US20070284077A1 - Smart Solar Roof - Google Patents

Smart Solar Roof Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US20070284077A1
US20070284077A1 US11420783 US42078306A US2007284077A1 US 20070284077 A1 US20070284077 A1 US 20070284077A1 US 11420783 US11420783 US 11420783 US 42078306 A US42078306 A US 42078306A US 2007284077 A1 US2007284077 A1 US 2007284077A1
Authority
US
Grant status
Application
Patent type
Prior art keywords
thermal energy
air
solar
heat
condenser
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Abandoned
Application number
US11420783
Inventor
Matteo Bonifacio Gravina
Original Assignee
Matteo B. Gravina
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date

Links

Images

Classifications

    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F24HEATING; RANGES; VENTILATING
    • F24SSOLAR HEAT COLLECTORS; SOLAR HEAT SYSTEMS
    • F24S10/00Solar heat collectors using working fluids
    • F24S10/30Solar heat collectors using working fluids with means for exchanging heat between two or more working fluids
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F24HEATING; RANGES; VENTILATING
    • F24SSOLAR HEAT COLLECTORS; SOLAR HEAT SYSTEMS
    • F24S20/00Solar heat collectors specially adapted for particular uses or environments
    • F24S20/60Solar heat collectors integrated in fixed constructions, e.g. in buildings
    • F24S20/67Solar heat collectors integrated in fixed constructions, e.g. in buildings in the form of roof constructions
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y02TECHNOLOGIES OR APPLICATIONS FOR MITIGATION OR ADAPTATION AGAINST CLIMATE CHANGE
    • Y02ATECHNOLOGIES FOR ADAPTATION TO CLIMATE CHANGE
    • Y02A30/00Adapting or protecting infrastructure or their operation
    • Y02A30/60Planning or developing urban green infrastructure
    • Y02A30/62Integration of district energy or distributed or on-site energy generation, e.g. combined heat and power generation or solar energy, in city layout
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y02TECHNOLOGIES OR APPLICATIONS FOR MITIGATION OR ADAPTATION AGAINST CLIMATE CHANGE
    • Y02BCLIMATE CHANGE MITIGATION TECHNOLOGIES RELATED TO BUILDINGS, e.g. HOUSING, HOUSE APPLIANCES OR RELATED END-USER APPLICATIONS
    • Y02B10/00Integration of renewable energy sources in buildings
    • Y02B10/20Solar thermal
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y02TECHNOLOGIES OR APPLICATIONS FOR MITIGATION OR ADAPTATION AGAINST CLIMATE CHANGE
    • Y02EREDUCTION OF GREENHOUSE GAS [GHG] EMISSIONS, RELATED TO ENERGY GENERATION, TRANSMISSION OR DISTRIBUTION
    • Y02E10/00Energy generation through renewable energy sources
    • Y02E10/40Solar thermal energy
    • Y02E10/44Heat exchange systems

Abstract

A heat pump use for expelling solar thermal energy by electromechanically transferring heat to a major component and continuously expels it from an upper level of a static structure. The invention receives and transfer solar thermal energy between two metal sheets that restricts heat and by means of airflow heat energy is transfer to a condensing unit. Solar energy is thereby expelled out into the ambient conventionally by means of airflow from a condensing unit draining system.

Description

    FIELD OF THE INVENTION
  • The present invention relates to energy preservation roofs, particularly to an invention for the preservation and the efficient use of energy. A hybrid between two types of devices, it is first an energy cooling system that retransfers solar radiation, and secondly it ventilates this energy.
  • BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • Inventions for practical conservation and use of energy are known in the roof industry. The roof industry has come up with elaborate designs and materials that help a building unit use less cooling or heating energy. Other devices that brought to the forefront are passives solar, and active solar devices that make use of solar radiation.
  • The traditional uses of air conditioning for residential and commercial units are the use of ceiling fans, heat pumps, and window units. Outside the house ventilation equipment reduce the amount of heat energy entering a unit. The applications of ventilation fans help reduce the amount of solar energy heat entering a building by transferring it back to the ambient. This mechanism does work for many residential and commercial units, but does come short of working in every geographical area. It also falls short of completely expelling all the heat energy completely because it only sends heated air that it is able to capture. This scheme does not filter out the air on corners or crevasses.
  • Another traditional device employ for the expedition of unwanted heated air is a bladed turbine. This device is strategically located on top of the roof. It is rooted within the inner area of the roof, and the ventilation turbine place above the roof skin. This methodology of using a wind turbine is practical as long as there is wind for making the turbine blades rotate. In U.S. Pat. No. 5,452,710 by Palmer explains on such method. This mechanism also helps reduce the amount of heat energy within a rooftop and rooms inside a unit. This type of device fails to vent all the heated air properly by only grasping air that the turbine can reach. It also fails by only working when wind is blowing. If no wind is blowing, the turbine will simply not rotate. This creates a bubble of heated air inside a roof. Another failure in part by this method is the rotation of the turbine when heated air is wanted. This is when the climate of a region is cold and the measurable amount of air inside a roof is needed as a carpeting effect against the outside air. By ventilating the warm air within to the outside, it also brings unwanted cold air into the roof, making this device useless half of the time.
  • Still other methods use in the reduction of solar energy for cooling. Material uses for these purposes are employed by using improve compositions of materials such as alternative stone in roof shingles, for example to U.S. Pat. No. 4,279,244 to McAlister or using sprinkler type system as in U.S. Pat. No. 6,732,951 to Salazar et al to repel unwanted radiation. Other methods are the use of aluminum chips such is the case for U.S. Pat. No. 4,617,198 to Overturf making use of the reflective qualities of aluminum for expelling incoming solar radiation. Although all methods are practical and do work under certain conditions, not one of them would work under all climatic and weather conditions. Furthermore, the geographical locations of modern life make some of these methods impractical.
  • In addition to ventilation devices and material use, passive and active solar systems are also utilized. These schemes are use in making use of solar radiation for lighting in the inner places of a building, also for making use of the heat content for various purposes. Primarily they fall into two types of systems, they are Photovoltaic and solar thermal collectors. Photovoltaic are for converting solar radiation to electrical energy by means of using semiconductors. This form although very attractive for number of reasons, it falls short of efficiency.
  • The overall efficiency of any type of Photovoltaic is very low; no panel is able to have efficiency above thirty percent in the market. On the other hand, solar thermal collectors do have a higher efficiency than Photovoltaic, but they also fall short when location is a factor. Such is the case where photovoltaic efficiency is limited are in U.S. Pat. No. 6,501,013 to PowerLight Corporation, and U.S. patent and U.S. Pat. No. 6,495,750 to PowerLight Corporation. These two types of systems although do serve a simple task, they do lack in efficiency and attractiveness. Many consumers find any obscure or alteration of their roof awkward. Even though, if making Photovoltaic and solar thermal collectors with an efficiency higher than fifty percent, segments of the general public would not want an alteration of their home.
  • SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • The present invention is a hybrid between two known inventions. The Invention is part ventilation and a solar energy utilization system. The simple means of concentrating heated incoming air and transferring to a cooling unit makes this system a ventilation device. On the other hand, the task of using solar energy and making use of it makes of the Invention also a solar thermal collector.
  • The advantage of the invention is its high rate of energy for use as potential energy. The high efficiency rate is an objective of the innovation, and that is to expel heat accumulated back to the ambient. The efficiency is superior to photovoltaic and solar concentrators. The ratio of the electrical energy consume to the rate of solar thermal energy it expels is over ten times for warm and hot climates.
  • An advantage is the energy it uses to the energy it produces. The practical application of the Invention is a two added energy innovation. Its heat absorption can be use to expel excess heat accumulated by roofs and roof attic. In addition, the use of heat as energy for several purposes can alleviate or reduce electricity or energy use by residential or commercial unit.
  • An advantage is the use of heat as energy. The use of capture heat in a control environment permits the user of this invention to use the energy content to heat water. In commercial use the heat can be utilize to heat water, ovens, or materials. When use as a solar energy collector the energy gain can be use for water heating in boilers, pool heating, or in industrial operations.
  • An advantage is the extra space accommodation it provides. By controlling the amount of heat a roof receives, an architect can also add additional space of a residential or commercial unit. The inner height of a roof can be elevated to accommodate extra space or produce additional cubic capacity.
  • A major advantage that is the most important factor is the invention is socially acceptable. The use of solar thermal concentrators that absorb the heat from the sun, and/or air, and sends it back, or makes use of it is acceptable. The unique way of expediting the overall process is socially acceptable because of the way it works. The process of working under the skin of a roof, without giving it an awkward view, makes this invention very attractive to home or commercial buyers of roofs.
  • An improvement of the invention over flat plate collector is wherein the ability to a) work under the skin of the outer envelope (roof shingle) hidden away from public view, and b) work from all angle as long as solar radiation is heating said roof, and 3) work without any interference from invention components.
  • An improvement of the invention over concentrating collector wherein the ability to a) work under the skin of the outer envelope roof shingle hidden away from public view, and b) work from all angles as long as solar radiation is heating said roof, and 3) work without any interference from said invention components.
  • An improvement of the invention over transpired air collector wherein the ability to a) work under the skin of the outer envelope roof shingle hidden away from public view, and b) work from all angles as long as solar radiation is heating said roof, and 3) work without any interference from said invention components.
  • The current embodiment of the present invention presented in a form for a typical residential unit; intended only as an expression of a diverse embodiment for residential, commercial, and industrial applications.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION
  • In the embodiment shown in FIG. 1, the invention shown as an expression how a typical housing unit circulates unwanted heated air inside a typical roof. Typical of housing units most of the air circulates and encapsulates by the incoming radiation. This circulation of heated air increases dramatically a heat bubble within.
  • FIG. 2 illustrates a bi-level frame constructed below the roof top material. The illustration shows how the upper level metal sheet (1) would receive the incoming radiation by conduction to the inside into its conduit of which it would be supported by inner supporting column (3) which are themselves supported by the lower level metal sheet (2).
  • FIG. 3 illustrates a cross section view between the upper metal sheet (1) and the lower metal sheet (2) with a view of an intersecting rail (5) with pump-to-chamber perforations (4) that allow for a continual flow of air through the chambers. The inner supporting columns (3) restrict free flow of air thus only permitting the air to circulate the chambers and through the cross sectional chamber-to-condenser perforation (6) only. Air movement passes only through the intersecting rail (5) which also serves for sustaining the weight of the upper metal sheet (1) and roof top materials.
  • FIG. 4 is a diagram of how free flowing air circulates within the chambers. Top view of diagram shows air movement through every cubical air chamber (26) finalizing back to the condensing unit (10). From the condensing unit (10) the air would then recycle again through internal or external pump method. Airflow may only pass through pump-to-chamber perforations (4) and continue through chamber-to-condenser perforation (6). The intersecting rail (5) and the inner supporting columns (3) restrict airflow movement.
  • In FIG. 5 the pump air would come about by the force of an air pump (15). This air would come directly from condensing coil (12). Movement of air first would travel through each cubical air chamber (26) as it passes through the pump-to-chamber perforations (4) through the chamber-to-condenser perforation (6) and unto the condensing unit air inlet (13). From their the air pump (15) suctions the incoming cooled air and receives it by means of an coil-to-pump conduit (16) from the eventual condensing coil (12) where the heat energy accumulated is condensed. As the heat energy heats the condensing coil (12) the fan blade (20) vents the air out to the ambient. The blowing fan blade (20) suctions air in the condensing unit (10) through condensing unit opening (11) in the condensing unit housing. As the force air in, it passes through the heated condensing coils (12) that are then cooled down by the air that passes through it. The cooled air is then recycled back to the first cubical air chamber (26) by the pump-to-cubical air chamber conduit (17). This process is repeated until the thermostat or until the electrical switch turns off the whole system.
  • As shown is FIG. 5, various components help make the condensing unit (10) a complete system. The condensing unit (10) locked into the roof by means of condensing unit screws (21) that locked by means of supporting columns (7). Other supporting devices are use to lock the air pump (15) in place for example the screws (14) that retain the air pump (15) in position. This is the same effect created by the supporting beams (19) that maintains the fan motor (18) and fan blade (20) in proper position. The metallic conduits that constitute the Invention seat on top of the roof supported by cross roof support frame (22) and the vertical roof column (23).
  • In FIG. 6 is a cross sectional view of the Invention shown with incoming solar radiation hitting its uppermost layer, the roof shingles (9). The radiation passes through the roof asphalt (8) by means of conduction and into the cubical air chamber (26) by means of convection by the upper metal sheet (1). Separating the upper metal sheet (1) on top of the lower metal sheet (2) are the inner columns (3). Natural roof support frame (22) and the adjacent roof column (23) support the outer rooftop and the Invention. FIG. 7 is a schematic diagram of how the whole system operates. FIG. 8 is a schematic diagram of power applied to the invention.
  • Last in FIG. 9, the condensing unit (10) illustrates the mechanical housing. At the bottom sides are the condensing unit brackets (24) that hold the condensing unit (10) on top of the roof. At its sides the condensing unit (10) has condensing unit opening (11) where air is force in and out through the condensing unit air outlet (13) and to the ambient surroundings.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF DRAWINGS
  • The present invention is illustrated by way of example and not limited in the figures of the accompanying drawing, in which:
  • FIG. 1 is a schematic illustration of a static structure illustrating solar energy radiation.
  • FIG. 2 is a schematic illustration of the two-layer metals sandwich between the conduit segregation columns.
  • FIG. 3 is a schematic illustration of two-layer metals sandwich between the conduit segregation columns and conduit separator with airflow perforations.
  • FIG. 4 is a schematic illustration of airflow inside the conduits by internal or external recirculation.
  • FIG. 5 is a schematic illustration of the condensing unit.
  • FIG. 6 is a schematic illustration of the airflow conduit place on a roof.
  • FIG. 7 is a schematic illustration of how heat is transfer through system.
  • FIG. 8 is a schematic illustration of the electrical diagram.
  • FIG. 9 is a schematic illustration of the condensing unit housing.

Claims (14)

  1. 1. A hybrid system composed of a solar thermal energy content accumulator and a ventilator of concentrated thermal energy. An energy radiation absorber on a roof of a building for receiving solar radiation for absorbing a high degree of energy content. The design is constructed for proper thermal emissions which includes:
    a bi-level metal sheet place one on top of another as to constrict heat energy. Metal panels place in perpendicular to each other as to restrict movement of heat airflow. Metal panels place in parallel to said panels with corrugations as to permit airflow. Bi-metal sheets use as deterring heat from accumulating inside a said building by actively flushing it by electromechanical means; and
    a thermal energy transportation flushing system. A mechanical device able to receive and concentrate heated air on a condenser. Said condenser able to constrict air flow forms a cumulative thermal reservoir. An air fan use to expel ambient air movement through the condenser.
  2. 2. A hybrid system composed of a solar thermal energy content accumulator and a ventilator of concentrated thermal energy, according to claim 1, wherein a bi-level metal frame is created by an upper metal sheet and a lower metal sheet that is sandwich between a metal framework.
  3. 3. A hybrid system composed of a solar thermal energy content accumulator and a ventilator of concentrated thermal energy, according to claim 1, wherein metallic parallel bars permit heat energy in the form of hot air to encapsulate in between metallic upper metal sheet and lower metal sheet.
  4. 4. A hybrid system composed of a solar thermal energy content accumulator and a ventilator of concentrated thermal energy, according to claim 1, wherein perpendicular metallic bars with corrugations permit heat flow.
  5. 5. A hybrid system composed of a solar thermal energy content accumulator and a ventilator of concentrated thermal energy, according to claim 1, wherein re-circulatory metallic vane transfers cooled air back for circulation inside solar energy content accumulator.
  6. 6. A hybrid system composed of a solar thermal energy content accumulator and a ventilator of concentrated thermal energy. An energy radiation absorber on a roof of a building for receiving solar radiation for absorbing a high degree of energy content. The design is constructed for proper thermal emissions which includes:
    a bi-level metal sheet place one on top of another as to constrict heat energy. Metal panels place in perpendicular to each other as to restrict movement of heat airflow. Metal panels place in parallel to said panels with corrugations as to permit airflow. Bi-metal sheets use as deterring heat from accumulating inside a said building by actively flushing it by electromechanical means; and
    a thermal energy transportation flushing system. A mechanical device able to receive and concentrate heated air on a condenser. Said condenser able to constrict air flow forms a cumulative thermal reservoir. An air fan use to expel ambient air movement through the condenser.
  7. 7. A hybrid system composed of a solar thermal energy content accumulator and a ventilator of concentrated thermal energy, according to claim 6, wherein ventilation system actively receives concentrated heated air and by mechanical means expelling concentrated thermal energy.
  8. 8. A hybrid system composed of a solar thermal energy content accumulator and a ventilator of concentrated thermal energy, according to claim 6, wherein an air pump actively re-circulates cooled air by into the system.
  9. 9. A hybrid system composed of a solar thermal energy content accumulator and a ventilator of concentrated thermal energy, according to claim 6, wherein a condenser receives heated air, condenser serves as reservoir of concentrated thermal energy.
  10. 10. A hybrid system composed of a solar thermal energy content accumulator and a ventilator of concentrated thermal energy, according to claim 6, wherein a fan forces ambient air through condenser.
  11. 11. A hybrid system composed of a solar thermal energy content accumulator and a ventilator of concentrated thermal energy, according to claim 6, wherein a draining tube serves as a passage way of heated air through condenser.
  12. 12. A hybrid system composed of a solar thermal energy content accumulator and a ventilator of concentrated thermal energy, according to claim 6, wherein a metal encase housing serves as air navigation vent for venting air through condenser.
  13. 13. A hybrid system composed of a solar thermal energy content accumulator and a ventilator of concentrated thermal energy. An energy radiation absorber on a roof of a building for receiving solar radiation for absorbing a high degree of energy content. The design is constructed for proper thermal emissions which includes:
    a bi-level metal sheet place one on top of another as to constrict heat energy. Metal panels place in perpendicular to each other as to restrict movement of heat airflow. Metal panels place in parallel to said panels with corrugations as to permit airflow. Bi-metal sheets use as deterring heat from accumulating inside a said building by actively flushing it by electromechanical means, and;
    a thermal energy transportation flushing system. A mechanical device able to receive and concentrate heated air on a condenser. Said condenser able to constrict air flow forms a cumulative thermal reservoir. An air fan use to expel ambient air movement through the condenser.
  14. 14. A hybrid system composed of a solar thermal energy content accumulator and a ventilator of concentrated thermal energy, according to claim 13, wherein air inside solar thermal energy content accumulator becomes heated during the day by solar radiation and serves as thermal heat transference.
US11420783 2006-05-29 2006-05-29 Smart Solar Roof Abandoned US20070284077A1 (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US11420783 US20070284077A1 (en) 2006-05-29 2006-05-29 Smart Solar Roof

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US11420783 US20070284077A1 (en) 2006-05-29 2006-05-29 Smart Solar Roof

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US20070284077A1 true true US20070284077A1 (en) 2007-12-13

Family

ID=38820696

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US11420783 Abandoned US20070284077A1 (en) 2006-05-29 2006-05-29 Smart Solar Roof

Country Status (1)

Country Link
US (1) US20070284077A1 (en)

Citations (35)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3957109A (en) * 1974-10-31 1976-05-18 Worthington Mark N Solar collector -- heat exchanger
US4231772A (en) * 1978-10-10 1980-11-04 Owens-Illinois, Inc. Solar powered heat pump construction
US4237965A (en) * 1978-04-12 1980-12-09 Hay Harold R Process and apparatus for modulating temperatures within enclosures
US4239031A (en) * 1978-10-30 1980-12-16 Granger Floyd R Combination roof structure and solar collector
US4279244A (en) * 1977-12-15 1981-07-21 Mcalister Roy E Radiant energy heat exchanger system
US4294229A (en) * 1978-09-12 1981-10-13 One Design, Inc. Thermosiphoning module for environmentally driven heating and cooling system
US4296798A (en) * 1977-11-15 1981-10-27 Horst Schramm Integrated house
US4313429A (en) * 1980-05-19 1982-02-02 Mcalaster Robert J Solar air collector
US4324289A (en) * 1978-07-12 1982-04-13 Lahti Raymond L Environmental heating and cooling apparatus
US4324229A (en) * 1977-11-28 1982-04-13 Risser James A Solar collector and heat and cold generator
US4338991A (en) * 1980-04-28 1982-07-13 Sigworth Jr Harrison W Combined solar heating and passive cooling apparatus
US4350200A (en) * 1978-07-24 1982-09-21 Mcelwain John A Solar energy collector and system
US4378908A (en) * 1979-12-10 1983-04-05 Wood Robert A Reversible solar assisted heat pump
US4552212A (en) * 1984-01-16 1985-11-12 Nuttle David A Structure heating and cooling system
US4610291A (en) * 1981-12-10 1986-09-09 Carroll Frank E Insulating shutter panels for building openings
US4617198A (en) * 1985-09-23 1986-10-14 Transmet Corporation Method for making roofing
US4621614A (en) * 1983-03-23 1986-11-11 Sykes Jr Marvin E Heat storage means
US4899728A (en) * 1989-01-27 1990-02-13 Solarwall International Limited Method and apparatus for preheating ventilation air for a building
US5103803A (en) * 1990-08-06 1992-04-14 Michael Epifanidis Heating and air conditioning solar heat accumulator
US5128181A (en) * 1989-02-07 1992-07-07 Heinz Kunert Construction element
US5452710A (en) * 1994-03-28 1995-09-26 Solar Attic, Inc. Self-sufficient apparatus and method for conveying solar heat energy from an attic
US6220339B1 (en) * 1995-09-12 2001-04-24 Edmond D. Krecke Energy system for buildings
US6269596B1 (en) * 1997-02-05 2001-08-07 Canon Kabushiki Kaisha Roof member and mounting method thereof
US6357512B1 (en) * 2000-07-26 2002-03-19 Zomeworks Passive heating and cooling system
US6495750B1 (en) * 2001-07-10 2002-12-17 Powerlight Corporation Stabilized PV system
US6501013B1 (en) * 2001-07-10 2002-12-31 Powerlight Corporation Photovoltaic assembly array with covered bases
US6526965B1 (en) * 2002-03-01 2003-03-04 Clyde W. Devore Solar energy collection panel for heating pools of water
US20030061773A1 (en) * 2001-10-01 2003-04-03 O'leary Patrick Structurally integrated solar collector
US6732951B1 (en) * 2002-04-27 2004-05-11 Pete Salazar Roof mounted evaporative cooling system
US6827081B2 (en) * 2002-10-02 2004-12-07 H.R. & E.J. Hay Charitable Trust Process and apparatus for modulating temperatures in thermal storage
US6923249B1 (en) * 2003-05-15 2005-08-02 Lockheed Martin Corporation Passive thermal control system
US6922908B1 (en) * 1999-04-16 2005-08-02 Raul Raudales Vegetable product drying
US20060052051A1 (en) * 2004-09-02 2006-03-09 Daniels William B Ii Roof providing improved passive ventilation and energy efficiency
US20060079173A1 (en) * 2004-10-08 2006-04-13 Coulton Michael S Roof ridge vent having honeycomb or like ventilation material
US7028685B1 (en) * 1998-03-09 2006-04-18 Edmond Krecke Air conditioning system for buildings and air-conditioned building, especially a zero energy house

Patent Citations (37)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4068652A (en) * 1974-10-31 1978-01-17 Worthington Mark N Multi-purpose solar collector/heat exchanger
US3957109A (en) * 1974-10-31 1976-05-18 Worthington Mark N Solar collector -- heat exchanger
US4296798A (en) * 1977-11-15 1981-10-27 Horst Schramm Integrated house
US4324229A (en) * 1977-11-28 1982-04-13 Risser James A Solar collector and heat and cold generator
US4279244A (en) * 1977-12-15 1981-07-21 Mcalister Roy E Radiant energy heat exchanger system
US4237965A (en) * 1978-04-12 1980-12-09 Hay Harold R Process and apparatus for modulating temperatures within enclosures
US4324289A (en) * 1978-07-12 1982-04-13 Lahti Raymond L Environmental heating and cooling apparatus
US4350200A (en) * 1978-07-24 1982-09-21 Mcelwain John A Solar energy collector and system
US4294229A (en) * 1978-09-12 1981-10-13 One Design, Inc. Thermosiphoning module for environmentally driven heating and cooling system
US4231772A (en) * 1978-10-10 1980-11-04 Owens-Illinois, Inc. Solar powered heat pump construction
US4239031A (en) * 1978-10-30 1980-12-16 Granger Floyd R Combination roof structure and solar collector
US4378908A (en) * 1979-12-10 1983-04-05 Wood Robert A Reversible solar assisted heat pump
US4338991A (en) * 1980-04-28 1982-07-13 Sigworth Jr Harrison W Combined solar heating and passive cooling apparatus
US4313429A (en) * 1980-05-19 1982-02-02 Mcalaster Robert J Solar air collector
US4610291A (en) * 1981-12-10 1986-09-09 Carroll Frank E Insulating shutter panels for building openings
US4621614A (en) * 1983-03-23 1986-11-11 Sykes Jr Marvin E Heat storage means
US4552212A (en) * 1984-01-16 1985-11-12 Nuttle David A Structure heating and cooling system
US4617198A (en) * 1985-09-23 1986-10-14 Transmet Corporation Method for making roofing
US4934338A (en) * 1989-01-27 1990-06-19 Solarwall International Limited Method and apparatus for preheating ventilation air for a building
US4899728A (en) * 1989-01-27 1990-02-13 Solarwall International Limited Method and apparatus for preheating ventilation air for a building
US5128181A (en) * 1989-02-07 1992-07-07 Heinz Kunert Construction element
US5103803A (en) * 1990-08-06 1992-04-14 Michael Epifanidis Heating and air conditioning solar heat accumulator
US5452710A (en) * 1994-03-28 1995-09-26 Solar Attic, Inc. Self-sufficient apparatus and method for conveying solar heat energy from an attic
US6220339B1 (en) * 1995-09-12 2001-04-24 Edmond D. Krecke Energy system for buildings
US6269596B1 (en) * 1997-02-05 2001-08-07 Canon Kabushiki Kaisha Roof member and mounting method thereof
US7028685B1 (en) * 1998-03-09 2006-04-18 Edmond Krecke Air conditioning system for buildings and air-conditioned building, especially a zero energy house
US6922908B1 (en) * 1999-04-16 2005-08-02 Raul Raudales Vegetable product drying
US6357512B1 (en) * 2000-07-26 2002-03-19 Zomeworks Passive heating and cooling system
US6495750B1 (en) * 2001-07-10 2002-12-17 Powerlight Corporation Stabilized PV system
US6501013B1 (en) * 2001-07-10 2002-12-31 Powerlight Corporation Photovoltaic assembly array with covered bases
US20030061773A1 (en) * 2001-10-01 2003-04-03 O'leary Patrick Structurally integrated solar collector
US6526965B1 (en) * 2002-03-01 2003-03-04 Clyde W. Devore Solar energy collection panel for heating pools of water
US6732951B1 (en) * 2002-04-27 2004-05-11 Pete Salazar Roof mounted evaporative cooling system
US6827081B2 (en) * 2002-10-02 2004-12-07 H.R. & E.J. Hay Charitable Trust Process and apparatus for modulating temperatures in thermal storage
US6923249B1 (en) * 2003-05-15 2005-08-02 Lockheed Martin Corporation Passive thermal control system
US20060052051A1 (en) * 2004-09-02 2006-03-09 Daniels William B Ii Roof providing improved passive ventilation and energy efficiency
US20060079173A1 (en) * 2004-10-08 2006-04-13 Coulton Michael S Roof ridge vent having honeycomb or like ventilation material

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
Hasan et al. Photovoltaic thermal module concepts and their performance analysis: a review
US6225705B1 (en) Convection energy generator
Zondag Flat-plate PV-Thermal collectors and systems: A review
US3996919A (en) System for collecting and storing solar energy
Chen et al. Modeling, design and thermal performance of a BIPV/T system thermally coupled with a ventilated concrete slab in a low energy solar house: Part 1, BIPV/T system and house energy concept
Vakiloroaya et al. A review of different strategies for HVAC energy saving
Khan et al. A review on wind driven ventilation techniques
US4373573A (en) Long term storage and use of solar energy
Mavroudaki et al. The potential for solar powered single-stage desiccant cooling in southern Europe
US4182406A (en) Solar energy system for heating and cooling of buildings utilizing moist air cycles
US20040031282A1 (en) Desiccant air conditioner
US20030029185A1 (en) Desiccant air conditioner with thermal storage
Kalogirou et al. Energy analysis of buildings employing thermal mass in Cyprus
US20020117166A1 (en) Solar-system house
Charron et al. Design and Optimization of Net Zero Energy Solar Homes.
US6843718B2 (en) Method of guiding external air in a building shell and a building; and a method of temperature control of a building
US20120149291A1 (en) Thermogenic Augmentation System
La et al. Case study and theoretical analysis of a solar driven two-stage rotary desiccant cooling system assisted by vapor compression air-conditioning
Yin et al. Design and performance of a novel building integrated PV/thermal system for energy efficiency of buildings
WO2005103581A1 (en) Structure and methods using multi-systems for electricity generation and water desalination
Li et al. Study on performance of solar assisted air source heat pump systems for hot water production in Hong Kong
Chow et al. Analysis of a solar assisted heat pump system for indoor swimming pool water and space heating
Chow et al. Hybrid solar: a review on photovoltaic and thermal power integration
US6533026B1 (en) Heat removing system
Geetha et al. Passive cooling methods for energy efficient buildings with and without thermal energy storage–A review