US20090050504A1 - Array of Spatially Separated Wipes Products - Google Patents

Array of Spatially Separated Wipes Products Download PDF

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Publication number
US20090050504A1
US20090050504A1 US12175471 US17547108A US2009050504A1 US 20090050504 A1 US20090050504 A1 US 20090050504A1 US 12175471 US12175471 US 12175471 US 17547108 A US17547108 A US 17547108A US 2009050504 A1 US2009050504 A1 US 2009050504A1
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Prior art keywords
container
stage
wipes
development
array
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Abandoned
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US12175471
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Jeffrey James Stechschulte
Philip Andrew Sawin
Jared Dean Simmons
Sarah Louise Thielman
Sarah Ann Dressel
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Procter and Gamble Co
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Procter and Gamble Co
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    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B65CONVEYING; PACKING; STORING; HANDLING THIN OR FILAMENTARY MATERIAL
    • B65DCONTAINERS FOR STORAGE OR TRANSPORT OF ARTICLES OR MATERIALS, e.g. BAGS, BARRELS, BOTTLES, BOXES, CANS, CARTONS, CRATES, DRUMS, JARS, TANKS, HOPPERS, FORWARDING CONTAINERS; ACCESSORIES, CLOSURES, OR FITTINGS THEREFOR; PACKAGING ELEMENTS; PACKAGES
    • B65D47/00Closures with filling and discharging, or with discharging, devices
    • B65D47/04Closures with discharging devices other than pumps
    • B65D47/06Closures with discharging devices other than pumps with pouring spouts or tubes; with discharge nozzles or passages
    • B65D47/08Closures with discharging devices other than pumps with pouring spouts or tubes; with discharge nozzles or passages having articulated or hinged closures
    • B65D47/0857Closures with discharging devices other than pumps with pouring spouts or tubes; with discharge nozzles or passages having articulated or hinged closures made separately from the base element provided with the spout or discharge passage
    • B65D47/0871Closures with discharging devices other than pumps with pouring spouts or tubes; with discharge nozzles or passages having articulated or hinged closures made separately from the base element provided with the spout or discharge passage and elastically biased towards the open position only
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B65CONVEYING; PACKING; STORING; HANDLING THIN OR FILAMENTARY MATERIAL
    • B65DCONTAINERS FOR STORAGE OR TRANSPORT OF ARTICLES OR MATERIALS, e.g. BAGS, BARRELS, BOTTLES, BOXES, CANS, CARTONS, CRATES, DRUMS, JARS, TANKS, HOPPERS, FORWARDING CONTAINERS; ACCESSORIES, CLOSURES, OR FITTINGS THEREFOR; PACKAGING ELEMENTS; PACKAGES
    • B65D83/00Containers or packages with special means for dispensing contents
    • B65D83/08Containers or packages with special means for dispensing contents for dispensing thin flat articles in succession
    • B65D83/0805Containers or packages with special means for dispensing contents for dispensing thin flat articles in succession through an aperture in a wall
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A47FURNITURE; DOMESTIC ARTICLES OR APPLIANCES; COFFEE MILLS; SPICE MILLS; SUCTION CLEANERS IN GENERAL
    • A47FSPECIAL FURNITURE, FITTINGS, OR ACCESSORIES FOR SHOPS, STOREHOUSES, BARS, RESTAURANTS OR THE LIKE; PAYING COUNTERS
    • A47F1/00Racks for dispensing merchandise; Containers for dispensing merchandise
    • A47F1/04Racks or containers with arrangements for dispensing articles, e.g. by means of gravity or springs
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A47FURNITURE; DOMESTIC ARTICLES OR APPLIANCES; COFFEE MILLS; SPICE MILLS; SUCTION CLEANERS IN GENERAL
    • A47FSPECIAL FURNITURE, FITTINGS, OR ACCESSORIES FOR SHOPS, STOREHOUSES, BARS, RESTAURANTS OR THE LIKE; PAYING COUNTERS
    • A47F10/00Furniture or installations specially adapted to particular types of service systems, not otherwise provided for
    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E04BUILDING
    • E04HBUILDINGS OR LIKE STRUCTURES FOR PARTICULAR PURPOSES; SWIMMING OR SPLASH BATHS OR POOLS; MASTS; FENCING; TENTS OR CANOPIES, IN GENERAL
    • E04H3/00Buildings or groups of buildings for public or similar purposes; Institutions, e.g. infirmaries, prisons
    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E04BUILDING
    • E04HBUILDINGS OR LIKE STRUCTURES FOR PARTICULAR PURPOSES; SWIMMING OR SPLASH BATHS OR POOLS; MASTS; FENCING; TENTS OR CANOPIES, IN GENERAL
    • E04H3/00Buildings or groups of buildings for public or similar purposes; Institutions, e.g. infirmaries, prisons
    • E04H3/02Hotels; Motels; Coffee houses; Restaurants; Shops; Department stores

Abstract

An array of wipes products that includes two or more different packages of wipes products displayed in different areas of a retail environment. The wipes products include wipes containers, which have functional and/or structural features tailored to children in a particular stage of development. The wipes containers in the array are structurally and/or functionally different from each other. The wipes products include substantially the same kind of wipe and may include a common source identifier.

Description

    CROSS REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS
  • This application claims the benefit of U.S. provisional application No. 60/965,385, filed Aug. 20, 2007.
  • FIELD OF INVENTION
  • The present disclosure relates generally to wipes containers having wipes disposed therein, and specifically to wipes containers having structural differences, common source identifiers and/or spatially separated locations in a retail environment for providing substantially the same wipes to users in different stages of development.
  • COPYRIGHT NOTICE
  • A portion of the disclosure of this patent document contains material which is subject to copyright and/or trademark protection. The copyright and trademark owner has no objection to the facsimile reproduction by anyone of the patent document or the patent disclosure, as it appears in the Patent and Trademark Office patent file or records, but otherwise reserves all copyright and trademark rights whatsoever.
  • BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • Disposable cleansing wipes for personal cleansing are known in the art. Wipes products often include a container, sometime referred to as a “tub” and one or more wipes disposed in the container. Depending on the use for which the wipes are intended, the wipes may also include compositions to aid in a particular cleaning process. Wipes may used to clean children, especially very young children, by their caregivers because very young children often lack the understanding and/or manual dexterity required to clean themselves. In some instances, a package of disposable wipes may provide a convenient way for a caregiver to clean a child. As children who have been cleaned with wipes grow older and begin to learn to clean themselves, they may continue to think of wipes as a personal cleansing tool. In order to encourage children to learn to clean themselves, for example, after eliminating bodily waste, some manufacturers may attempt to provide wipes containers that children of various ages find desirable.
  • At least some manufacturers provide wipes products with child-appropriate graphics, for example, on the wipes container. The graphics may be included to make the wipes product more attractive or appealing to a child. The graphics may also provide encouragement to a child to use the wipes or provide instruction to the child for using the wipes properly. One problem encountered by some manufacturers of wipes products that provide child-appropriate graphics on wipes products is that a wide variety of graphics may be required in order to provide a wipes product that appeals to a variety of users such as children of different genders, ages, and/or ethnic backgrounds. For example, some younger children may prefer graphics that are less appealing to some older children, some boys may prefer graphics that some girls find unappealing, and some children from one country or region of the World may prefer graphics that some children in a different country or region find unappealing. Additionally, a child's preferences in graphics may change as the child grows older. For example, a relatively younger or less developed child may not be able to distinguish the same features (e.g., relatively subtle facial features) in a picture that an older or more developed child is able to distinguish. In such instances, the younger child may not appreciate or even perceive that the features are present. On the other hand, an older child may find simpler graphics typically suited for younger children to be undesirable.
  • At least some children, particularly older children who are able to manipulate a wipes container and access the wipes disposed therein, may be less likely to require and/or desire the help of a caregiver to clean themselves. These children may demonstrate a desire to “graduate” from the use of a younger child's product, and it may be important to the potty-training process of the child that he/she recognizes his/her progress towards “graduating” from the potty-training process entirely. By enabling a child to independently access the wipes contained inside a wipes container, the process of “potty-training” a child or teaching a child personal hygiene skills associated with using the restroom may be easier and/or more enjoyable to both the child and the caregiver.
  • Like many consumer products, personal cleaning wipes and traditional dry toilet-tissue are sold in retail stores, many of which are arranged in aisles that display related products in proximity to each other. As some children grow older and mature, they may consider areas of a retail store displaying baby care products such as diapers, training pants, bibs, baby bottles, and/or baby wipes to be for use by children younger and/or less mature than themselves, and consequently demonstrate an unwillingness to use the products displayed in these areas. If some of the products displayed in the “baby aisle” are wipes, then a caregiver of a child in a later stage of development may find it more difficult to encourage the child to use the wipes displayed in the baby aisle. On the other hand, an older and/or more mature child may associate wipes products that are displayed in proximity to personal cleaning products traditionally used by adults (“adult personal cleaning products”) to be for “big kids” (i.e., older and/or more mature children), thereby potentially increasing the child's desire to use the wipes. Nonlimiting examples of adult personal cleaning products include bar soap, body wash, traditional shampoo and conditioner, hair styling products, toilet tissue, bath sponges, deodorant/antiperspirant, toothpaste, mouthwash, shaving cream/gel, razors, and the like.
  • One problem that may be encountered when placing substantially the same wipes product in two or more containers or packages that may have different structural or functional features and displaying each of the containers in different areas of store is that consumers may not associate the two wipes product with the same manufacturer. In such instances, customers may choose to buy wipes made by another manufacturer simply because the customers do not associate the spatially separated wipes products as having a common manufacturer. When a consumer switches to a new brand of wipes brands (i.e., wipes made by a different manufacturer or supplier of wipes), the new wipes may not have the same substrates, texture, cleaning compositions, perfume, and/or other characteristics or ingredients to which a child has become accustomed. In such an instance, the child may develop a rash or other skin ailment as a result of using the new wipes. By providing some sort of source identifier on the container or package of wipes, it may be possible to communicate to a consumer that a single manufacturer provides substantially the same wipes for different stages of child development, even though the containers may contain structural or functional differences and are displayed in different areas of a retail environment.
  • Accordingly, it would be desirable to provide an array of at least two wipes packages that have the same or substantially the same wipes disposed therein. It would also be desirable to provide an array of at least two wipes packages that have different structural and/or functional features and are each displayed in one or more different areas of a retail environment. It would further be desirable to provide an array of at least two wipes packages that are each displayed in one or more different areas of a retail environment and include a common source identifier.
  • SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • In order to provide a solution to the problems stated above, at least one embodiment disclosed herein provides an array of wipes products. The array comprises a first package. The first package comprises a first container. The first package is displayed at a first location in a retail store. The first container includes one or more sides, a top, and a bottom that define an internal storage space. The internal storage space of the first container is configured to store one or more wipes and has one or more wipes disposed therein. The first container includes at least one of a first structural feature and a first functional feature adapted to enable a user in a first stage of development to manipulate the first container such that the one or more wipes disposed in the internal storage space of the first container are accessible by the user in the first stage of development. The array also comprises a second package. The second package comprises a second container. The second package is displayed at a second location in a retail store that is spatially separated from the first location. The second container includes one or more sides, a top, and a bottom that define an internal storage space configured to store one or more wipes and having one or more wipes disposed therein. The wipes disposed in the first container are substantially the same kind of wipes as the wipes disposed in the second container. The second container comprises at least one of a second structural feature and a second functional feature adapted to enable a user in a second stage of development to manipulate the second container such that the one or more wipes disposed in the internal storage space of the second container are accessible by the user in the second stage of development.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • FIG. 1A is a perspective view of a wipes container in an open configuration.
  • FIG. 1B is a perspective view of a wipes container in a closed configuration.
  • FIG. 2 is a perspective view of an example of a wipes container.
  • FIG. 3A is a perspective view of an example of a wipes container with the lid in a closed configuration.
  • FIG. 3B is a perspective view of an example of a wipes container with the lid in a partially-open configuration.
  • FIGS. 4-10 are various views of an example of a wipes container tailored to a user in the independence stage of development.
  • FIGS. 11-16 are various views of an example of a wipes container tailored to a user in the learning stage of development.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION Definitions
  • “Array” refers to two or more products which are each sold individually, but which are each part of a broader collective offering. The individual offerings in the array are associated with each other by some commonality or connection. Examples of such a commonality or connection may include, but are not limited to: a common source identifier, a common color scheme, or a common graphic, which signal that the products are related and are offerings to sub-groups within the overall group to which the array or array as a whole is offered.
  • “Disposed” refers to an element being positioned in a particular place with regard to another element.
  • “Functionally different” refers to wipes products having one or more features that may be structurally similar or even the same, but that operate differently. For example, two wipes products may include containers that each comprise a button for manipulating a lid, but one button may require a user to push down on the button to open the lid, while the other button requires a user to push the button in or to the side. Therefore, the buttons are functionally different. “Down” or “downward,” when used herein to refer to the direction in which force is applied to a button, means a direction that is parallel to and in substantially the same direction as the force of gravity when the container is positioned as it would be for normal use, i.e., the bottom of the container resting unaided on a substantially flat, level surface. The phrase “to the side” and the term “in,” when used herein to refer to the direction in which force is applied to a button, mean a direction that is orthogonal to the direction of the force of gravity when the container is positioned as it would be for normal use with the bottom of the container resting unaided on a substantially flat, level surface. As used herein, the terms “parallel” and “orthogonal” include directions within forty-five degrees of the true parallel and orthogonal directions. In another example, two wipes containers may both utilize a spring operatively engaged with a button to open a lid. However, one spring may fully open the lid, while the other spring only partially opens the lid. Therefore, the wipes products are functionally different.
  • “Joined” refers to configurations whereby an element is directly secured to another element by affixing the element directly to the other element and to configurations whereby an element is indirectly secured to another element by affixing the element to intermediate member(s) which in turn are affixed to the other element.
  • “Kinds of wipes” refers to wipes having a particular attribute that may be used to distinguish one wipes product from another wipes product. One example of different kinds of wipes includes wet-wipes and dry-wipes. Another example includes scented wipes and unscented wipes. Another example includes two or more wipes products wherein the wipes of each wipe product have different substrate compositions, substrate basis weights, and/or substrate colors, patterns, or other indicia. Nonlimiting examples of wipes that are the same kind of wipes include two or more wipes products that have the same type and amount of substrate material arranged the same way and the same amount of the same compositions disposed on or in the wipe in the same way. Wipes manufactured on the same or different production line(s) configured to perform identical processes using substantially the same materials are considered to be the same kind of wipes even if subsequent testing reveals differences in one or more physical or chemical parameters.
  • “Majority of products displayed” and “majority of products” are interchangeable and generally refer to products being displayed such that more than 50% of the commercially occupied space at a particular location in a retail store is being devoted to the display of the particular product type. This does not include available space that is not dedicated or intended to display product at the present time, but does include space that is currently empty but intended to display product (e.g., a particular product is sold out, but will be restocked). For example, if a particular aisle in a store is 75% full (i.e., 75% of the available shelf space is dedicated or intended to display products at the present time) and 51% of the dedicated space is used to display personal cleaning products, then the majority of products being displayed in the aisle are personal cleaning products.
  • “Nonwoven” refers to a fibrous structure, e.g., web made from an assembly of continuous fibers, co-extruded fibers, non-continuous fibers and combinations thereof, without weaving or knitting. Exemplary, nonlimiting processes for producing nonwovens include spunbonding, carding, melt-blowing, air-laying, wet-laying, co-form.
  • “Retail environment” and “retail store” are interchangeable and refer to a business that offers consumer products for sale.
  • “Source identifier” refers to a recognizable sensory signal that communicates to a person the identity of a provider of a particular good or service. For example, the sensory signal may be the depiction of a trademark, the name of a company, a brand name, or a logo. One particularly suitable example of a source identifier is the trademark KANDOO, which may found on PAMPERS brand wipes, distributed by the Procter & Gamble company; Cincinnati, Ohio. When two or more products each include a source identifier that is configured to communicate to a consumer that the two or more products are provided by the same provider, the source identifiers on each of products may be referred to as a “common source identifier.” It is to be understood that a common source identifier need not necessarily comprise identical source identifiers on.
  • “Stages of development” refers to categories in a child developmental classification system based on the main characteristics that are typical for children as they progress in their development from newborns to children in older age ranges such as, for example, two years to seven years old. Generally, each stage of development is characterized by representative cognitive, motor, emotional, and learning developmental attributes exhibited by a typical child as the child grows and matures. There is no single upper age limit for the children in any particular stage of development, and it will be recognized that children may progress through stages of development at different rates. Additionally, it is to be understood that a normal statistical distribution of child development can typically be found in a particular population or segment of a population of children. In such a statistical distribution, it may be seen that children in a particular stage of development are related in age (i.e., the children are about the same age or in a relatively narrow range of ages such as less than 2 years apart). However, the characteristics associated with stages of development may be more significant than the age ranges typically associated with such stages. Nonlimiting examples and descriptions of various stages of development are provided in more detail hereinbelow. Additional examples and descriptions of various stages of development can be found in U.S. Pat. No. 6,763,944, titled “Array Of Disposable Absorbent Article Configurations And Packaging” issued to Ronn, et al on Jul. 20, 2004.
  • “Structurally different” generally refers to wipes containers having one or more features that differ in shape or appearance. For example, two wipes containers that comprise different shapes and/or sizes. In another example, two wipes containers may have portions or discrete elements that vary in size, shape and/or appearance such as different sized buttons or lids are said to be structurally different.
  • “Tailored” refers to aspects of products that are specifically chosen to correspond to one or more aspects of a sub-segment of the baby wet-wipes market as a whole. In particular, tailored elements are different among product offerings in the array of products on the basis of some aspect or attribute of the sub-population of baby wet-wipes users to which the element is being targeted or adapted. For example, individual wipes products in a array of such wipes products may be tailored to two or more baby stages of development, two or more use situations, two or more desired benefits, or any combination of these. For ease of understanding of these concepts and the concepts of tailored offerings generally, a description of stages of development will be provided for illustrative purposes.
  • “Wipes” refer to personal cleaning products comprising a substrate, such as a web of nonwoven material, and may include a benefit composition. Examples of wipes can be found in PCT Pub. No. WO2006/004871; U.S. Publication Nos. 2005/0008680; 2006/0058210; 2007/0238383; and 2007/0254145.
  • Wipes used for cleaning various surface, such as bodily surfaces, typically come in a variety of different configurations. As previously noted, a wipe may comprise at least a substrate. No particular design for such a wipe substrate is required and those of skill in the art will readily appreciate that all manner and variety of known wipe substrates may be suitable. Nonwoven materials are typical, though not required, for substrates. The properties of a wipe substrate according to the present invention may be homogeneous or non-homogeneous. For example, while a single uniform web is suitable, it may be desired to have a layered substrate where fiber composition is different among some or all of the various layers. Additionally, zones of varying properties are also possible. Substrates for wipes may be made from a variety of conventional natural and/or synthetic fibers including, without limitation, cellulosic based fibers (such as rayon, cotton, pulp, lyocell, and variations of these), or polyethylene, polypropylene, polyester, bicomponent, and/or other synthetic fibers. The wipes disclosed herein may include one or more personal care compositions commonly that are commonly known to be included in wipes products and suitable for cleaning the body of a child. Nonlimiting examples of such cleaning compositions may be found in U.S. Publication Nos. 2005/0008680; 2005/0008681; and 2006/0058210.
  • FIGS. 1A and 1B show an example of a wipes container 10 suitable for use with certain embodiments of wipes products. The wipes container 10 shown in FIGS. 1A and 1B is a reusable wipes container 10. That is, the container 10 is adapted to permit a user to replenish the supply of wipes 24 in the container 10 should the supply of wipes 24 be exhausted. It is to be understood that the container 10 need not necessarily be a reusable container 10. The wipes container 10 may include one or more walls 14, a top 17, and a bottom 19 that define an interior storage space 12. The interior storage space 12 may be adapted to receive and/or store one or more wipes 24 and/or a removable cartridge 26 of wipes 24. The wipes container 10 may further include a lid 20 that is operatively joined to the container 10, for example, by hinge 30. The lid 20 typically includes a vapor impermeable material to help maintain a suitable moisture level of the wipes 24 disposed in the container 10 when the lid 20 is closed (i.e., covers the opening 22 through which the stored wipes may be dispensed). The top 17 may be adapted to provide access to the interior storage space 12 of the container 10, for example, to replace a depleted cartridge 26 of wipes. Alternatively or additionally, the bottom 19 and/or one or more of the walls 14 may be adapted to provide access to the interior storage space 12. FIG. 1A shows the container 10 with the top 17 in an open configuration and the lid 20 in a closed configuration. FIG. 1B shows the container 10 with the top 17 and the lid 20 in a closed configuration, and a cartridge 26 of wipes 24 disposed in the interior storage space 12. The wipes container 10 may be formed from any suitable material commonly known in the art, for example, injection molded polypropylene. Additionally, the wipes container 10 may be configured in any size or dimension that is suitable for use by children in one or more stages of development.
  • The stages of development for children may range from newborns to older children (e.g., children at or over the age of five years). One stage of development, referred to herein as the “bonding stage,” covers a pre-locomotive phase and includes newborns and other immobile infants in a bonding stage with a parent or caregiver. These children may have a level of activity that includes little more than head raising or rolling over. Another stage of development, referred to herein as the “discovery stage,” includes babies who are developing activity and mobility in the form of sitting, scooting, rolling, and crawling. Yet another stage of development, referred to herein as the “explorer stage,” includes toddlers whose level of activity includes standing, walking, and beginning to run. Still another stage of development, referred to herein as the “learning stage,” includes children capable of doing certain tasks by themselves (e.g., dressing) and developing coordination that enables them to walk and run without losing balance. The learning stage may also include preliminary potty-training and associated personal cleaning practices whereby the child is introduced to various personal hygiene regimens with at least some assistance from a caregiver. Another stage of development, referred to herein as the “independence stage,” includes children undergoing additional training, for example, further potty-training and/or personal cleaning instruction, in an attempt to achieve independence for these and other activities. In some instances, the assistance provided to the child by a caregiver in practicing personal cleaning tasks typically associated with potty-training may be relatively substantial when the child is in the learning stage. However, the level of assistance on the part of the caregiver may decrease to a minimal level or no assistance at all as the child enters and/or progresses through the independence stage.
  • An array of wipes products tailored to children in different stages of development may include an offering suitable for use by children in any number of the above described stages, sub-stages, or additional stages. For ease of explanation, the disclosure that follows will generally describe wipes products tailored to children in two different stages of development, namely the learning and independence stages. However, it is to be understood that any number, or even all, of the stages of development are contemplated for use with the disclosed wipes products. It is to be further understood that the disclosure herein contemplates other suitable descriptions of stages of development, which may be different from those described above.
  • Caregivers of children typically desire that the perianal area of a child be cleaned after the child uses the restroom, and at least some caregivers may employ wipes such as, for example, wet-wipes for this cleaning. As used herein, the phrase “uses the restroom” generally refers to when a child evacuates bodily waste such as urine and feces, but need not necessarily involve the use of a typical waste receptacle and/or a designated area where such bodily functions are commonly carried out. As a child matures, typically with age, and transitions, for example, from the exploring stage to the learning stage of development, at least some caregivers of children may desire that the children develop the ability to clean themselves after using the restroom, ideally, without the presence and/or assistance of the caregiver.
  • The learning stage may be chosen by some caregivers to begin potty-training and personal hygiene training due to the increased coordination and motor skill development typically exhibited by children in the learning stage of development. Many children entering the learning stage may be, for example, between two and three years old. Children just entering the learning stage may require substantial assistance from a caregiver to properly carry out a personal cleaning task. However, a child in the learning stage may be receptive to the idea of achieving independence with regard to personal cleaning and open to encouragement in achieving this goal. The term “personal cleaning,” as used herein, generally refers to cleaning of the perianal and/or genital region after using the restroom. In order to further promote the idea of independent personal cleaning, a caregiver may require and/or encourage a child to attempt to manipulate a wipes container in order to access the wipes disposed inside the container. If the wipes container is configured such that a child enjoys interacting with it, the child may show an increased desire to interact with the wipes container. Conversely, if a child finds a particular wipes container unattractive, or functionally difficult to operate, the child may show a decreased desire to interact with it.
  • FIG. 2 shows a non-limiting example of a wipes container 210 suitable for use by children in the learning stage. In order to provide a wipes container 210 that children in the learning stage can manipulate, it may be desirable to include one or more structures or features in the wipes container 210 that facilitate manipulation of the container 210 by such children. The container 210 may be relatively large compared to containers tailored to children in later stages of development. Container 210 may be in the shape of a simple geometric figure that provides stability when the container 210 is manipulated by a user. In certain embodiments, the container 210 may resemble the shape of a rectangle or square with a top 217 and sides 214 that are substantially flat. The base 213 of a rectangular or square shape container 210 may provide suitable stability to keep the container 210 from tipping over and/or sliding when a user in the learning stage manipulates the container 210. The container 210 may include a lid 220 adapted to provide a relatively vapor impermeable barrier when closed, and access to wipes disposed in the container 210 when open. The lid 220 may include a full-action spring, i.e., a spring that is adapted to position the lid 220 in a fully open position. While the present disclosure uses the term spring, it is to be understood that any mechanism suitable for releasing stored energy may be used to open the lid. The lid 220 may be configured to be relatively large and/or relatively easy to grasp in order to potentially increase the ease of opening and/or closing the lid 220 by a child in the learning stage. The container 210 may also include a button 205 for opening the lid 220. The button 205 may be adapted to work cooperatively with a spring such as, for example, a full-action spring. One example of a full-action spring includes a torsion type spring that provides sufficient force to position the lid 220 in a fully vertical configuration (i.e., the lid 220 is substantially perpendicular to the top 217 of the container 210) or even past vertical (i.e., the lid 220 forms an angle >90° with the top 217 of the container 210). Depending on the force exerted by the full-action spring, it may be desirable to provide a stopping mechanism to prevent the lid 220 from traveling past vertical. In certain embodiments, a user may actuate the button 205 by applying at least a minimum amount of force to the button 205 in a predetermined direction. The amount and/or direction of the applied force may be tailored to users in a particular stage of development, for example, the minimum force required to open a container tailored to a child in the learning stage may be less than the minimum required to open a container tailored to a child in the independence stage. By applying the proper amount and/or direction of force to the button 205, the lid 220 may be opened, thereby enabling a user to access wipes disposed in the container 210. By providing a container 210 with a relatively stable shape, a relatively easy to push button 205, and a full-action spring, it may be possible for a user in the learning stage of development to access wipes in the container 210 by using only one hand.
  • The container 210 may be configured to include one or more portions having stage-specific indicia 235 disposed thereon or materials tailored to users in the learning stage. In certain embodiments, indicia 235 tailored to users in the learning stage may include indicia 235 that illustrate the proper use of the wipes product such as, for example, by including a depiction of a character performing a personal cleaning task, a depiction of the wipe being disposed in the toilet, and/or a series of depictions illustrating two or more steps in a personal cleaning process. The stage-specific indicia 235 shown in FIG. 2 depict an anthropomorphic frog character performing a wiping task. In certain embodiments, the button 205 may include a material that provides a tactile sensation that is different from the tactile sensation provided by the adjacent portions of the container 210. For example, the button 205 and/or lid 220 may include a material that provides a tactile sensation of softness to a user relative to portions of the container 210 adjacent these elements. Alternatively or additionally, the button 205 and/or lid 220 may include one or more colors that are different than one or more colors included in the portions of the container 210 adjacent these elements such that the button 205 and/or lid 220 readily appear as discrete elements of the container 210 to a child in the learning stage.
  • The container 210 may include one or more source identifiers 225. The source identifier 225 may be disposed on any suitable portion of the container 210. In embodiments where the wipes product includes packaging, a source identifier 225 may be disposed on the packaging. The source identifier 225 may include any suitable depiction that communicates the source of the wipes. The source identifier 225 may comprise stage-specific indicia. Similarly, the stage-specific indicia may comprise a source identifier. Non-limiting examples of suitable source identifiers and stage-specific indicia include words, pictures, colors, letters, animals, characters, objects, and/or shapes. Additionally, the source identifier 225 and/or stage-specific indicia may comprise an anthropomorphic image of any of the aforementioned examples. As used herein the term “anthropomorphic image” generally refers to an image that includes human physical features, such as, for example eyes, a nose, a mouth, ears, hair, arms, legs, hands and/or feet arranged such that the image appears to possess human qualities.
  • In the independence stage, a child may begin to demonstrate at least some independence with regard to potty-training and personal cleaning. Many children in the independence stage may be five years old or older, for example between the ages of five years and seven years old. Children in the independence stage may exhibit well developed motor skills relative to children in the learning stage, and may have the manual dexterity to clean themselves with minimal or no assistance from a caregiver. In certain instances, children in the independence stage may begin to demonstrate independence and/or self-perceived maturity by exhibiting a reluctance or even refusal to associate themselves with or use articles that they perceive as being for use with or by children in an earlier stage of development. In these instances, caregivers may find that children in the independence stage may be reluctant or refuse to use the same wipes product for personal cleaning that they used in the learning stage. Reluctance or refusal by a child in the independence stage of development to use a particular wipes product may undesirably impact the potty-training or personal cleaning training of the child, especially if the caregiver does not recognize the source or cause of the reluctance or refusal. Even if the caregiver does recognize the source of reluctance or refusal by the child to use a particular wipes product, switching to a wipes product that the child does not refuse to use may result in undesirable consequences such as, for example, rashes and/or other skin ailments on the skin of child.
  • Surprisingly, it has been found that by providing the same kind of wipes in two structurally and/or functionally different wipes containers, it may be possible to provide a suitable wipes product to children in both the learning and independence stage without changing the kind of wipes. By providing a first container that appeals to a child in the learning stage and providing a second container that a child in the independence stage perceives as being for use by children in the independence stage, the same wipes may appear to be two different wipes products to children. In certain embodiments, the wipes containers tailored for use by children in the independence stage may include structural or functional features that inhibit manipulation of the containers (i.e., make it more difficult for a user to open the container or activate a feature of the container) by users in an earlier stage of development.
  • FIGS. 3A and 3B show an embodiment of a wipes container 310 that includes non-limiting examples of features tailored to a user in the independence stage. The container 310 may be configured to be smaller in one or more dimensions than a container tailored to learning stage users (e.g., the container 210 shown in FIG. 2). Because the container 310 is tailored to users in the independence stage, who typically demonstrate a greater level of manual dexterity than users in the learning stage, the container 310 may not require the same amount of stability as a container tailored to learning stage users (“learning stage container”). Therefore, container 310 may be adapted to have a wider range of shapes, sizes and/or configurations than a learning stage container. The container 310 may include one or more sides 314 or a portion of one or more sides 314 that are not flat, for example, sides 314 or portions of sides 314 that are concave, convex, or curvilinear. The container 310 may additionally include rounded edges 316. The container 310 may include a lid 320 disposed on the top 317 of the container 310. In certain embodiments, the lid 320 may have a locked and unlocked position. When the lid 320 is in the locked (i.e., closed) position, as seen in FIG. 3A, a user may be unable to grasp and/or manipulate the lid 320 in order to access the wipes disposed in the container 310. When the lid 320 is in the unlocked (i.e., open or partially open but less than vertical) position, as shown in FIG. 3B, a user may be able to position the lid 320 in a fully open or other desired position in order to access wipes disposed in the container 310. Additionally or alternatively, the lid 320 may be configured to be smaller than and/or not as easy to grasp as the lid of a learning stage container. The container 310 may also include a button 305 for opening the lid 320. The button 305 may be adapted to act cooperatively with a partial action spring, i.e., a spring or other similar device adapted to position the lid 320 in a partially open or unlocked position when the button 305 is actuated. While the present disclosure uses the term spring, it is to be understood that any suitable mechanism for releasing stored energy may be used to open the lid. In certain embodiments, a rubber band, plastic “dog bone” or other component that exploits the properties of an elastically deformable rubber or plastic element in order to provide sufficient force to position the lid in at least a partially open configuration may be used. The button 305 may be adapted to require a higher minimum actuating force or a more complex actuating process than a button tailored to learning stage users. In certain embodiments, the actuating force for button 305 may be selected so that a user in an earlier stage of development such as, for example, the learning stage is inhibited from opening the container 310. In certain embodiments, the button 305 may also be configured to include more than one step to open, for example, by requiring that a user push the button 305 in a first direction and then simultaneously or sequentially push the button 305 in a second direction. In certain embodiments, the button 305 may be configured such that the container 310 is easier to open with two hands than with one hand, for example, by using one hand to stabilize the container 310 and the other hand to actuate the button 305. It is believed that a two-handed opening process may require a higher level of dexterity than the one-handed opening process that may be used to open the lid of a learning stage container.
  • The container 310 may be configured to include one or more functional or structural features that are different from those of a container tailored to users in the learning stage. Portions of the independence stage container 310 may have stage-specific indicia 335 or materials tailored to users in the independence stage. For example, the container 310 may include indicia 335 showing one or more outdoor activities that a child in the independence stage may enjoy, rather than the more “potty-training” oriented indicia 235 that may be depicted on a wipes product tailored to users in the learning stage. Non-limiting examples of stage-specific indicia 335 appropriate for the independence stage include a depiction of a character riding a bicycle, playing with dolls, and/or playing sports. In certain embodiments, the button 305 and the lid 320 or portions thereof may provide a similar or identical tactile sensation to a user, for example by including a smooth portion 306 on the button 305 and the lid or the portions of the lid proximate the button. Alternatively or additionally, the button 305 and/or lid 320 may include one or more colors that are the same as one or more colors included in the portions of the container 310 adjacent the button 305. For example, the button 305 and/or lid 320 may be the same color as the portions of the container 310 adjacent these elements such that the button 305 and/or lid 320 do not readily appear to be discrete elements to a child in the independence stage of development. The container 310 may include one or more source identifiers 325. The source identifier 325 may include any suitable depiction that communicates the source of the wipes, including the non-limiting examples described above.
  • While the preceding examples of embodiments of stage-specific wipes products describe particular structural and functional features tailored to a particular stage of development, it is to be understood that the examples of the combinations of features disclosed are nonlimiting. In certain embodiments, for example, the size of the button or lid on the learning stage container may be smaller than the button on the independence stage container but because of the inclusion of one or more other features, the wipes products still may be considered to be tailored to their respective stages of development.
  • In at least some instances, if a caregiver cleans a child with the same kind and/or brand of wipes during the earlier stages of the child's development, the child may associate the particular kind and/or brand of wipes with personal cleaning and may even prefer the particular kind and/or brand of wipes to other brands and/or kinds of wipes in later stages of development. Wipes for cleaning children under the age of two are sometimes referred to as baby-wipes, and are often used to clean bodily exudates from a child during a diaper changing process. As the child grows older and passes through one or more stages of development, a caregiver of the child may continue to perform substantially all of the cleaning of the child until the child reaches, for example, the learning stage. In the earlier stages of development, e.g., the bonding, discovering, and exploring stages of development, the majority of children may comprise children under the age of two years old who typically wear diapers or other similar absorbent articles. When a diaper worn by a child in an early stage of development is soiled by the child, a caregiver of the child typically replaces the soiled diaper with a clean diaper. During this diaper changing process, the caregiver may clean the skin of the child with wipes to remove any actual or perceived bodily exudates or contaminants from the skin of the child. As the child in this example passes through the first several stages of development, the diaper changing process may be repeated many times, and as a result the child may become accustomed to the wipes and/or associate the wipes with personal cleaning.
  • The wipes products described above may provide a suitable means for a caregiver of a child to employ the same kind of wipes for cleaning the child as the child progresses through various stages of development. In some instances, however, a consumer may not realize that two or more different wipes products comprise the same kind of wipes or that the different wipes products are even suitable for the same purpose. Therefore, it may be desirable that different wipes products comprising the same wipes include one or more common source identifiers to communicate to a consumer and/or a child of the consumer that the functionally and/or structurally different wipes products include the same kind of wipes. By providing a common source identifier on the two different wipes products, the consumer may be more likely to recognize that the two different wipes products include the same kind of wipes and/or are provided by the same source. Additionally, a user in the independence stage may also recognize different wipes products having a common source identifier and may express an increased desire to use a familiar kind of wipe that is packaged in a container tailored to users in the independence stage of development.
  • Consumer products are often arranged within retail stores according to particular plans, such as according to the type of goods being sold. In many cases, retail stores arrange products in aisles, that is, goods of a particular type may be displayed together in a single aisle or two or more aisles positioned adjacent to each other. In some cases, the goods may be spatially separated from goods that are of a different type. For example, the majority of products displayed in one aisle or portion of an aisle may be automotive products such as motor oil or antifreeze. The majority of products displayed in another aisle or portion of an aisle may be personal cleaning products such as toilet tissue, napkins, paper towels, and/or facial tissue. As used herein, “spatially separated” generally means regions or items in a retail store located more than about 10 meters away from one another and/or in different aisles and that cannot be viewed from a consumer's location in the retail store by the turning of the consumer's head or by the turning around of the consumer's body. In order to reduce the reluctance or refusal of a child in the independence stage to use products that the child associates with one or more earlier stages of development, it may be desirable to display the wipes products tailored to children in the independence stage in an area of a retail environment where the majority of products displayed are personal cleaning products typically used by adults. In this manner, a child in the independence stage may associate the wipes products displayed outside of the baby care portion of the store as being for use by adults. It may further be desirable to provide the spatially separated wipes products described above with functionally and/or structurally different containers in order to potentially reinforce the perception of a child in the independence stage that the two wipes products are different wipe products. For example, by providing a wipes product that is not only displayed in the adult personal cleaning aisle but also includes a different container such as, for example, a container tailored to a child in the independence stage, the reluctance or refusal of a child to use the wipes product may even be further reduced.
  • EXAMPLE
  • FIGS. 4-16 show various views of two wipes containers 410 and 510. Each wipes container 410 and 510 is configured with one or more structural and functional feature differences believed to be tailored to a user in a particular stage of development. Container 510 (shown in FIGS. 11-16), designated as “the current tub,” in Tables 1 and 2 below, includes structural and functional features believed to be tailored to children in the learning stage. In this particular example, the learning stage may be considered to roughly correspond to children who are at least two years old but less than five years old, but need not necessarily be limited to any particular age or age range in other examples and/or embodiments. Container 410 (shown in FIGS. 4-10), designated as “the new tub in Tables 1 and 2 below,” includes structural and functional features believed to be tailored to children in the independence stage. In this particular example, the learning stage may be considered to roughly correspond to children who are at least five years old, but less than seven years old but need not necessarily be limited to any particular age or age range in other examples and/or embodiments.
  • The distinguishing structural and functional features of the learning stage tub 510 include: a generally rectangular-shaped, purple-colored, relatively rigid plastic tub 510 approximately 71 mm in height; a generally round-shaped lid 520 that is green in color and has dimensions of approximately 85 mm×95 mm and covering a generally circular-shaped opening 522; a teal-colored button 505 comprising a relatively soft rubber material and having a frog-hand depicted thereon as a raised feature 506; and an instructional graphic 535 depicting an anthropomorphic frog character involved in a personal cleaning task (e.g., wiping itself) disposed on the front 529 and back of the tub 510. The opening mechanism 507 that opens the lid 520 when the button 505 is actuated comprises a metal spring 508 operatively associated with the button 505. The opening mechanism is configured to fully open the lid 520 such that the lid 520 is at least substantially perpendicular to the top 517 of the tub 510. FIGS. 12 and 13 show a close-up view of the opening mechanism 507 of container 510. FIG. 16 shows the bottom 519 of the tub 510.
  • The distinguishing structural and functional features of the independence stage tub 410 include: a generally rectangular-shaped (with rounded (curvilinear) edges), purple-colored, relatively rigid, plastic tub 410 approximately 65 mm in height; a rectangular-shaped, green-colored lid 420 having dimensions of approximately 95 mm×65 mm covering a somewhat irregularly shaped opening 422; a button 405 integrated into portions of the top 417 and front side 414 of the tub 410 and comprising substantially the same material as the top 417 and sides 414 of the container 410. The button 405 is the same color as the top 417 and sides 414 of the tub 410 and the button 405 does not protrude out from the surface of the tub 410, nor is the button 405 recessed more than about 4mm below the surface of the tub 410. Thus, a child who has not yet reached the independence stage of development may not recognize the button 405 as a discrete element of the tub 410. The opening mechanism 407 that lifts the lid 420 when the button 405 is actuated comprises a silicone elastic member 408 disposed at the base of the lid 420. FIGS. 6 and 7 show the opening mechanism 407 of container 410. FIGS. 9 and 10 show the bottom 419 and a side 414 of the container 410, respectively.
  • Tables 1 and 2 summarize test results from a consumer test for determining the impact of tailoring structural and/or functional features on a wipes container to a particular stage of development. The results in Table 1 summarize the responses of consumer test subjects randomly selected from a pool of consumer test subjects who have children between the ages of 3 and 7. The test subjects are all mothers of one child involved in the test outlined below. Table 2 summarizes observations of test administrators of children interacting with stage-specific wipes containers. While the children in this test are grouped on the basis of age, it is believed that the data shown in Tables 1 and 2 can be directly correlated to children in the learning and independence stages of development. The mean age of the learning stage children is 3.5 years old. The mean age for the independence stage children is 6.1 years old.
  • The mothers are asked to answer the questions shown in Table 1. A summary of the responses from the mothers is shown in the second and third columns of Table 1. Just prior to asking the indicated questions, test administrators permit the mothers to observe the learning stage tub and the independence stage tub simultaneously. The percentages shown are based on the total number of test subjects. For question 1, the percent of people answering “yes” is carried to question 2 where it is broken down further according to the particular answer given. Thus, 88% of all the mothers of children aged 3 to 4 feel that one package is more appropriate for an older child than the other, and all 88% feel that it is the independence stage package that is more appropriate. On the other hand, 87% of mothers of children aged 5 to 7 feel that one package is more appropriate for an older child than the other, and 83% of mothers of children aged 5 to 7 feel that it is the independence stage package that is more appropriate. The mothers are also asked the age at which they think it would be appropriate for their child to use the independence stage tub. The ages submitted by the mothers in response to this question are averaged together to give the result displayed in Table 1. It can be seen from Table 1 that the majority of mothers in both groups feel that the independence stage tub is more appropriate than the learning stage tub for use by older children, and that the appropriate age to switch is around 5 years old.
  • TABLE 1
    Mothers of children Mothers of children
    Questions Asked age 3-4 age 5-7
    1) Is one of these packages more appropriate 88%/12% 87%/13%
    for an older child? (yes/no)
    2) If yes to question 1, which tub is more 88%/0%  83%/4% 
    appropriate for an older child?
    (Independence stage Tub/learning stage
    Tub)
    3) At what age would you switch tubs? 5.3 5.2
  • Table 2 shows the observations of the test administrators after they observe the children interacting with the learning stage and independence stage tubs. The children participating in the test are given the learning stage tub and asked to open it. After a child successfully opens the learning stage tub, the child is given the independence stage tub and asked to open it. The number of attempts it takes a child to open each tub is recorded and the tub that requires the fewest attempts to open is considered to be the “easier tub to open” for purposes of the second observation shown in Table 2. Observers record a failed attempt to open (i.e., child unable to open the tub) when the child begins exhibiting signs of frustration or agitation, or becomes frantic after unsuccessfully attempting to open the container. Failed attempts to open are also recorded when the wipes container is rolled over onto one of its sides or top during an attempt to open. As can be seen in Table 2, 75% of the learning stage children are able to open the learning stage tub easier, and 0% is able to open the independence stage tub easier. Further, only 63% of the learning stage children are able to open the independence stage tub at all. In contrast, 100% of the independence stage children are able to open the independence stage tub.
  • TABLE 2
    Children Children
    Observations age 3-4 age 5-7
    1) Tub that is easier to open (learning 75%/0%/25% 41%/55%/4%
    stage tub/independence stage tub/No
    difference)
    2) % of children able to open the 63% 100%
    independence stage tub
  • The dimensions and values disclosed herein are not to be understood as being strictly limited to the exact numerical values recited. Instead, unless otherwise specified, each such dimension is intended to mean both the recited value and a functionally equivalent range surrounding that value. For example, a dimension disclosed as “40 mm” is intended to mean “about 40 mm.”
  • All documents cited in the Detailed Description of the Invention are, in relevant part, incorporated herein by reference; the citation of any document is not to be construed as an admission that it is prior art with respect to the present invention. To the extent that any meaning or definition of a term in this document conflicts with any meaning or definition of the same term in a document incorporated by reference, the meaning or definition assigned to that term in this document shall govern.
  • While particular embodiments of the present invention have been illustrated and described, it would be obvious to those skilled in the art that various other changes and modifications can be made without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention. It is therefore intended to cover in the appended claims all such changes and modifications that are within the scope of this invention.

Claims (20)

  1. 1. An array of wipes products, the array comprising:
    a. a first package comprising a first container and being displayed at a first location in a retail store, the first container including one or more sides, a top and a bottom that define an internal storage space configured to store one or more wipes and having one or more wipes disposed therein, the first container including at least one of a first structural feature and a first functional feature adapted to enable a user in a first stage of development to manipulate the first container such that the one or more wipes disposed in the internal storage space of the first container are accessible by the user in the first stage of development; and
    b. a second package comprising a second container and being displayed at a second location in a retail store that is spatially separated from the first location, the second container including one or more walls that define an internal storage space configured to store one or more wipes and having one or more wipes disposed therein, wherein the wipes disposed in the first container are substantially the same kind of wipes as the wipes disposed in the second container, the second container comprising at least one of a second structural feature and a second functional feature adapted to enable a user in a second stage of development to manipulate the second container such that the one or more wipes disposed in the internal storage space of the second container are accessible by the user in the second stage of development
    wherein the first and second containers are at least one of structurally and functionally different from each other.
  2. 2. The array of claim 1 wherein the first stage of development corresponds to the learning stage and wherein the second stage of development corresponds to the independence stage.
  3. 3. The array of claim 1, wherein the first container comprises one or more first structural features selected from the group consisting of a button that includes one or more colors that are different from one or more of the colors included in a portion of the first container proximate the button, a button that includes one or materials that are different from one or more materials included in a portion of the first container proximate the button, a circular opening, a circular lid, substantially flat sides, rectangular shape.
  4. 4. The array of claim 1, wherein the first container comprises one or more first functional features selected from the group consisting of a full-action spring, and one handed opening.
  5. 5. The array of claim 1, wherein the second container comprises one or more second structural features selected from the group consisting of a button that includes one or more colors that are substantially the same as one or more of the colors included in a portion of the first container proximate the button, a button that includes one or materials that are substantially the same as one or more materials included in a portion of the first container proximate the button, a rectangular opening, a rectangular lid, convex sides, concave sides, sides including a curvilinear configuration, rounded edges, round shape.
  6. 6. The array of claim 1, wherein the second container comprises one or more second functional features selected from the group consisting of a partial-action spring, and two-handed opening.
  7. 7. The array of claim 1, wherein the first stage of development is the learning stage of development and the second stage of development is the independence stage of development, and less than about 25% of users in the first stage of development are able to open the second container easier than the first container.
  8. 8. The array of claim 1, wherein the retail store comprises one or more aisles and wherein the first and second locations in the retail store are different aisles, portions of different aisles or different portions of the same aisle.
  9. 9. The array of claim 1, wherein the majority of the products displayed at the first location in the retail store are baby care products.
  10. 10. The array of claim 1, wherein the majority of the products displayed at the second location in the retail store are adult personal cleaning products.
  11. 11. The array of claim 1, wherein the first container includes stage-specific indicia for the first stage of development and the second container includes stage-specific indicia for the second stage of development.
  12. 12. An array of wipes products comprising:
    a. a first package comprising a first container and being displayed at a first location in a retail store, the first container including one or more sides, a top, and a bottom that define an internal storage space configured to store one or more wipes and having one or more wipes disposed therein, the first container comprising at least one of a first structural feature and a first functional feature adapted to enable a user in a first stage of development to manipulate the first container such that the one or more wipes disposed in the internal storage space of the first container are accessible by the user in the first stage of development;
    b. a second package comprising a second container and being displayed at a second location in a retail store that is spatially separated from the first location, the second container including one or more walls that define an internal storage space configured to store one or more wipes and having one or more wipes disposed therein, wherein the wipes disposed in the second container are substantially the same kind of wipes as the wipes disposed in the first container, the second container comprising at least one of a second structural feature and a second functional feature adapted to enable a user in a second stage of development to manipulate the second container such that the one or more wipes disposed in the internal storage space of the second container are accessible by the user in the second stage of development; and
    c. at least one common source identifier on the first and second package,
    wherein the first and second containers are at least one of structurally and functionally different from each other.
  13. 13. The array of claim 12, wherein the retail store comprises one or more aisles and wherein the first and second locations are different aisles, portions of different aisles or different portions of the same aisle.
  14. 14. The array of claim 12, wherein the majority of the products displayed in the first location of the retail store are baby care products.
  15. 15. The array of claim 12, wherein the majority of the products displayed in the second location of the retail store are adult personal cleaning products.
  16. 16. The array of claim 12, wherein the first container comprises one or more first structural features and the structural features are selected from the group consisting of a button that includes one or more colors that are different from one or more of the colors included in a portion of the first container proximate the button, a button that includes one or materials that are different from one or more materials included in a portion of the first container proximate the button, an oversized opening, an oversized lid, a circular opening, a circular lid.
  17. 17. The array of claim 12, wherein the first stage of development is the learning stage of development and the second stage of development is the independence stage of development, and less than about 25% of users in the first stage of development are able to open the second container easier than the first container.
  18. 18. The array of claim 12, wherein the first container includes stage-specific indicia for the first stage of development and the second container includes stage-specific indicia for the second stage of development.
  19. 19. An array of wipes products comprising:
    a. a first package comprising a first container and stage-specific indicia tailored to a user in a learning stage of development, the first container including one or more sides, a top, and a bottom that define an internal storage space configured to store one or more wipes and having one or more wipes disposed therein, the first container comprising at least one of a first structural feature and a first functional feature adapted to enable the user in the learning stage to manipulate the first container such that the one or more wipes disposed in the internal storage space of the first container are accessible by the user in the learning stage;
    b. a second package comprising a second container and stage-specific indicia tailored to a user in an independence stage of development, the second container including one or more sides, a top, and a bottom that define an internal storage space configured to store one or more wipes and having one or more wipes disposed therein, the second container comprising at least one of a second structural feature and a second functional feature adapted to enable the user in the independence stage to manipulate the second container such that the one or more wipes disposed in the internal storage space of the second container are accessible by the user in the independence stage; and
    c. the one or more wipes disposed in the first container being the same kind of wipes as the one or more wipes disposed in the second container
    wherein the first package is displayed at a first location in a retail store proximate baby care products, and wherein the second package is displayed at a second location in the retail store proximate adult personal cleaning products and wherein the first and second containers are at least one of structurally and functionally different from each other.
  20. 20. The array of claim 19, wherein the adult personal cleaning products comprise toilet tissue.
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Cited By (9)

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US20110240514A1 (en) * 2008-11-14 2011-10-06 Takeshi Bandoh Dispensing container for wet sheets
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US9889963B2 (en) 2012-12-20 2018-02-13 Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc. Refillable dispensing container for stacked moist wipes
US20150144649A1 (en) * 2013-11-25 2015-05-28 Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc. Wet Wipe Refill Container Indicator
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