US20030144089A1 - Baseball practice bat - Google Patents

Baseball practice bat Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US20030144089A1
US20030144089A1 US10373446 US37344603A US2003144089A1 US 20030144089 A1 US20030144089 A1 US 20030144089A1 US 10373446 US10373446 US 10373446 US 37344603 A US37344603 A US 37344603A US 2003144089 A1 US2003144089 A1 US 2003144089A1
Authority
US
Grant status
Application
Patent type
Prior art keywords
bat
movable handle
shaft
knob
baseball
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Abandoned
Application number
US10373446
Inventor
Richard Ryan
Original Assignee
Richard Ryan
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date

Links

Images

Classifications

    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B60/00Details or accessories of golf clubs, bats, rackets or the like
    • A63B60/06Handles
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B60/00Details or accessories of golf clubs, bats, rackets or the like
    • A63B60/06Handles
    • A63B60/08Handles characterised by the material
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B60/00Details or accessories of golf clubs, bats, rackets or the like
    • A63B60/06Handles
    • A63B60/10Handles with means for indicating correct holding positions
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B60/00Details or accessories of golf clubs, bats, rackets or the like
    • A63B60/06Handles
    • A63B60/14Coverings specially adapted for handles, e.g. sleeves or ribbons
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B60/00Details or accessories of golf clubs, bats, rackets or the like
    • A63B60/06Handles
    • A63B60/20Handles with two handgrips
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B60/00Details or accessories of golf clubs, bats, rackets or the like
    • A63B60/06Handles
    • A63B60/32Handles with means for changing the angular position of the handle about its longitudinal axis
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B69/00Training appliances or apparatus for special sports
    • A63B69/0002Training appliances or apparatus for special sports for baseball
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B69/00Training appliances or apparatus for special sports
    • A63B69/0002Training appliances or apparatus for special sports for baseball
    • A63B2069/0004Training appliances or apparatus for special sports for baseball specially adapted for particular training aspects
    • A63B2069/0008Training appliances or apparatus for special sports for baseball specially adapted for particular training aspects for batting
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B2102/00Application of clubs, bats, rackets or the like to the sporting activity ; particular sports involving the use of balls and clubs, bats, rackets, or the like
    • A63B2102/18Baseball, rounders or similar games
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B59/00Bats, rackets or the like, not covered by groups A63B49/00 - A63B57/00
    • A63B59/50Substantially rod-shaped bats for hitting a ball in the air, e.g. for baseball

Abstract

A baseball practice bat has a movable handle portion disposed around a shaft between the barrel portion of the bat and the knob at the other end of the bat to provide sensual, visual, audible or electronic feedback to a practice hitter or coach as to proper hand and arm position while hitting a ball based on temporal feedback from the motion of the movable handle.

Description

    CROSS REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS
  • This application is a continuation-in-part of U.S. Utility patent application Ser. No. 10/175,513 filed Jun. 19, 2002, and published on Jan. 16, 2003 as US-2003-0013563-A1, which is a continuation-in-part of U.S. Utility patent application Ser. No. 09/735,725 filed Dec. 12, 2000, now issued U.S. Pat. No. 6,406,387, which is incorporated by reference in its entirety.[0001]
  • BACKGROUND OF INVENTION
  • The present invention relates generally to the field of baseball equipment. More particularly, the invention relates to a practice bat for baseball. [0002]
  • The game of baseball has been played in the United States for more than one hundred years. The game is played by opposing teams and consists primarily of a pitcher of one team throwing a ball to a batter of the other team who attempts to hit the ball with the bat and to run to each of four bases without being tagged out. [0003]
  • The bat is round in cross section and narrow in diameter, thereby making it difficult to hit a ball, which tends to be only slightly larger in diameter than the bat barrel. Bats are generally constructed of wood or aluminum. There tend to be no moving parts on a baseball bat. Baseball players tend to spend many hours practicing their hitting technique so that when they play the game, they can hit the ball with maximum efficiency. [0004]
  • Hitting coaches know that the most efficient way to swing a bat for optimal performance is to have the leading arm do most of the work until the ball makes contact with the barrel of the bat. After that, both hands and arms are used equally. It is difficult, with a standard bat, for the batter or the coach to verify that the batter is actually using his or her leading arm properly. Additionally, coaches train their players to hold the bat in such a way that the batters knuckles of one hand are aligned with the knuckles of the other hand. This ideal alignment is also difficult to verify during the swinging process. [0005]
  • SUMMARY OF INVENTION
  • The present invention is implemented in the form of a baseball practice bat having a main bat barrel disposed at one end of a shaft, a knob disposed at the opposing end of the shaft and a movable handle portion that translates along the shaft between the barrel section and the knob. Accordingly the user, a practice batter, grips the shaft just above the knob with their leading hand (i.e. left hand for “right handed” hitting) and then uses the trailing hand to both grip the moving handle and displace it away from the leading handing. Thus, when upon properly swinging the bat the trailing hand will urge the movable handle towards the knob at the moment of impact with the ball. [0006]
  • Various embodiments provide other features, devices and methods for sensing and correlating the balls impact with the bat with the translation of the movable handle on the shaft and the positions the moving handle using the trailing hand gripping the movable handle [0007]
  • In additional embodiments a second handle grip is provided above the knob so as to provide feedback on the correct rotation of the leading and trailing hand during the swing by reference to the rotational position of the movable and fixed handle at the moment of impact with the ball. [0008]
  • In further embodiments various methods are deployed to provide the practice batter or coach with visual, audible, sensory or electronic feedback that correlate the position and/or rotation of the movable grip at the moment of impact with the baseball. [0009]
  • In yet additional embodiments the aforementioned features, devices and methods for sensing and correlating the balls impact with the bat with the movable grip position are provided in the form of a kit adapted to be added as well as removed from a regulation baseball bat; such as one might use in play. [0010]
  • Other objects and advantages of the invention will no doubt occur to those skilled in the art upon reading and understanding the following detailed description along with the accompanying drawings. [0011]
  • The above and other objects, effects, features, and advantages of the present invention will become more apparent from the following description of the embodiments thereof taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings. [0012]
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF DRAWINGS
  • FIG. 1 is a cross-sectional view of the baseball practice bat. [0013]
  • FIG. 2 is a perspective view of a person starting a swing using the practice bat. [0014]
  • FIG. 3 is a perspective view of a person during a swing using the practice bat. [0015]
  • FIG. 4 is a cross-sectional view of a second embodiment of the practice bat. [0016]
  • FIG. 5 is a cross-sectional view of another embodiment of the practice bat. [0017]
  • FIG. 6 is a partial cut-away view of another embodiment of the practice bat. [0018]
  • FIG. 7A, 7B and [0019] 7C are elevations of further embodiments of the practice bat.
  • FIG. 8A is a perspective view of a movable handle and optional stop or fixed handle or grip for retrofitting to an existing bat. FIG. 8B is an elevation sectional view of one embodiment of the movable handle. FIG. 8C is a perspective view of the movable handle of FIG. 8B prior to application. FIG. 8D is a cross section through the perspective view in FIG. 8C. FIG. FIG. 8E is a cross-sectional view of one embodiment of the optional stop for retrofitting to an existing bat. [0020]
  • FIG. 9 is a cross-sectional view of another embodiment of the practice bat having incorporating one or more electronic sensor to enable alternative feedback and data logging schemes. [0021]
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION
  • Detailed descriptions of the preferred embodiments are provided herein. It is to be understood, however, that the present invention may be embodied in various forms. Therefore, specific details disclosed herein are not to be interpreted as limiting, but rather as a basis for the claims and as a representative basis for teaching one skilled in the art to employ the present invention in virtually any appropriately detailed system, structure or manner. [0022]
  • FIG. 1 is a side, sectional view of the baseball practice bat of the present invention. Although the following description will refer to the term baseball bat in describing the present invention, it should be understood that the present invention also includes softball bats. The bat [0023] 100 is comprised of three main functional elements, the main bat barrel 130, the movable handle 120 and the knob 110, all connected by a centrally located generally rigid shaft 160. These functional elements are preferably expressed in a substantially monolithic construction, for example as in a traditional baseball bat formed by turning a single piece of wood in a lathe. The shaft 160 may be made from a tubular material such as stainless steel or may be made of solid material such as fiberglass, aluminum or wood. Movable handle translates along the region of shaft region 160 defined by the bottom of barrel 130 and the batter's leading hand placed above knob 110. While movable handle 120 is illustrated as having indentations or ridges molded in the contour of finger this is optional, for example when it is desirable to correlate the rotation of handle 120 about shaft 160 during the practice swing. that form finger grips, this is optional
  • The practice bat of the present invention is used in the following way, as shown in FIG. 2 and FIG. 3. The user [0024] 50 grips the bat shaft or the illustrated fixed handle 100 attached above the knob 110 with the leading hand using the trailing hand to grip and slide the movable handle 200 up close to bat barrel 300. The leading arm and hand 52 is held in the normal fashion. One key to optimal hitting is to let the leading hand and arm 52 do most of the work until the ball 62 strikes the bat barrel 300, after which point both the leading arm 52 and the trailing arm 54 share the work equally. If the batter is using his leading arm 52 correctly the sliding handle 200 will not slide down rigid shaft 160 and meet the fixed handle 100 prior to the batter hitting the ball.
  • Additionally, the rotation of movable handle [0025] 200 about the axis of the bat barrel and shaft provides further indicia of a poor or inferior swing. In a proper swing the batter's hands remain in substantially the same orientation to each other with respect to the plane of the hands, as if the palm was fully opened rather than gripping the bat. The handles remaining parallel to each other during the swing is usually manifested by retaining the alignment of the knuckles of each hand at the completion of the swing, which can be indicated by various means as described in further embodiments. However, as the free rotation of the movable grip about the shaft also causes the player to tend to not strike the ball solidly (causing poor flight of the ball) when the hands come out of alignment, this provides superior feedback as it more closely simulates game play and is readily apparent to coaches. More significantly, improper rotation of the hands with the inventive practice bat cannot be accommodated by twisting or bending the torso, and thus avoids the development of such compensating habits that frustrate the development of superior skills and game performance.
  • The motion of the movable handle toward the knob is sensed during the execution of a swing. In the simplest embodiment the hitter feel the movable handle contacting the leading hand at the moment they hit the ball. Accordingly, the practice batter can also observe if their hands have maintained the correct orientation through the swing, as the improper rotation of one hand with respect to the other will be apparent by simple inspection of the knuckle alignment. Thus, a batter can practice the correct method of hitting by verifying that his or her leading arm is doing most of the work prior to the ball hitting [0026]
  • The practice bat shown in FIG. 1 is optionally formed by assembly of a shaft, barrel and knob, or by standard manufacturing, such as grinding a wood bat on a lathe or by rotary swaging or hammering of a metal bat, such as aluminum. [0027]
  • Although the shaft [0028] 160 may be the same diameter as a standard bat handle, for familiarity of feel and ease of gripping, the shaft 160 is preferably made smaller such that when the handle 120 the feel of the bat 400 is similar to a standard bat.
  • Although non-resilient grips may be used, a resilient grip [0029] 121 preferably is disposed on the outer surface of moving handle 120 provides better comfort for the user.
  • As with the prior embodiment, the grips [0030] 414, 416 preferably have ridges 424 for the fingers, thereby allowing for proper alignment of the handles 406, 408 during swinging. However, in alternative embodiments the optional ridges can be replaced by a smooth, conforming, moldable, tactile or like gripping surface, as well as surfaces similar to a conventional bat grip.
  • FIG. 4 illustrates an alternative embodiment wherein a stop [0031] 461 is disposed on shaft 460 such that the hand gripping shaft 460 above knob 410 is protected from direct contact with movable handle 420 during the practice swing. In this embodiment it is desirable to provide the upper surface of stop 461 with an activation mechanism that is sensitive to contact with handle 420 to enhance either the hitter or coach's perception of the contact of movable handle 420 with stop 461. A variety of such mechanisms will be further described with respect to additional embodiments of the invention.
  • Alternatively, as shown in FIG. 5 the resilient grips [0032] 521 may also have a flange 526 located on the bottom end. Thus either a stop 561 or fixed handle 562 is disposed between knob 510 or barrel 530 can contain a mechanism that provides the temporal indication of moving handles 526 position at the time of impact with the baseball. Thus the lower surface of flange 526 and the upper surface of either stop 561 or fixed handle 562 may be constructed from metals or other hard materials that produce an audible sound on impact, or may contain electromechanical contact or momentum change sensitive switches that activate other electronic or recording devices as further described.
  • In other embodiments, the sound may be generated by an alternate mechanism. For example, an air bladder could be impacted and compressed by the projection on the handle. When the air bladder was compressed, air escaping the chamber could pass through a sound-generating orifice. [0033]
  • To the extent it is also desirable to determine if the hands improperly rotate during the swing, the switch contact on either of these surface can be radially disposed with respect to shaft [0034] 560 such that a activation only occurs when a complementary feature or device in the opposing surface becomes radially coaligned as the moving hand rotates moving handle 520.
  • Thus the feedback from the appropriate contact of the switch activating features associated with the moving handle and a stop or grip can both signals can be audible, vibratory or an electronic trigger signal. The electronic trigger signal might be used to activate a prerecorded sound on a microchip, or activate other devices or be recorded in a data log. [0035]
  • As shown in FIG. 6, the barrel is preferably tapered, in which case a stop [0036] 628 is attached to the top of the shaft 660 to prevent the movable handle 620 from being forced up the widening section leading to the barrel 630 and getting stuck. The stop 628 may be attached in any suitable manner, including welding, adhesive, mechanical means.
  • However, as shown in the various embodiments in FIGS. 7A, B and C the barrel may need not be tapered or conform to regular sizes or shapes. FIG. [0037] 7A illustrates an embodiment wherein the diameter of the moving grip and the grip area on shaft 760 above knob 710 is substantially the same diameter. In such a case it is preferable to omit a flange at the bottom of moving grip 720 to avoid pinching a portion of the leading hand's fingers between the flange lower shaft portions at the narrowing of the shaft. Alternatively, by also providing the lower stop, i.e. element 461 as shown in FIG. 4, the potentially for injury is minimized.
  • In FIG. 7B the bat has a severe taper towards the end of the barrel [0038] 730 and the start of shaft 760 such that only a narrow shaded portion of the barrel retains the traditional or regulation diameter. The narrow portion of the barrel corresponds to ideal hitting region to provide further training and practice of both timing, arm and body motion to improve hand eye coordination.
  • In FIG. 7C the bat barrel [0039] 730 is significantly narrower than the regulation bat to challenge the batters hitting accuracy, thus offering an alternative method to emphasize yet another aspect of hand eye coordination with combined training and practice of both timing, arm and body motion.
  • In yet another embodiment the invention can be implemented via a kit comprising a movable handle assembly. FIG. 8A illustrates an alternative embodiment of the invention in perspective view of the invention in which the movable handle and the optional stop both comprise subcomponents adopted for attachment or retrofitting to an existing baseball bat that might be used in both practice and play, or interchanged between any of the bat shapes in the preceding Figures. FIG. 8B is a cross-sectional view of one embodiment of the movable handle. Movable handle [0040] 820 is composed is constructed optionally from 2 half cylinder segments 820 a and 820 b that separate at parting line 821 in FIG. 8A. FIG. 8C is a perspective view of the movable handle of FIG. 8B prior to application onto shaft 860.
  • FIG. 8D is a cross-sectional view of one embodiment of the optional stop for retrofitting to an existing bat. Halves [0041] 820 a and 820 b are connected by hinge 822 disposed opposite edges 821 a and 821 b that define parting line 821. Snap 822 extending from edge 821 b locks a mating feature or detent device provided in or on edge 821 a to secure segments 820 a and 820 b after inserting the open device in FIG. 8C over shaft 860.
  • FIG. 8E illustrates a preferred embodiment in which the kit also comprises either a grip stop [0042] 862 or lower grip for insertion onto shaft 860 above end knob 810 and moving handle 820. Grip stop 861 is optionally formed from two half cylinder segments 861 a and 861 b inside surface 861 c and 861 d of grip stop 861 are preferably deformable rubber or similar material for securing the grip stop 861 to shaft 860 via the frictional forces exerted by compressing surface 861 c and 861 d against the shaft. Halves fit via optional mating features 864′ and 864″ that extend from half 861 b and fit bores 863 and 863″ on half 861 a. Halves 861 a and 861 b are secured together to compress surface 861 c and 861 d via screws 866′ and 866″ that penetrate bores 865′ and 865″ in half cylinder 861 a such that they reach matching threads 862′ and 862″ formed in half cylinder 861 a.
  • FIG. 9 illustrates a non-limiting embodiment for incorporating various sensing and signaling devices into the barrel of the bat. The shaft [0043] 960 is centered and secured to the barrel 930 by a collar 922, which is held fixedly in place by a setscrew 921. The rigid shaft 960 is also fastened to the top cover 962 of bat barrel 930 by a screw 914 as it passes through a bushing 916. The shaft 960 is optional fixedly secured to non-movable, fixed handle 911 by adhesive or other known means. Alternatively, shaft 960 is secured to knob 910. Movable handle 920 has a brass inner tube 928 that disposed around shaft 960 for sliding thereon. The brass tube 928 can also be constructed of rigid plastic, such as nylon, or other sturdy metals and materials having a low coefficient of friction with respect to the shaft material for sliding thereon. A rubber or other resilient grip 923 surrounds the brass tube 928 and terminates at one end in a flange 912. Thus impact or vibration sensor 931 is disposed inside bat barrel 930 between shaft 960. Electrical signal leads 932 pass either along or through shaft 960 to handle portion 911. Handle 911 may comprise further circuitry or electronic components 933 and/or 934 for receiving, processing or routing multiple signals received from sensor 931 or switch 913. Alternatively, electronic components 933 can produce an audible or vibratory signal. Switch 913 is optionally a pressure sensitive or momentary contact switch disposed within handle 911 and is activated by either the contact of flange 912 or a pin 924 radially disposed about flange 912 to indicated rotation of the finger or knuckle positions on resilient grip 923.
  • Alternatively, a second switch type sensor ( not shown) similar to switch [0044] 913 can be disposed in fixed handle 911 that is activated by contact of flange 912 independent of the rotation of grip 923 about the cylindrical axis of bat 900.
  • Thus one or more of sensor [0045] 931 and switches in handle 911 can be connect to an alarm circuit for producing an audible, vibratory or electronic trigger signal for comparing the position of the movable handle 920 at the moment the bat contacts the ball. Thus component 933 can accept one or more trigger signal for data logging in an electronic storage media any of events of hitting ball, grip contact or grip rotation relative to shaft. Alternatively the trigger signal produced by component 933 can activate one or move still or video cameras to record an image of the hitter. Thus by examining this data log and/or picture the hitter or coach can ascertain if the practice is improving the hitting performance by observing trends over the practice session, a positive trend being a continued reduction in the time lag between hitting the ball and the moving handle contacting the lower handle or an equivalent stop.
  • Further, the photographic record of swing, as activated by ball impact or handle movement provides an opportunity for additional coaching and correction of hitting techniques for instructional purposes. The camera may be activated via electronic signal transmitted directly by a wire extending from handle [0046] 911 at connector 934, but preferably via an optical signal, received by a photocell, or characteristic sound produced by electronic component 933. A particularly convenient form of a camera is a commercially available Personal Digital Assistant (PDA) as it can also serve as a general purpose computer and electronic data storage device for data logging purposes. Alternatively the Electronic components attached to the bat, moving handle or fixed handle/grip or stop can be provided as part of a retrofit kit.
  • Alternatively, connector [0047] 934 can be port for connecting headphones so that the batter can hear an audible signal without distraction from background noise.
  • Many features have been listed with particular configurations, options, and embodiment. Anyone or more of the features described may be added to or combined with any of the other embodiments or other standard devices to create alternate combinations and embodiments. [0048]
  • Although the examples given include much specificity, they are intended as illustration of only a few possible embodiments of the invention. Other embodiments and modifications will, no doubt, occur to those skilled in the art. Thus, the examples given should only be interpreted as illustrations of some of the preferred embodiments of the invention, and the full scope of the invention should be determined by the appended claims and their legal equivalent [0049]
  • While the invention has been described in connection with a preferred embodiment, it is not intended to limit the scope of the invention to the particular form set forth, but on the contrary, it is intended to cover such alternatives, modifications, and equivalents as may be within the spirit and scope of the invention as defined by the appended claims. [0050]

Claims (17)

  1. 1. A baseball practice bat, comprising:
    a) a shaft having a first end and a second end,
    b) a knob disposed at the first end of said shaft,
    c) a barrel disposed at the second end of said shaft,
    d) a movable handle located around said shaft between said barrel and said knob,
    e) said movable handle configured to translate along said shaft to provide indication of a correct baseball swing,
    f) wherein the motion of the movable handle toward the knob is sensed during the execution of a swing.
  2. 2. The baseball practice bat of claim 1 wherein the barrel is tapered in thickness in the direction of said knob.
  3. 3. The baseball practice bat of claim 2 further comprising a first stop disposed around at least a portion of said shaft disposed to limit translation of the movable handle between the tapered portion of said barrel and said knob.
  4. 4. The baseball practice bat of claim 1 further comprising a grip stop disposed around at least a portion of said shaft disposed to limit translation of the movable handle between said barrel and said grip stop.
  5. 5. The baseball practice bat of claim 1 further comprising a fixed grip disposed around at least a portion of said shaft adjacent said knob to limit translation of the movable handle between said barrel and said fixed grip.
  6. 6. The baseball practice bat of claim 1, further comprising a switch responsive to movement of the movable handle toward said knob.
  7. 7. The baseball practice bat of claim 6, wherein said switch activates an audible alarm.
  8. 8. The baseball practice bat of claim 6, wherein said switch activates a vibratory alarm.
  9. 9. The baseball practice bat of claim 6, wherein said switch activates a camera.
  10. 10. The baseball practice bat of claim 6, wherein said switch triggers the transmission and storage of a signal corresponding to the timing of the one or more of the events selected from the group consisting of the contact of the ball with the bat, the contact of the movable handle with a fixed stop or handle, the rotation of the movable handle about the axis of the bat.
  11. 11. The baseball practice bat of claim 6, wherein said switch triggers one or more cameras or video recording devices for collecting an image of the hitter according the occurrence of an event selected from the group consisting of the contact of the ball with the bat, the contact of the movable handle with a fixed stop or handle, the rotation of the movable handle about the axis of the bat.
  12. 12. A kit for adapting a baseball bat to a practice bat, the kit comprising:
    a) a movable handle assembly.
  13. 13. The kit of claim 9 further comprising a stop assembly or fixed grip assembly,
  14. 14. The kit of claim 9 further comprising a switch for connecting to an alarm circuit for producing an audible, vibratory or electronic signal indicating the movement of said movable handle toward said knob.
  15. 15. The kit of claim 11 further comprising a switch for connecting to an alarm circuit for producing an audible, vibratory or electronic signal indicating the contact of the barrel portion of said bat with a baseball for temporal comparison with the movement of said movable handle toward said knob.
  16. 16. The kit of claim 11 further comprising a switch for triggering a camera to record one or more images upon the activation of one or more switches disposed in the bat.
  17. 17. The kit of claim 11 further comprising headphones for connecting to an electronic component disposed in the handle of set bat and producing an audible signal indicating movement of said movable handle toward said knob.
US10373446 2000-12-12 2003-02-24 Baseball practice bat Abandoned US20030144089A1 (en)

Priority Applications (3)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US09735725 US6406387B1 (en) 2000-12-12 2000-12-12 Baseball practice bat
US10175513 US20030013563A1 (en) 2000-12-12 2002-06-19 Baseball practice bat
US10373446 US20030144089A1 (en) 2000-12-12 2003-02-24 Baseball practice bat

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US10373446 US20030144089A1 (en) 2000-12-12 2003-02-24 Baseball practice bat

Related Parent Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US10175513 Continuation-In-Part US20030013563A1 (en) 2000-12-12 2002-06-19 Baseball practice bat

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US20030144089A1 true true US20030144089A1 (en) 2003-07-31

Family

ID=46282038

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US10373446 Abandoned US20030144089A1 (en) 2000-12-12 2003-02-24 Baseball practice bat

Country Status (1)

Country Link
US (1) US20030144089A1 (en)

Cited By (20)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20050124442A1 (en) * 2003-12-05 2005-06-09 Wells James H. Baseball bat
US20050153797A1 (en) * 2004-01-12 2005-07-14 Nutter Mark E. Warm-up bat
US20050179774A1 (en) * 2004-02-13 2005-08-18 Whitney Fletcher BASECAM: a system for using a camera within a baseball base
US20060025246A1 (en) * 2004-05-17 2006-02-02 Forney Jeffrey A Swing training bat
US20060223656A1 (en) * 2005-04-01 2006-10-05 Libonati Michael R Ball sports training aid
US7140988B1 (en) 2004-08-10 2006-11-28 Rawlings Sporting Goods Company, Inc. Bat with interchangeable handle and barrel
US20070155525A1 (en) * 2005-12-30 2007-07-05 Davenport Michael D Golf swing trainer
US7297077B1 (en) 2003-12-12 2007-11-20 Robert Battaglino Bat exercise, practice, and training device
US20090131206A1 (en) * 2007-11-15 2009-05-21 Leinert Bruce R Baseball bat
US20100125010A1 (en) * 2008-11-18 2010-05-20 2152318 Ontario Inc. Hockey stick apparatus for stick handling training and methods of stick handling training
US20100248867A1 (en) * 2009-03-26 2010-09-30 Tande Alan B Practice bat
US20100267497A1 (en) * 2009-04-20 2010-10-21 Daniel Silvain Swing Assist and Training Device
US20110034275A1 (en) * 2008-05-16 2011-02-10 Hyensoo Kim Baseball swing training device
US20140243117A1 (en) * 2013-02-22 2014-08-28 Evan Fytros Hand grip for athletic equipment
US8827846B2 (en) 2012-02-01 2014-09-09 Christopher Shocklee System for selecting components of a modular bat
WO2015200516A1 (en) * 2014-06-24 2015-12-30 Easton Baseball / Softball Inc. Removable, rotatable grip element for a ball bat or other sporting-good implement
US20160158619A1 (en) * 2014-12-05 2016-06-09 Rip-It Holdings, Llc Instrumented softball or baseball bat and bat knob and system for monitoring a bat swing
US9364734B1 (en) * 2013-10-21 2016-06-14 Nicholas E. Dixon, Jr. Training bat apparatus for practicing bat handling skills
US9586111B2 (en) 2013-03-12 2017-03-07 Easton Baseball / Softball Inc. Sporting-good implement with rotatable handle
US9700776B2 (en) 2012-02-01 2017-07-11 5 Star, Llc Handle weighted bat and assembly process

Citations (19)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2091458A (en) * 1936-06-04 1937-08-31 George A Sleight Adjustable handgrip
US2701379A (en) * 1951-11-01 1955-02-08 Mildred D Balistreri Handle grip
US3897058A (en) * 1974-03-22 1975-07-29 Alvin F Koch Athletic testing device
US4898386A (en) * 1989-02-10 1990-02-06 Anderson Donald A Training bat
US5011145A (en) * 1987-09-04 1991-04-30 Bartkowicz Robert J Baseball bat with rotary grip
US5221088A (en) * 1991-01-22 1993-06-22 Mcteigue Michael H Sports training system and method
US5360209A (en) * 1993-05-06 1994-11-01 Mollica Robert D Batting training device
US5451047A (en) * 1995-01-06 1995-09-19 Liu; Chao-Jih Sound-producing apparatus
US5542676A (en) * 1993-02-11 1996-08-06 Soundadvice For Sports, Inc. Biosensor feedback device for sporting implements
US5577966A (en) * 1993-07-20 1996-11-26 Duran; Anthony P. Sport swing training aid
US5803840A (en) * 1995-08-08 1998-09-08 Young; Gary Sound producing baseball bat
US5839983A (en) * 1993-07-09 1998-11-24 Kramer; Robert M. T. Adjustable grips for a ball bat
US5841029A (en) * 1996-12-20 1998-11-24 Dynamis, Inc. Swing speed device
USD457929S1 (en) * 2001-06-15 2002-05-28 Baseball Marketing Ideas, L.L.C. Batting swing trainer with movable slide
US6406387B1 (en) * 2000-12-12 2002-06-18 Richard L. Ryan Baseball practice bat
US6561930B2 (en) * 2001-02-16 2003-05-13 Kenneth A. Mabry Training ball bat
US6599200B1 (en) * 1997-11-26 2003-07-29 Charles A. Kallassy Golf swing training device and training method
USD480122S1 (en) * 2002-02-22 2003-09-30 Baseball Marketing Ideas, L.L.C. Batting swing trainer
USD483827S1 (en) * 2003-06-05 2003-12-16 Baseball Marketing Ideas, Llc Batting swing trainer

Patent Citations (19)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2091458A (en) * 1936-06-04 1937-08-31 George A Sleight Adjustable handgrip
US2701379A (en) * 1951-11-01 1955-02-08 Mildred D Balistreri Handle grip
US3897058A (en) * 1974-03-22 1975-07-29 Alvin F Koch Athletic testing device
US5011145A (en) * 1987-09-04 1991-04-30 Bartkowicz Robert J Baseball bat with rotary grip
US4898386A (en) * 1989-02-10 1990-02-06 Anderson Donald A Training bat
US5221088A (en) * 1991-01-22 1993-06-22 Mcteigue Michael H Sports training system and method
US5542676A (en) * 1993-02-11 1996-08-06 Soundadvice For Sports, Inc. Biosensor feedback device for sporting implements
US5360209A (en) * 1993-05-06 1994-11-01 Mollica Robert D Batting training device
US5839983A (en) * 1993-07-09 1998-11-24 Kramer; Robert M. T. Adjustable grips for a ball bat
US5577966A (en) * 1993-07-20 1996-11-26 Duran; Anthony P. Sport swing training aid
US5451047A (en) * 1995-01-06 1995-09-19 Liu; Chao-Jih Sound-producing apparatus
US5803840A (en) * 1995-08-08 1998-09-08 Young; Gary Sound producing baseball bat
US5841029A (en) * 1996-12-20 1998-11-24 Dynamis, Inc. Swing speed device
US6599200B1 (en) * 1997-11-26 2003-07-29 Charles A. Kallassy Golf swing training device and training method
US6406387B1 (en) * 2000-12-12 2002-06-18 Richard L. Ryan Baseball practice bat
US6561930B2 (en) * 2001-02-16 2003-05-13 Kenneth A. Mabry Training ball bat
USD457929S1 (en) * 2001-06-15 2002-05-28 Baseball Marketing Ideas, L.L.C. Batting swing trainer with movable slide
USD480122S1 (en) * 2002-02-22 2003-09-30 Baseball Marketing Ideas, L.L.C. Batting swing trainer
USD483827S1 (en) * 2003-06-05 2003-12-16 Baseball Marketing Ideas, Llc Batting swing trainer

Cited By (39)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20050124442A1 (en) * 2003-12-05 2005-06-09 Wells James H. Baseball bat
US7086973B2 (en) 2003-12-05 2006-08-08 Mattingly Hitting Products, Llc Baseball bat
US7297077B1 (en) 2003-12-12 2007-11-20 Robert Battaglino Bat exercise, practice, and training device
US9101803B2 (en) 2003-12-12 2015-08-11 Robert Battaglino Bat exercise, practice, and training device
US20080064536A1 (en) * 2003-12-12 2008-03-13 Robert Battaglino Bat exercise, practice, and training device
US20050153797A1 (en) * 2004-01-12 2005-07-14 Nutter Mark E. Warm-up bat
US7147580B2 (en) 2004-01-12 2006-12-12 Nutter Sports, L.L.C. Warm-up bat
US20050179774A1 (en) * 2004-02-13 2005-08-18 Whitney Fletcher BASECAM: a system for using a camera within a baseball base
US20060025246A1 (en) * 2004-05-17 2006-02-02 Forney Jeffrey A Swing training bat
US7140988B1 (en) 2004-08-10 2006-11-28 Rawlings Sporting Goods Company, Inc. Bat with interchangeable handle and barrel
US7682267B2 (en) 2005-04-01 2010-03-23 Libonati Michael R Ball sports training aid
US7297078B2 (en) 2005-04-01 2007-11-20 Libonati Michael R Ball sports training aid
WO2006107767A3 (en) * 2005-04-01 2007-10-11 Michael R Libonati Ball sports training aid
WO2006107767A2 (en) * 2005-04-01 2006-10-12 Libonati Michael R Ball sports training aid
US20060223656A1 (en) * 2005-04-01 2006-10-05 Libonati Michael R Ball sports training aid
US20100105495A1 (en) * 2005-04-01 2010-04-29 Libonati Michael R Golf training aid
US7922595B2 (en) 2005-04-01 2011-04-12 Libonati Michael R Golf training aid
US7618328B2 (en) 2005-12-30 2009-11-17 Davenport Michael D Golf swing trainer
US20070155525A1 (en) * 2005-12-30 2007-07-05 Davenport Michael D Golf swing trainer
US8066594B2 (en) 2007-11-15 2011-11-29 Leinert Bruce R Baseball bat
US9526960B2 (en) 2007-11-15 2016-12-27 Bruce R. Leinert Baseball bat
US20110105256A1 (en) * 2007-11-15 2011-05-05 Leinert Bruce R Baseball bat
US7878930B2 (en) 2007-11-15 2011-02-01 Leinert Bruce R Baseball bat
US20090131206A1 (en) * 2007-11-15 2009-05-21 Leinert Bruce R Baseball bat
US8801551B2 (en) 2007-11-15 2014-08-12 Bruce R. Leinert Baseball bat
US20110034275A1 (en) * 2008-05-16 2011-02-10 Hyensoo Kim Baseball swing training device
US7857717B2 (en) * 2008-11-18 2010-12-28 Martin Jean-Maurice Hockey stick apparatus for stick handling training and methods of stick handling training
US20100125010A1 (en) * 2008-11-18 2010-05-20 2152318 Ontario Inc. Hockey stick apparatus for stick handling training and methods of stick handling training
US8118693B2 (en) * 2009-03-26 2012-02-21 Tande Alan B Practice bat
US20100248867A1 (en) * 2009-03-26 2010-09-30 Tande Alan B Practice bat
US20100267497A1 (en) * 2009-04-20 2010-10-21 Daniel Silvain Swing Assist and Training Device
US8167744B2 (en) * 2009-04-20 2012-05-01 Daniel Silvain Swing assist and training device
US8827846B2 (en) 2012-02-01 2014-09-09 Christopher Shocklee System for selecting components of a modular bat
US9700776B2 (en) 2012-02-01 2017-07-11 5 Star, Llc Handle weighted bat and assembly process
US20140243117A1 (en) * 2013-02-22 2014-08-28 Evan Fytros Hand grip for athletic equipment
US9586111B2 (en) 2013-03-12 2017-03-07 Easton Baseball / Softball Inc. Sporting-good implement with rotatable handle
US9364734B1 (en) * 2013-10-21 2016-06-14 Nicholas E. Dixon, Jr. Training bat apparatus for practicing bat handling skills
WO2015200516A1 (en) * 2014-06-24 2015-12-30 Easton Baseball / Softball Inc. Removable, rotatable grip element for a ball bat or other sporting-good implement
US20160158619A1 (en) * 2014-12-05 2016-06-09 Rip-It Holdings, Llc Instrumented softball or baseball bat and bat knob and system for monitoring a bat swing

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US5165683A (en) Method and apparatus for sport swing training
US5203568A (en) Golf training device
US5707298A (en) Implement swing training device
US7147580B2 (en) Warm-up bat
US3136546A (en) Swingable practice game implement with slidable weight
US5511789A (en) Golf swing training device
US4438925A (en) Handle for racquetball racquet
US5476262A (en) Putter trainer
US20050143203A1 (en) Ball bats and methods of making same
US5470073A (en) Golf instructional device
US5269511A (en) Baseball batting training aid
US6949036B2 (en) Batting swing trainer and method
US6491591B1 (en) Putter stabilizing brace for putt training
US5230506A (en) Batting practice device
US6599200B1 (en) Golf swing training device and training method
US5577966A (en) Sport swing training aid
US4555111A (en) Practice bat
US2273416A (en) Golf instruction device
US6461163B1 (en) Sport club swing trainer arrangement
US4848746A (en) Tennis racket grip
US20030069095A1 (en) Apparatus and method for improving athletic proficiency
US4768785A (en) Training device for baseball/batting practice softball
US5674138A (en) Baseball bat and practice device combination
US20040048696A1 (en) Batting swing trainer and method
US4981297A (en) Spherical golf club grip structure