US20060205470A1 - Automated gaming assembly providing a game visual enhancement - Google Patents

Automated gaming assembly providing a game visual enhancement Download PDF

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Publication number
US20060205470A1
US20060205470A1 US11359457 US35945706A US2006205470A1 US 20060205470 A1 US20060205470 A1 US 20060205470A1 US 11359457 US11359457 US 11359457 US 35945706 A US35945706 A US 35945706A US 2006205470 A1 US2006205470 A1 US 2006205470A1
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Prior art keywords
player
system
outcome
station
gaming
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Abandoned
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US11359457
Inventor
Martin Parent
Marjolaine Marcotte
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Martin Parent
Marjolaine Marcotte
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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63FCARD, BOARD, OR ROULETTE GAMES; INDOOR GAMES USING SMALL MOVING PLAYING BODIES; VIDEO GAMES; GAMES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • A63F5/00Roulette games
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63FCARD, BOARD, OR ROULETTE GAMES; INDOOR GAMES USING SMALL MOVING PLAYING BODIES; VIDEO GAMES; GAMES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • A63F7/00Indoor games using small moving playing bodies, e.g. balls, discs or blocks
    • A63F7/22Indoor games using small moving playing bodies, e.g. balls, discs or blocks in which the playing bodies are projected through the air
    • A63F7/30Details of the playing surface, e.g. obstacles; Goal posts; Targets; Scoring or pocketing devices; Playing-body-actuated sensors, e.g. switches; Tilt indicators; Means for detecting misuse or errors
    • A63F2007/308Means for detecting misuse or errors, e.g. giving audible or visible warning; Preventing misuse

Abstract

One embodiment of the present invention may be described as an automated gaming system comprising an outcome generating means, a platform surrounding it, and a plurality of player stations. Player stations are communicatively linked to the outcome generating means to provide players with participations in a wagering game. The automated gaming system is adapted to provide player stations to at least five players to concurrently participate in the game, these players being located at similar distance from the outcome generating means and being offered an unobstructed view of the outcome generating means since the player stations are located on one side of a player when the player faces the outcome generating means.

Description

    CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS
  • [0001]
    This application is a continuation-in-part of, and claims priority from, PCT application Ser. No. CA 05/000382, filed on Mar. 11, 2005 and entitled “Automated Gaming Assembly Providing a Game Visual Enhancement”, which claims priority from U.S. provisional application No. 60/551,833 filed on Mar. 11, 2004, the specifications of which are hereby incorporated by reference.
  • FIELD OF THE INVENTION
  • [0002]
    The invention relates to a new device designed to offer a casino-type automated game.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • [0003]
    Further features and advantages of the present invention will become apparent from the following detailed description, taken in combination with the appended drawings, in which:
  • [0004]
    FIG. 1 is a perspective view of an automated gaming system comprising six player stations;
  • [0005]
    FIG. 2 is a top view of the six-player station automated gaming system of FIG. 1;
  • [0006]
    FIG. 3 is side view of the automated gaming system of FIG. 1;
  • [0007]
    FIG. 4 is a top view of the six-player automated gaming system of FIG. 1 without the head 70;
  • [0008]
    FIG. 5 is an exploded view of a player station attachment on the platform of the automated gaming system of FIG. 1;
  • [0009]
    FIG. 6 is a top view of the roulette system used to establish outcomes in the six-player station automated gaming system of FIG. 1;
  • [0010]
    FIG. 7 is a screen shot representative of the image displayed on an electronic screen of a player station during the play of a round of roulette;
  • [0011]
    FIG. 8 is a block diagram illustrating components of the automated gaming assembly and of the player stations of FIG. 1;
  • [0012]
    FIG. 9 is a flow chart illustrating steps involved in playing a round of roulette with the automated gaming system of FIG. 1;
  • [0013]
    FIG. 10 is a top view of an alternative embodiment suitably designed to play a die game; and
  • [0014]
    FIGS. 11 a and 11 b are block diagrams illustrating components of a system comprising the embodiment illustrated on FIG. 10.
  • [0015]
    It will be noted that throughout the appended drawings, like features are identified by like reference numerals.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION
  • [0016]
    In an embodiment, the present description details an automated gaming system which comprises: a central section comprising an outcome generation system; and a plurality of player stations substantially disposed in periphery of the central section. The player stations are adapted to register wagers depending on received wagering inputs from players using input means disposed substantially on one operative face of each player station, and to resolve wagers based on an outcome signal received from the outcome generation system. The automated gaming system is adapted to receive a substantial portion of the player stations with their operative face facing substantially tangentially with respect to the outcome generation system thereby substantially facing a side of a player operating the player station when the player faces toward the outcome generation system.
  • [0017]
    In another embodiment, the present description details an automated gaming assembly comprising:—an outcome generation system;—a platform disposed in periphery of the outcome generation system at an appropriate height for a player facing toward the outcome generation system to have a direct view of an outcome generated by the outcome generation system. The platform comprises platform sections adapted to attach player stations to be communicatively linked to the outcome generation system for a player to play an outcome generation system associated game with the player operating a player station by using input means disposed on an operative face of each player station. The automated gaming assembly is adapted to attach a player station with the operative face of the player station substantially facing a side of the player operating the player station when the player faces toward the outcome generation system.
  • [0018]
    In a first embodiment of the invention as illustrated on FIG. 1, a perspective view of an automated mechanical roulette system 10 is schematically illustrated. The roulette system 10 comprises a base 20; a body 25; a platform 30 on which player stations 40 are disposed and attached; an automated driven roulette system 45 surrounded by the platform 30 and protected by a dome 50; and a series of support members 60 supporting the system head 70 and complementary screens 80 suitable for providing game history information. Complementary screens 80 may also provide special feature information or advertising information. On this view, a portion of the roulette system 45 is visible when the dome 50 is elevated for maintenance, as illustrated.
  • [0019]
    While the embodiment provides possible solutions for particular functional structures, variants are available. For example, many outcome generating means are available, including a roulette system 45, a die game system, and a ball game system. The player stations 40 are any interactive terminals communicatively linked to an outcome generating system and permitting players to participate in the wagering game. The complementary screens are any displaying means such as electronic screens, electronically controlled lights, and other suitable displays.
  • [0020]
    FIG. 2 illustrates the system 10 through a top view wherein only a portion of the platform 30 and the player stations 40 are visible. The head 70 hides most of the player stations 40, the dome 50 and the roulette system 45 in this view.
  • [0021]
    FIG. 3 provides a side view of the system 10. On this view, a portion of the roulette system 45 is visible when the dome 50 is down.
  • [0022]
    As illustrated on FIG. 4, the platform 30 comprises in its central portion a cut-out (under dome 50) for disposing the roulette system 45 (see FIG. 6). The platform 30 has a generally triangular shape surrounding the roulette system 45 with two player stations 40 disposed back to back on each tip. Globally, six player positions around the platform 45 at a similar distance from the roulette system 45 are available for players to operate a player station 40 and therefore to participate in the roulette game. A support member 60 is also disposed at each tip near the player stations 40 closer to the roulette system 45. The dome 50 is disposed above the roulette system 45 to perform a protective function; i.e., preventing interference by anyone which could influence the course of the ball during a roulette outcome generation process.
  • [0023]
    As illustrated in FIG. 4, a player 99 being placed face to a player station 40 may place wagers using player station inputting means such as a touch screen, or buttons (not shown in this example). The player station 40 face which bears inputting means is the operative face of the player station 40. Once a roulette outcome generation process is initiated, the player 99 has to rotate either his head or himself to have a direct view of the ball determining the roulette outcome. When facing the roulette system 45, the player has the player station substantially on his side and has an unobstructed view of the roulette system 45. Only the dome 50 and a portion of the platform 30 are between him and the roulette system 45; the first one being transparent and the second being at the same level as the roulette system 45 therefore not obstructing his view. Thus, no obstacle or unnecessary distance prevents players 99 from witnessing the outcome generation process.
  • [0024]
    The type of attachment used to secure player stations 40 on the platform 30 offers the benefit of allowing attaching different models of player stations 40. The attachment illustrated on FIG. 5 is based on a cylindrical connector 41 used as a stop-pin in combination with an arc-shaped aperture 42 located in the platform 30. Power and communication wires 43 pass from the player station 40 to under the platform 30 through the cylindrical connector 41. The player station 40 rotates according to an attachment axis defined by the securing assembly 44 rotatably attaching the player station 40 to the platform 30. Accordingly, the maximum rotation the player station 40 may perform is determined by the length of the arc-shaped aperture 42 performed in the platform 30. A metal plate (not shown) attached to the under surface of the platform 30 prevents access to the wires 43. The plate 30 may further be at least partially covered by a decorative triangularly shaped support moulding (not shown) disposed between the platform 30 and the system body 25 supporting part of the station weight. Thus, the resulting assembly permits to exchange a player station 40 with a different one without having to change the whole system. It further offers a certain freedom of rotation for enhanced player comfort.
  • [0025]
    Even if the above example of attaching means uses a cylindrical connector and a stop-pin combination, other variants are available such as a permanent attachment, a sliding attachment, etc. The same applies with wire or wireless communication with the roulette system.
  • [0026]
    FIG. 6 illustrates the roulette system 45, particularly the roulette structure and the ball 92 used to generate the outcome. The roulette structure comprises a series of identified slots 90 suitably designed to receive the ball 92 at the end of its course. The slots 90 are individually identified by a number and a color. The numeral identifications are non-repetitive and are from 0 (or 00) to 36. The coloring identifications are divided in three colors: green for the 0 (and 00 in appropriate cases) identified slot(s), red for half of the over 0 identified slots 90, and black for the remaining part of the slots 90; the colors alternating to never have to adjacent slots 90 of the same color (not shown on the roulette of FIG. 6 to ensure clarity). The roulette structure 45 presents slopes that are suitably designed to provide the same probabilities to each slot 90 of receiving the ball 92 at the end of its course while preventing the ball 92 to land anywhere else. Canoes 94 are disposed around the slots 90 to modify the ball course and therefore render the prevision of the ball landing slot 90 more difficult. The roulette structure 45 comprises an edge 100 limiting the ball course into the roulette system 45. As the ball 92 decelerates, the ball 92 is forced by the slope to travel form the edge 100 toward the center of the roulette structure to end its course in one slot 90. Outcome identifying means, comprising a light emitting diode 96 and light detecting sensors 98, permit the roulette outcome identification. Each slot 90 has a corresponding light detecting sensor 98. When the ball 92 lands in one slot 90, the corresponding light detecting sensor 98 does not receive any light signal from the light emitting diode 96 and therefore identifies the ball landing slot 90 to a processor which translates the light detecting sensor 98 position into the roulette outcome. Thus, an outcome generating means comprises outcome setting means (ball 92 and slots 90), outcome identifying means (diode, sensors and processor), communicating means and controlling means (programmed game controller).
  • [0027]
    To generate a roulette outcome, the section of the roulette structure 45 that bears slots 90 is driven in one rotational direction, namely clockwise, while the ball 92 is propelled counter clockwise onto the roulette structure 45 through an ejection conduit 102 disposed on periphery of the roulette structure edge 100 slightly over the normal course of the ball 92. Thus, as the ball 92 starts its course on the roulette structure 45, the ball 92 first follows the edge 100, decelerates, potentially bumps onto one or more canoes 94, and ultimately lands in one slot 90.
  • [0028]
    Securely disposed in the assembly base 25, an airflow motor (not shown) propels the ball 92 into a conduit (not shown) leading the ball 92 into the ejection conduit 102 when needed, a roulette motor (not shown) drives the rotation of the rotating section of the roulette structure, and a gaming controller 120 (schematically shown on FIG. 8) controls the airflow motor and the roulette motor. The gaming controller 120 also controls the means detecting the roulette outcome, namely the light emitting diode 96 and the light detecting sensors 98. It further controls the means retrieving the ball 92 from the roulette structure once the outcome is generated and identified, what is performed by elevating a portion of the roulette structure for the ball 92 to fall in a receiving container disposed under the elevated portion of the roulette structure and leading the ball back in the airflow fed conduit. Furthermore, the gaming controller 120 is in communication with the player stations 40. The gaming controller 120 may also be in communication with other components, such as a sound controller, a complementary screen controller, a management system, security and detection systems, and a player tracking system through a local area network (LAN) or a wireless communication network.
  • [0029]
    As stated, the player stations 40 are in communication with the gaming controller 120. Each player station 40, in the described embodiment, comprises a controlling means (a controller 140 or a program) controlling participation in the game, namely exchanging data and signals with other player station components and controlling communication with the gaming controller 120. Displaying means (the electronic screen 142, lights) visible by the player provides information to the player on the conduct of the game, as illustrated on FIG. 7. The electronic screen 142 provides a image of a wagering mat 110; a series of counters 112 informing the player on statuses such the amount of credits wagered 112 b, the credits remaining available 112 a to wager, and the prize won 112 c; a message box 114 informing on game state as if wagers are either or not possible to place; and an outcome area 116 informing players on last outcomes. The player stations also comprise player inputting means 144 embodied in touch screens, buttons and/or other sensing surfaces; monetary inputting means 146 such a coin hopper, card receiving means or a ticket reader; and an awarding means such as a ticket printer. Player stations 40 also comprise storing means (memory 150 or counters) maintaining programs, data and counter information such as wagering information.
  • [0030]
    FIG. 8 schematically illustrates functional relationship existing between a player station 40 and the automated gaming assembly. The player station controller 140 exchanges signals with the player station components to player the game, and with the gaming controller 120. According to gaming controller signals, different states are set in the game played on the player station 40, resulting in the game being at different steps of its process. For its part, the gaming controller 120 exchanges signals with the roulette mechanism 122 (such as the different motors) influencing the roulette and ball state 124, outcome identification means 128, and protecting means 126 including protection-related sensors and dome mechanism. The assembly comprises memory 130 used by the gaming controller 120 to keep programs and registered information.
  • [0031]
    FIG. 9 illustrates steps involved in playing roulette. The process starts with the gaming controller 120 secured in the automated gaming system 10 signalling the player stations 40 that a round is ready to start (step 150). In accordance, the player stations 40 activate the credit receiving process (step 152) and the wagering process (step 154). During these processes, the players may place new credits in their player stations 40 and used the credits available to place wagers on the next roulette outcome. An end wagering process (step 156) is also performed to prevent new wagers from being placed (step 158) when the outcome generation process fulfills an advancement criterion. Thus, the roulette play involves initiation of the roulette game outcome generation (step 170) taking form of the gaming controller 120 sending signals to the motor for the ball 92 to be propelled on the roulette structure. According to settings, the end wagering process (step 156) may involve evaluation of the ball speed or a ball travelling duration. After the wagering process has ended on player stations 40 (step 158), the ball 92 ultimately lands in one slot 90, the outcome is identified, and the gaming controller 120 transmits the roulette outcome to the player stations 40 (step 160). Each player station controller 140 resolves registered wagers (step 162) based on the received outcome signal; and pays the player accordingly, typically by increasing and decreasing counter values (164). Then, when the time is up, usually the time to retrieve the ball 92 from its landing slot 90, a new round is initiated (step 150).
  • [0032]
    FIG. 10 illustrates another embodiment of the invention wherein the game played is a die game (such as a crap game) with the playing stations disposed around the outcome generation assembly 160 being of two kinds: a) wagering stations 180 comprising a ticket reader, an electronic screen with touch screen and a station controller (not visible), and b) player stations 190 with a ticket reader 192, enhanced electronic screen and touch screen comparable to wagering stations 180, and a station controller (not visible). A player using a wagering station 180 may place wagers on the die outcome while a player using a player station 190 may further apply some control over the outcome generation process, such as, depending on the game played, holding die, modifying die toss settings, etc.
  • [0033]
    Communicatively linked to the automated gaming assembly 160 but physically separately located is a service station 170 permitting players to transfer money entered in the service station 170 into credits available to be wagered. Thus, a player feeds the service station 170 with the amounts he wants to wager at the beginning of its play session, receives a ticket identifying his account, goes to a wagering station 180 or a player station 190, and places his ticket into the ticket reader 182 or 192. The station 180 or 190, after reading the ticket, communicates with an accounting system, transfers founds to the station 180 or 190 where the credits become available for the player to wager. When the player desires to ends his session, he removes the ticket from the station 180 or 190, places it into a service station 170 wherein the ticket is exchanged for a redeemable voucher an attendant may exchange for standard currency.
  • [0034]
    Thus, the block diagram illustrating the system for the play of an automated die game using the assembly of FIG. 10 is slightly different from the one hereinabove depicted. FIG. 11 illustrates the system comprising the automated gaming assembly 200, the player station(s) 220, the wagering stations 240, and the service station(s) 260. A network (LAN) 290 links the service station(s) 260, the automated gaming assembly 200 and a central server 280 wherein an accounting database 282 maintains information on found transfer, such as money deposited in service station(s) 260, credit transferred to a player station 220 or a wagering station 240, and credits transferred into vouchers redeemable by attendants. A secured network 292 maintains communication between the gaming controller 202 and the station controllers 222 and 224.
  • [0035]
    As illustrated, each service station 260 comprises a controller 262 that: a) maintains communication with the central server 280; b) commands the printing of ticket printing and voucher printing by a printer 264 for allowing player to play or to redeem prizes won; c) commands ticket reading to be read by a reader 266 when a player ends its session; and d) accesses memory 268.
  • [0036]
    The automated die assembly 200 may comprise protecting means 206 (as example including a dome) preventing players from fraudulently influencing the outcome, an outcome generation mechanism 204 being partially controllable by a player at a player station using outcome control inputs, die 208, and die identification means 210 including image capturing and analysing means. These components are more or less controlled by the gaming controller 202 depending in part from signals received from a player station for the outcome generation. The assembly further comprises memory 212 for storing necessary programs and registering information.
  • [0037]
    The player station(s) 220 and wagering stations 240 are composed of a controller 222 and 242; an electronic screen 224 and 244 adapted for their particular needs; input means 226 and 246 also adapted for their particular needs; a ticket reader 228 and 248; and memory 230 and 250. As stated, the needs of a wagering station 220 differ from the ones of a player station 240. The latter permits a player to influence the outcome generation process while the wagering station 220 capability is limited to placing wagers regarding die outcomes. Thus, an outcome generation process includes signal exchange between the gaming controller 202 and a player station controller 222.
  • [0038]
    Other physical embodiments are possible according to the kind of stations that are suitable for the game, the available equipment, and the services that have to be offered at the player stations. For instance, the stations may essentially be located on the platform, be distinct devices extending around the platform, or partially to almost totally embedded in the platform. Touch screen, buttons, matting with wired sensors underneath, one screen or many screens of different dimensions, or even no screen can be used according to the needs.
  • [0039]
    Another embodiment (not illustrated) is one wherein the players are all facing the same direction. For instance, the player stations may all have their operative faces facing clockwise, therefore establishing that players are all facing the some direction between the back and the side of the player placed in front of him. Accordingly, players may prefer this configuration depending on his preferences regarding the proximity of other players.
  • [0040]
    Yet another embodiment (not illustrated) is one wherein player stations comprise two operative faces substantially opposed to each other. According to this embodiment, two players disposed at locations on the two sides of a platform tip may participate in the wagering game.
  • [0041]
    An addition to one embodiment is a player station remotely located from the automated gaming system, and receiving both outcome signals and captured images from the automated gaming system. In this case, the player located at this remote player station would witness the outcome through the captured image rather than witnessing it live.
  • [0042]
    Another embodiment is an assembly wherein an attendant would participate in the game even if the wagers are resolved by player stations.
  • [0043]
    As the above embodiments were disclosed for the play of roulette and die games, other games may benefit from similar gaming systems. The list of suitable games includes bingo, keno, electronic card games, or even automated race games.
  • [0044]
    Furthermore, the automated gaming assembly and player station controllers may be adapted for the play of a pari-mutuel game. Accordingly, wagering information would be continuously exchanged between player stations. In consequence, the wagering resolution process, rather than demanding knowledge only of the outcome and of a static pay schedule, would demand more information from other sources, at least wagering information from other player stations. The information exchange would be different but the assembly would essentially remain the same. Other embodiments could also differ regarding programs, games, communication, game control, etc. without departing from the scope of the invention.
  • [0045]
    It is intended, while block diagram illustrates system components communicating with each other, that those skilled in the art will recognize that the invention may be embodied through a combination of hardware and software components. These components are illustrates as such in the appended block diagrams solely to teach their functionalities and relationship. Thus, programmable computers, computer applications or operating systems may be suitable to perform functions illustrated by one or more illustrated components without departing from the scope of the invention.
  • [0046]
    Furthermore, in case of some functional components being possible to be embodied as functional methods, these methods may be embodied in a machine or a system, carried out as a computer readable medium, a processing-readable memory, or communicated as an electrical or electro-mechanic signal.
  • [0047]
    Thereupon, the intent of the above document is to efficiently teach the invention through exemplary embodiments, while solely the appended claims are intended to define the scope of the invention.

Claims (30)

  1. 1. An automated gaming system comprising:
    a central section comprising an outcome generation system; and
    a plurality of player stations disposed in periphery of the central section, wherein the player stations are adapted to register wagers depending on received wagering inputs from players using input means disposed on an operative face of each player station, and to resolve wagers based on an outcome signal received from the outcome generation system, and
    wherein the automated gaming system is adapted to provide the player stations with their operative face facing substantially tangentially with respect to the outcome generation system thereby substantially facing a side of a player operating the player station when the player faces toward the outcome generation system.
  2. 2. The automated gaming system of claim 1, wherein at least one of said player stations further comprises:
    displaying means for displaying information regarding participation in the wagering game;
    storing means for storing data related to the wagering game;
    communicating means for receiving signals from the outcome generation means; and
    controlling means controlling participations in the wagering game, comprising controlling the displaying of game information, the storing of game data used in game participations and the exchange of communications with the outcome generating means.
  3. 3. The automated gaming system of claim 1, wherein the outcome generating means comprising:
    outcome setting means for setting outcomes;
    outcome identifying means for identifying outcomes;
    communicating means for communicating signals [which signals?] from ???? to???; and
    controlling means adapted to signal the outcome generating means to initiate a game outcome generation process, to receive an outcome signal from the outcome identifying means, and to transmit a game outcome signal to at least one of player stations.
  4. 4. The automated gaming system of claim 3, wherein the controlling means of the outcome generation means receives a signal from one of said player stations, and generates and communicates a response signal to one of said player stations modifying one of a game outcome generation process, and a wager resolving process.
  5. 5. The automated gaming system of claim 1, wherein two of said player stations are disposed substantially back to back.
  6. 6. The automated gaming system of claim 1, wherein the outcome generating means and the platform are at similar height.
  7. 7. The automated gaming system of claim 1, wherein at least one of said player stations is attached to the platform through attaching means that permits, when the player station is released, to exchanged said player station with another one of a different model.
  8. 8. The automated gaming system of claim 1, wherein at least one of said player stations is rotationally attached to the platform, whereby permitting adjustment of orientation of said player station.
  9. 9. The automated gaming system of claim 3, wherein the game outcome is one of roulette, a die game, a ball game, and a virtual card game.
  10. 10. The automated gaming system of claim 3, wherein the game outcome is one generated using at least one of balls, cards, electronically generated images, and die.
  11. 11. The automated gaming system of claim 3, wherein the game outcome is one generated using symbols, with said symbols being provided either by reels, wheels or electronic displays.
  12. 12. The automated gaming system of claim 3, wherein the outcome generation system comprises a roulette system using a roulette spinning portion and a ball rolling at an initial speed gradually decreasing during the outcome generation process, the automated gaming system further comprising speed evaluating means that evaluates the speed of the ball and that signals the controlling means of the outcome generation system when a predetermined speed criterion is reached upon which said controlling means signals the player stations to prevent new wagers from being registered.
  13. 13. The automated gaming system of claim 1, wherein the automated gaming system is communicatively linked to an additional remote player station.
  14. 14. The automated gaming system of claim 1, further comprising an attendant position where an attendant controls the conduct of the wagering game.
  15. 15. The automated gaming system of claim 1, further comprising an additional displaying means providing one of: a) special feature information, b) game history information, and c) advertising information.
  16. 16. The automated gaming system of claim 1, further being communicatively linked to a service station wherein one of said players performs monetary processes permitting said player to register credits available to be used on one of said player stations.
  17. 17. The automated gaming system of claim 16, wherein the service station is structurally remote from the automated gaming system.
  18. 18. The gaming system of claim 1, wherein one of said player stations further comprises an operative face which normally points a direction between a vertical direction and substantially toward one of said players operating said player station.
  19. 19. The gaming system of claim 1, wherein one of said player stations further comprises two operative faces facing substantially opposite directions, wherein each one of said operative faces is adapted to provide participations in the wagering game to one of said players.
  20. 20. An automated gaming assembly comprising:
    an outcome generation system;
    a platform disposed around the outcome generation system at an appropriate height for a player facing toward the outcome generation system to have a direct view of an outcome generated by the outcome generation system; the platform comprising platform sections adapted to attach player stations to be communicatively linked to the outcome generation system for a player to play an outcome generation system associated game with the player operating a player station by using input means disposed on an operative face of each player station,
    wherein the automated gaming assembly is adapted to attach a player station with the operative face of the player station substantially facing a side of the player operating the player station when the player faces toward the outcome generation system.
  21. 21. The automated gaming assembly of claim 20, wherein the platform comprises a tip section extending outwardly with respect to the outcome generating means wherein said attaching means is located.
  22. 22. The automated gaming assembly of claim 20, wherein the outcome generating means and the platform are at similar height.
  23. 23. The automated gaming assembly of claim 20, wherein said attaching means are adapted to attach two of said player stations in a back to back configuration.
  24. 24. The automated gaming assembly of claim 20, wherein said attaching means are adapted to attach one of said player stations comprising two operative faces facing substantially opposite directions, thereby adapted to provide concurrent participations of two of said players in the wagering game.
  25. 25. The automated gaming assembly of claim 20, wherein one of said player stations is either embedded in the platform, annexed to the platform, or installed on the platform.
  26. 26. The automated gaming assembly of claim 20, wherein the outcome generating means generates roulette outcomes.
  27. 27. The automated gaming assembly of claim 20, wherein the outcome generating means uses at least one of a ball, a card, an electronically generated image and a dice to generate an outcome.
  28. 28. The automated gaming assembly of claim 20, wherein the outcome generating means uses symbols to generate outcomes, with said symbols being provided either by reels, wheels or an electronic displaying means.
  29. 29. The automated gaming assembly of claim 20, wherein the attaching means permits to adjust orientation of an attached player station.
  30. 30. The automated gaming assembly of claim 20, wherein the operative face of one of said player stations, when attached to the platform, is pointing a direction between a vertical direction and substantially toward the player operating said player station.
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WO2009093065A1 (en) * 2008-01-21 2009-07-30 Nrc Group Plc Roulette gaming system

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