiophene, furan and isoquinoline. Substituent groups are any substituent with a molecular weight of about 300 or less. Examples include but are not limited to halogen, hydroxy, cyano, —C(O)C1-6 C1-C12 alkyl, C1-C12 alkenyl or alkynyl, halo alkyl, C1-C12 alkoxy nitro and amino. Compounds which have substituents added to their core structure are termed derivatives. For example toluene and acetophenone are derivatives of benzene.
  • It should be appreciated that the term “non-polar chemical compound” as used herein denotes a chemical compound, which, as a whole, has a zero permanent dipole moment. For example, by this definition, CO2 is considered to be non-polar, even though it has polar bonds between the individual molecules. Accordingly, the term “polar compound” as used herein denotes a compound that, as a whole, has a non-zero dipole moment.
  • The activation reaction may comprise one of a reduction or an oxidation reaction. The polar compound 18 may comprise one of water or steam. One of ammonia, nitric oxide, carbon monoxide, methane, or the like may be added to the water or steam.
  • In another example embodiment, the polar compound 18 may comprise one of water, ammonia, nitric oxide, and carbon monoxide. Those skilled in the art will appreciate that other polar compounds may be used with the present invention. Further, those skilled in the art will appreciate that the use of water (or steam) will facilitate both an oxidation and a reduction reaction.
  • In a further example embodiment as shown in FIG. 2, the chemical compound 12 and the at least one of the oxidizing agent or the reducing agent 19 and the polar compound 18 may be introduced into a chamber 22 containing the catalyst 14. The chamber 22 may comprise a tubular reactor. The alternating current may be controlled by an electronic control device 24. The chemical compound 12 (e.g., CO2) may be introduced to the chamber 22 from a gas tank 11. The polar compound 18 (e.g., water) may be introduced to the chamber 22 from a peristaltic pump 17. The oxidizing agent (e.g., oxygen) or the reducing agent (e.g. hydrogen) 19 may be introduced from tank 21. After passing the chemical compound 12 and at least one of the oxidizing agent or the reducing agent 19 and the polar compound 18 through the chamber 22 containing the catalyst 14 and applying the alternating current thereto, the resulting products of the reaction may be passed through an ice-water trap 26 and/or a dry ice/liquid nitrogen trap 28 before being separated in a molecular sieve 30 prior to computer analysis (such as gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), high performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and other analysis techniques) at analyzer 32.
  • In one example embodiment, the low reactivity chemical compound 12 may comprise CO2. In such an embodiment, the useful product may comprise formaldehyde in at least one of a monomeric and a polymeric form. In other example embodiments, the useful product may comprise at least one of an aldehyde, trioxane, ethane, ethylene, formaldehyde, and paraformaldehyde. The useful products may contain at least one of carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen. Still further, the useful products may comprise at least one of an alcohol compound and an olefin. Also, oxygen (O2) may be a result of the reaction.
  • In a further example embodiment, the chemical compound 12 may comprise an aromatic compound. The aromatic compound may comprise benzene or a benzene derivative. In such an embodiment, the reducing agent 19 (such as hydrogen) may be provided to the catalyst and the aromatic compound, and the useful product may comprise cyclohexane or a benzene derivative. Alternatively, an oxidizing agent 19 (such as oxygen) may be provided to the catalyst and the aromatic compound, and the useful product may comprise at least one of acetophenone, a phenol, or a benzene derivative.
  • The catalyst 14 may comprise one of a precious metal, a semi-conducting oxide, a semi-conducting cermet, and a varistor. Examples of catalysts that may be used with the present invention include, but are not limited to catalysts comprising platinum, platinum black, rhodium, rhodium black, palladium, palladium black, silver, manganese oxide, a manganese oxide derivative, molybdenum oxide, a molybdenum oxide derivative, iron oxide, an iron oxide derivative, cerium oxide, a cerium oxide derivative, titanium oxide, doped titanium oxide and related compounds, cobalt oxide, rhodium oxide, zinc oxide, and the like. Further examples for catalyst material may generally include oxides of alkali metals, alkaline earths, lanthanides, actinides, transition metals, and nonmetals.
  • In one example embodiment as shown in FIG. 3, the catalyst 14 may comprise a catalyst layer applied to a support 16 such as porous ceramic substrate. For example, the catalyst layer 14 may be supported by a layer 16 of a solid electrolyte. In certain embodiments, the catalyst 14 may be applied to the solid electrolyte layer 16, which in turn may be applied onto a separate support (not shown). The solid electrolyte layer 16 may be one of a continuous layer or a discontinuous layer. The solid electrolyte 16 may comprise one of stabilized zirconia (stabilized with, e.g., gadolinium oxide, samarium oxide, lanthanum oxide, ytterbium oxide, yttrium oxide or other adequate materials known to those skilled in the art), Nafion, other hydrogen ion conducting materials, beta aluminas, or the like. The temperature range of the reactor will be determined by the specific properties of these materials, known to those skilled in the art.
  • The alternating current may be applied across a three-phase boundary at an interface between the catalyst 14 and the solid electrolyte layer 16 via the electronic control device 24. In order to apply the alternating current to the catalyst layer 14, three electrodes may be provided. For example, a reference electrode 40 may be applied to the solid electrolyte layer 16, a counter electrode 42 may be applied to the solid electrolyte layer 16, and a working electrode 44 may be applied to the catalyst layer 14.
  • In a further example embodiment, a polarization impedance of the supported catalyst layer 14 may be monitored. In order to monitor the polarization impedance, the electronic control device 24 may include means for determining the applied current and voltage. The determination of the polarization impedance from the sensed current is explained in detail in Catelectric's U.S. Pat. No. 7,352,392 incorporated by reference in its entirety. The polarization impedance may be controlled by varying the alternating current from electronic control device 24, enabling optimization of the activation reaction.
  • In addition, a controlled oxygen partial pressure environment may be provided at a level of the supported catalyst layer. The oxygen may be produced from the solid electrolyte layer 16 under the voltage applied between the working electrode 44 and the reference electrode 40, and is a function of the DECAN™ process. Alternately, the oxygen may be provided from tank 21 (FIG. 2). The partial pressure of the oxygen at a level of the catalyst layer 14 may be monitored. The determining of the partial pressure of oxygen may also be achieved via the electronic control device 24 as a function of a voltage measurement. For example, a monitoring of the partial pressure of the oxygen may comprise monitoring an interfacial impedance of the supported catalyst layer 14. The partial pressure of oxygen at a level of the catalyst layer 14 may then be determined as a function of the interfacial impedance. Alternately, the polarization impedance of the supported catalyst layer 14 may be monitored as discussed above, and the partial pressure of oxygen at the level of the catalyst layer 14 may be determined as a function of the monitored polarization impedance (e.g., achieved via the electronic control device 24).
  • In addition, a momentary value of the alternating current may be determined by the electronic control device 24 as a function of the monitored polarization impedance.
  • The amount of the oxidizing agent or the reducing agent 19 and/or the polar compound 18 provided may be controlled in order to optimize the activation reaction. Further, a ratio of an amount of the chemical compound 12 to an amount of the oxidizing agent or the reducing agent 19 and/or the polar compound 18 provided may be controlled in order to optimize the activation reaction.
  • In a further example embodiment, heat may be applied to the catalyst in order to optimize the activation reaction. Heat may be applied via heating element 34, which is controlled by temperature control unit 36 (FIG. 2). Oxygen 19 may be applied from an oxygen source (e.g., tank 21) or may be generated by controlling the voltage applied to the solid electrolyte layer, as discussed above.
  • The present invention also generally includes a method for the activation of a chemical compound. The chemical compound 12 is introduced to a catalyst 14. An oxidizing agent or a reducing agent 19 is provided to the catalyst 14 and the chemical compound 12. An alternating current is applied to the catalyst 14 to produce an activation reaction in the chemical compound 12. This activation reaction produces a useful product. For example, the chemical compound may comprise a polar compound 12 and the oxidizing or reducing agent 19 may comprise a polar reactant (e.g., water or steam) or a non-polar reactant (oxygen or hydrogen). Additionally, the chemical compound may comprise a non-polar chemical compound 12 (as discussed above) and the oxidizing or reducing agent 19 may comprise a polar reactant (e.g., water or steam) or a non-polar reactant (oxygen or hydrogen). For example, one polar compound like methanol could react with another polar compound like ethanol to form products of value, or one non-polar compound like benzene could react with another nonpolar compound like methane.
  • As shown in FIG. 11, the present invention also relates to methods and apparatus for oxidizing chemical compounds (e.g., aromatic compounds 112) by electrocatalysis comprising: providing a catalytic cell 14, applying a polarized current or voltage to the catalytic cell from a current/voltage source 20, and passing an oxidizing agent 19 (such as a gaseous stream of air, oxygen, or a mixture of oxygen and one or more inert gases) and the compound to be oxidized 112 over the catalytic cell 14.
  • The catalytic cell 14 may comprise a cryptomelane-type manganese oxide octahedral molecular sieve (OMS-2).
  • In one embodiment, the catalytic cell 14 comprises a working electrode 44 comprising a substrate having a manganese oxide octahedral molecular sieve catalyst (OMS-2) thereon, a counter electrode 42 and a reference electrode 40.
  • In further embodiment the OMS-2 catalyst 14 contains nano-metal particles.
  • In further embodiment the metal contained in the OMS-2 catalyst 14 having nano-metal particles is chosen from the group consisting of Ni2+, Zn2+, Co2+, Cu2+, Fe2+, Fe3+, V4+, V5+, Ti4+, Ti3+, Cr3+, Cr2+, Co3+, Cu1+, Ce3+, Ce4+, La3+, Na+, K+, Ba2+, Y3+, Zr4+, Li+, Sr2+.
  • In a further embodiment the OMS-2 catalyst 14 containing nano-metal particles is Pt-OMS-2.
  • In a further embodiment the substrate (support 16) having manganese oxide octahedral molecular sieve catalyst (OMS-2) 14 is a porous a porous material preferably having a pore size of 5-20 mesh.
  • Preferably the porous substrate 16 is Corning Honeycomb Cordierite® yttrium stabilized zirconium, CeO2 or HfO2.
  • In a further embodiment the catalytic cell 14 comprises a working electrode 44 comprising silver or platinum gauze supported by an insulated pad, the working electrode 44 in contact with the substrate 16, said substrate 16 having a cryptomelane-type manganese oxide octahedral molecular sieve catalyst 14 thereon (e.g., Pt-OMS-2). The counter electrode 42 is a silver or platinum wire and the reference electrode 40 is a silver or platinum wire. In a further embodiment the catalytic cell is heated to a temperature of between about 25° and about 900° C., preferably between about 100° and about 450° C. (e.g., via heating element 34 of FIG. 2).
  • In further embodiment the oxidation is accomplished at a pressure of about 1 atm to about 2 atm.
  • In a further embodiment the gaseous stream further comprises CO2 and water vapor alone or in combination.
  • In a further embodiment the aromatic compound 112 is a derivative of benzene, preferably the aromatic compound is benzene and the oxidized product is acetophenone.
  • In a further embodiment the catalytic cell 14 may comprise a metal oxide chosen from the group consisting of CuOx, Ni Ox, ZnO and VOx (wherein x is an integer from 1-4).
  • In another embodiment the catalytic cell 14 is heated to a temperature of about between about 25° C. and about 900° C. preferably between about 100° C. and about 450° C.
  • In another embodiment the oxidation is accomplished at a pressure of about 1 atm to about 2 atm.
  • In another embodiment the gaseous stream further comprises CO2 and water vapor alone or in combination.
  • In another embodiment the aromatic compound 112 is benzene and the oxidized product is acetophenone.
  • The examples below illustrate example embodiments of a process for the reduction of carbon dioxide using water as the source of hydrogen in accordance with the present invention. The examples below were carried out using the apparatus described above in connection with FIG. 2. However, it should be appreciated by those skilled in the art that the inventive process is not limited by the following examples and may be implemented for the reduction of other molecules, e.g., higher molecular mass alcohols to olefins and other compounds.
  • EXAMPLE 1
    • a. Substrates: Commercial Calcia Fully Stabilized Zirconia (FSZ) porous ceramics from Vesuvius Hi-Tech Ceramics was used as the solid electrolyte layer 16.
    • b. Deposition of the catalyst: Liquid-Phase Chemical Vapor Deposition (LP-CVD) was used for coating of the catalyst layer 14 (platinum). Pt(acac)2 (Strem Chemicals Inc.) was used as the platinum precursor. The temperature of the precursor was set at 120-150 C, while the temperature of the FSZ (calcia) was set at 400-500 C. Argon was used as the carrier gas. The carrier gas flow rate of the precursor was 500-1000 sccm/min, and the carrier gas was heated to 100-150 C before being introduced into the CVD synthesis tube. Oxygen was used as an oxidant. The oxygen flow rate was set at 80-200 sccm/cm. The total pressure of the CVD reactor was controlled at 5-20 KPa. The platinum deposition time was 1-4 hours.
    • c. Assembling of three electrodes: Three electrodes were deposited on the FSZ (calcia) ceramic catalyst as described above in connection with FIG. 3. The three electrodes each comprise 0.25 mm platinum wires (Alfa Aesar). The three platinum wires were assembled on the FSZ (calcia) using platinum paste (from Engelhard/BASF) and then treated in air at 900° C. The reference electrode 40 was directly connected to the support 16 without contact with the platinum layer 14. The counter electrode 42 was assembled before the deposition of the catalyst layer 14 of LP-CVD of platinum, and is in contact with the FSZ support layer 16. The working electrode 44 was deposited on the platinum LP-CVD catalyst layer 14. After assembling the three electrodes, the catalyst assembly with three electrodes was placed in a quartz tube and reduced in 8% hydrogen/helium mixed gas at 600-800° C. for 4-6 hours.
    • d. Catalytic reaction—reactor and reaction parameters: The supported Pt-FSZ catalyst assembly, with the three electrodes, was placed in a quartz tube reactor (e.g., tubular reactor 22 of FIG. 2). The reactor was purged of air and was thereafter operated at slightly positive pressure of about 5-14 psig. The tube reactor temperature was set at 600 to 950° C.
  • It should be noted that the present invention is not limited to the foregoing description. For example, the temperature may be as low as room temperature or higher than 950° C.; the solid electrolyte can be Nafion, and the catalyst can be platinum black. Other materials for use as the solid electrolyte or catalyst will be apparent to those skilled in the art.
  • Further, the solid electrolyte layer 16 can be deposited on a support 16 comprising an inert ceramic substrate (e.g., cordierite catalyst supports provided by Corning Inc. or St. Gobain Co) via any of the appropriate methods known to those skilled in the art. Similarly, the catalyst 14 can be deposited on the solid electrolyte layer 16 via any of the appropriate methods known to those skilled in the art.
  • In addition, the implementation of the process does not require a continuity of the solid electrolyte layer 16 or of the catalyst layer 14. What is necessary is a preponderance of grain boundaries where the catalyst 14 is in contact with the solid electrolyte 16 and sufficient open porosity to allow for the access of the reacting phases to the catalytically active interfaces.
  • Carbon dioxide (CO2) used was zero grade gas from Airgas. Water used was de-ionized water. Water was injected by a peristaltic pump 17, and evaporated by a heated ceramic tube. CO2 was used as the carrier gas provided from tank 11. The molar ratio of CO2 to water was set at 10 to 1 or 5 to 1. The flow of CO2 was monitored by a mass flow meter and was varied between 200 scc/minute and 1600 scc/minute. It should be noted that the water/CO2 ratio can take any values within the interval 1/1000 to 1000/1, and even outside this range.
  • The system was polarized (via the electronic control device 24 and three electrodes 40, 42, and 44) with a pulsed current at about 1 kHz at average voltages ranging from 0.03 to 0.1 V rms. The current passed averaged between 0.03 and 0.13 mA. This process is described in detail in U.S. patent application Ser. No. 11/588,113 mentioned above.
  • Eight runs of polarization were applied, each lasting about 15 minutes.
  • An unexpected result of this process was that a substantial amount of a white powder was formed, which was collected at the cold areas of the reactor 22, as well as in the water trap 26 and liquid nitrogen trap 28. The gas phase was analyzed by gas chromatography (e.g., analyzer 32) with thermal and flame ionization detectors.
  • The powder was dispersed in the water samples collected by the traps, which were then analyzed by Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) and High-Pressure Liquid Chromatography (HPLC). With the reactor temperature set at 900° C. data collected was consistent with the presence in these samples of paraformaldehyde and small amounts of trioxane. The result of the NMR analysis is shown in FIG. 4.
  • EXAMPLE 2
  • The catalyst 14 used in this example was the same as that for example 1. The temperature of the quartz tube reactor was set at 600° C. The main product identified by NMR was paraformaldehyde, as shown in FIG. 5.
  • EXAMPLE 3
    • a. Substrates: Commercial Calcia Fully Stabilized Zirconia (FSZ) porous ceramics from Vesuvius Hi-Tech Ceramics was used as the solid electrolyte layer 16.
    • b. Deposition of the catalyst: A catalyst layer 14 of octahedral manganese oxide OMS-2 was prepared as follows: 5.6 g K2SO4, 8.81 g K2S2O8 and 3.77 g MnSO4 and 70 ml DI water were added into a 125 ml autoclave and put into a 4748 Parr acid digestion bomb for 96 hours; the temperature was maintained at 250° C. The solid was washed repeatedly with de-ionized water. The suspension was filtered and stirred overnight at 85° C. into a beaker with 300 ml de-ionized water. The suspension was coated on the Vesuvius porous ceramic body and was dried at 120° C. for 12 hours.
    • c. Assembly of electrodes: Three platinum electrodes were positioned as described in Example 1. Platinum paste (Engelhard BASF) was applied to assemble the electrodes. Then the catalytic assembly was reduced in 6% Hydrogen/helium mixed gas for 2 hours at 150-300° C.
  • The as-prepared catalytic assembly was placed in a tube quartz reactor (tubular reactor 22) and connected with the electronic control device 24. The tube quartz reactor 22 was sealed and isolated with an air environment. CO2 (zero grade from Air gas) was introduced from tank 11 and controlled with a flow meter. Water was injected with a pre-calibrated peristaltic pump 17. Water was heated by a ceramic tube at above 130° C. Then the reactor 22 was purged with CO2.
  • The system was set at slightly higher atmosphere pressure (for example 5 kpa). The electronic control device 24 supplied polarized current or voltage to the catalytic assembly via electrodes 40, 42, and 44. The tube reactor was set at 250-450° C.
  • The products were analyzed by NMR and GC techniques.
  • The Pt-OMS-2 catalyst 14 was tested in the CO2—H2O system starting from 250° C. and up to 450° C. When the reaction started at 250° C., it was slow. After 4 hours, the sample was analyzed from the first ice water trap 26 by NMR. The resultant NMR patterns did not show any product. The concentration of products may have been out of the limit or the product yield was very low. The second test was done at 300° C. The resultant NMR proton patterns showed a low concentration of paraformaldehyde (about 0.5-1.0% in molar). In particular, the NMR results showed a weak peak of paraformaldehyde at this temperature. The third test was done at 400° C. The resultant NMR patterns from the ice water trap 26 and the NMR patterns of the dry ice trap 28 showed stronger peaks of paraformaldehyde at this temperature. The concentration of paraformaldehyde was about 1.0-1.5% in molar. The fourth test was done at 450° C. The resultant NMR proton patterns show higher concentrations of paraformaldehyde at this temperature. The concentration of paraformaldehyde was about 3.0-5.0% in molar.
  • For the above four tests, the CO2 flow rate used was 200 sccm, and the water injection rate was 9.16 ml/min. The flow rate of CO2/H2O was 2.37.
  • Based on the above results, the CO2 conversion rate at different temperatures is shown in Table 1 below.
  • TABLE 1
    Conversion rate of carbon dioxide in the
    reactions at different temperatures
    Temperature (° C.) Conversion Rate (%)
    250 Low
    300 0.5-1.0%
    400 1.0-1.5%
    450 3.0-5.0%
  • EXAMPLE 4
  • Synthesis of ZnO Catalyst: A low-pressure chemical vapor deposition (LPCVD) technique was used to deposit a catalyst layer 14 of ZnO on a calcium fully stabilized zirconia (FSZ) support 16. The Zn precursor was Zn(CHCOO)2(98+%, Aldrich). The temperature of the FSZ template was set at 300° C. The temperature of precursor was set at 160° C. The deposition pressure was controlled at 3 kPa. The sample was coated two times. In the second run, the position of the sample was reversed (front to back and top bottom of reactor) to get better uniformity of coating. Each coating time was 4 hours. The total CVD coating time was 8 hours. After LPCVD, the sample was heated with a ramp rate at 5° C./min and calcined at 600° C. for 12 hours in air.
  • Reactor and Electrodes: Three electrodes were assembled on the ZnO-coated FSZ support as described above in connection with FIG. 3. After the ZnO coated FSZ catalyst assembly was calcined, an area of 25 mm2 at the end was pretreated with 5M HCL to remove ZnO. A Platinum reference electrode 40 was assembled at this area. At another end of the cylinder sample, the same method as above was used to remove the ZnO layer, and a platinum wire was connected with the FSZ support layer 16 directly as the counter electrode 42. The working electrode 44 was attached to the ZnO catalyst layer 14. Platinum paste (6082 from BASF) was applied to enable the platinum electrodes to have good contact with the catalyst assembly.
  • After the electrodes were assembled, the resistance between the electrodes was measured with a Digital Multimeter (HDM350). The results are shown in Table 2 below.
  • TABLE 2
    Resistance between electrodes at different temperatures
    Resistance between Resistance between Resistance between
    working electrode working electrode counter electrode
    and reference and counter and reference
    Temp. electrode electrode electrode
    200° C.   20M  135K  >20M
    500° C. 10.5M 19.6K 10.1M
    600° C. 1.06M 5.85K 0.55M
  • The CO2 flow from tank 11 was measured with a flowmeter (OMEGA FL-3504G). Water injection was measured by a calibrated peristaltic pump 17 (Watson Marlow Sci400). Water was dropped on heated ceramic frit (>130° C.) and evaporated in a T tube. Then water was introduced into the reactor with the CO2 carrier gas. ZnO-FSZ catalyst assembly was placed into a 2-inch quartz tube reactor (e.g., tubular reactor 22). The reactor 22 was heated to 600-700° C. with a tube furnace (Thermolyne 21100) or via heating element 34. The ZnO-FSZ catalyst assembly was connected with the three electrodes to the electronic control device 24 and polarized by a voltage or a current controlled by the electronic control device 24. The outflow products were cooled by an ice-water trap 26 and a dry ice trap 28. The gas from the reactor was dried by a molecular sieve column 30, then the gas composition was analyzed with an analyzer 32 (e.g., a gas chromatograph (SRI 8610C)).
  • A voltage of −2.5 V to 2.5V was applied for the polarization tests for with a potentiostatic EIS mode or single frequency mode. The temperature of CO2 and H2O was set at 600 and 700° C. The flow rate of CO2 was between 200-500 sccm. The ratio of CO2/H2O was set at 1:1 and 1:3 respectively. With different polarization, each EIS spectrum was taken by a Gamry Reference 600.
  • The ZnO coated FSZ assembly was investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The morphology of the ZnO catalyst layer 14 is shown in FIG. 6 (×50000) and FIG. 7 (×100000). Based on SEM images, the morphologies suggest that the ZnO catalyst layer 14 is continuous and the ZnO particle size is about 20-50 nm.
  • The products of CO2 and H2O activation were separated into two phases: liquid phase and gas phase. Liquid phase products were characterized by NMR and gas phases were analyzed with an SRI 8610C gas chromatograph. Other techniques such as HPLC-MS and GC-MS may also be employed. FIG. 8 is a proton NMR spectrum of the synthesized products. The CO2 flow rate was set at 320-450 sccm; water was injected with a flow rate of 10 mL/hour (or 207 sccm/min). The CO2/H2O molar ratio was 1.6-2.2. Based on the results shown in FIG. 8, one major product was synthesized. The NMR chemical shift is between 4.75 to 5.20 ppm. Small amounts of formaldehyde were present at a chemical shift of 8.25 ppm.
  • The polarization voltage was set at −1.2 V to −1.5 V. The typical polarization bode spectrum is shown in FIG. 9. The “A” line is without polarization and the “B” line is with −1.2 V polarizations. In the polarization condition, the Zmod decreased. For example, Zmod decreased from 3.825 kΩ to 3.573 kΩ at a frequency of 500 kHz. These data suggest that the reaction is fast when the catalytic cell was polarized.
  • FIG. 10 is a single frequency EIS spectrum. With the fixed frequency of 500 KHz, the Zmod was shown to change with time. This change reflected the dynamic reactions at the surface of the catalytic assembly. The comparison tests showed that if alternating negative and positive polarizations were used, the Zmod would decrease after negative polarization, which increases the reaction rate.
  • Gas chromatography (GC) online analysis of the products of the reaction found new broad peaks at 14.5-20.5 min. These peaks were assigned to ethylene and ethane.
  • EXAMPLE 5
  • a) Synthesis of the OMS-2 Catalyst
  • K2S2O8, K2SO4, and MnSO4 were mixed with 70 ml Deionized (DI) water in a 125 ml autoclave. The autoclave with above suspension was heated at 250° C. for 3-4 days. Then as-synthesized product was wash with DI water for several times to remove inorganic ions. The pulp-like OMS-2 was then put into a beaker with 200-300 ml DI water.
  • Other doped catalysts have different recipes. Co, Cu, Fe, and Ce doped OMS-2 could be synthesized using hydrothermal methods.
  • b) Substrate
  • Porous materials were used as the substrate for (Support 16) loading OMS-2 coating (catalyst 14) at the surface. Corning Honeycomb cordierite was used as the substrate. Its pore sizes are 5-20 mesh. Other porous substrates such as yttrium stabilized zirconium could be used.
  • c) Assembly of Three Electrodes
  • Counter electrode 42 and reference electrode 40 were assembled first before coating a layer of OMS-2 manganese oxide (catalyst 14). Silver or platinum wires were used as electrode. Silver conductive paste was applied to fix the wires on the substrate 16. After assembled electrodes, the sample was put in an oven for curing at 80° C. for 6 hours. Then it was calcined at 600° C. for 8 hours.
  • The other working electrode 44 was assembled by using silver or platinum gauze. The gauze was supported by an insulated pad. The pad was contacted with the substrate.
  • d) Loading OMS-2 Catalyst on the Substrate
  • 10-mesh cordierite honeycomb is used as the substrate 16.
  • The pulp-like OMS-2 was stirred and heated to 80-90° C. for 6 hours in a beaker. OMS-2 pulp-like slurry was dropped to the substrate. By using the evacuation apparatus (FIG. 2), OMS-2 was uniformly coated on the substrate 16 to provide catalyst layer 14.
  • The working electrode 44 was modified by using droplets of pulp-like OMS. The reference electrode 40 was cleaned by removing OMS-2. The OMS-2 coated substrate was dried at 120° C. for overnight.
  • e) Chemical Vapor Deposition of Platinum on OMS-2
  • The as-coated OMS-2 sample was put into a quartz tube (tubular reactor 22). The tube was heated in a tube furnace at 300-450° C. Pt(acac)2 (Stream Chemicals Inc.) was used as the precursor and oxygen was used as oxidant (oxidizing agent 19). Argon was used as the carrier gas and preheated to 100-150° C. The pressure in the tube was set at 5-20 kPa. The carrier gas flow was set at 500-1000 sccm and oxygen flow was set at 50-200 sccm. The LP-CVD time was 1-3 hours.
  • EXAMPLE 6 Electrocatalytic Oxidation of Benzene
  • a) Reaction Setup
  • Air was used as carrier gas and oxidant 19. The flow rate was controlled by a Mass flow controller or a rotameter. The concentration of benzene could be diluted by addition of air and other gases. By putting the benzene bubbler in a warm water bath, the concentration of benzene 112 will be increased.
  • The system was set at slightly higher than atmospheric pressure (for example 5 kpa). The current/voltage source 20 supplied polarized current or voltage to the catalytic cell 14. The tube reactor temperature was set at 100-450° C. controlled by heating element 34 of FIG. 2.
  • The products were analyzed by NMR, GC-MS, and GC at analyzer 32. GCMS data for the oxidation of benzene is provided at FIGS. 12-14.
  • b) Polarization Methods
  • OMS-2 is a mixed valent manganese oxide. Mn has high mixed oxidation states of valence 3+ and 4+. Oxygen ion is easy to move between the vacancies of the lattice. When a small DC current was applied to the sample at a certain frequency, the impedance of the sample changed more than 10 percent. Oxygen ions could be continuously driven to the surface by positive current (or DC voltage). These oxygen ions could react with benzene.
  • Method 1: Apply a small current on the interface of the catalysts.
  • Galvanostatic EIS graph showed that the reaction was promoted by using a small current.
  • Method 2: Apply a positive or negative voltage on the interface of the catalysts.
  • The foregoing examples are meant to illustrate the function and applicability of the present invention without limiting its scope. Those skilled in the art will appreciate that the present invention has numerous applications and that the parameters, materials, chemical compounds, and other variables mentioned in the examples above can be varied or changed depending on the application and desired result.
  • From the foregoing examples those skilled in the art will appreciate that the present invention encompasses methods, processes, and apparatus for the activation of the reaction between low-reactivity, non-polar molecules (such as CO2) with polar molecules/species (such as water or steam), leading to products useful in the production of polymers, in organic synthesis reactions. For example, in accordance with the present invention a process is provided which leads to the activation of the reaction of carbon dioxide (and of other similar low-reactivity, non-polar molecules) with polar compounds (such as water, steam, or others) in a heterogeneous catalytic reaction. For example, the present invention may be used to activate the following reactions (among others):
  • CO2+H2O
  • CO2+H2O+CH4
  • CO2+NO
  • CO2+NO+CH4
  • CO2+NH3
  • C6H6+H2O
  • C6H6+C6H6+CH4
  • C6H6+H2O+CH4
  • C6H6+CH3OH and similar compounds
  • C6H6+NO
  • C6H6+NH3
  • Those skilled in the art will appreciate that the foregoing list of reactions is not intended to be limiting, and that the present invention may be used to facilitate other reactions, as discussed in detail above.
  • It should now be appreciated that the present invention provides advantageous methods and apparatus for the activation of carbon dioxide and other low-reactivity molecules.
  • Although the invention has been described in connection with various illustrated embodiments, numerous modifications and adaptations may be made thereto without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention as set forth in the claims.

Claims (26)

  1. 1. A method for oxidizing chemical compounds to oxidized products by electrocatalysis comprising:
    i) providing a catalytic cell;
    ii) applying a polarized current or voltage to the catalytic cell;
    iii) passing a gaseous stream of air or oxygen or a mixture of oxygen; and one or more inert gases and the compound to be oxidized over the catalytic cell.
  2. 2. A method for oxidizing aromatic compounds to oxidized products by electrocatalysis comprising the steps of:
    i) providing a catalytic cell comprising a cryptomelane-type manganese oxide octahedral molecular sieve (OMS-2);
    ii) applying a polarized current or voltage to the catalytic cell;
    iii) passing a gaseous stream of air or oxygen or a mixture of oxygen and one or more inert gases and the aromatic compound to be oxidized over the catalytic cell.
  3. 3. The method according to claim 2 wherein said catalytic cell comprises a working electrode comprising a substrate having a manganese oxide octahedral molecular sieve catalyst (OMS-2) thereon; a counter electrode and a reference electrode.
  4. 4. The method according to claim 3 wherein said OMS-2 contains nano-metal particles.
  5. 5. The method according to claim 4 wherein the metal is chosen from the group consisting of Ni2+, Zn2+, Co2+, Cu2+, Fe2+, Fe3+, V4+, V5+, Ti4+, Ti3+, Cr3+, Cr2+, Co3+, Cu1+, Ce3+, Ce4+, La3+, Na+, K+, Ba2+, Y3+, Zr4+, Li+, Sr2+.
  6. 6. The method according to claim 2 wherein the OMS-2 containing nano-metal particles is Pt-OMS-2.
  7. 7. The method according to claim 3 wherein the substrate is a porous material.
  8. 8. The method according to claim 7 wherein the porous material has a pore size of 5-20 mesh.
  9. 9. The method according to claim 8 wherein the porous material is Corning Honeycomb Cordierite®.
  10. 10. The method according to claim 7 wherein the porous material is chosen from the group consisting of yttrium stabilized zirconium, CeO2 and HfO2.
  11. 11. The method according to claim 3 wherein the working electrode comprises silver or platinum gauze supported by an insulated pad, the working electrode in contact with the substrate having a cryptomelane-type manganese oxide octahedral molecular sieve catalyst thereon.
  12. 12. The method according to claim 11 wherein the catalyst is Pt-OMS-2.
  13. 13. The method according to claim 11 wherein the counter electrode is a silver or platinum wire.
  14. 14. The method according to claim 11 wherein the reference electrode is a silver or platinum wire.
  15. 15. The method according to claim 2 wherein said catalytic cell is heated to a temperature of between about 25° and about 900° C.
  16. 16. The method according to claim 1 wherein said catalytic cell is heated to a temperature of between about 100° and about 450° C.
  17. 17. The method according to claim 2 wherein the oxidation is accomplished at a pressure of about 1 atm to about 2 atm.
  18. 18. The method according to claim 2 wherein the gaseous stream further comprises CO2 and water vapor alone or in combination.
  19. 19. The method according to claim 2 wherein said aromatic compound is chosen from the group consisting of benzene and its derivatives.
  20. 20. The method according to claim 2 wherein the aromatic compound is benzene and the oxidized product is acetophenone.
  21. 21. A method for oxidizing aromatic compounds to oxidized products by electrocatalysis comprising the steps of:
    i) providing a catalytic cell comprising a metal oxide chosen from the group consisting of CuOx, Ni Ox, ZnO and VOx (wherein x is an integer from 1-4;
    ii) applying a polarized current or voltage to the catalytic cell;
    iii) passing a gaseous stream of air or oxygen or a mixture of oxygen and one or more inert gases and the aromatic compound to be oxidized over the catalytic cell.
  22. 22. The method according to claim 21 wherein the catalytic cell is heated to a temperature of about between about 25° C. and about 900° C.
  23. 23. The method according to claim 21 wherein the oxidation is accomplished at a pressure of about 1 atm to about 2 atm.
  24. 24. The method according to claim 21 wherein the gaseous stream further comprises CO2 and water vapor alone or in combination.
  25. 25. The method according to claim 21 wherein the aromatic compound is a derivative of benzene.
  26. 26. The method according to claim 21 wherein the aromatic compound is benzene and the oxidized product is acetophenone.
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