US20060206978A1 - Medical garments for assisting in skin-to-skin holding of infants in neonatal intensive care units - Google Patents

Medical garments for assisting in skin-to-skin holding of infants in neonatal intensive care units Download PDF

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US20060206978A1
US20060206978A1 US11/377,001 US37700106A US2006206978A1 US 20060206978 A1 US20060206978 A1 US 20060206978A1 US 37700106 A US37700106 A US 37700106A US 2006206978 A1 US2006206978 A1 US 2006206978A1
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garment
medical
skin
hook
loop
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US11/377,001
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Shadin Hilton
Pamela Sprague
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Shadin Hilton
Pamela Sprague
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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A41WEARING APPAREL
    • A41DOUTERWEAR; PROTECTIVE GARMENTS; ACCESSORIES
    • A41D13/00Professional, industrial or sporting protective garments, e.g. surgeons' gowns or garments protecting against blows or punches
    • A41D13/12Surgeons' or patients' gowns or dresses
    • A41D13/1236Patients' garments
    • A41D13/1245Patients' garments for the upper part of the body
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A41WEARING APPAREL
    • A41DOUTERWEAR; PROTECTIVE GARMENTS; ACCESSORIES
    • A41D1/00Garments
    • A41D1/21Maternity clothing; Clothing specially adapted for persons caring for infants
    • A41D1/215Nursing clothing, e.g. for breastfeeding

Abstract

A medical apparatus for assisting a person in skin-to-skin holding of an infant on the person's chest or stomach. The medical apparatus includes a garment having a chest portion with a midline opening extending from a neck opening. The garment is adapted to fit a wide range of different-sized persons by having adjustable-sized sides. Loop material for a hook-and-loop fastener is attached to outside surfaces of the garment. The loop material includes chest portions, stomach portions, shoulder portions, or combinations thereof. One or more straps are provided. Each strap includes hook material to form the hook-and-loop fastener(s) so that each strap may be removably attached to the loop material using the hook material to secure medical equipment to the garment while holding the infant within the garment and against the person. This medical equipment may include IV tubing, ventilator tubing, nasogastric tubing, or combinations thereof, extending from the infant.

Description

  • This application claims the priority benefit of commonly owned U.S. Provisional Patent Application having Ser. No. 60/662,290 entitled GARMENT FOR ASSISTING PARENT IN SKIN-TO-SKIN HOLDING OF INFANT IN NEONATAL INTENSIVE CARE UNIT filed on Mar. 16, 2005, which is hereby incorporated by reference.
  • TECHNICAL FIELD
  • The present invention generally relates to medical equipment. More particularly, the present invention relates to medical garments for use in skin-to-skin holding of an infant in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU).
  • BACKGROUND
  • Preterm infants often require hospitalization and some require the care of a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). Skin-to-skin holding has been reported as a valuable intervention for preterm infants for over a decade. However, many neonatal intensive care units are not practicing this therapy; citing the lack of protocols and techniques as a barrier.
  • In an article entitled “Holding the Very Low Birth Weight Infant: Skin-to-Skin Techniques” by Theresa Kledzik, RN, the author describes some recent studies using skin-to-skin holding and useful techniques for implementing skin-to-skin holding of preterm infants. Current understanding of the effects of the parent body on preterm infant development suggests that the physical cradle of the parent's chest and arms during skin-to-skin holding has a profound effect on the development of the newborn's brain as well as on the parenting process. Recent studies report the long term effects of skin-to-skin holding include a greater head circumference and significant improvement in motor and cognitive development at one year of age. Heightened parent sensitivity and infant interaction through six months of age was also observed. NICUs around the world have employed this intervention and noted benefits to both infants and parents. A recent survey of U.S. nurseries has reported that the number of units that practice skin-to-skin holding is growing.
  • Although most units reported that they accommodate parent requests for skin-to-skin holding, few nurseries offer or encourage its routine practice. Further, infants receiving many common NICU treatments were not considered candidates for this intervention, and only eight percent of the NICUs made skin-to-skin holding available to infants on high-frequency oscillatory ventilation (HFOV). Perceived barriers include lack of protocols or guidelines for safe implementation, and 64 percent of the nurseries reportedly experienced difficulties with implementation.
  • The first step to successfully implement skin-to-skin holding with a particular infant is to recognize that the possibility exists. Protocols that suggest that the infant be “stable” prior to holding can be ambiguous to the bedside caregiver. “Stability” in an infant in intensive care is certainly a variable term. Over many years, numerous studies have noted that skin-to-skin holding improved physiologic stability. With this information, one might conclude that in fact the “unstable” infant is a more likely candidate for the experience. Studies of very small infants and those on ventilators have supported this conclusion, showing significant benefits from skin-to-skin holding. In our experience, parents have routinely and successfully held skin-to-skin infants with bilateral chest tubes, with multiple lines, and on ventilators, including HFOV. Babies with frequent and significant apnea, bradycardia, and desaturation have experienced more stable vital signs when supported by the contact of ski-to-skin holding.
  • Although nestling an infant on a parent's chest is a very positive experience for both, the actual transfer of the baby from the bed to the parent can be stressful for the NICU infant. These considerations are most challenging with the first holding and when the infant's acuity increases. Thoughtful planning must also take into account the position of the infant during the move and during the holding. It has long been believed that midline head positioning may decrease the risk of intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH). Recent information cautions that, for the very immature infant, in the first week of life and during times of changing respiratory compliance, positioning the head 90 degrees to one side may contribute to an IVH.
  • The newly delivered mother may have physical compromises that make it difficult or impossible for her to be in the NICU or to participate actively while she is there. But because the immediate postpartum period is a time of heightened maternal engrossment with the infant, every measure should be taken to support it. Frequent phone contact, photos and videos of the baby, and when possible, visit with him in the NICU may lessen her sense of separation and support the attachment process.
  • The NICU setting and the technology-dependent newborn also influence the natural impulse of the new parents to embrace their child. Mothers and fathers very much want to hold and care for their infants. In the NICU, that desire may intensify, and parents may express the desire, presuming it s impossible to hold their baby. Parents also may be reluctant to hold him for fear of causing him injury. Staff may inadvertently contribute to this perception when discussing plans for holding with the parents, especially while the infant is still below a certain weight, less than a specified age, and/or on a particular support, such as the ventilator. Thus, a need exists for a way to make parents feel more comfortable holding their preterm infant, especially when the infant is connected to various support (e.g., IV drip, ventilator).
  • Skin-to-skin holding can be very effective for low-birth-weight, technology-dependent infants, but such holding can be difficult and cumbersome due to various tubes and hoses needing to be routed to the infant. Also, skin-to-skin holding may need to be performed for long periods of time in some cases. Hence, there is a need for a way to better facilitate skin-to-skin holding of infants, especially infants needing frequent and/or longer-term holding in conjunction with support from medical equipment.
  • SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • The problems and needs outlined above may be addressed by embodiments of the present invention. In accordance with one aspect of the present invention, a medical apparatus is provided that includes a garment, one or more patches of hook or loop material, and one or more straps. The garment is adapted to cover at least part of a chest area of a person while the person is skin-to-skin holding an infant, where the infant has medical tubing extending therefrom. Each patch is attached to an outside surface of the garment. Each strap includes hook or loop material, such that each strap may be removably attached to any of the one or more patches to form a hook-and-loop fastener to secure at least part of the medical tubing extending from the infant.
  • The garment may include a front portion and a back portion, and the garment may have side openings separating the front portion from the back portion of the garment. In such case, the medical apparatus may further include tie strings attached to the garment and located at the side openings for connecting the back portion of the garment to the front portion of the garment while the garment is worn. This provides an adjustable-sized garment adapted to fit a wide range of persons.
  • At least one of the patches may be attached to a front panel of the garment. At least one of the patches may be attached to a shoulder portion of the garment. At least one of the patches may be attached to a stomach portion of the garment. At least one of the patches may be attached to a chest portion of the garment. There may be any combination of placements of patches on the garment.
  • The garment preferably has an extended midline collar opening extending from a neck region toward a bottom of the garment. The garment may have a front opening separating a left front portion from a right front portion of the garment, like a button-down shirt. The medical apparatus may further include one or more fasteners attached to the garment. Such fastener(s) would be adapted to close at least part of the front opening by connecting the left front portion to the right front portion of the garment. Such fastener(s) may be a hook-and-loop fastener, a button, a snap, a clip, a buckle, a strap, a tie string, or combinations thereof, for example.
  • The garment may include an elastic material portion extending between a front portion and a back portion of the garment. This is another way to provide an adjustable size for the garment.
  • The garment may be generally vest shaped without sleeves. Alternatively, the garment may have sleeves (short, mid, or long sleeves). As yet another alternative, the garment may be generally apron shaped (without a back portion for covering a person's back while being worn) or hospital-gown shaped (with a large opening at the back), for example.
  • In accordance with another aspect of the present invention, a medical apparatus is provided that includes a garment, one or more patches of loop material, and one or more tube-securing straps. The garment is adapted to cover at least part of a chest area and at least part of a stomach area of a person while the person is skin-to-skin holding an infant, where the infant has medical tubing extending therefrom. The one or more patches of loop material are attached on an outside surface of the garment. The one or more patches of loop material are located over a chest portion of the garment, a stomach portion of the garment, a shoulder portion of the garment, or any combination thereof. Each tube-securing strap includes hook material, such that each tube-securing strap may be removably attached to any of the one or more patches to form a hook-and-loop fastener to secure at least part of the medical tubing extending from the infant. The garment may have a V-neck collar region, for example. Alternatively, the garment may have a front opening separating a left front portion from a right front portion of the garment, and further including button fasteners adapted to at least partially close the front opening (like that of a button-down shirt for example). The garment may have an midline opening at the chest portion of the garment. The medical apparatus may further include a chest strap extending from one side of the garment at the midline opening. Such chest strap includes hook material (or a button hole), for example, such that the hook material (or button hole) of the chest strap may be removably attached to at least one of the one or more patches located on an opposite side of the midline opening to form a hook-and-loop fastener (or to a button on the other side of the chest portion) to at least partially close the midline opening at the chest portion of the garment.
  • In accordance with yet another aspect of the present invention, a medical apparatus for assisting a person in skin-to-skin holding of an infant on the person's chest or stomach is provided. The medical apparatus includes a garment, loop material, and one or more straps. The garment has a chest portion with a midline opening extending from a neck opening (e.g., large v-neck or, alternatively, full opening like a button down shirt). The garment is adapted to fit a range of different sized persons by having adjustable-sized side portions (e.g., openings with ties or, alternatively, elastic material). The loop material is part of a hook-and-loop fastener. The loop material is attached to an outside surface of the garment. A chest portion of the loop material is located on at least one side of the chest portion of the garment, a stomach portion of the loop material is located on at least one side of a stomach portion of the garment, and a shoulder portion of the loop material is located on at least one shoulder portion of the garment. The loop portion may be one integral piece, or alternatively, one or more patches of material. Each strap includes hook material of the hook-and-loop fastener, such that each strap may be removably attached to the loop material to form the hook-and-loop fastener to secure medical equipment to the garment (e.g., tubing extending from the infant while the infant is being held within the garment and against the person's chest or stomach).
  • The foregoing has outlined rather broadly features of the present invention in order that the detailed description of the invention that follows may be better understood. Additional features and advantages of the invention will be described hereinafter which form the subject of the claims of the invention. It should be appreciated by those skilled in the art that the conception and specific embodiment disclosed may be readily utilized as a basis for modifying or designing other structures or processes for carrying out the same purposes of the present invention. It should also be realized by those skilled in the art that such equivalent constructions do no depart from the spirit and scope of the invention as set forth in the appended claims.
  • DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • The following is a brief description of the drawings, which illustrate exemplary embodiments of the present invention and in which:
  • FIG. 1 shows a parent skin-to-skin holding a preterm infant using a first illustrative embodiment of the present invention;
  • FIG. 2 shows a front view of a medical garment of a second illustrative embodiment;
  • FIG. 3 shows a use of the second illustrative embodiment during skin-to-skin holding of a preterm infant;
  • FIG. 4 shows a parent skin-to-skin holding a preterm infant using a third illustrative embodiment of the present invention;
  • FIG. 5 shows a parent skin-to-skin holding a preterm infant using a fourth illustrative embodiment of the present invention;
  • FIG. 6 shows a parent skin-to-skin holding a preterm infant using a fifth illustrative embodiment of the present invention; and
  • FIG. 7 shows a parent skin-to-skin holding a preterm infant using a sixth illustrative embodiment of the present invention.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF ILLUSTRATIVE EMBODIMENTS
  • Referring now to the drawings, wherein like reference numbers are used herein to designate like or similar elements throughout the various views, illustrative embodiments of the present invention are shown and described. The figures are not necessarily drawn to scale, and in some instances the drawings have been exaggerated and/or simplified in places for illustrative purposes only. One of ordinary skill in the art will appreciate the many possible applications and variations of the present invention based on the following illustrative embodiments of the present invention.
  • Generally, an embodiment of the present invention provides a medical garment for assisting in skin-to-skin holding of an infant, especially in cases where there are tubes and hoses connecting medical equipment to the infant in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), for example. Preterm or premature babies, and other babies having medical conditions, may have any number and type of medical tubing and/or wires extending therefrom, such as IV tubing, ventilator tubing, nasogastric tubing, heat monitors, breathing monitors, and other sensors, for example. This is especially common in a NICU.
  • FIG. 1 shows a medical garment 20 in accordance with first illustrative embodiment of the present invention. FIG. 1 shows a woman 22 skin-to-skin holding a premature baby 24 using the medical garment 20 of the first embodiment. As is preferred in using a skin-to-skin holding technique, the baby 24 is held against the mother's skin. The medical garment 20 provides a way to retain and secure medical tubing 26, while also assisting the mother 22 in holding the baby 24. Also, the garment 20 covers the mother's chest area while holding the baby 24, which may provide more privacy for the mother 22 (e.g., in a hospital environment). The garment 20 may also help keep the mother and baby from being cold if they are in a cold environment.
  • The baby 24 shown in FIG. 1 has an IV tube 30 and other tubes 32 for a breathing assistance device (not shown). The medical garment 20 of the first embodiment has several patches 40 of loop material. Each of the patches 40 is attached to the outside of the garment 20 (e.g., sewn onto the garment 20). In the first embodiment shown in FIG. 1, the patches 40 are located on the stomach area 42, the chest area 44, and the shoulder area 48 of the garment 20. A set of straps 50 of various sizes are also part of the medical garment 20. Each strap 50 has hook material attached to at least one side (preferably only on one side). The hook material on the straps 50 is adapted to interlock with the loop material of the patches 40 to form hook-and-loop fasteners. As shown in FIG. 1, the straps 50 can be removably attached to the patches 40 as needed or as desired to retain the medical tubing 26. By securing the medical tubing 26, it allows the person 22 holding the baby 24 to move around or reposition easier. It also allows the person 22 holding the baby 24 to lay or sit more comfortably.
  • The straps 50 provide a wide array of placements on the patches 40 to quickly adapt to different tubing types, different tubing directions (relative to the person and baby), and different numbers of tubing 26. Thus, the medical garment 20 is adaptable to handle many different configurations of tubing 26, both quickly and easily. It is preferred to have loop material on the patches 40 because the loop material is typically softer than the hook material, which will make the medical garment 20 more comfortable for the person 22 holding the baby 24 and for the baby. However, all or some of the patches 40 may have hook material, in alternative. Likewise, all or some of the straps 50 may have loop material, correspondingly.
  • Still referring to FIG. 1, the medical garment 20 of the first embodiment is generally vest shaped. It has a front portion 56 and a back portion 58. The back portion 58 typically will not need patches 40 like those of the front portion 56, but patches 40 may be included on part or all of the back portion 58 for other embodiments. The medical garment 20 of the first embodiment has adjustable sides 60 through the use of side openings 62 connected by tie strings 64. The tie strings 64 allow for the same medical garment 20 to be adjusted to fit a wide array of persons with different sized and shaped upper bodies. Hence, one size medical garment 20 may be adapted for use for many different size people.
  • Also, because the side openings 62 on the first embodiment separate the front portion 56 from the back portion 58, the medical garment 20 may be put on and taken off by tying and untying the tie strings 64. This may be useful in some situations to help the mother 22 position the baby 24 and medical tubing 26 before closing and tying some or all of the tie strings 64 on the sides 60. Although tie strings 64 are shown in this illustrative embodiment, any suitable fastener may be used to close or partially close the side openings 62, including (but not limited to): hook-and-loop fastener, button, snap, clip, buckle, strap, or any combination of fasteners, for example.
  • In the first embodiment, the medical garment 20 has an extended midline collar opening 70 extending from a neck region (the neck opening) toward a bottom of the garment 20 (about half way down the garment 20 in this example). The extended opening 70 allows the mother 22 to place the baby 24 into the garment 20 and/or remove the baby 24 from inside the garment 20 while the garment 20 is still worn by the mother 22. Also, the extended opening 70 allows the baby's head to be partially exposed, which aids in the routing of medical tubing 26, as shown in FIG. 1 for example. In other embodiments, the garment 20 may include one or more fasteners (e.g., buttons, hook-and-loop, snaps, ties, etc.) for providing partial closure of the midline extended opening 70 at any location along the opening 70 (e.g., upper, mid, lower, or any combination thereof).
  • The medical garment 20 of an embodiment may be made from any suitable material with any suitable thread count or thread pattern, including (but not limited to): cotton, linen, polyester, leather, suede, vinyl, Lycra, Spandex, wool, or any combination thereof, for example. In a preferred embodiment, the garment is made from a machine-washable, soft, and comfortable material (e.g., cotton or cotton blend).
  • FIGS. 2 and 3 shows a medical garment 20 in accordance with a second embodiment of the present invention. The second embodiment is essentially the same as the first embodiment, except that the patches 40 are smaller and the placement of the patches 40 is varied slightly (compare FIGS. 1 and 2). Making the patches 40 smaller and strategically located where most likely needed during use to secure medical tubing 26 may still provide much variability in positioning the straps 50 and medical tubing 26 during use of the garment (see e.g., the various configurations of straps 50 and sizes of straps 50 shown in FIG. 2). Also, the smaller patches 40 may make the medical garment 20 more comfortable to wear for the person 22 holding the baby 24 and/or for the baby 24. FIG. 3 shows the medical garment 20 of the second embodiment being used for skin-to-skin holding of a baby 24 having medical tubing 26 extending therefrom. Note that the medical tubing 26 in FIG. 3 is oriented and configured differently from the medical tubing 26 shown in FIG. 1. This illustrates that an embodiment of present invention provides many options for securing the medical tubing 26, which may further aid in holding the baby 24 and being comfortable while doing so.
  • FIG. 4 shows a person 22 skin-to-skin holding a baby 24 using a third illustrative embodiment of the present invention. In FIG. 3, note that an IV tube 30 is routed from the mother's right shoulder 46, to her stomach area 42, and into the medical garment 20 to the baby 24. This illustrates yet another configuration for holding the medical tubing 26. In the third embodiment, the medical garment 20 is again vest shaped. However, the medical garment 20 of the third embodiment does not include the adjustable side openings. The medical garment of FIG. 4 has two front portions 56, side portions 60, and a back portion 58. In another embodiment (not shown), the medical garment 20 may include an opening in the back portion 58 of the garment 20 to provide an adjustable size for the garment 20. For example, the medical garment 20 of an embodiment may be generally apron shaped with little or no back portion, not covering all or part of the person's back while being worn. This may be useful in situations where it is difficult for the mother to move (e.g., due to medical conditions of the mother), for example. Also in other embodiments (not shown), the medical garment 20 may have short sleeves or long sleeves of any suitable type or design, for example.
  • As shown in FIG. 4, the medical garment of the third embodiment has a front opening 72 separating a left front portion 74 from a right front portion 76 of the garment 20. In this example, the garment 20 includes button fasteners 78 (e.g., like that of a button down shirt) for closing or partially closing the front opening 72. An advantage of the full front opening 72 is that it may be easier to place the baby 24 into the garment 20 and remove the baby 24 from the garment 20. It may also help making the routing of medical tubing 26 more comfortable for the mother 22 and/or the baby 24, such as the IV tubing 30 shown in FIG. 4 for example. The patches 40 of the third embodiment (FIG. 4) are essentially the same as those of the first embodiment (FIG. 1). But as with any of embodiment of the present invention, the number, shape, size, and placement of the patches 40 may vary. In some embodiments (not shown) there may be patches 40 on only one side (left or right) of the medical garment 20, for example. In other embodiments (not shown), there may be more or larger patches 40 in the stomach area 42, for example. An embodiment (not shown) may have patches 40 in only the chest area 44 or in only the shoulder area 46, for example. Likewise, in any embodiment, the straps 50 may vary in size, shape, number, and placement. These are just a few examples to illustrate the numerous permutations and possible configurations for the patches 40 and straps 50 of an embodiment.
  • FIG. 5 shows a parent 22 skin-to-skin holding a preterm infant 24 using a fourth illustrative embodiment of the present invention. The fourth embodiment shown in FIG. 5 is essentially the same as the third embodiment shown in FIG. 4, except that it includes an additional feature. As shown in FIG. 5, the fourth embodiment includes a chest strap 80 extending from one side (right side in this example) of the garment at the top of the opening 72. The chest strap 80 can provide an adjustable partial closure of the upper portion of the opening 72. This may enhance the privacy for the mother 22 skin-to-skin holding her baby 24 by preventing the top portion of the opening 72 from falling open too much when she moves about or bends. The chest strap 80 is an optional feature that may be added to any of the embodiments of the present invention.
  • FIG. 6 shows a parent 22 skin-to-skin holding an infant 24 having medical conditions, by using a fifth illustrative embodiment of the present invention. The medical garment 20 of the fifth embodiment shown in FIG. 6 is essentially the same as the third embodiment shown in FIG. 4, except that it includes adjustable side openings 62 with tie strings 64 (like that of the first embodiment shown in FIG. 1). This illustrates how different features of different embodiments may be combined in other permutations to form other embodiments of the present invention.
  • FIG. 7 shows a care giver 22 skin-to-skin holding an ill or sick child 24 using a sixth illustrative embodiment of the present invention. The medical device 20 of the sixth embodiment shown in FIG. 7 is essentially the same as the third embodiment shown in FIG. 4, except that it includes an elastic material portion 90 extending between the front and back portions of the garment 20 (at the sides 60). The elastic material portion 90 is another way to provide an adjustable size for the garment 20. Thus, the medical garment 20 of the sixth embodiment can accommodate a variety of different sized persons. The elastic material portion 90 may be implemented in other embodiments of the present invention as well. In another embodiment (not shown), the back portion 58 of the garment 20 may include an elastic material portion to provide further or alternative adjustability for the garment 20.
  • Advantages and benefits of an embodiment of the present invention may include (but are not necessarily limited to):
      • Allowing skin-to-skin holding while comfortably retaining and securing medical tubing, hoses, and lines;
      • Providing more comfort to the parent and the infant during skin-to-skin holding;
      • Providing quick and easy fastening of tubing, hoses, and other medical equipment;
      • Providing a medical garment that may be washed and reused many times;
      • Providing an inexpensive solution to comfortably securing hoses and tubes during skin-to-skin holding;
      • Providing infinite adjustability and fast release using hook and loop fasteners;
      • Providing a garment configuration that allows one garment to fit many different sizes of people;
      • Providing an effective medical apparatus that is easy to use and easy to understand for NICU personnel (requires little or no training; can be easily and quickly explained to personnel); and
      • Providing an effective medical apparatus that encourages the use of skin-to-skin holding in NICU.
  • Although embodiments of the present invention and at least some of its advantages have been described in detail, it should be understood that various changes, substitutions, and alterations can be made herein without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention as defined by the appended claims. Moreover, the scope of the present application is not intended to be limited to the particular embodiments of the process, machine, manufacture, composition of matter, means, methods, and steps described in the specification. As one of ordinary skill in the art will readily appreciate from the disclosure of the present invention, processes, machines, manufacture, compositions of matter, means, methods, or steps, presently existing or later to be developed, that perform substantially the same function or achieve substantially the same result as the corresponding embodiments described herein may be utilized according to the present invention. Accordingly, the appended claims are intended to include within their scope such processes, machines, manufacture, compositions of matter, means, methods, or steps.

Claims (20)

1. A medical apparatus comprising:
a garment adapted to cover at least part of a chest area of a person while the person is skin-to-skin holding an infant, where the infant has medical tubing extending therefrom;
one or more patches of hook or loop material, each patch being attached to an outside surface of the garment;
one or more straps, each strap comprising hook or loop material, such that each strap may be removably attached to any of the one or more patches to form a hook-and-loop fastener to secure at least part of the medical tubing extending from the infant.
2. The medical apparatus of claim 1, wherein the garment comprises a front portion and a back portion, and wherein the garment has side openings separating the front portion from the back portion of the garment.
3. The medical apparatus of claim 2, further comprising tie strings attached to the garment and located at the side openings for connecting the back portion of the garment to the front portion of the garment while the garment is worn.
4. The medical apparatus of claim 1, wherein at least one of the patches is attached to a front panel of the garment.
5. The medical apparatus of claim 1, wherein at least one of the patches is attached to a shoulder portion of the garment.
6. The medical apparatus of claim 1, wherein at least one of the patches is attached to a stomach portion of the garment.
7. The medical apparatus of claim 1, wherein at least one of the patches is attached to a chest portion of the garment.
8. The medical apparatus of claim 1, wherein the garment has an extended midline collar opening extending from a neck region toward a bottom of the garment.
9. The medical apparatus of claim 1, wherein the garment has a front opening separating a left front portion from a right front portion of the garment.
10. The medical apparatus of claim 9, further comprising a fastener attached to the garment, the fastener being adapted to close at least part of the front opening by connecting the left front portion to the right front portion of the garment.
11. The medical apparatus of claim 10, wherein the fastener is selected from the group consisting of a hook-and-loop fastener, a button, a snap, a clip, a buckle, a strap, a tie string, and combinations thereof.
12. The medical apparatus of claim 1, wherein the garment comprises an elastic material portion extending between a front portion and a back portion of the garment.
13. The medical apparatus of claim 1, wherein the garment is generally vest shaped without sleeves.
14. The medical apparatus of claim 1, wherein the garment has sleeves adapted to cover at least part of the person's arms when worn.
15. The medical apparatus of claim 1, wherein the garment is generally apron shaped and does not include a back portion adapted to cover a person's back while being worn.
16. A medical apparatus comprising:
a garment adapted to cover at least part of a chest area and at least part of a stomach area of a person while the person is skin-to-skin holding an infant, where the infant has medical tubing extending therefrom;
one or more patches of loop material attached on an outside surface of the garment, the one or more patches of loop material being located over a chest portion of the garment, a stomach portion of the garment, a shoulder portion of the garment, or combinations thereof;
one or more tube-securing straps, each tube-securing strap comprising hook material, such that each tube-securing strap may be removably attached to any of the one or more patches to form a hook-and-loop fastener to secure at least part of the medical tubing extending from the infant.
17. The medical apparatus of claim 16, wherein the garment has a V-neck collar region.
18. The medical apparatus of claim 16, wherein the garment has a front opening separating a left front portion from a right front portion of the garment, and further comprising button fasteners adapted to at least partially close the front opening.
19. The medical apparatus of claim 16, wherein the garment has an midline opening at the chest portion of the garment, and further comprising a chest strap extending from one side of the garment at the midline opening, the chest strap comprising hook material, such that the hook material of the chest strap may be removably attached to at least one of the one or more patches located on an opposite side of the midline opening to form a hook-and-loop fastener to at least partially close the midline opening at the chest portion of the garment.
20. A medical apparatus for assisting a person in skin-to-skin holding of an infant on the person's chest or stomach, the medical apparatus comprising:
a garment having a chest portion with a midline opening extending from a neck opening, the garment being adapted to fit a range of different sized persons by having adjustable-sized side portions;
loop material of a hook-and-loop fastener attached to an outside surface of the garment, a chest portion of the loop material being located on at least one side of the chest portion of the garment, a stomach portion of the loop material being located on at least one side of a stomach portion of the garment, and a shoulder portion of the loop material being located on at least one shoulder portion of the garment;
one or more straps, each strap comprising hook material of the hook-and-loop fastener, such that each strap may be removably attached to the loop material to form the hook-and-loop fastener to secure medical equipment to the garment.
US11/377,001 2005-03-16 2006-03-16 Medical garments for assisting in skin-to-skin holding of infants in neonatal intensive care units Abandoned US20060206978A1 (en)

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* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
WO2009046523A1 (en) * 2007-10-09 2009-04-16 British Columbia Institute Of Technology Wearable medical tubing and cabling containment harness
US20090199338A1 (en) * 2008-02-07 2009-08-13 House Steven C Furniture Attachment System and Methods of Use
US7850595B2 (en) 2007-01-08 2010-12-14 White Robert D Transferring and holding device for high-risk neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) patients
US20110087171A1 (en) * 2009-10-13 2011-04-14 Jennifer Bracci Method and apparatus to secure life support lines to an infant during neonatal care
US20110108594A1 (en) * 2009-11-11 2011-05-12 Davis Amanda Marie Medical garment for skin-to-skin care and methods of use
US20120234877A1 (en) * 2006-12-22 2012-09-20 Hiniduma-Lokuge Prasanga D Infant Carrier
CN103445323A (en) * 2013-09-10 2013-12-18 广州市番禺区中心医院 Emergency transfer clothes for babies
US20150089710A1 (en) * 2013-10-02 2015-04-02 Hudlo Llc Skin-to-skin care garment
USD752855S1 (en) 2014-03-20 2016-04-05 Hudlo Llc Infant carrier garment
US20160158473A1 (en) * 2014-12-04 2016-06-09 Michael Schuster Ventilator circuit stabilizer and method of stabilizing a ventilator
US9375037B1 (en) * 2012-10-16 2016-06-28 Sarah Clark Adjustable infant carrying garment for outdoor wear
US9402430B2 (en) 2012-05-04 2016-08-02 Brownmed, Inc. Garment for carrying a baby to provide skin-to-skin contact
US10405672B2 (en) 2017-05-10 2019-09-10 Saplacor, LLC Neonate medical wraps for a baby and parent, and related methdos
GB2578003A (en) * 2018-10-08 2020-04-15 Greater Glasgow Healthboard Critical care securing device
EP3537958A4 (en) * 2016-11-14 2020-04-29 Glenn Fernandes Infant care apparatus and system
US10869802B2 (en) * 2009-06-15 2020-12-22 Barbara H. Kozol Infant joint compression device and method

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US2696617A (en) * 1953-02-25 1954-12-14 Worcester Gurdon Saltonstall Vest
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US5611085A (en) * 1992-11-02 1997-03-18 Rasmussen; Verner Garment for holding an electrocardiographic monitoring unit and cables
US5440761A (en) * 1993-01-29 1995-08-15 Nikon Inc. Multi-faceted photographer's vest
US6032289A (en) * 1995-05-05 2000-03-07 Villapiano; Susan Security garments
US5652961A (en) * 1995-12-29 1997-08-05 Knight-Yurt; Robin Lee Detachable hospital uniform scrub top
US5832536A (en) * 1996-02-29 1998-11-10 Kramer Handgun Leather, Inc. Holster undershirt
USRE38393E1 (en) * 1996-04-04 2004-01-27 Armel Bronson Harness/combination vest
US5897519A (en) * 1997-03-11 1999-04-27 Tapeless Technologies, Inc Intravenous securing device and secondary wound dressing
US5909802A (en) * 1997-07-08 1999-06-08 Albert A. Puco Vest backpack
US5907869A (en) * 1998-05-13 1999-06-01 Bohn; Elaine M. Vest that carries oxygen
US5946725A (en) * 1998-07-22 1999-09-07 Shatzkin; Ellen Adult infant bonding garment
US5991925A (en) * 1998-11-10 1999-11-30 Wu; Bo Kun Vest having locating pads with fastening strips for attaching accessories thereto
US6460187B1 (en) * 1999-05-26 2002-10-08 Marilyn R. Siegel Medical clothing
US6286146B1 (en) * 1999-11-15 2001-09-11 Debra Rocker Method of wearing weighted training vest while listening to audio equipment
US6574800B1 (en) * 2000-05-11 2003-06-10 Leger Jayle G. Garments for support, concealment, and accessibility of medical drainage apparatus
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US6918770B2 (en) * 2002-08-19 2005-07-19 Brightwave Enterprises, Llc Infant nurturing medical device
US6647552B1 (en) * 2003-02-05 2003-11-18 Guided Inspiration, Inc. Medical dignity garment
US20040226073A1 (en) * 2003-04-03 2004-11-18 Mccullar Lisa D. Post-surgical garment with drain-retaining pockets
US20060037124A1 (en) * 2004-08-19 2006-02-23 Cho Ho Soon M Papilla gown
US20070157362A1 (en) * 2004-11-08 2007-07-12 Bernadine Rogers Patient garment
US7296303B1 (en) * 2005-04-25 2007-11-20 Donna Samet Garment with pet carrying pouch
US20070017001A1 (en) * 2005-07-22 2007-01-25 Wagner Julie G Child's vest
US7293295B2 (en) * 2005-11-21 2007-11-13 2 Assist, Llc Medical support assembly garment
US7258593B2 (en) * 2006-01-11 2007-08-21 Jean Mineconzo Camisole for mastectomy patients

Cited By (23)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20120234877A1 (en) * 2006-12-22 2012-09-20 Hiniduma-Lokuge Prasanga D Infant Carrier
US7850595B2 (en) 2007-01-08 2010-12-14 White Robert D Transferring and holding device for high-risk neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) patients
US8360953B2 (en) 2007-01-08 2013-01-29 White Robert D Transferring and holding device for high-risk neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) patients
US20110087064A1 (en) * 2007-01-08 2011-04-14 White Robert D Transferring and holding device for high-risk neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) patients
US8763562B2 (en) * 2007-10-09 2014-07-01 British Columbia Institute Of Technology Wearable medical tubing and cabling containment harness
US20100325772A1 (en) * 2007-10-09 2010-12-30 Theresia Trevan Fladl Wearable medical tubing and cabling containment harness
WO2009046523A1 (en) * 2007-10-09 2009-04-16 British Columbia Institute Of Technology Wearable medical tubing and cabling containment harness
US20090199338A1 (en) * 2008-02-07 2009-08-13 House Steven C Furniture Attachment System and Methods of Use
US7954188B2 (en) * 2008-02-07 2011-06-07 House Steven C Furniture attachment system and methods of use
US10869802B2 (en) * 2009-06-15 2020-12-22 Barbara H. Kozol Infant joint compression device and method
US20110087171A1 (en) * 2009-10-13 2011-04-14 Jennifer Bracci Method and apparatus to secure life support lines to an infant during neonatal care
US20110108594A1 (en) * 2009-11-11 2011-05-12 Davis Amanda Marie Medical garment for skin-to-skin care and methods of use
US9402430B2 (en) 2012-05-04 2016-08-02 Brownmed, Inc. Garment for carrying a baby to provide skin-to-skin contact
US9375037B1 (en) * 2012-10-16 2016-06-28 Sarah Clark Adjustable infant carrying garment for outdoor wear
CN103445323A (en) * 2013-09-10 2013-12-18 广州市番禺区中心医院 Emergency transfer clothes for babies
US20150089710A1 (en) * 2013-10-02 2015-04-02 Hudlo Llc Skin-to-skin care garment
USD752855S1 (en) 2014-03-20 2016-04-05 Hudlo Llc Infant carrier garment
US20160158473A1 (en) * 2014-12-04 2016-06-09 Michael Schuster Ventilator circuit stabilizer and method of stabilizing a ventilator
EP3537958A4 (en) * 2016-11-14 2020-04-29 Glenn Fernandes Infant care apparatus and system
US10405672B2 (en) 2017-05-10 2019-09-10 Saplacor, LLC Neonate medical wraps for a baby and parent, and related methdos
USD859817S1 (en) * 2017-05-10 2019-09-17 Saplacor, LLC Neonate medical wrap
GB2578003A (en) * 2018-10-08 2020-04-15 Greater Glasgow Healthboard Critical care securing device
WO2020074871A1 (en) * 2018-10-08 2020-04-16 Greater Glasgow Healthboard Critical care securing device

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