US20070101771A1 - Napped face stitch bonded fabric and related process - Google Patents

Napped face stitch bonded fabric and related process Download PDF

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Publication number
US20070101771A1
US20070101771A1 US11/500,065 US50006506A US2007101771A1 US 20070101771 A1 US20070101771 A1 US 20070101771A1 US 50006506 A US50006506 A US 50006506A US 2007101771 A1 US2007101771 A1 US 2007101771A1
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Prior art keywords
yarns
recited
substrate
fabric
arrangement
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US11/500,065
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Martin Wildeman
Patrick Swanson
Robert Fontaine
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Martin Wildeman
Patrick Swanson
Robert Fontaine
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Priority to US70856305P priority Critical
Application filed by Martin Wildeman, Patrick Swanson, Robert Fontaine filed Critical Martin Wildeman
Priority to US11/500,065 priority patent/US20070101771A1/en
Publication of US20070101771A1 publication Critical patent/US20070101771A1/en
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    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D04BRAIDING; LACE-MAKING; KNITTING; TRIMMINGS; NON-WOVEN FABRICS
    • D04BKNITTING
    • D04B21/00Warp knitting processes for the production of fabrics or articles not dependent on the use of particular machines; Fabrics or articles defined by such processes
    • D04B21/02Pile fabrics or articles having similar surface features
    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D04BRAIDING; LACE-MAKING; KNITTING; TRIMMINGS; NON-WOVEN FABRICS
    • D04BKNITTING
    • D04B21/00Warp knitting processes for the production of fabrics or articles not dependent on the use of particular machines; Fabrics or articles defined by such processes
    • D04B21/14Fabrics characterised by the incorporation by knitting, in one or more thread, fleece, or fabric layers, of reinforcing, binding, or decorative threads; Fabrics incorporating small auxiliary elements, e.g. for decorative purposes
    • D04B21/16Fabrics characterised by the incorporation by knitting, in one or more thread, fleece, or fabric layers, of reinforcing, binding, or decorative threads; Fabrics incorporating small auxiliary elements, e.g. for decorative purposes incorporating synthetic threads
    • D04B21/165Fabrics characterised by the incorporation by knitting, in one or more thread, fleece, or fabric layers, of reinforcing, binding, or decorative threads; Fabrics incorporating small auxiliary elements, e.g. for decorative purposes incorporating synthetic threads with yarns stitched through one or more layers or tows, e.g. stitch-bonded fabrics
    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D10INDEXING SCHEME ASSOCIATED WITH SUBLASSES OF SECTION D, RELATING TO TEXTILES
    • D10BINDEXING SCHEME ASSOCIATED WITH SUBLASSES OF SECTION D, RELATING TO TEXTILES
    • D10B2403/00Details of fabric structure established in the fabric forming process
    • D10B2403/01Surface features
    • D10B2403/011Dissimilar front and back faces
    • D10B2403/0111One hairy surface, e.g. napped or raised

Abstract

A pile fabric of stitch bonded construction. A ground yarn is stitchbonded into a substrate to define a ground layer. A pile yarn is stitchbonded into the substrate in combination with the ground yarn. During formation at least a portion of the pile yarns are shifted over sinker fingers between non-adjacent needles such that loops extend in arching relation over at least one intermediate needle line. Once the yarns have been stitchbonded into the substrate, the upstanding loops are subjected to a napping treatment wherein the loops are pulled away from the substrate until broken. An arrangement of split and frayed yarn ends is formed over the ground layer.

Description

    CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS
  • This application claims the benefit of and priority from U.S. Provisional Application 60/708,563 having a filing date of 16 Aug. 2005, the contents of which are incorporated herein by reference in their entirety.
  • TECHNICAL FIELD
  • The present invention generally pertains to plush face fabrics suited for use in home furnishing such as for use in constructing upholstery. More particularly, the present invention is directed to a napped face stitchbonded fabric and to a process for making such fabric.
  • BACKGROUND
  • Felt-like and suede-like fabrics are well known for use in applications such as furnishing and automotive seating upholstery. These fabrics have a pleasing look and tactile feel to their front side. Moreover, these fabrics can stand up to high friction environments while keeping their appearance intact. In the past, processes for creating these fabrics have included shearing, napping, or brushing warp-knitted or woven loop piled fabrics. While such products provide suitable performance characteristics, they face deficiencies due to the costs associated with forming the initial knit and woven fabric substrates.
  • In order to address the deficiencies of using woven or knit base fabrics while still providing a desired plush pile surface, it has been proposed to use stitch bonded base fabrics formed with rows of parallel stitch lines subjected to a sanding or shearing process. Such a product is disclosed in my U.S. Pat. No. 6,423,393 the teachings of which are incorporated herein by reference as if fully set forth herein. Due to the application of the sanding or shearing process, such products exhibit a relatively dense plush pile face with the individual yarns being sharply clipped or cut.
  • Napping is a fabric treatment process wherein a face of the fabric is moved across a treatment apparatus such as one or more rotating cylinders incorporating an arrangement of extensions such as metal points or burrs such that the extensions pluck yarns away from the surface and form a downy layer of broken fibers across the surface. In the past, napping has been used on woven and knitted fabrics to form goods such as flannel, wool broadcloth and the like. However, as indicated in my prior patent 6,423,393, napping has been considered too harsh for stitchbonded fabrics.
  • As will be recognized, stitchbonded fabrics are well known. Such fabrics typically utilize a relatively light-weight substrate layer such as a non-woven web or the like through which parallel rows of stitching yarns are passed by needles to form an arrangement of stitches. The stitching yarns form the body of the fabric and define the fabric surface structure. The stitching yarns themselves provide coherency and strength to the fabric. In formation of a stitch bonded fabric yarns may be passed between adjacent rows over sinker fingers to provide a looped pile surface. The rows of stitches are typically formed in relatively close relation to one another so as to provide desired coverage levels and to impart desired strength characteristics. Due to the close proximity of the stitch rows, napping has generally been considered an unsuitable surface treatment since the crossing yarns between the rows tend to be of inadequate length to efficiently engage the burrs on the napping machine. Moreover, the bristles of the nappers and/or the brushes tend to dig into the stitchbonded fabrics, causing the staple fibers of the nonwoven web to be pulled up through the outer stitching.
  • SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • The present invention provides advantages and alternatives over the prior art by providing a process whereby fabrics of stitchbonded construction may be effectively treated by napping. A resultant fabric construction is also provided.
  • According to one aspect of the invention the stitch bonded fabric includes a planar substrate such as a nonwoven web of staple fibers. A ground yarn is stitchbonded into the substrate in a substantially flat stitch arrangement such as a fully threaded chain stitch, tricot stitch or the like to form rows of stitches defining a ground covering across the substrate. A pile yarn is also stitchbonded into the substrate to form loop pile stitches with upstanding loops. During formation, at least a portion of the pile yarns are shifted over multiple sinker fingers between non-adjacent needles such that loops extend in arching relation over at least one intermediate needle line. Once the yarns have been stitchbonded into the substrate, the upstanding loops are subjected to a napping treatment wherein the loops are pulled away from the substrate until broken. An arrangement of split and frayed yarn ends is thus formed over the ground layer.
  • Other features and aspects of the present invention are discussed in greater detail below.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • A full and enabling disclosure of the present invention, including the best mode thereof, directed to one of ordinary skill in the art, is set forth more particularly in the remainder of the specification, which makes reference to the appended figures in which:
  • FIG. 1 illustrates schematically a two bar stitch bonding process for selectively forming an arrangement of surface loops in combination with a cooperating ground yarn system through a fibrous substrate;
  • FIG. 2 illustrates schematically the stitching of a ground yarn in an arrangement of substantially flat chain stitches by a multiplicity of reciprocating needles in a fully threaded arrangement;
  • FIG. 3 illustrates schematically the stitching of a surface yarn in a pattern of extended length loops formed by shifting loop-forming yarns between non-adjacent needles;
  • FIG. 4 illustrates a representative napping process for tensioned breakage of surface loops; and
  • FIG. 5 illustrates a stitchbonded fabric having a napped face of frayed surface yarns.
  • While the invention has been illustrated and will hereinafter be described in connection with certain exemplary embodiments and practices, it is to be understood that in no event is the invention to be limited to such illustrated and described embodiments and practices. On the contrary, it is intended that the present invention shall extend to all alternatives and modifications as may embrace the general principles of this invention within the full and true spirit and scope thereof.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS
  • Reference will now be made to the drawings wherein, to the extent possible, like reference numerals designate like components throughout the various views. In general, the fabric of the present invention comprises a multi-bar stitchbonded fabric made from a multiplicity of yarns stitched through a substrate, particularly a nonwoven substrate. As it is known in the art, a multi-bar fabric refers to a stitchbonded fabric made using at least two independent guide bars.
  • Exemplary fabric construction practices are illustrated and will be described through reference to a stitch bonding machine such as a Liba stitch bonding machine although it is likewise contemplated that other stitch bonding equipment may likewise be used if desired. Referring simultaneously to FIGS. 1-3, according to one contemplated practice, a substrate material 30 such as a carded and cross-lapped fleece or a needle punched or spun bonded fleece is conveyed to a stitch-forming position in the direction indicated by the arrow. If desired, the substrate material 30 may include a percentage of low melting point fibers such as low melting point polyester or bicomponent polyester having a core of relatively high melting point material and a sheath of lower melting point polyester to facilitate heat activated point bonding so as to enhance structural integrity.
  • As illustrated, the stitch forming position is defined by a row of reciprocating needles 34 extending in adjacent relation to one another across the width of the substrate material 30 in the cross machine direction substantially transverse to the direction of movement of the substrate material 30. As will be appreciated, while only four needles have been illustrated, in actual practice a large number of such needles are arranged in close relation to one another between the fingers 47 of a sinker bar. By way of example only, and not limitation, it is contemplated that the so called gauge or needle density in the cross machine direction is preferably about 28 needles per inch, although higher or lower needle densities may likewise be utilized if desired.
  • According to the illustrated and potentially preferred practice, at least two yarns systems are used to form stitches through the substrate material 30. In the potentially preferred practice, a ground yarn 36 (FIG. 2) is carried through a first set of moveable yarn guides 38 carried by a first guide bar (not shown) for cooperative substantially fully threaded engagement with the needles 34 across the width of the substrate material 30. For ease of reference, the substrate material 30 is not illustrated in FIG. 2.
  • As will be appreciated by those of skill in the art, in operation the ground yarn 36 is moved into engagement with the needles which, in turn, carry the ground yarn 36 in a reciprocating manner through the substrate material 30 without engaging fingers 47 of the sinker bar. This results in formation of an arrangement of substantially flat cooperating ground yarn stitches 40 extending in relatively closely spaced rows along the substrate material 30. By way of example only, and not limitation, the cooperating ground yarn stitches 40 may be held in a full chain stitch configuration although other stitch arrangements including tricot stitches and the like may likewise be utilized if desired. Preferably, the spacing of the stitch lines formed by the ground yarn 36 will be close enough that the ground yarn stitches 40 define a substantially continuous covering across the technical back 41 of the substrate material 30. The ground yarn 36 and the substrate material 30 thus define a substantially stable stitch bonded structure.
  • As illustrated in FIGS. 1 and 3, in accordance with a potentially preferred practice, an arrangement of loop elements 42 is formed projecting away from, and standing above, the ground yarn stitches 40 in a predefined pattern across the technical back 41 of the fabric. According to the preferred practice of the present invention, the loop elements 42 are formed substantially concurrently with the formation of the ground yarn stitches 40 through the substrate material 30. As best illustrated in FIG. 3 (wherein the substrate is not shown for ease of reference) according to one potentially preferred practice, loop elements 42 may be formed by a pile yarn 44 threaded through moveable yarn guides 46 carried by a guide bar (not shown). While only two pile yarns 44 are illustrated for explanatory purposes, it is to be understood that in actual practice, multiple pile yarns 44 are used across the width of the fabric threaded in a pattern relative to the needles to impart a desired loop arrangement.
  • As illustrated, the pile yarn 44 is preferably carried in alternating fashion back and forth between a first pair of non-adjacent needles thereby forming an arrangement of loop elements 42 that extend in arching relation over one or more intermediate needle rows corresponding to skipped needles between the cooperating pair of non-adjacent needles. In this procedure, the pile yarn passes over two or more sinker fingers 47 thus maintaining the desired raised arched relation. Arranging the loop elements to span across one or more intermediate needle rows gives rise to extended length loops that facilitates grasping by napping burrs in a subsequent napping operation as will be described more fully hereinafter. As shown, it is contemplated that the intermediate needles may also be engaged by pile forming yarns from other yarn guides so as to form loops as part of at least a second cooperating needle pair. Of course, the intermediate needles can also be left free of pile forming yarns if desired. Thus, the concentration of loop elements can be readily controlled. In this regard, by controlling yarn guide movement, arched loop elements may extend away from every needle row to predetermined non-adjacent needle rows if desired.
  • As previously indicated, the substrate used as the base of the stitchbonded fabric is preferably a nonwoven web structure, although a film, a woven, or a knitted product may also be used if desired. A nonwoven fiber fleece formed from staple fibers of a synthetic material such as polyester may be particularly preferred. However, other synthetic fibers such as polypropylene or nylon as well as natural fibers such as wool may be used if desired. A blend of different fibers may also be used. According to one contemplated practice the staple fibers can have a denier of from about 2 to about 6 with a staple length of about 2 to 4 inches. In one potentially preferred embodiment, the staple fibers have a denier of about 4 and a staple length of about 4 inches.
  • If desired, binder fibers can be incorporated into the nonwoven substrate in combination with the staple fibers. As used herein, binder fibers refers to fibers that when subjected to heat will bond with one another and with other materials contained within the web. Binder fibers are typically made from synthetic materials having a relatively low softening temperature such as low melting point polyesters. Although the binder fibers can be made entirely form a low melting point polymer, in one particular embodiment of the present invention, the binder fibers incorporated into the nonwoven substrate are multicomponent fibers, such as bicomponent fibers in which the low melting point polymer comprises the sheath polymer and a higher melting point fiber comprises the core polymer.
  • The fiber fleece is preferably formed by carding and cross-lapping a nonwoven web followed by needle punching to impart fiber cohesion. However, other construction techniques such as air laying, spun bonding and the like may also be used if desired. The basis weight of the nonwoven substrate can vary depending upon the particular application for which the fabric is being used. However, for most applications such as upholstery and the like, the nonwoven substrate can have a basis weight of from about 80 to about 150 grams per square meter or higher.
  • The pile yarn 44 is preferably a multifilament yarn of polyester, nylon or other suitable synthetic fiber. By way of example only, and not limitation, one contemplated construction for the pile yarn is 150 denier, 200 filament polyester. One potentially preferred stitch notation for insertion of the pile yarn is 1,0/2, 3. The pile stitch density is preferably in the range of about 20 to about 30 stitches per inch and more preferably about 23 to about 26 stitches per inch. Although the pile yarn is preferably a texturized filament yarn, it is also contemplated that flat yarns and even some spun yarns may be used if desired.
  • According to a potentially preferred practice, the ground yarns 36 are preferably flat, dull yarns meaning the yarns are not texturized and refract little light. Although flat, dull yarns are desirable, it should be understood that any suitable yarn may be used without limitation. For instance, texturized and spun yarns may be used if desired. As previously indicated, the ground yarns 36 are preferably stitched in covering relation to the substrate material 30. Preferably, a chain stitch, such as 0.1/0.1, is used which gives stability in the warp direction (machine direction). Once incorporated into the substrate material, the ground yarn provides the web with integrity and strength. According to one contemplated practice, the ground yarn 36 is a multifilament polyester yarn having a denier of from about 70 to about 150. One exemplary ground yarn is a 70 denier 34 filament polyester. Although ground yarns polyester may be preferred, it is likewise contemplated that other synthetic and natural fibers may be utilized if desired.
  • According to the potentially preferred practice, once the substrate has been stitchbonded, the resultant fabric structure 43 is heat set by traditional techniques to impart stability. By way of example, the fabric structure 43 may be conveyed through a tenter frame such as will be well known to those of skill in the art at about 350° F. for about 30 seconds. During the heat treatment the fabric is firmed up and the fibers are stabilized. Also, the texturized yarns may bulk thereby making the yarns look fuller. Further, during heat treatment, any binder fibers that may be present in the substrate melt and bond. After heat setting, the fabric can be dyed as desired as is known within the textile art. Of course, it is also contemplated that the fabric can be dyed after napping if desired.
  • In accordance with the contemplated practice, after heat treatment and any desired dyeing, the stitch bonded fabric is preferably delivered to a napping operation where the surface loops 42 formed by the pile yarns 36 are preferably broken by applied tension as they are pulled away from the substrate material 30. According to one potentially preferred practice, the fabric 43 is delivered to a napping machine 60 such as a double action napper as will be well known to those of skill in the art. As will be appreciated, in the napping machine 60 the technical back 41 of the fabric with the formed surface loops 42 contacts an arrangement of burr wheels 64. In the potentially preferred practice, the burr wheels are mounted on a cylinder that rotates in the same direction as the fabric but at a different speed so as to cause the burr wheels to pluck and brush the surface loops 42.
  • A representative embodiment of a napped fabric 70 formed by the practice of the present invention is illustrated in FIG. 5. As shown, the napped fabric 70 includes a pile layer 72 disposed above a backing formed by the substrate material 30 and ground yarn stitches 40. Due to the tensioned breakage caused by the napping treatment, at least a substantial portion of the pile yarns are frayed such that free ends of individual broken filaments and/or fibrils of the pile yarns define a surface covering across a user contact surface of the napped fabric 70.
  • The present invention has been described with reference to exemplary and potentially preferred embodiments and practices. However, it will be apparent to those skilled in the art that many changes can be made in the embodiments described without departing from the scope of the present invention. Thus, in no event is the scope of the present invention to be limited to the structures and practices described in this application. Rather, it is intended that the invention shall extend to all alternatives and equivalents embracing the broad principles of this invention within the full spirit and scope thereof.

Claims (20)

1. A method of forming a stitchbonded pile fabric of multi-bar construction, the method comprising the steps of:
providing a substrate layer of fibrous non-woven construction;
stitching a plurality of ground yarns through the substrate layer using an arrangement of needles in the cross machine direction so as to define an arrangement of substantially parallel stitch lines running in the machine direction of the fabric so as to form a ground covering across the substrate layer;
stitching at least a first pile forming yarn of multi-filament construction through the substrate such that said first pile forming yarn defines a first arrangement of loop elements projecting away from the ground covering, wherein during formation of the first arrangement of loop elements, the first pile forming yarn is shogged from a first needle to a second non-adjacent needle in the cross machine direction such that said first pile forming yarn travels over a plurality of sinker fingers between the first and second needles whereby at least a portion of the loop elements extend in raised arched relation over at least one intermediate needle line; and
napping the fabric formed by the stitching steps such that at least a portion of the loop elements extending in arched relation over intermediate needle lines are pulled away from the substrate and broken to define surface of frayed yarn ends across the fabric.
2. The invention as recited in claim 1, wherein the substrate layer comprises needlepunched staple fibers with a heat activated bonding constituent.
3. The invention as recited in claim 2, wherein the substrate layer is characterized by a mass per unit area of about 20 to about 200 grams per square meter.
4. The invention as recited in claim 1, wherein said ground yarns are stitched through the substrate layer in a substantially fully threaded stitching arrangement.
5. The invention as recited in claim 4, wherein said ground yarns are stitched through the substrate layer in a chain stitch pattern.
6. The invention as recited in claim 1, wherein the ground yarns comprise multi-filament flat yarns.
7. The invention as recited in claim 1, wherein the ground yarns comprise multifilament polyester yarns characterized by a linear density in the range of about 50 to about 200 denier.
8. The invention as recited in claim 1, wherein at least a second pile forming yarn of multi-filament construction is stitched through the substrate such that that said second pile forming yarn defines a second arrangement of loop elements projecting away from the ground covering, wherein during formation of the second arrangement of loop elements, the second pile forming yarn is shogged from a third needle to a fourth needle in the cross machine direction such that said second pile forming yarn travels over a plurality of sinker fingers between the third and fourth needles, and wherein at least one of the third and fourth needles forms an intermediate needle line between the first and second needles.
9. The invention as recited in claim 8, wherein the first and second pile forming yarns comprise textured polyester yarns
10. The invention as recited in claim 9, wherein the first and second pile forming yarns are characterized by a linear density in the range of about 50 to about 1000 denier.
11. A pile fabric formed by the method of claim 1
12. A method of forming a stitchbonded pile fabric of multi-bar construction, the method comprising the steps of:
providing a substrate layer of fibrous non-woven construction;
stitching a plurality of ground yarns through the substrate layer using an arrangement of needles in the cross machine direction so as to define an arrangement of substantially parallel stitch lines running in the machine direction of the fabric so as to form a ground covering across the substrate layer;
stitching a plurality of pile forming yarns of multi-filament construction through the substrate such that at least a portion of said pile forming yarns defines an arrangement of loop elements projecting away from the ground covering, wherein during formation of the arrangement of loop elements, a portion of the pile forming yarns are shogged back and forth between non-adjacent needles in the cross machine direction such that the pile forming yarns travel over a plurality of sinker fingers between the non-adjacent needles whereby at least a portion of the loop elements extend in raised arched relation over at least one intermediate needle line; and
napping the fabric formed by the stitching steps such that at least a portion of the loop elements extending in arched relation over intermediate needle lines are pulled away from the substrate and broken to define a surface of frayed yarn ends across the fabric.
13. The invention as recited in claim 12, wherein the pile forming yarns are stitched concurrently with formation of the ground covering using common needles.
14. The invention as recited in claim 12, wherein the substrate layer comprises needlepunched staple fibers with a heat activated bonding constituent.
15. The invention as recited in claim 12, wherein said ground yarns are stitched through the substrate layer in a substantially fully threaded stitching arrangement.
16. The invention as recited in claim 15, wherein said ground yarns are stitched through the substrate layer in a chain stitch pattern.
17. The invention as recited in claim 12, wherein the pile forming yarns comprise textured polyester yarns
18. The invention as recited in claim 17, wherein the pile forming yarns are characterized by a linear density in the range of about 50 to about 1000 denier.
19. A pile fabric formed by the method of claim 12.
20. The invention as recited in claim 12, wherein during the napping step substantially all of the loop elements extending in arched relation over intermediate needle lines are pulled away from the substrate and broken.
US11/500,065 2005-08-16 2006-08-07 Napped face stitch bonded fabric and related process Abandoned US20070101771A1 (en)

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Cited By (10)

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US20100263154A1 (en) * 2009-04-17 2010-10-21 Tietex International Ltd. Stitch bonded multi-surface foam cleaning pad
US20110296875A1 (en) * 2009-02-18 2011-12-08 Kaneka Corporation Pile knitted fabric and sewn product employing pile knitted fabric
US20120030893A1 (en) * 2007-05-07 2012-02-09 Martin Wildeman Cleaning and personal care articles
WO2015171990A1 (en) * 2014-05-08 2015-11-12 Southern Mills, Inc. Flame resistant fabric having wool blends
US20150359295A1 (en) * 2014-06-11 2015-12-17 Tietex International, Ltd. Recyclable shoe insole and related method
US20160159293A1 (en) * 2011-07-08 2016-06-09 Edward J. Wenzel Method for stitching vehicle interior components and components formed from the method
US9790627B2 (en) 2011-07-08 2017-10-17 Inteva Products, Llc Method for stitching vehicle interior components and components formed from the method
US9809176B2 (en) 2011-07-08 2017-11-07 Inteva Products, Llc Method for stitching vehicle interior components and components formed from the method
CN107587254A (en) * 2017-09-29 2018-01-16 浙江新千禧纺织股份有限公司 A kind of super soft flannelette and preparation method thereof
US10364520B2 (en) 2011-07-08 2019-07-30 Inteva Products, Llc Apparatus for stitching vehicle interior components

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Cited By (19)

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US20120030893A1 (en) * 2007-05-07 2012-02-09 Martin Wildeman Cleaning and personal care articles
US10661529B2 (en) * 2007-05-07 2020-05-26 Tietex International Ltd. Cleaning and personal care articles
US20110296875A1 (en) * 2009-02-18 2011-12-08 Kaneka Corporation Pile knitted fabric and sewn product employing pile knitted fabric
US8397542B2 (en) * 2009-02-18 2013-03-19 Kaneka Corporation Pile knitted fabric and sewn product employing pile knitted fabric
US20100263154A1 (en) * 2009-04-17 2010-10-21 Tietex International Ltd. Stitch bonded multi-surface foam cleaning pad
US8291542B2 (en) * 2009-04-17 2012-10-23 Tietex International Ltd. Stitch bonded multi-surface foam cleaning pad
US9889802B2 (en) * 2011-07-08 2018-02-13 Inteva Products, Llc Method for stitching vehicle interior components and components formed from the method
US20160159293A1 (en) * 2011-07-08 2016-06-09 Edward J. Wenzel Method for stitching vehicle interior components and components formed from the method
US9790627B2 (en) 2011-07-08 2017-10-17 Inteva Products, Llc Method for stitching vehicle interior components and components formed from the method
US10364520B2 (en) 2011-07-08 2019-07-30 Inteva Products, Llc Apparatus for stitching vehicle interior components
US9937877B2 (en) 2011-07-08 2018-04-10 Inteva Products, Llc Method for stitching vehicle interior components and components formed from the method
US9869044B2 (en) 2011-07-08 2018-01-16 Inteva Products, Llc Apparatus and methods for stitching vehicle interior components and components formed from the methods
US9873966B2 (en) 2011-07-08 2018-01-23 Inteva Products, Llc Method for stitching vehicle interior components and components formed from the method
US9809176B2 (en) 2011-07-08 2017-11-07 Inteva Products, Llc Method for stitching vehicle interior components and components formed from the method
WO2015171990A1 (en) * 2014-05-08 2015-11-12 Southern Mills, Inc. Flame resistant fabric having wool blends
US10774451B2 (en) 2014-05-08 2020-09-15 Southern Mills, Inc. Flame resistant fabric having wool blends
US20150359295A1 (en) * 2014-06-11 2015-12-17 Tietex International, Ltd. Recyclable shoe insole and related method
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