New! View global litigation for patent families

US20050160281A1 - System and method for delivering versatile security, digital rights management, and privacy services - Google Patents

System and method for delivering versatile security, digital rights management, and privacy services Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US20050160281A1
US20050160281A1 US10984368 US98436804A US2005160281A1 US 20050160281 A1 US20050160281 A1 US 20050160281A1 US 10984368 US10984368 US 10984368 US 98436804 A US98436804 A US 98436804A US 2005160281 A1 US2005160281 A1 US 2005160281A1
Authority
US
Grant status
Application
Patent type
Prior art keywords
storage
sp
security
access
system
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Granted
Application number
US10984368
Other versions
US7925894B2 (en )
Inventor
Robert Thibadeau
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
Seagate Technology LLC
Original Assignee
Seagate Technology LLC
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date

Links

Images

Classifications

    • GPHYSICS
    • G06COMPUTING; CALCULATING; COUNTING
    • G06FELECTRICAL DIGITAL DATA PROCESSING
    • G06F21/00Security arrangements for protecting computers, components thereof, programs or data against unauthorised activity
    • G06F21/70Protecting specific internal or peripheral components, in which the protection of a component leads to protection of the entire computer
    • G06F21/78Protecting specific internal or peripheral components, in which the protection of a component leads to protection of the entire computer to assure secure storage of data
    • G06F21/80Protecting specific internal or peripheral components, in which the protection of a component leads to protection of the entire computer to assure secure storage of data in storage media based on magnetic or optical technology, e.g. disks with sectors
    • G06F21/805Protecting specific internal or peripheral components, in which the protection of a component leads to protection of the entire computer to assure secure storage of data in storage media based on magnetic or optical technology, e.g. disks with sectors using a security table for the storage sub-system
    • GPHYSICS
    • G06COMPUTING; CALCULATING; COUNTING
    • G06FELECTRICAL DIGITAL DATA PROCESSING
    • G06F3/00Input arrangements for transferring data to be processed into a form capable of being handled by the computer; Output arrangements for transferring data from processing unit to output unit, e.g. interface arrangements
    • G06F3/06Digital input from or digital output to record carriers, e.g. RAID, emulated record carriers, networked record carriers
    • G06F2003/0697Digital input from or digital output to record carriers, e.g. RAID, emulated record carriers, networked record carriers device management, e.g. handlers, drivers, I/O schedulers
    • GPHYSICS
    • G06COMPUTING; CALCULATING; COUNTING
    • G06FELECTRICAL DIGITAL DATA PROCESSING
    • G06F3/00Input arrangements for transferring data to be processed into a form capable of being handled by the computer; Output arrangements for transferring data from processing unit to output unit, e.g. interface arrangements
    • G06F3/06Digital input from or digital output to record carriers, e.g. RAID, emulated record carriers, networked record carriers
    • G06F3/0601Dedicated interfaces to storage systems

Abstract

A method for providing enhanced security features in a storage device involves partitioning a storage media in the storage device into a hidden partition and a storage partition in the storage media. A base class is written to the hidden partition. A security provider base class is instantiated from the base class. The security provider base class is adapted to control access to the storage media.

Description

    CROSS REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATION(S)
  • [0001]
    This application is a continuation in part of pending application Ser. No. 10/963,373, filed Oct. 12, 2004, entitled “SYSTEM AND METHOD FOR DELIVERING VERSATILE SECURITY, DIGITAL RIGHTS MANAGEMENT, AND PRIVACY SERVICES FROM STORAGE CONTROLLERS,” which is a continuation in part of pending application Ser. No. 09/912,931, filed on Jul. 25, 2001, entitled “METHODS AND SYSTEMS FOR PROMOTING SECURITY IN A COMPUTER SYSTEM EMPLOYING ATTACHED STORAGE DEVICES,” both of which are incorporated herein by reference in their entireties.
  • BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • [0002]
    The present invention generally relates to methods and systems for securing computer systems. More particularly, the present invention relates to methods and devices containing a security partition and a disc drive architecture for securing information in a system, which may be connected to a networked environment.
  • [0003]
    Computer operating systems or platforms play a central role in electronic commerce, as well as in day-to-day business operations for large and small companies alike. As more computer systems become connected to networks (private and public), the need to secure information has become critical. Unfortunately, traditional operating systems provide limited security.
  • [0004]
    To protect information, most business have taken steps to protect individual server platforms. However, no overall corresponding improvement in client platforms has been implemented, in part, because of the variety of client platforms and because of the cost. While the PC platform provides the benefits of flexibility and openness, fueling exceptional economic growth, the same benefits also expose users to security breaches, such as hackers, viruses, and the like.
  • [0005]
    It is sometimes possible to detect whether software has been modified, provided that it is known what element of the OS might have been modified. However, current computing platform technologies do not allow a local or remote user to test whether a platform can be trusted with sensitive information. For example, a host system can verify that a particular user is accessing the system, but it is difficult (if not impossible) to establish with certainty whether the particular user's computing platform is a corporate machine and whether it runs the required software and configurations.
  • [0006]
    With the advent and widespread deployment of the Internet, the deficiencies of conventional computer security systems have been exposed and sometimes exploited. A disadvantage of the Internet is that it permits many ways to infiltrate the perimeter defenses of conventional computer systems. Damaging virus programs, for example, can be injected through firewalls and into a computer system. Generally, infiltration of these perimeter defenses can compromise data and computer programs, which can impact derivative capabilities, such as digital rights management.
  • [0007]
    While software has been developed to provide some protection on a platform by platform basis, software-only security implementations are dependent on proper installation and execution. A conventional example of such localized computer system security is virus detection software. Virus detection software, however, can be susceptible to exploitation by, for example “spoofing” or “wrappering” strategies. In a compromised system, virus detection software may be made to appear operational, even when it is not operating properly. This highlights a fundamental problem with conventional computer security systems, namely that the security system operates within the same environment as the operating system. Software security implementations (such as virus detection software) may be impacted by software that has already been executed on the software platform. The phrase “software platform” as used herein generally refers to the operating environment or operating system (OS). Even tightly controlled software cannot vouch for its own integrity. For example, if malicious software, such as a virus, has bypassed the perimeter defenses or security features of the OS and has managed to corrupt its operation, the OS cannot be expected to recognize the security breach, reliably.
  • [0008]
    Furthermore, the operating system environment for many computer systems is also common, for example, to the Internet environment or to another network communications medium. Because of the commonality between the client operating system and the operating environment, many means of attack on a computer system are available merely by moving computer code, for example, from the Internet to the computer operating system.
  • [0009]
    Some conventional methods of computer protection may involve special purpose security hardware or firmware installed in the BIOS of a computer system. These methods can establish secondary lines of defense internal to operation of a computer system but external to the complicated and error-prone operating system environment.
  • [0010]
    Other conventional computer security systems may include a security device connected to a SCSI bus that protects storage devices on the bus. This type of security system recognizes that the storage device is more secure while not operating in an environment common to the operating system. However, the SCSI bus of this system exposes all devices on the bus, including the storage devices. Specifically, the SCSI bus exposes all devices on the bus by allowing access to the attached devices. Therefore, effective utilization of a security device attached to a SCSI bus requires intimate operating systems involvement.
  • [0011]
    Still other computer security systems recognize the benefit of guarding the storage device at the controller level but are based on shared private keys. Shared private keys are well-known to provide less security than securing and concealing elements of public-private key encryption, because authentication keys are shared and are not private to a single device. This type of system suffers the same problem of operating system dependence illustrated above, because it is also directed to modification of the file management system of the computer operating system.
  • [0012]
    In another type of computer security system, the security perimeter consists of self-contained software that exports only a simple storage interface for external access and that verifies the integrity of each command before processing the command. By contrast, most file servers and client machines execute a multitude of services that are susceptible to attack. Typically, such a system provides for automated recovery to a known good state, relying on secure storage mechanisms. Unfortunately, this type of system also requires operating systems modification. The automated recovery system incorporates complexity and, therefore, vulnerability, approaching that of an OS. Moreover, the automated recovery system permits opportunities for the introduction of Trojan horses, nd the like. “Trojan Horse” is a generic term for a irus or a security-violating program or script that is disguised as something else. Typically, a Trojan Horse masquerades as a benign program, like a directory Lister for example, but which contains a trap door or attack program that can be used to break into a network.
  • [0013]
    The ATA Host Protected Area security protocol provides security to a computer system by hiding a portion of a storage media of a storage device during the boot phase of a computer system. In this method, the storage device hides a portion of the storage media by telling the operating system that the storage device has less storage space than the storage device actually has. The undeclared storage space represents an area of the storage media that is essentially inaccessible to the BIOS. Special BIOS firmware or other special code can have exclusive access to the hidden or undeclared portion of storage device. As an additional security measure, the ATA Host Protected Area can require passcode access to this additional amount of storage space. The ATA Host Protected Area was originally designed to provide security assurance in the form of an enhanced operating system and application crash recovery system. For example, the hidden or undeclared portion of the storage device can be used to cache a known good version of the system or application software, outside the capability of the operating system to address. In practice, this restricts access to a portion of the storage device to a computer program running either in the main device firmware or in the operating system environment.
  • [0014]
    However, the ATA Host Protected Area protocol has a security hole in that it is still possible to intercept communications with the storage device. The hidden ATA Host Protected Area partition of the storage device can be revealed, for example, by putting that same disc drive into another computer that does not reserve the Host Protected space. The passcode, if used, is not retained across power cycles. While the ATA Host Protected Area is an acceptable place to protect local backup code and data from virus-like infections, the ATA Host Protected Area is typically not the best place to conceal data. Furthermore, the only authentication required by ATA Host Protected Area is a “first come, first served, winner take all” type of device authentication.
  • [0015]
    Still another type of computer security system involves a Trusted Computing Platform (TCP). In general, a trusted platform (TP) is a computing platform that is trusted by local users and remote entities, including users, software, web sites and all third parties. To enable a user to trust a computing platform, a trusted relationship must be built between the user and the computing platform, which can verify to the user that an expected boot process, a selected operating system, and a set of selected security features in the computing platform have been properly installed and are functioning correctly. An organization called the “Trusted Computing Platform Alliance” (TCPA, and later reconstituted as the Trusted Computing Group, TCG) has defined a specification for the TCP. The TCPA/TCG via the specification advocates that a separate mechanism, called the Subsystem, be used to establish trust relationships between various modules and components within the system and with other entities. Generally, the subsystem includes a Trusted Platform Module (TPM) and software for performing integrity metrics in conjunction with the TPM.
  • [0016]
    The Subsystem is designed to prevent logical, or software-based attacks. Generally, the Subsystem establishes a hardware-based foundation for trust, based on a set of integrity metrics, which are defined as measurements of key platform characteristics. Specifically, the integrity metrics are measurements that can be used to establish platform identity, such as BIOS, boot-loader, OS loader, and OS security policies. Cryptographic hashing techniques are used to extend trust from the BIOS to other areas of the platform.
  • [0017]
    Any type of computing platform (for example, a PC, server, personal digital assistant (PDA), printer, mobile phone, or any other networkable device) may be a trusted platform. A trusted platform is particularly useful for mobile platforms that are connected to a network, in part, because physical mobility coupled with connectivity increases the need for stronger trust and confidence in the computer platform. In particular, such connectivity and mobility increases the likelihood of viruses and of unauthorized access to critical systems. Unfortunately, though the present trusted drive architecture prevents the drive from being compromised by logical or software based attacks, the Subsystem may, optionally, still be compromised by physical means, which can expose the secrets of the Subsystem.
  • SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • [0018]
    In one embodiment, a storage media of a storage device is partitioned into a hidden partition and a storage partition. A base class is written to the hidden partition. A security provider base is instantiated from the base class. The security provider base class is adapted to control access to the storage media.
  • [0019]
    In another embodiment, the storage device has a processor and firmware adapted to access data stored on a storage media. Disc drive firmware is written to a controller of the storage device. The storage media of the storage device is partitioned into a hidden portion and a data portion. A security provider object template is written to the hidden partition. Security providers are instantiated using the security provider object template. Each security provider is adapted to control access to the storage device.
  • [0020]
    A storage device for providing hardened security features has a storage media partitioned into a hidden portion and a data portion and has a storage controller adapted to control access to the storage media. A trusted drive feature is stored in a firmware of the storage controller, and is adapted to authenticate access requests to determine whether each access request can be trusted. A SP base object is stored in the hidden portion, and is adapted to cooperate with the trusted drive feature to control access rights to data on the storage media.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • [0021]
    FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a disc drive in which the present invention is useful.
  • [0022]
    FIG. 2A is a simplified block diagram of a system according to one embodiment of the present invention.
  • [0023]
    FIG. 2B is a simplified block diagram of a system according to another embodiment of the present invention.
  • [0024]
    FIG. 3 is a simplified flow diagram of the creation of a Trusted drive according to an embodiment of the present invention.
  • [0025]
    FIG. 4 is a simplified flow diagram of a customization process provided by an original equipment manufacturer in order to customize security features of the drive for a particular customer.
  • [0026]
    FIGS. 5A and 5B illustrate a simplified block diagram of a partitioned storage media having a hidden partition and security provider objects.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION
  • [0027]
    FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a disc drive 100 in which the present invention may be used. Disc drive 100 can be configured as a traditional magnetic disc drive, a magneto-optical disc drive or an optical disc drive, for example. Disc drive 100 includes a housing with a base 102 and a top cover (not shown). Disc drive 100 further includes a disc pack 106, which is mounted on a spindle motor (not shown) by a disc clamp 108. Disc pack 106 includes a plurality of individual discs 107, which are mounted for co-rotation about central axis 109. Each disc surface has an associated slider 110, which is mounted to disc drive 100 and carries a read/write head for communication with the disc surface.
  • [0028]
    In the example shown in FIG. 1, sliders 110 are supported by suspensions 112 which are in turn attached to track accessing arms 114 of an actuator 116. The actuator shown in FIG. 1 is of the type known as a rotary moving coil actuator and includes a voice coil motor (VCM), shown generally at 118. Voice coil motor 118 rotates actuator 116 with its attached sliders 110 about a pivot shaft 120 to position sliders 110 over a desired data track along a path 122 between a disc inner diameter 124 and a disc outer diameter 126. Voice coil motor 118 operates under control of internal circuitry 128. Other types of actuators can also be used, such as linear actuators.
  • [0029]
    During operation, as discs 107 rotate, the discs drag air under the respective sliders 110 and along their bearing surfaces in a direction approximately parallel to the tangential velocity of the discs. As the air passes beneath the bearing surfaces, air compression along the air flow path causes the air pressure between the discs and the bearing surfaces to increase, creating a hydrodynamic lifting force that counteracts the load force provided by suspensions 112. The hydrodynamic lift force causes the sliders 110 to lift and fly above or in close proximity to the disc surfaces.
  • [0030]
    In general, disc drive controllers and storage subsystem controllers currently trust their hosts. Various threats, as outlined above, can compromise host security and allow unauthorized access to confidential information that is stored on disc drives and on storage subsystems. Therefore, there is a need for improved security of storage devices and storage subsystems.
  • [0031]
    Hereinafter, the terms “storage device”, “storage subsystem” and “disc drive” or “disc” are used interchangeably, except where otherwise noted, and include any data storage device that is accessible directly via a network or that is installed within a computer system. The storage device need not necessarily incorporate a physical “disc”, but preferably incorporates a place for storage managed by a controller with firmware.
  • [0032]
    As used herein, the phrase “computer system” is used to refer to any device having a memory storage that can be connected to a private or public network, whether directly or indirectly. For example, computer systems include, but are not limited to, desktop computer systems, laptop computer systems, networked computer systems, wireless systems such as cellular phones and PDA's, digital cameras including self-contained web-cams, and/or any reasonable combination of these systems and de-vices.
  • [0033]
    One solution for improving storage device security involves introducing a sophisticated operating system architecture, such as Unix, Linux, Windows, and the like, into the controller for the storage device. High-end systems, such as Storage Area Network (SAN) systems, have adopted this approach.
  • [0034]
    An alternative solution involves building access controls into the resource-limited environments of disc drives and storage subsystem controllers. Unfortunately, this technique costs precious additional physical controller resources and risks inconvenience to the customer when access is denied.
  • [0035]
    The present invention relates to a system and method for promoting storage device security using a trusted drive architecture. The “Trusted Drive” design (meaning a drive or storage subsystem controller design) for providing versatile security and digital rights management according to the present invention pertains to specific types of hidden data and hidden operations.
  • [0036]
    FIG. 2A illustrates a simplified block diagram of a system 200 including a security provider (SP) according to an embodiment of the present invention. As shown, the system 200 has a storage subsystem 202 in communication with a network 204. The network 204 can be of any type, including local area network (LAN), wide area network (WAN), the Internet, ad hoc wireless network, public switched network, and so on. Additionally, the term storage subsystem 202 refers to any device capable of connecting (directly or indirectly) to a network 204. For example, the storage subsystem 202 may be a storage media internal to computer system. Alternatively, the storage subsystem 202 may be a stand-alone device capable of connecting directly to a network or attaching as a peripheral device to a personal computer or workstation.
  • [0037]
    The storage subsystem 202 includes a host operating system 206, which relies at least in part on software and data obtained from a storage media 208. Typically, the storage media 208 includes firmware 210 that reads and writes data to and from a data storage portion 212 of the storage media 208. Additionally, at least a portion of the storage device firmware 210 can be rewritten by the operation system, and at least another portion of the device firmware 210 resists being written by the operating system and may be written only using one or more of the conventional hardware methods.
  • [0038]
    Finally, the storage subsystem 202 may include a hidden partition 214, which can be used to store the SP or elements of the SP required for access to data stored in the hidden partition and/or on the data storage portion 212 of the storage device 208. Specifically, the SP may be used by the storage subsystem 202 to control access to the storage device 208 as a whole, and to the data storage portion 212 and the hidden partition 214 in particular.
  • [0039]
    In general, the hidden partition 214 is a contiguous logical set of blocks in the storage subsystem 202, which are not acknowledged to the operating system 206 of the host because these logical blocks are not addressed by the read/write commands. In other words, the hidden partition 214 is hidden precisely because the host operating system 206 is not aware that it exists except through commands specialized to the security features. If, for example, the storage subsystem 202 has a total storage space of four hundred Gigabytes, and two hundred Megabytes are reserved for the hidden partition 214, then the host operating system 206 is informed that the total disk space of the storage subsystem 202 equals 399.8 Gigabytes. The two hundred Megabyte hidden partition 214 is simply not available to the operating system 206 for read/write operations.
  • [0040]
    The term “partition” is used herein to mean a contiguous grouping of bytes allocated during low-level formatting of the storage device. In certain embodiments, “partition” may refer to a contiguous grouping of memory blocks of approximately 512 bytes each. Special security partitions and the structures and processes that support these security partitions are included in the present computer security system. Moreover, the system of the present invention is substantially not dependent on an operating system.
  • [0041]
    Generally, the persistent data for a Security Provider (SP) is stored in a contiguous, logical set of blocks in the storage subsystem 202. In a preferred embodiment, the contiguous, logical set of blocks in the storage subsystem 202 constitutes a hidden partition 214. The persistent data typically includes the name, passcode, and public-private keys for the SP and for the authorized users of the SP. In otherwords, the SP stores its name and its passcode (the passcode the SP uses to authorize itself), and its public-private keys, as well as the names, passcodes and public keys of its permitted users. The persistent data is stored in an authority table. An authority record is an entry in the authority table for a single user agent. This user agent may represent a real person, or may represent another SP, a device, or any other entity capability of providing the proper credentials.
  • [0042]
    It will be understood that an SP is (for the most part) a completely self-contained unit that manages its own access control. The SP also controls access to elements within the SP or accessible via firmware to the SP. The credentials needed for access include the name, the passcode, and the capability of proving identity by digitally signing and directing information by exchange only to the recipient. In establishing the access controls for a SP, the creator can choose to allow access based on knowledge of the SP's name, of a passcode, and/or of private and public keys.
  • [0043]
    By building the access control to controller resources into the storage subsystems 202, the cost to the use of physical storage resources can be balanced against the improved security features. Specifically, the access control architecture of the drive can be manipulated externally, scaled as needed from low-end to high-end controller systems, and enhanced dramatically to provide hardened security services.
  • [0044]
    The phrase “manipulated externally” refers to the fact that access control parameters can be variously set by the factory, the OEM, the VAR, the Company, and the end user. Access controls can be strong or weak depending on the capabilities desired and on the user's tolerance for inconveniences associated with access control procedures.
  • [0045]
    The access control architecture is scalable, meaning that a single model of access control can be fabricated at low costs. As capabilities are added to the access control architecture, the costs may increase. Such increased capabilities include support for physical access tokens (such as Smart Card access, digital fingerprinting and the like) and speed (such as encryption hardware and the like).
  • [0046]
    The development of such security tokens, smart cards, and other similar security features has resulted in standards that can be applied to offer well-understood, hardened security services to the customer.
  • [0047]
    Generally, there are three relatively well-known and publicly accessible standards for providing such security features. One is the Microsoft Cryptographic Service Provider standard. Another is the RSA Security Public Key Cryptography Standard Number 11 or “Cryptoki”. A third is the class of ISO 7816 ICC Smartcard standards and their derivatives.
  • [0048]
    The Microsoft Cryptographic Service Provider standard (MS CSP), produced by Microsoft Corporation of Redmond, Wash., is an example of such hardened security. The MS CSP carefully defines the special controller (e.g., smart card or special chip) functionality need by the operating system (in this case the Microsoft Windows operating system) for hardened login, named resource access, cross-domain authorization, file encryption, network encryption, and secure network access for email and Internet services. The MS CSP is designed for environments using tokens and cryptographic chips.
  • [0049]
    Similarly, for Unix, Linux, and Java operating systems, there is another standard corresponding to the MS CSP standard. For these operating systems, the standard is called the RSA PKCS#11 standard, which is a standard developed by RSA Laboratories, a research arm of RSA Security of Bedford, Mass. “PKCS” is an acronym for Public Key Cryptography Standard.
  • [0050]
    The class of 7816 ICC Smart Card standards provides more capability and versatility than the CSP or PKCS#11. Where the CSP provides cryptographic operations, and PKCS#11 additionally provides storage for certifications, the 7816 standards and their derivatives additionally provide full file system storage with access control that is different for different files.
  • [0051]
    A disc drive or storage subsystem that simply offers MS CSP, RSA PKCS#11, and ISO 7816 services represents a cost effective, well-accepted way to harden the associated operating system against threats. Firmware packages that implement the external controller-side of CSP, PKCS#11, and ISO 7816 are typically in the thirty to sixty Kilobyte range in size.
  • [0052]
    Distinct collections of security services that share underlying hardware already exist and can be referred to as Security Provider Objects or SP Objects. Fundamentally, SP Objects provide access control to controller resources and storage data. For example, a Controller SP Object provides access control to test diagnostics and maintenance programs that run in the controller. Because there are literally thousands of companies that provide host and network security products that can be used to harden security via the MS CSP, RSA PKCS#11, or ISO 7816 standards, the SP Objects are designed to be independent of one another. The SP Objects are generally self-contained, but they tend to utilize a common toolset. Generally, the SP Object can be considered a self-contained environment with its own access controls to its own security resources. This allows disc controller resources to be minimized. Specifically, while a disc drive or storage subsystem might be required to support many different security products, only a small subset of such security products would typically be enabled at any given time. Moreover, no particular SP Object would be enabled “all the time”. A characteristic of the RSA PKCS#11, MS CSP, and ISO 7816 standards are that the operating systems tend to use them in small bursts. For example, when browsing the Internet, the CSP is used only when the user accesses secure web pages (pages utilizing secure socket layer security, for example). While accessing such pages, the CSP is used intensively (with many “calls” per second), but when not access as secure page, the CSP is not used. This security access tendency is true for most security applications.
  • [0053]
    With respect to Trusted Drive implementations, the trusted drive feature can be referred to as a SP as well. In general, the storage subsystem or disc drive according to a embodiment of the present invention is adapted to provide hardened security features, including trusted drive features.
  • [0054]
    Referring to FIG. 2B, the system 200 is shown as a simplified block diagram including a trusted drive feature according to an embodiment of the present invention. As shown, the system 200 has a storage subsystem 202 in communication with a network 204. The network 204 can be of any type, including local area network (LAN), wide area network (WAN), the Internet, ad hoc wireless network, public switched network, and so on. Additionally, the term storage subsystem 202 refers to any device capable of connecting (directly or indirectly) to a network 204. For example, the storage subsystem 202 may be a storage media internal to a personal computer or a server. Alternatively, the storage subsystem 202 may be a stand-alone device capable of connecting directly to a network or attaching as a peripheral device to a personal computer or workstation.
  • [0055]
    The storage subsystem 202 includes a host operating system 206, which relies at least in part on software and data obtained from a storage media 208. Typically, the storage media 208 includes firmware 210 that reads and writes data to and from the storage media 208. The storage media 208 is divided into a data portion 212 and a hidden portion (hidden partition) 214. In this embodiment, a trusted drive feature 220 is embedded in the controller within the firmware 210.
  • [0056]
    Additionally, at least a portion of the storage device firmware 210 can be rewritten by the operation system, and at least another portion of the device firmware 210 resists being written by the operating system and may be written only using one or more of the conventional hardware methods. In a preferred embodiment, the trusted drive feature 220 is stored in the portion of the firmware 210 that resists being written by the operating system (non-writeable firmware).
  • [0057]
    In general, the hidden partition 214 is a contiguous logical set of blocks in the storage subsystem 202, which are not acknowledged to the operating system 206 of the host during the boot process. In other words, the host operating system 206 is not aware that the hidden partition 214 exists. If, for example, the storage subsystem 202 has a total storage space of four hundred Gigabytes, and two hundred Megabytes are reserved for the hidden partition 214, then the host operating system 206 is informed that the total disk space of the storage subsystem 202 equals 399.8 Gigabytes. The two hundred Megabyte hidden partition 214 is simply not available to the operating system 206 for read/write operations.
  • [0058]
    Within the hidden partition 214, one or more authority records 216 and a base class 218 are stored. The authority records 216 can be used to store the SP or elements of the SP required for access to data stored in the hidden partition and/or on the data storage portion 212 of the storage device 208. In one embodiment, all authority records 216 can be governed by a single master authority record. The host OS 206 is not permitted to access the SP data stored within the hidden partition 214, except through the trusted drive feature 220. This independence of the SP data from the Host OS 206 provides an important benefit over conventional security methods and systems, namely that the hidden partition represents a location on a computer system where information such as a secret can be effectively concealed.
  • [0059]
    Finally, the hidden portion 214 of the storage device 208 has a base class 218, which can be used to specify a SP Base class 222, from which all of the security provider classes ultimately derive. The base class 218 is sometimes referred to as a “root class”, and the SP base class is a “subclass” within a hierarchy of classes of the security provider. Generally, the base class 218 allows the OEM or the manufacturer to specify a SP base class 222 from which each SP Object can be instantiated and from which all other SP classes derive. The SP Base class 222 provides default methods for an instantiated SP. For example, the SP Base class 222 provides default record data management methods and a default administration key, which can be used to log into the administration SP 228 and to configure access controls, which can override the default configuration. In other words, the administration SP 228 can be used to configure the access controls to disallow access using the default key and even to change access permissions for the administration SP 228.
  • [0060]
    The base class 218 also provides default methods for the secure import and export of entire SPs and parts of SPs and for local replication of entire SPs within the storage controller based on, triggers internal to the storage controller.
  • [0061]
    During manufacturing, all trusted drives are initialized with an administration SP 228 and a “Controller SP Object” (which in this embodiment is the trusted drive feature 220). The administration SP 224 provides access control to the creation, modification, and deletion of other SP Objects.
  • [0062]
    Once the administration SP 224 is initialized, it is logged into, and the controller SP object is initialized with its own access controls. Significantly, it is then possible to deny the administration SP 224 a right to further modify or destroy the controller SP.
  • [0063]
    As shown in FIG. 2B, in addition to the base SP 222 and the administration SP 224, other SP objects (elements 226-232) may be instantiated using the base SP 226, including a public key store 226, a log SP 228, a registry SP 230, public key revocation store 232, a clock time SP 234, a diagnostics SP 236, a test SP 238, and an external code SP 240. Access to the administration SP 224 is required for the creation of other SPs on a storage controller.
  • [0064]
    A public key store 226 is used to cryptographically verify a request for a new SP instantiation. For example, in one embodiment, a SP Object from the storage device manufacturer may require a digital signature associated with the storage device manufacturer in order to validate a request for a new SP instantiation. A Computer Associates eTrust SP may require a Computer Associates signature or certificate to validate a request for a new eTrust SP instantiation. If the storage device does not support public key access in the general access controls defined by the controller SP, no resident authorizing key is required.
  • [0065]
    In another embodiment, the trusted drive system 200 has a log SP 228 type that can track and log the activity of other SPs based on the success or failure of the other SP to gain access to data or to manipulate data or methods associated with the other SP. The log SP 228 incorporates provisions for cyclic logs and all other capabilities possible through the general access controls.
  • [0066]
    In yet another embodiment, the trusted drive system 200 has a registry SP 230 type that provides a standard SP handle (virtual distinguished name) through which any number of physical copies of a SP Object can be located and managed. The Registry SP 230 can distinguish and manage Master SPs from copies of the Master (both local and non-local), and can distinguish and manage specific Master data within an SP so that there can be a “Master Record” or “Master Value.”
  • [0067]
    In another embodiment, the trusted drive system 200 is provided with a key and passcode revocation store 232, which checks authorizing public keys, passcodes and other authentication elements for revocation. In still another embodiment, the system 200 includes a clock-time SP type 234 that can provide a hardened source of clock or elapsed time both to other SPs and to the Host.
  • [0068]
    In yet another embodiment, the system 200 provides a diagnostics SP 236 adapted to provide hardened access control to storage controller diagnostics. A test SP 238 may be provided to harden control to storage controller testing as appropriate. Additionally, an external code SP 240 may be provided to harden access controls to customer provided software running on the storage controller.
  • [0069]
    Each of the above-described embodiments may be implemented in a single trusted drive system 200 (as shown in FIG. 2B). Alternatively, various SP elements 226-240 may be selected to be included as needed. The base class 224 provided in the hidden partition 214 is used to create each base SP 222, and the base SP 222 is used to create the SP objects for hardened security. In general, the storage location of the base SP 222 and the various SP objects 224-240 may vary. Specifically, the SP objects 222-240 may all be stored outside of the hidden partition (as shown) or may be stored within the hidden partition. Alternatively, the public key store 226 may be stored within the hidden partition 214, while other elements are stored outside of the hidden partition 214 in the data store 212.
  • [0070]
    In one embodiment, all of the SP objects 222-240 are provided within the hidden partition 214. In a second embodiment, all of the SP objects 222-240 are provided outside of the hidden partition. In a third embodiment, the base SP 222, the administration SP 224 and the public key store 226 are provided within the hidden partition 214, while the other sp objects 228-240 are stored in the data store 212. The specific arrangement of the SP Objects 222-240 depends on the security implementation, on the memory allocation for the hidden partition 214, and on various design and implementation issues, such as (for example) whether the OEM will be permitted to instantiate and configure additional SP objects.
  • [0071]
    FIG. 3 is a simplified flow diagram illustrating an installation of a trusted drive architecture at the factory. Once the disc drive hardware is assembled (step 300), firmware is written to the drive controllers or the storage subsystem controllers (step 302). Generally, the firmware includes trusted drive controls and optionally encryption functions. Additionally, in cases where hardware acceleration of cryptographic operations is desirable, special hardware may be added.
  • [0072]
    The disc drive or storage subsystem is then powered up (step 304). A hidden partition is created on the storage media (step 306), and SP Object templates are created and written to the hidden partition (step 308). Various versions of trusted drives that offer many instances of SP Objects to many different companies may allocate a large hidden partition (as much as a few gigabytes in size). Trusted drives that do not offer Host services or that offer only a few specific Host services may allocate a small hidden partition (as small as a kilobyte, for instance).
  • [0073]
    The disc drive or storage subsystem is then initialized with an Administration SP Object and a Controller SP Object (step 310). The Administration SP Object provides access control over the creation, modification and deletion of other SP Objects. In the factory, the particular version of the trusted drive installs a default means of logging into the Administration SP. Once the Administration SP Object is initialized, an authorized agent logs into the Administration SP (step 312), and initializes the Controller SP Object with its own access controls (step 314). At this point, it is possible to deny the Administration SP a right to access, modify, or delete the Controller SP. Specifically authorized agents can then run testing, diagnostics, and maintenance programs on the controller (step 316).
  • [0074]
    Ideally, since the factory devices are on an internal factory network, testing can be enabled using the security features of the trusted drive. Specifically, testing is enabled using cryptographic keys stored securely on a secure factory server. A handful of trusted drives can be used to secure the factory keys from threats. Either a Microsoft CSP SP, a PKCS#11 SP, or an ISO 7816 SP can provide the security.
  • [0075]
    In general, the Controller SP may be provided with access controls adapted to allow the controller to upload new firmware in the field, to run diagnostics, and to run maintenance programs. For example, if there are original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) with customer-specific diagnostics, a specific customer can be assigned its own passcode to access the diagnostics. The access permissions for this customer may also enable the customer to change the passcode, to remove the passcode, or to add cryptographic permission for his diagnostics. The customer can even set up the Controller SP so that no agent other than the customer can change the customer's access to his particular diagnostics.
  • [0076]
    In one embodiment, the storage media may be partitioned with a hidden portion and a data storage portion. In another embodiment, the storage media may be partitioned with multiple hidden portions and one or more data storage portions. In this embodiment, an SP Object may be associated with a specific storage location on a physical or logical storage device. Specifically, each SP Object is associated with its own logical partition, which is not available to the OS except through authenticated access to the trusted drive firmware on the storage controller.
  • [0077]
    FIG. 4 illustrates a simplified flow diagram of the OEM process. As shown, in order to integrate a trusted disc drive or storage subsystem into a platform, the OEM selects which SP Objects it additionally wishes to enable (step 400). For example, on some Trusted drives, there is an SP Objected adapted to provide Host-Drive locking for a storage-enabled television set or a game controller. In this instance, the OEM logs into the Administration SP (step 402). The OEM then creates a Host-Drive locking SP with specific access controls (step 404). The access controls allow only the OEM or his authorized agents to unlock the drive from the host. The OEM may also install ranges of SPs intended for specific customer (step 406). For example, the OEM may install PKCS#11 SPs for server customers and Microsoft CSP SPs for its desktop customers. The OEM can then sell the drive and deliver the drive to the customer (step 408) either as a storage subsystem or as part of a system, depending on the specific implementation.
  • [0078]
    The access controls established by the OEM can be frozen so that downstream customers cannot change or modify the features provided. Alternatively, the OEM may allow some of the access controls to be modified further by a downstream customer.
  • [0079]
    In general, it will be understood by workers skilled in the art that the potential number of security providers is without limit. In that regard, the drives or storage subsystems may be assembled and configured with multiple SPs according to the needs of the specific company or customer for whom the drives are intended. For example, a company may be provided with a Checkpoint Virtual Private Network SP, a Microsoft CSP SP, a Lotus Notes SP, and a Netscape SP, which can be installed on all platforms delivered to that company. Each SP object can be installed at the factory, or at a later time by the OEM, into one or more hidden partitions on the drive. Each SP template can be stored in a different hidden partition, or they may be stored in a single hidden partition.
  • [0080]
    An Information Technology (IT) manager can configure the trusted drives or subsystems with additional host security facilities. For example, the IT manager can place specific firewall capabilities on some platforms and may choose to specifically harden access to keystores utilized in his particular public key infrastructure. He may also choose to deeply hide password banks that provide access to key company resources. Since the SP Objects are easy to create and manage using familiar database tools, such security measures can be implemented easily. Moreover, the IT manager can provide whole disc encryption where the encryption keys are kept on high security servers.
  • [0081]
    For an end user such as a home computer user, the drive is provided with an SP application for accessing and enabling or disabling SP objects. The application can, for example, show that the drive includes a “RealNetworks” SP for a company such as RealNetworks, Inc. of Seattle, Wash. (which allows for multimedia file downloads from its web site), offers a discount on audio and video downloads. The end user can then turn on that SP. Alternatively, if the user is a home user, he or she may disable all SPs.
  • [0082]
    If the user is a software developer, he or she may want to develop his or her own SP Object, perhaps to store some very private information such as his login information for his stock holdings. In this instance, the user may download a software development kit (SDK) from a web site from the OEM or the manufacturer. The user can then write his or her own SP instance as, for example, an instance of the standard database SP, but requiring RSA Token control for access. The user can then submit the object code to the web site for the code to be signed, and thereby authorized to create a SP Object on the Trusted drive. In this instance, the SP is host-side software that is written and installed on the Host. For security reasons, developers are not permitted to write new firmware and to upload the firmware to the Trusted drive.
  • [0083]
    Within the Trusted Drive architecture, it is possible to define a SP Object, like the Controller SP, that provides privileged access to authorized users to upload code to the controller. Thus, customers can be provided with a “Sandbox” where a Sandbox SP can safely execute scripts uploaded from the Host on a dynamic basis. A “sandbox” as it is understood in this instance is a virtual OS environment, which allows the user to upload code into random access memory to run within a confined window, thereby allowing for code debugging without permanently effecting the trusted drive. Several sandbox applications are commercially available, including Wave Systems Embassy by Wave Systems Corp. of Lee, Mass. TCPA/TCGs TPM is being developed to have this capability (optionally), and it is likely that the Trusted Windows Palladium/NGSCB architecture will incorporate a Sandbox for running arbitrary code. Such a Sandbox SDK would likely be available from third parties and not from the disc manufacturer.
  • [0084]
    FIGS. 5A and 5B illustrate a simplified block diagram of trusted drive implementation according to an embodiment of the present invention. In FIG. 5A, the hidden portion 500 of the storage media, the main portion 502 of the storage media and the partition 504 separating them are shown.
  • [0085]
    In the embodiment shown, objects stored in the hidden partition portion 500 of the storage media are illustrated, including an authority record 506 which controls access permissions to the hidden partition 500. A base class 508 is shown, which is used to instantiate the security provider record 510 and access control records 512. The symbol table records 514 defines objects of access associated with the specific security provider record 510, including a list of symbols or names of objects that can be accessed by naming them. Symbol types 516 store the types of symbols possible, including an SP, a table, a record, a column, an executable, an integer, a string, a real number, a blob, and a BigNum. The last five items are just basic data types supported by SPs. The administration SP controls access to the various SPs contained within the SP Record, and any given SP can control access to itself.
  • [0086]
    The symbol record 514 is just a table within the SP with record columns for symbols, types of symbols (stored in related symbol type 516), byte offsets into the SP (or executable), checksums for integrity checks, and an associated access control table of access control records 512 that apply to the object named by the symbol. The byte offset generally allows the byte offset to fully address the contents of the symbol in memory.
  • [0087]
    The access control 518 contains a number, a pointer to the user record called the authority record 506, and a statement of the kind of actions permitted. Each access control instantiation is stored as an ACL record 512 with an associated ACL type 520. The actions permitted by access control 518 include at least the following actions: read, write, modify, and execute.
  • [0088]
    The symbol table 514 also contains entries for log control 522 and replication control 524. In general, the log control 522 instructs a log entry to be placed on the success or failure of an access attempt. Replication control 524 instructs a replication copy of an entire SP or an entry in an SP to be made, based on a change to the data pointed to by the symbol.
  • [0089]
    Finally, initial system tables 526 are shown within the hidden portion 500. The initial system tables 526 are created by the manufacturer when the partition 504 is created. A data buffer 528 is shown overlapping the partition 504. The data buffer 528 is utilized by the controller to hold information temporarily while access rights are determined.
  • [0090]
    Turning to FIG. 5B, the storage portion 502 is shown in greater detail. As shown, the base class 508 is provided in the hidden portion 500, but is connected via a line that crosses the partition 504 to a SP base 530 within the storage portion 502. The remaining SP objects are instantiated in the storage portion 502. As shown, the SP lightweight directory access protocol (LDAP) 532 and associated LDAP response codes 534 are associated with the SP base 530. Additionally, in this embodiment, and MS CSP standard security feature 536 is provided, which is associated with the SP base 530.
  • [0091]
    An SP standard query language (SQL) object 538 links the SP Log 540, the SP registry 542 and its associated registry record 544, and the SP Administration 546. The storage portion 502 also contains a SP type object 548, a store type object 550, and a channel type object 552.
  • [0092]
    FIGS. 5A and 5B thus illustrate the two storage portions 500 and 502, containing the hidden partition objects and the remaining SP objects. Since literally thousands of companies can provide Host and Network security products, the SP Objects are designed to be independent and self-contained and are designed to utilize a common toolset.
  • [0093]
    In this embodiment, the media is pre-loaded with SP Object templates and a base class 508. The SP Objects which can then be instantiated using the base class 508 and configured utilizing the SP administration 546 to provide hardened access controls to specific objects, resources, programs, data, and the like. The SP Objects can be varying and complex, and the technique of storing a base class within the hidden portion 508, which can only be accessed by authorized users to instantiate the security provider objects, provides a flexible, versatile system for delivering and managing digital rights and privacy services from storage.
  • [0094]
    The trusted drive is initialized at the factory with the SP admin and SP controller objects, which then provides access to the drive to create SP objects, initialize them, and configure the drive to provide hardened security. The consumer, OEM, or other specifically authorized agents can then be provided with the key for accessing the administration SP in order to configure the SP Objects or to instantiate additional SP objects in order to harden security services. Only authorized users are permitted by the drive to access the protected data, and secure information is hidden from the operating system so that the drive data is protected from unauthorized access.
  • [0095]
    In general, the system and methods of the present invention provide versatile security, digital rights management, and privacy services from disc drives and storage subsystems via the storage controllers. Specifically, firmware provided in the storage controllers at the factory offers hardened security features utilizing SP Objects stored in a hidden partition on the storage media. Since the firmware controllers can only be updated by authorized users according to the Controller SPs access controls, access to the hidden partitions and to the drive itself are controlled by access controls in the firmware itself. In this manner, OEMS, IT professionals, and users are free to make use of such security features as desired, and the trusted drive features can be utilized as desired.
  • [0096]
    It is to be understood that even though numerous characteristics and advantages of various embodiments of the invention have been set forth in the foregoing description, together with details of the structure and function of various embodiments of the invention, this disclosure is illustrative only, and changes may be made in detail, especially in matters of structure and arrangement of parts within the principles of the present invention to the full extent indicated by the broad general meaning of the terms in which the appended claims are expressed. For example, the particular elements may vary depending on the particular application for the versatile security system while maintaining substantially the same functionality without departing from the scope and spirit of the present invention. In addition, although the preferred embodiment described herein is directed to a system for implementing security providers in a storage system, such as those implementing the Microsoft CSP security standard or the RSA PKCS#11 security standard, it is expected that such standards will evolve and that new standards may supplant them. It will be appreciated by those skilled in the art that the teachings of the present invention can be applied to any storage system implementing trusted drive or other security standards in which a software element must be instantiated on the storage device, without departing from the scope and spirit of the present invention.

Claims (35)

  1. 1. A method for providing enhanced security features in a storage device, the method comprising:
    partitioning a storage media in the storage device into a hidden partition and a storage partition in the storage media;
    writing a base class to the hidden partition; and
    instantiating a security provider base class from the base class, the security provider base class adapted to control access to the storage media.
  2. 2. The method of claim 1 wherein the step of instantiating comprises:
    instantiating a SP administration object and a SP controller object from the security provider base class;
    logging into the SP administration object; and
    initializing the SP controller object using the SP administration object.
  3. 3. The method of claim 2 wherein the SP controller object is initialized with access controls.
  4. 4. The method of claim 2 wherein the step of initializing comprises:
    creating an access control record identifying an user authorized to access the SP controller object and access permissions associated with the authorized user.
  5. 5. The method of claim 1 wherein before the step of partitioning, the method further comprising:
    assembling the storage device;
    writing firmware to a controller; and
    powering up the drive.
  6. 6. The method of claim 1 wherein the security provider object is a Microsoft CSP security provider or a RSA PKCS#11 security provider.
  7. 7. The method of claim 1 wherein more than one security provider base class is initialized and wherein each security provider base class is associated with specific storage location on the storage media, the step of initializing further comprising:
    creating an access control record identifying a user authorized to access an SP controller object; and
    creating access permissions within the access control record associated with the specific storage location on the storage media, the access permissions adapted to control access to the specific storage location.
  8. 8. The method of claim 1 wherein the storage device is a disc drive.
  9. 9. A method for promoting security in a storage device, the storage device having a processor and firmware adapted to access data stored on a storage media, the method comprising:
    writing trusted drive firmware to a controller of the storage device;
    partitioning the storage media of the storage device into a hidden portion and a data portion;
    writing a security provider object template to the hidden partition; and
    instantiating security providers using the security provider object template, each security provider adapted to control access to the storage device.
  10. 10. The method of claim 9 and further comprising:
    prohibiting access by a host operating system to the storage device except through authenticated access to the trusted drive firmware of the controller.
  11. 11. The method of claim 9 and further comprising:
    instantiating an administration security provider object and a security provider controller object from the security provider object template.
  12. 12. The method of claim 11 wherein the step of initializing comprises:
    logging in to the administration security provider object; and
    initializing the security provider controller object with access controls using the administration security provider object.
  13. 13. The method of claim 11 wherein the administration security provider object has one or more authority records stored in the hidden partition, each authority record having an associated data set, the method further comprising:
    controlling access to the storage media according to the one or more authority records.
  14. 14. The method of claim 13 wherein each object stored on the storage media is associated with a security provider, and wherein the step of controlling further comprises:
    controlling access permissions to objects stored on the storage media according to the associated security provider.
  15. 15. The method of claim 9 wherein, upon receiving an access request for access to data stored on the storage device, the method further comprising:
    querying a requesting device for trust information;
    determining whether the remote device can be trusted using the trusted drive feature and an instantiation of the security provider object template; and
    if the remote device can be trusted, permitting storage controller access to a specific storage location.
  16. 16. A storage device for providing hardened security features having a storage media partitioned into a hidden portion and a data portion and having a storage controller adapted to control access to the storage media, the storage device comprising:
    a trusted drive feature stored in a firmware of the storage controller, the trusted drive feature adapted to authenticate access requests to determine whether each access request can be trusted; and
    a SP base object stored in the hidden portion and adapted to cooperate with the trusted drive feature to control access rights to data on the storage media.
  17. 17. The storage device of claim 16, and further comprising:
    one or more instantiated security providers stored in the hidden portion of the storage media, each instantiated security provider associated with a particular area on the storage media.
  18. 18. The storage device of claim 17 wherein the SP base is invoked to create a SP administration object and a SP controller object, the SP administration object is adapted to configure associated security provider objects, the SP controller object is adapted to control access to a particular area on the storage media.
  19. 19. The storage device of claim 16 and further comprising:
    a trusted drive authorizing public key store adapted to cryptographically verify a request for a new security provider instantiation.
  20. 20. The storage device of claim 16 and further comprising:
    a key and passcode revocation store adapted to check keys, passcodes, or other authenticators for revocation.
  21. 21. The storage device of claim 16 and further comprising:
    a registry security provider adapted to provide a standard security provider handle through which any number of physical copies of a security provider can be located and managed.
  22. 22. The storage device of claim 16 and further comprising:
    a hardened log SP adapted to track and log the activity of other security providers based on successes and failures to gain access to data controlled by the other security provider.
  23. 23. The storage device of claim 16 and further comprising:
    a clock time security provider adapted to provide a hardened clock source to other devices and/or to other security providers.
  24. 24. The storage device of claim 16 and further comprising:
    a diagnostics security provider adapted to harden access to storage controller diagnostics.
  25. 25. The storage device of claim 16 and further comprising:
    a test security provider adapted to harden access control to storage controller testing.
  26. 26. The storage device of claim 16 and further comprising:
    an external code security provider adapted to harden access control to software running on the security provider.
  27. 27. A storage device comprising:
    a storage media comprising a plurality of partitions, one or more of the partitions being hidden from a host operating system;
    a controller coupled to the storage media and to controller firmware, the controller adapted to read and to write data to and from the storage media;
    a trusted drive feature stored in the controller firmware; and
    one or more security provider objects stored in the one or more hidden partitions, each security provider object cooperating with the trusted drive feature to restrict unauthorized access to data stored on the storage media.
  28. 28. The storage device of claim 27 wherein the trusted drive feature authenticates data access requests to determine whether each access request is received from a trusted entity according to access rights stored in the one or more hidden partitions.
  29. 29. The storage device of claim 27 wherein each security provider object is stored in a hidden partition related to the security provider object.
  30. 30. The storage device of claim 27 wherein the security provider object comprises:
    a base security provider class.
  31. 31. The storage device of claim 30 wherein the base security provider class comprises:
    an security provider administration object constructor for instantiating an administration object to configure associated security provider objects; and
    a security provider controller object constructor for instantiating a controller object to cooperate with the trusted drive feature to control access to a particular area on the storage media.
  32. 32. An enhanced security feature for use in a storage device having a storage media and a controller, the enhanced security feature comprising:
    a trusted drive feature stored in firmware of the controller of the storage device, and
    a security provider stored in a hidden partition defined on the storage media, the security provider cooperating with the trusted drive feature to control access to data stored on the storage media.
  33. 33. The enhanced security feature of claim 32 wherein the trusted drive feature authenticates access requests to determine whether each access request can be trusted.
  34. 34. The enhanced security feature of claim 32 wherein the security provider comprises:
    a security provider administration object for administering security provider settings; and
    a security provider controller object for managing access controls associated with portions of the storage media.
  35. 35. The enhanced security feature of claim 32 wherein the security provider comprises a software algorithm implementing a standard security protocol.
US10984368 2001-07-25 2004-11-09 System and method for delivering versatile security, digital rights management, and privacy services Active 2026-01-03 US7925894B2 (en)

Priority Applications (3)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US09912931 US7036020B2 (en) 2001-07-25 2001-07-25 Methods and systems for promoting security in a computer system employing attached storage devices
US10963373 US20050066191A1 (en) 2001-07-25 2004-10-12 System and method for delivering versatile security, digital rights management, and privacy services from storage controllers
US10984368 US7925894B2 (en) 2001-07-25 2004-11-09 System and method for delivering versatile security, digital rights management, and privacy services

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US10984368 US7925894B2 (en) 2001-07-25 2004-11-09 System and method for delivering versatile security, digital rights management, and privacy services

Publications (2)

Publication Number Publication Date
US20050160281A1 true true US20050160281A1 (en) 2005-07-21
US7925894B2 US7925894B2 (en) 2011-04-12

Family

ID=34753209

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US10984368 Active 2026-01-03 US7925894B2 (en) 2001-07-25 2004-11-09 System and method for delivering versatile security, digital rights management, and privacy services

Country Status (1)

Country Link
US (1) US7925894B2 (en)

Cited By (23)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20030188173A1 (en) * 2002-03-26 2003-10-02 Zimmer Vincent J. Hardened extended firmware interface framework
US20060242068A1 (en) * 2004-12-21 2006-10-26 Fabrice Jogand-Coulomb Method forversatile content control
US20060259785A1 (en) * 2005-05-10 2006-11-16 Seagate Technology Llc Method and apparatus for securing data storage while insuring control by logical roles
US20070106682A1 (en) * 2005-11-09 2007-05-10 Microsoft Corporation Independent Computation Environment and Data Protection
US20070107056A1 (en) * 2005-11-09 2007-05-10 Microsoft Corporation Hardware-aided software code measurement
US20070168292A1 (en) * 2004-12-21 2007-07-19 Fabrice Jogand-Coulomb Memory system with versatile content control
US20070271597A1 (en) * 2006-05-19 2007-11-22 Microsoft Corporation BIOS Based Secure Execution Environment
US20080005560A1 (en) * 2006-06-29 2008-01-03 Microsoft Corporation Independent Computation Environment and Provisioning of Computing Device Functionality
US20080010455A1 (en) * 2006-07-07 2008-01-10 Michael Holtzman Control Method Using Identity Objects
US20080010451A1 (en) * 2006-07-07 2008-01-10 Michael Holtzman Content Control Method Using Certificate Revocation Lists
US20080010685A1 (en) * 2006-07-07 2008-01-10 Michael Holtzman Content Control Method Using Versatile Control Structure
US20080022413A1 (en) * 2006-07-07 2008-01-24 Michael Holtzman Method for Controlling Information Supplied from Memory Device
US20080072071A1 (en) * 2006-09-14 2008-03-20 Seagate Technology Llc Hard disc streaming cryptographic operations with embedded authentication
US20080121646A1 (en) * 2004-05-14 2008-05-29 Manfred Schininger Storage Machine For Objects
US20080128444A1 (en) * 2004-09-21 2008-06-05 Manfred Schininger Storage Dispenser For Objects
US20080158388A1 (en) * 2006-12-27 2008-07-03 Tomi Lahcanski Removable storage device providing automatic launch capability in an image processing system
US20080168247A1 (en) * 2007-01-05 2008-07-10 Seagate Technology Llc Method and apparatus for controlling access to a data storage device
US20100138652A1 (en) * 2006-07-07 2010-06-03 Rotem Sela Content control method using certificate revocation lists
US20100161928A1 (en) * 2008-12-18 2010-06-24 Rotem Sela Managing access to an address range in a storage device
US7802111B1 (en) * 2005-04-27 2010-09-21 Oracle America, Inc. System and method for limiting exposure of cryptographic keys protected by a trusted platform module
US8566603B2 (en) 2010-06-14 2013-10-22 Seagate Technology Llc Managing security operating modes
US8601283B2 (en) 2004-12-21 2013-12-03 Sandisk Technologies Inc. Method for versatile content control with partitioning
US9842154B2 (en) * 2016-04-29 2017-12-12 Netapp, Inc. Secure data replication

Families Citing this family (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20110055589A1 (en) * 2009-09-01 2011-03-03 Hsieh Tieh-Chin Information certification system
US8478725B2 (en) * 2009-09-14 2013-07-02 Vmware, Inc. Method and system for performing live migration of persistent data of a virtual machine
US8646054B1 (en) 2012-03-23 2014-02-04 Western Digital Technologies, Inc. Mechanism to manage access to user data area with bridged direct-attached storage devices
US8831218B2 (en) 2012-04-10 2014-09-09 Western Digital Technologies, Inc. Digital rights management system and methods for provisioning content to an intelligent storage
US8914634B2 (en) 2012-04-10 2014-12-16 Western Digital Technologies, Inc. Digital rights management system transfer of content and distribution

Citations (90)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US6173402B2 (en) *
US3576544A (en) * 1968-10-18 1971-04-27 Ibm Storage protection system
US3890601A (en) * 1974-03-11 1975-06-17 Philco Ford Corp Password operated system for preventing unauthorized or accidental computer memory alteration
US4183085A (en) * 1976-11-18 1980-01-08 International Business Machines Corporation Protection of data processing system against unauthorized programs
US4442484A (en) * 1980-10-14 1984-04-10 Intel Corporation Microprocessor memory management and protection mechanism
US4593384A (en) * 1984-12-21 1986-06-03 Ncr Corporation Security device for the secure storage of sensitive data
US5012514A (en) * 1990-06-26 1991-04-30 Paul Renton Hard drive security system
US5022077A (en) * 1989-08-25 1991-06-04 International Business Machines Corp. Apparatus and method for preventing unauthorized access to BIOS in a personal computer system
US5027401A (en) * 1990-07-03 1991-06-25 Soltesz John A System for the secure storage and transmission of data
US5101374A (en) * 1988-05-19 1992-03-31 The United States Of America As Represented By The Director Of The National Security Agency Secure, fast storage and retrieval without interactive checking
US5164988A (en) * 1991-10-31 1992-11-17 International Business Machines Corporation Method to establish and enforce a network cryptographic security policy in a public key cryptosystem
US5345590A (en) * 1990-08-31 1994-09-06 International Business Machines Corporation Method and apparatus for cross-partition control in a partitioned process environment
US5394469A (en) * 1994-02-18 1995-02-28 Infosafe Systems, Inc. Method and apparatus for retrieving secure information from mass storage media
US5432939A (en) * 1992-05-27 1995-07-11 International Business Machines Corp. Trusted personal computer system with management control over initial program loading
US5448045A (en) * 1992-02-26 1995-09-05 Clark; Paul C. System for protecting computers via intelligent tokens or smart cards
US5504814A (en) * 1991-07-10 1996-04-02 Hughes Aircraft Company Efficient security kernel for the 80960 extended architecture
US5600805A (en) * 1992-06-15 1997-02-04 International Business Machines Corporation Pass-through for I/O channel subsystem call instructions for accessing shared resources in a computer system having a plurality of operating systems
US5623637A (en) * 1993-12-06 1997-04-22 Telequip Corporation Encrypted data storage card including smartcard integrated circuit for storing an access password and encryption keys
US5754821A (en) * 1993-12-23 1998-05-19 International Business Machines Corporation Method and system for providing access to a protected partition of a memory device utilizing a passthru command
US5787498A (en) * 1989-05-15 1998-07-28 Dallas Semiconductor Corporation Integrated circuit memory with verification unit which resets an address translation register upon failure to define one-to-one correspondences between addresses and memory cells
US5809546A (en) * 1996-05-23 1998-09-15 International Business Machines Corporation Method for managing I/O buffers in shared storage by structuring buffer table having entries including storage keys for controlling accesses to the buffers
US5815665A (en) * 1996-04-03 1998-09-29 Microsoft Corporation System and method for providing trusted brokering services over a distributed network
US5889941A (en) * 1996-04-15 1999-03-30 Ubiq Inc. System and apparatus for smart card personalization
US5892902A (en) * 1996-09-05 1999-04-06 Clark; Paul C. Intelligent token protected system with network authentication
US5892899A (en) * 1996-06-13 1999-04-06 Intel Corporation Tamper resistant methods and apparatus
US5928364A (en) * 1995-11-30 1999-07-27 Casio Computer Co., Ltd. Secret data storage device, secret data reading method, and control program storing medium
US5940513A (en) * 1995-08-25 1999-08-17 Intel Corporation Parameterized hash functions for access control
US5949601A (en) * 1995-03-10 1999-09-07 Iomega Corporation Read/write protect scheme for a disk cartridge and drive
US6000023A (en) * 1996-07-19 1999-12-07 Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. Method for partitioning storage regions on hard disk and computer system adapted to the same
US6044349A (en) * 1998-06-19 2000-03-28 Intel Corporation Secure and convenient information storage and retrieval method and apparatus
US6061449A (en) * 1997-10-10 2000-05-09 General Instrument Corporation Secure processor with external memory using block chaining and block re-ordering
US6088802A (en) * 1997-06-04 2000-07-11 Spyrus, Inc. Peripheral device with integrated security functionality
US6092202A (en) * 1998-05-22 2000-07-18 N*Able Technologies, Inc. Method and system for secure transactions in a computer system
US6134662A (en) * 1998-06-26 2000-10-17 Vlsi Technology, Inc. Physical layer security manager for memory-mapped serial communications interface
US6138239A (en) * 1998-11-13 2000-10-24 N★Able Technologies, Inc. Method and system for authenticating and utilizing secure resources in a computer system
US6141752A (en) * 1998-05-05 2000-10-31 Liberate Technologies Mechanism for facilitating secure storage and retrieval of information on a smart card by an internet service provider using various network computer client devices
US6157984A (en) * 1997-05-15 2000-12-05 Seagate Technology, Llc Integrated controller/processor for disc drive having direct memory access
US6173402B1 (en) * 1998-03-04 2001-01-09 International Business Machines Corporation Technique for localizing keyphrase-based data encryption and decryption
US6173282B1 (en) * 1997-11-27 2001-01-09 Nortel Networks Limited Electronic sealed envelope
US6175924B1 (en) * 1997-06-20 2001-01-16 International Business Machines Corp. Method and apparatus for protecting application data in secure storage areas
US6182222B1 (en) * 1997-03-25 2001-01-30 Electronic Data Systems Corporation Secure data storage system and method
US6192472B1 (en) * 1997-09-12 2001-02-20 International Business Machines Corporation Method and apparatus for the secure distributed storage and retrieval of information
US6219771B1 (en) * 1996-08-30 2001-04-17 Nec Corporation Data storage apparatus with improved security process and partition allocation functions
US6219726B1 (en) * 1994-07-27 2001-04-17 International Business Machines Corporation System for providing access protection on media storage devices by selecting from a set of generated control parameters in accordance with application attributes
US6226744B1 (en) * 1997-10-09 2001-05-01 At&T Corp Method and apparatus for authenticating users on a network using a smart card
US6235281B1 (en) * 1994-02-07 2001-05-22 Knoll Aktiengesellschaft Use of anti-TNF antibodies as drugs for the treatment of disorders with an elevated serum level of interleukin-6
US6268789B1 (en) * 1996-11-22 2001-07-31 Voltaire Advanced Data Security Ltd. Information security method and apparatus
US6269409B1 (en) * 1997-09-02 2001-07-31 Lsi Logic Corporation Method and apparatus for concurrent execution of operating systems
US6321358B1 (en) * 1997-08-28 2001-11-20 Seagate Technology Llc Object reconstruction on object oriented data storage device
US6324627B1 (en) * 1998-06-22 2001-11-27 Virtual Data Security, Llc Virtual data storage (VDS) system
US6330653B1 (en) * 1998-05-01 2001-12-11 Powerquest Corporation Manipulation of virtual and live computer storage device partitions
US20010052073A1 (en) * 1998-06-12 2001-12-13 Kern Robert Frederic Storage controller conditioning host access to stored data according to security key stored in host-inaccessible metadata
US6360945B1 (en) * 1998-06-16 2002-03-26 Ncr Corporation Methods and apparatus for employing a hidden security partition to enhance system security
US20020069169A1 (en) * 2000-12-01 2002-06-06 Hiroko Sukeda Data processing method of smart card system
US20020077177A1 (en) * 1999-04-08 2002-06-20 Scott Elliott Security system for video game system with hard disk drive and internet access capability
US6421779B1 (en) * 1997-11-14 2002-07-16 Fujitsu Limited Electronic data storage apparatus, system and method
US20020108051A1 (en) * 2000-06-08 2002-08-08 Nicolas Fougeroux Method for secure storage of sensitive data in a silicon chip integrated system storage in particular a smart card and integrated system therefor
US6438690B1 (en) * 1998-06-04 2002-08-20 International Business Machines Corp. Vault controller based registration application serving web based registration authorities and end users for conducting electronic commerce in secure end-to-end distributed information system
US20020136406A1 (en) * 2001-03-20 2002-09-26 Jeremy Fitzhardinge System and method for efficiently storing and processing multimedia content
US20020157010A1 (en) * 2001-04-24 2002-10-24 International Business Machines Corporation Secure system and method for updating a protected partition of a hard drive
US20020178337A1 (en) * 2001-05-23 2002-11-28 Wilson Kenneth Mark Method and system for creating secure address space using hardware memory router
US20030023867A1 (en) * 2001-07-25 2003-01-30 Thibadeau Robert H. Methods and systems for promoting security in a computer system employing attached storage devices
US20030046472A1 (en) * 2001-08-21 2003-03-06 Neil Morrow Enhanced protocol conversion system
US20030084168A1 (en) * 2001-10-31 2003-05-01 Erickson John S. Policy enforcement and access control for distributed networked services
US6647481B1 (en) * 2002-01-31 2003-11-11 Western Digital Ventures, Inc. Method for accessing data storage locations having addresses within a hidden logical address range
US6650492B2 (en) * 2000-09-28 2003-11-18 Seagate Technology Llc Self-contained disc drive write authentication test
US20030225960A1 (en) * 2002-06-01 2003-12-04 Morris Guu Method for partitioning memory mass storage device
US6691198B1 (en) * 2000-03-30 2004-02-10 Western Digital Ventures, Inc. Automatically transmitting scheduling data from a plurality of storage systems to a network switch for scheduling access to the plurality of storage systems
US6691226B1 (en) * 1999-03-16 2004-02-10 Western Digital Ventures, Inc. Computer system with disk drive having private key validation means for enabling features
US6707548B2 (en) * 2001-02-08 2004-03-16 Array Bioscience Corporation Systems and methods for filter based spectrographic analysis
US6711605B2 (en) * 1997-09-12 2004-03-23 Hitachi, Ltd. Multi OS configuration method and computer system
US6715073B1 (en) * 1998-06-04 2004-03-30 International Business Machines Corporation Secure server using public key registration and methods of operation
US20040088513A1 (en) * 2002-10-30 2004-05-06 Biessener David W. Controller for partition-level security and backup
US20040128500A1 (en) * 2002-12-31 2004-07-01 Cihula Joseph F. Method and apparatus for strong authentication and proximity-based access retention
US6820063B1 (en) * 1998-10-26 2004-11-16 Microsoft Corporation Controlling access to content based on certificates and access predicates
US6836853B1 (en) * 1999-12-31 2004-12-28 Intel Corporation Non-volatile memory based monotonic counter
US6854039B1 (en) * 2001-12-05 2005-02-08 Advanced Micro Devices, Inc. Memory management system and method providing increased memory access security
US6871278B1 (en) * 2000-07-06 2005-03-22 Lasercard Corporation Secure transactions with passive storage media
US6889329B1 (en) * 2000-07-28 2005-05-03 Sun Microsystems, Inc. Adding secure external virtual memory to smart cards
US6892383B1 (en) * 2000-06-08 2005-05-10 International Business Machines Corporation Hypervisor function sets
US20050160151A1 (en) * 2003-12-17 2005-07-21 International Business Machines Corporation Method and system for machine memory power and availability management in a processing system supporting multiple virtual machines
US6957364B2 (en) * 2001-02-02 2005-10-18 Hitachi, Ltd. Computing system in which a plurality of programs can run on the hardware of one computer
US7124301B1 (en) * 1997-11-28 2006-10-17 Fujitsu Limited Data protection method for a removable storage medium and a storage device using the same
US7155616B1 (en) * 2000-07-31 2006-12-26 Western Digital Ventures, Inc. Computer network comprising network authentication facilities implemented in a disk drive
US7228243B2 (en) * 2005-09-22 2007-06-05 International Business Machines Corporation Implementing a high resolution monotonic system clock
US20070250710A1 (en) * 2006-04-25 2007-10-25 Seagate Technology Llc Versatile secure and non-secure messaging
US20070250915A1 (en) * 2006-04-25 2007-10-25 Seagate Technology Llc Versatile access control system
US20080215306A1 (en) * 2005-10-14 2008-09-04 Freescale Semiconductor, Inc Device and Method for Managing a Retransmit Operation
US7539890B2 (en) * 2006-04-25 2009-05-26 Seagate Technology Llc Hybrid computer security clock
US7600129B2 (en) * 1995-10-02 2009-10-06 Corestreet, Ltd. Controlling access using additional data

Family Cites Families (16)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
JPH0241550A (en) * 1988-08-01 1990-02-09 Nec Corp Data processing device
JPH05134895A (en) * 1991-11-15 1993-06-01 Fuji Electric Co Ltd Trace data storage and management system
JP3391990B2 (en) * 1996-09-19 2003-03-31 株式会社日立国際電気 Logging managing and logging the watch and an information processing apparatus
GB9713094D0 (en) 1997-06-21 1997-08-27 Philips Electronics Nv Optical disc drive
ES2274557T3 (en) 1998-08-31 2007-05-16 Irdeto Access B.V. System for providing encrypted data, to decrypt encrypted data system and method for providing a communications interface system said decryptor.
US7085931B1 (en) 1999-09-03 2006-08-01 Secure Computing Corporation Virtual smart card system and method
US6986052B1 (en) 2000-06-30 2006-01-10 Intel Corporation Method and apparatus for secure execution using a secure memory partition
JP3865629B2 (en) 2001-07-09 2007-01-10 株式会社ルネサステクノロジ Storage device
US20060174352A1 (en) 2001-07-25 2006-08-03 Seagate Technology Llc Method and apparatus for providing versatile services on storage devices
US20040073795A1 (en) 2002-10-10 2004-04-15 Jablon David P. Systems and methods for password-based connection
CN100390817C (en) 2003-06-10 2008-05-28 大唐微电子技术有限公司 IC smart card with dynamic logic sectorization and access right control function and implementing method thereof
US20050197859A1 (en) 2004-01-16 2005-09-08 Wilson James C. Portable electronic data storage and retreival system for group data
US20050177714A1 (en) 2004-02-10 2005-08-11 Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. Authentication method of data processing apparatus with recording device and apparatus for the same
US20050210266A1 (en) 2004-03-18 2005-09-22 Cottrell Andrew P Secure device connection and operation
CN100338589C (en) 2005-07-29 2007-09-19 大唐微电子技术有限公司 Method and IC card for controlling storage logic partition access authority
JP5134863B2 (en) 2007-05-21 2013-01-30 株式会社ブリヂストン Method for producing a conductive roller

Patent Citations (102)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US6173402B2 (en) *
US6182222B2 (en) *
US6173282B2 (en) *
US3576544A (en) * 1968-10-18 1971-04-27 Ibm Storage protection system
US3890601A (en) * 1974-03-11 1975-06-17 Philco Ford Corp Password operated system for preventing unauthorized or accidental computer memory alteration
US4183085A (en) * 1976-11-18 1980-01-08 International Business Machines Corporation Protection of data processing system against unauthorized programs
US4442484A (en) * 1980-10-14 1984-04-10 Intel Corporation Microprocessor memory management and protection mechanism
US4593384A (en) * 1984-12-21 1986-06-03 Ncr Corporation Security device for the secure storage of sensitive data
US5101374A (en) * 1988-05-19 1992-03-31 The United States Of America As Represented By The Director Of The National Security Agency Secure, fast storage and retrieval without interactive checking
US5787498A (en) * 1989-05-15 1998-07-28 Dallas Semiconductor Corporation Integrated circuit memory with verification unit which resets an address translation register upon failure to define one-to-one correspondences between addresses and memory cells
US5022077A (en) * 1989-08-25 1991-06-04 International Business Machines Corp. Apparatus and method for preventing unauthorized access to BIOS in a personal computer system
US5012514A (en) * 1990-06-26 1991-04-30 Paul Renton Hard drive security system
US5027401A (en) * 1990-07-03 1991-06-25 Soltesz John A System for the secure storage and transmission of data
US5345590A (en) * 1990-08-31 1994-09-06 International Business Machines Corporation Method and apparatus for cross-partition control in a partitioned process environment
US5504814A (en) * 1991-07-10 1996-04-02 Hughes Aircraft Company Efficient security kernel for the 80960 extended architecture
US5164988A (en) * 1991-10-31 1992-11-17 International Business Machines Corporation Method to establish and enforce a network cryptographic security policy in a public key cryptosystem
US5448045A (en) * 1992-02-26 1995-09-05 Clark; Paul C. System for protecting computers via intelligent tokens or smart cards
US5432939A (en) * 1992-05-27 1995-07-11 International Business Machines Corp. Trusted personal computer system with management control over initial program loading
US5600805A (en) * 1992-06-15 1997-02-04 International Business Machines Corporation Pass-through for I/O channel subsystem call instructions for accessing shared resources in a computer system having a plurality of operating systems
US5623637A (en) * 1993-12-06 1997-04-22 Telequip Corporation Encrypted data storage card including smartcard integrated circuit for storing an access password and encryption keys
US5754821A (en) * 1993-12-23 1998-05-19 International Business Machines Corporation Method and system for providing access to a protected partition of a memory device utilizing a passthru command
US6235281B1 (en) * 1994-02-07 2001-05-22 Knoll Aktiengesellschaft Use of anti-TNF antibodies as drugs for the treatment of disorders with an elevated serum level of interleukin-6
US5394469A (en) * 1994-02-18 1995-02-28 Infosafe Systems, Inc. Method and apparatus for retrieving secure information from mass storage media
US6219726B1 (en) * 1994-07-27 2001-04-17 International Business Machines Corporation System for providing access protection on media storage devices by selecting from a set of generated control parameters in accordance with application attributes
US5949601A (en) * 1995-03-10 1999-09-07 Iomega Corporation Read/write protect scheme for a disk cartridge and drive
US5940513A (en) * 1995-08-25 1999-08-17 Intel Corporation Parameterized hash functions for access control
US7600129B2 (en) * 1995-10-02 2009-10-06 Corestreet, Ltd. Controlling access using additional data
US5928364A (en) * 1995-11-30 1999-07-27 Casio Computer Co., Ltd. Secret data storage device, secret data reading method, and control program storing medium
US5815665A (en) * 1996-04-03 1998-09-29 Microsoft Corporation System and method for providing trusted brokering services over a distributed network
US5889941A (en) * 1996-04-15 1999-03-30 Ubiq Inc. System and apparatus for smart card personalization
US5809546A (en) * 1996-05-23 1998-09-15 International Business Machines Corporation Method for managing I/O buffers in shared storage by structuring buffer table having entries including storage keys for controlling accesses to the buffers
US5892899A (en) * 1996-06-13 1999-04-06 Intel Corporation Tamper resistant methods and apparatus
US6000023A (en) * 1996-07-19 1999-12-07 Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. Method for partitioning storage regions on hard disk and computer system adapted to the same
US6219771B1 (en) * 1996-08-30 2001-04-17 Nec Corporation Data storage apparatus with improved security process and partition allocation functions
US5892902A (en) * 1996-09-05 1999-04-06 Clark; Paul C. Intelligent token protected system with network authentication
US6268789B1 (en) * 1996-11-22 2001-07-31 Voltaire Advanced Data Security Ltd. Information security method and apparatus
US6182222B1 (en) * 1997-03-25 2001-01-30 Electronic Data Systems Corporation Secure data storage system and method
US6157984A (en) * 1997-05-15 2000-12-05 Seagate Technology, Llc Integrated controller/processor for disc drive having direct memory access
US6088802A (en) * 1997-06-04 2000-07-11 Spyrus, Inc. Peripheral device with integrated security functionality
US6175924B1 (en) * 1997-06-20 2001-01-16 International Business Machines Corp. Method and apparatus for protecting application data in secure storage areas
US6321358B1 (en) * 1997-08-28 2001-11-20 Seagate Technology Llc Object reconstruction on object oriented data storage device
US6269409B1 (en) * 1997-09-02 2001-07-31 Lsi Logic Corporation Method and apparatus for concurrent execution of operating systems
US6711605B2 (en) * 1997-09-12 2004-03-23 Hitachi, Ltd. Multi OS configuration method and computer system
US6192472B1 (en) * 1997-09-12 2001-02-20 International Business Machines Corporation Method and apparatus for the secure distributed storage and retrieval of information
US6226744B1 (en) * 1997-10-09 2001-05-01 At&T Corp Method and apparatus for authenticating users on a network using a smart card
US6061449A (en) * 1997-10-10 2000-05-09 General Instrument Corporation Secure processor with external memory using block chaining and block re-ordering
US6421779B1 (en) * 1997-11-14 2002-07-16 Fujitsu Limited Electronic data storage apparatus, system and method
US6173282B1 (en) * 1997-11-27 2001-01-09 Nortel Networks Limited Electronic sealed envelope
US7124301B1 (en) * 1997-11-28 2006-10-17 Fujitsu Limited Data protection method for a removable storage medium and a storage device using the same
US6173402B1 (en) * 1998-03-04 2001-01-09 International Business Machines Corporation Technique for localizing keyphrase-based data encryption and decryption
US6330653B1 (en) * 1998-05-01 2001-12-11 Powerquest Corporation Manipulation of virtual and live computer storage device partitions
US6141752A (en) * 1998-05-05 2000-10-31 Liberate Technologies Mechanism for facilitating secure storage and retrieval of information on a smart card by an internet service provider using various network computer client devices
US6092202A (en) * 1998-05-22 2000-07-18 N*Able Technologies, Inc. Method and system for secure transactions in a computer system
US6715073B1 (en) * 1998-06-04 2004-03-30 International Business Machines Corporation Secure server using public key registration and methods of operation
US6438690B1 (en) * 1998-06-04 2002-08-20 International Business Machines Corp. Vault controller based registration application serving web based registration authorities and end users for conducting electronic commerce in secure end-to-end distributed information system
US6336187B1 (en) * 1998-06-12 2002-01-01 International Business Machines Corp. Storage system with data-dependent security
US20010052073A1 (en) * 1998-06-12 2001-12-13 Kern Robert Frederic Storage controller conditioning host access to stored data according to security key stored in host-inaccessible metadata
US6446209B2 (en) * 1998-06-12 2002-09-03 International Business Machines Corporation Storage controller conditioning host access to stored data according to security key stored in host-inaccessible metadata
US6360945B1 (en) * 1998-06-16 2002-03-26 Ncr Corporation Methods and apparatus for employing a hidden security partition to enhance system security
US6044349A (en) * 1998-06-19 2000-03-28 Intel Corporation Secure and convenient information storage and retrieval method and apparatus
US6324627B1 (en) * 1998-06-22 2001-11-27 Virtual Data Security, Llc Virtual data storage (VDS) system
US6134662A (en) * 1998-06-26 2000-10-17 Vlsi Technology, Inc. Physical layer security manager for memory-mapped serial communications interface
US6820063B1 (en) * 1998-10-26 2004-11-16 Microsoft Corporation Controlling access to content based on certificates and access predicates
US6138239A (en) * 1998-11-13 2000-10-24 N★Able Technologies, Inc. Method and system for authenticating and utilizing secure resources in a computer system
US6691226B1 (en) * 1999-03-16 2004-02-10 Western Digital Ventures, Inc. Computer system with disk drive having private key validation means for enabling features
US20020077177A1 (en) * 1999-04-08 2002-06-20 Scott Elliott Security system for video game system with hard disk drive and internet access capability
US6468160B2 (en) * 1999-04-08 2002-10-22 Nintendo Of America, Inc. Security system for video game system with hard disk drive and internet access capability
US6836853B1 (en) * 1999-12-31 2004-12-28 Intel Corporation Non-volatile memory based monotonic counter
US6691198B1 (en) * 2000-03-30 2004-02-10 Western Digital Ventures, Inc. Automatically transmitting scheduling data from a plurality of storage systems to a network switch for scheduling access to the plurality of storage systems
US20020108051A1 (en) * 2000-06-08 2002-08-08 Nicolas Fougeroux Method for secure storage of sensitive data in a silicon chip integrated system storage in particular a smart card and integrated system therefor
US6892383B1 (en) * 2000-06-08 2005-05-10 International Business Machines Corporation Hypervisor function sets
US6871278B1 (en) * 2000-07-06 2005-03-22 Lasercard Corporation Secure transactions with passive storage media
US6889329B1 (en) * 2000-07-28 2005-05-03 Sun Microsystems, Inc. Adding secure external virtual memory to smart cards
US7155616B1 (en) * 2000-07-31 2006-12-26 Western Digital Ventures, Inc. Computer network comprising network authentication facilities implemented in a disk drive
US6650492B2 (en) * 2000-09-28 2003-11-18 Seagate Technology Llc Self-contained disc drive write authentication test
US20020069169A1 (en) * 2000-12-01 2002-06-06 Hiroko Sukeda Data processing method of smart card system
US6957364B2 (en) * 2001-02-02 2005-10-18 Hitachi, Ltd. Computing system in which a plurality of programs can run on the hardware of one computer
US6707548B2 (en) * 2001-02-08 2004-03-16 Array Bioscience Corporation Systems and methods for filter based spectrographic analysis
US7046805B2 (en) * 2001-03-20 2006-05-16 Digeo, Inc. System and method for efficiently storing and processing multimedia content
US20020136406A1 (en) * 2001-03-20 2002-09-26 Jeremy Fitzhardinge System and method for efficiently storing and processing multimedia content
US20020157010A1 (en) * 2001-04-24 2002-10-24 International Business Machines Corporation Secure system and method for updating a protected partition of a hard drive
US20020178337A1 (en) * 2001-05-23 2002-11-28 Wilson Kenneth Mark Method and system for creating secure address space using hardware memory router
US6915402B2 (en) * 2001-05-23 2005-07-05 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. Method and system for creating secure address space using hardware memory router
US20050066191A1 (en) * 2001-07-25 2005-03-24 Seagate Technology Llc System and method for delivering versatile security, digital rights management, and privacy services from storage controllers
US7036020B2 (en) * 2001-07-25 2006-04-25 Antique Books, Inc Methods and systems for promoting security in a computer system employing attached storage devices
US20030023867A1 (en) * 2001-07-25 2003-01-30 Thibadeau Robert H. Methods and systems for promoting security in a computer system employing attached storage devices
US20030046472A1 (en) * 2001-08-21 2003-03-06 Neil Morrow Enhanced protocol conversion system
US20030084168A1 (en) * 2001-10-31 2003-05-01 Erickson John S. Policy enforcement and access control for distributed networked services
US6854039B1 (en) * 2001-12-05 2005-02-08 Advanced Micro Devices, Inc. Memory management system and method providing increased memory access security
US6647481B1 (en) * 2002-01-31 2003-11-11 Western Digital Ventures, Inc. Method for accessing data storage locations having addresses within a hidden logical address range
US20030225960A1 (en) * 2002-06-01 2003-12-04 Morris Guu Method for partitioning memory mass storage device
US7114051B2 (en) * 2002-06-01 2006-09-26 Solid State System Co., Ltd. Method for partitioning memory mass storage device
US20040088513A1 (en) * 2002-10-30 2004-05-06 Biessener David W. Controller for partition-level security and backup
US20040128500A1 (en) * 2002-12-31 2004-07-01 Cihula Joseph F. Method and apparatus for strong authentication and proximity-based access retention
US7178034B2 (en) * 2002-12-31 2007-02-13 Intel Corporation Method and apparatus for strong authentication and proximity-based access retention
US7356665B2 (en) * 2003-12-17 2008-04-08 International Business Machines Corporation Method and system for machine memory power and availability management in a processing system supporting multiple virtual machines
US20050160151A1 (en) * 2003-12-17 2005-07-21 International Business Machines Corporation Method and system for machine memory power and availability management in a processing system supporting multiple virtual machines
US7228243B2 (en) * 2005-09-22 2007-06-05 International Business Machines Corporation Implementing a high resolution monotonic system clock
US20080215306A1 (en) * 2005-10-14 2008-09-04 Freescale Semiconductor, Inc Device and Method for Managing a Retransmit Operation
US20070250915A1 (en) * 2006-04-25 2007-10-25 Seagate Technology Llc Versatile access control system
US20070250710A1 (en) * 2006-04-25 2007-10-25 Seagate Technology Llc Versatile secure and non-secure messaging
US7539890B2 (en) * 2006-04-25 2009-05-26 Seagate Technology Llc Hybrid computer security clock

Cited By (37)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US7127579B2 (en) * 2002-03-26 2006-10-24 Intel Corporation Hardened extended firmware interface framework
US20030188173A1 (en) * 2002-03-26 2003-10-02 Zimmer Vincent J. Hardened extended firmware interface framework
US20080121646A1 (en) * 2004-05-14 2008-05-29 Manfred Schininger Storage Machine For Objects
US7925375B2 (en) * 2004-05-14 2011-04-12 Keba Ag Storage machine for objects
US20080128444A1 (en) * 2004-09-21 2008-06-05 Manfred Schininger Storage Dispenser For Objects
US8145351B2 (en) 2004-09-21 2012-03-27 Keba Ag Storage dispenser for objects
US8504849B2 (en) 2004-12-21 2013-08-06 Sandisk Technologies Inc. Method for versatile content control
US20070168292A1 (en) * 2004-12-21 2007-07-19 Fabrice Jogand-Coulomb Memory system with versatile content control
US20060242068A1 (en) * 2004-12-21 2006-10-26 Fabrice Jogand-Coulomb Method forversatile content control
US8601283B2 (en) 2004-12-21 2013-12-03 Sandisk Technologies Inc. Method for versatile content control with partitioning
US20100077214A1 (en) * 2004-12-21 2010-03-25 Fabrice Jogand-Coulomb Host Device and Method for Protecting Data Stored in a Storage Device
US7802111B1 (en) * 2005-04-27 2010-09-21 Oracle America, Inc. System and method for limiting exposure of cryptographic keys protected by a trusted platform module
US20060259785A1 (en) * 2005-05-10 2006-11-16 Seagate Technology Llc Method and apparatus for securing data storage while insuring control by logical roles
US8127147B2 (en) * 2005-05-10 2012-02-28 Seagate Technology Llc Method and apparatus for securing data storage while insuring control by logical roles
US20070107056A1 (en) * 2005-11-09 2007-05-10 Microsoft Corporation Hardware-aided software code measurement
US8112798B2 (en) 2005-11-09 2012-02-07 Microsoft Corporation Hardware-aided software code measurement
US7756893B2 (en) 2005-11-09 2010-07-13 Microsoft Corporation Independent computation environment and data protection
US20070106682A1 (en) * 2005-11-09 2007-05-10 Microsoft Corporation Independent Computation Environment and Data Protection
US7987512B2 (en) 2006-05-19 2011-07-26 Microsoft Corporation BIOS based secure execution environment
US20070271597A1 (en) * 2006-05-19 2007-11-22 Microsoft Corporation BIOS Based Secure Execution Environment
US20080005560A1 (en) * 2006-06-29 2008-01-03 Microsoft Corporation Independent Computation Environment and Provisioning of Computing Device Functionality
US8266711B2 (en) * 2006-07-07 2012-09-11 Sandisk Technologies Inc. Method for controlling information supplied from memory device
US20100138652A1 (en) * 2006-07-07 2010-06-03 Rotem Sela Content control method using certificate revocation lists
US8613103B2 (en) 2006-07-07 2013-12-17 Sandisk Technologies Inc. Content control method using versatile control structure
US20080010455A1 (en) * 2006-07-07 2008-01-10 Michael Holtzman Control Method Using Identity Objects
US20080010451A1 (en) * 2006-07-07 2008-01-10 Michael Holtzman Content Control Method Using Certificate Revocation Lists
US8639939B2 (en) 2006-07-07 2014-01-28 Sandisk Technologies Inc. Control method using identity objects
US20080022413A1 (en) * 2006-07-07 2008-01-24 Michael Holtzman Method for Controlling Information Supplied from Memory Device
US8245031B2 (en) 2006-07-07 2012-08-14 Sandisk Technologies Inc. Content control method using certificate revocation lists
US20080010685A1 (en) * 2006-07-07 2008-01-10 Michael Holtzman Content Control Method Using Versatile Control Structure
US20080072071A1 (en) * 2006-09-14 2008-03-20 Seagate Technology Llc Hard disc streaming cryptographic operations with embedded authentication
US20080158388A1 (en) * 2006-12-27 2008-07-03 Tomi Lahcanski Removable storage device providing automatic launch capability in an image processing system
US20080168247A1 (en) * 2007-01-05 2008-07-10 Seagate Technology Llc Method and apparatus for controlling access to a data storage device
US20100161928A1 (en) * 2008-12-18 2010-06-24 Rotem Sela Managing access to an address range in a storage device
US9104618B2 (en) 2008-12-18 2015-08-11 Sandisk Technologies Inc. Managing access to an address range in a storage device
US8566603B2 (en) 2010-06-14 2013-10-22 Seagate Technology Llc Managing security operating modes
US9842154B2 (en) * 2016-04-29 2017-12-12 Netapp, Inc. Secure data replication

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date Type
US7925894B2 (en) 2011-04-12 grant

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US6883098B1 (en) Method and computer system for controlling access by applications to this and other computer systems
US7725703B2 (en) Systems and methods for securely booting a computer with a trusted processing module
US7921288B1 (en) System and method for providing different levels of key security for controlling access to secured items
US7237123B2 (en) Systems and methods for preventing unauthorized use of digital content
US7461249B1 (en) Computer platforms and their methods of operation
US6173402B1 (en) Technique for localizing keyphrase-based data encryption and decryption
US20040034794A1 (en) System and method for comprehensive general generic protection for computers against malicious programs that may steal information and/or cause damages
US20030159070A1 (en) System and method for comprehensive general generic protection for computers against malicious programs that may steal information and/or cause damages
England et al. A trusted open platform
US20020169878A1 (en) Secured system for accessing application services from a remote station
US7228434B2 (en) Method of protecting the integrity of a computer program
US20070277240A1 (en) Posture-based data protection
US20020174369A1 (en) Trusted computer system
US8950007B1 (en) Policy-based whitelisting with system change management based on trust framework
US20080148339A1 (en) Group policy for unique class identifier devices
US20070112772A1 (en) Method and apparatus for securely accessing data
US20050154885A1 (en) Electronic data security system and method
US7506170B2 (en) Method for secure access to multiple secure networks
Garriss et al. Trustworthy and personalized computing on public kiosks
US7426747B2 (en) Methods and systems for promoting security in a computer system employing attached storage devices
US20100037296A1 (en) Client Authentication And Data Management System
US20060272027A1 (en) Secure access to segment of data storage device and analyzer
US20140020083A1 (en) Customizable Storage Controller With Integrated F+ Storage Firewall Protection
US20080046581A1 (en) Method and System for Implementing a Mobile Trusted Platform Module
US6272631B1 (en) Protected storage of core data secrets

Legal Events

Date Code Title Description
AS Assignment

Owner name: SEAGATE TECHNOLOGY LLC, CALIFORNIA

Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:THIBADEAU, ROBERT H.;REEL/FRAME:016405/0069

Effective date: 20050225

AS Assignment

Owner name: JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, N.A., AS ADMINISTRATIVE AGENT

Free format text: SECURITY AGREEMENT;ASSIGNORS:MAXTOR CORPORATION;SEAGATE TECHNOLOGY LLC;SEAGATE TECHNOLOGY INTERNATIONAL;REEL/FRAME:022757/0017

Effective date: 20090507

Owner name: WELLS FARGO BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS COLLATE

Free format text: SECURITY AGREEMENT;ASSIGNORS:MAXTOR CORPORATION;SEAGATE TECHNOLOGY LLC;SEAGATE TECHNOLOGY INTERNATIONAL;REEL/FRAME:022757/0017

Effective date: 20090507

AS Assignment

Owner name: MAXTOR CORPORATION, CALIFORNIA

Free format text: RELEASE;ASSIGNOR:JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, N.A., AS ADMINISTRATIVE AGENT;REEL/FRAME:025662/0001

Effective date: 20110114

Owner name: SEAGATE TECHNOLOGY HDD HOLDINGS, CALIFORNIA

Free format text: RELEASE;ASSIGNOR:JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, N.A., AS ADMINISTRATIVE AGENT;REEL/FRAME:025662/0001

Effective date: 20110114

Owner name: SEAGATE TECHNOLOGY LLC, CALIFORNIA

Free format text: RELEASE;ASSIGNOR:JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, N.A., AS ADMINISTRATIVE AGENT;REEL/FRAME:025662/0001

Effective date: 20110114

Owner name: SEAGATE TECHNOLOGY INTERNATIONAL, CALIFORNIA

Free format text: RELEASE;ASSIGNOR:JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, N.A., AS ADMINISTRATIVE AGENT;REEL/FRAME:025662/0001

Effective date: 20110114

AS Assignment

Owner name: THE BANK OF NOVA SCOTIA, AS ADMINISTRATIVE AGENT,

Free format text: SECURITY AGREEMENT;ASSIGNOR:SEAGATE TECHNOLOGY LLC;REEL/FRAME:026010/0350

Effective date: 20110118

AS Assignment

Owner name: SEAGATE TECHNOLOGY INTERNATIONAL, CAYMAN ISLANDS

Free format text: TERMINATION AND RELEASE OF SECURITY INTEREST IN PATENT RIGHTS;ASSIGNOR:WELLS FARGO BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS COLLATERAL AGENT AND SECOND PRIORITY REPRESENTATIVE;REEL/FRAME:030833/0001

Effective date: 20130312

Owner name: SEAGATE TECHNOLOGY US HOLDINGS, INC., CALIFORNIA

Free format text: TERMINATION AND RELEASE OF SECURITY INTEREST IN PATENT RIGHTS;ASSIGNOR:WELLS FARGO BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS COLLATERAL AGENT AND SECOND PRIORITY REPRESENTATIVE;REEL/FRAME:030833/0001

Effective date: 20130312

Owner name: EVAULT INC. (F/K/A I365 INC.), CALIFORNIA

Free format text: TERMINATION AND RELEASE OF SECURITY INTEREST IN PATENT RIGHTS;ASSIGNOR:WELLS FARGO BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS COLLATERAL AGENT AND SECOND PRIORITY REPRESENTATIVE;REEL/FRAME:030833/0001

Effective date: 20130312

Owner name: SEAGATE TECHNOLOGY LLC, CALIFORNIA

Free format text: TERMINATION AND RELEASE OF SECURITY INTEREST IN PATENT RIGHTS;ASSIGNOR:WELLS FARGO BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS COLLATERAL AGENT AND SECOND PRIORITY REPRESENTATIVE;REEL/FRAME:030833/0001

Effective date: 20130312

FPAY Fee payment

Year of fee payment: 4