US20020043764A1 - Educational trading card game and method - Google Patents

Educational trading card game and method Download PDF

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US20020043764A1
US20020043764A1 US09/769,104 US76910401A US2002043764A1 US 20020043764 A1 US20020043764 A1 US 20020043764A1 US 76910401 A US76910401 A US 76910401A US 2002043764 A1 US2002043764 A1 US 2002043764A1
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cards
card
theme
historicon
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Christopher Imhof
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Christopher Imhof
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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63FCARD, BOARD, OR ROULETTE GAMES; INDOOR GAMES USING SMALL MOVING PLAYING BODIES; VIDEO GAMES; GAMES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • A63F1/00Card games
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63FCARD, BOARD, OR ROULETTE GAMES; INDOOR GAMES USING SMALL MOVING PLAYING BODIES; VIDEO GAMES; GAMES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • A63F3/00Board games; Raffle games
    • A63F3/00003Types of board games
    • A63F3/00063Board games concerning economics or finance, e.g. trading
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63FCARD, BOARD, OR ROULETTE GAMES; INDOOR GAMES USING SMALL MOVING PLAYING BODIES; VIDEO GAMES; GAMES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • A63F3/00Board games; Raffle games
    • A63F3/04Geographical or like games ; Educational games
    • A63F3/0449Geographical or like games ; Educational games concerning history

Abstract

An educational trading card game involves the use of a plurality of cards having graphic representations of the events, persons and/or concepts associated therewith. The educational trading cards have various colors, shapes, sizes, numerical representations and various informational content associated therewith which enable a game player, in accordance with a particular set of rules, to acquire as many trading cards as possible to accomplish “winning” of particular game rounds with one or more opponent players. In one embodiment, the trading card system and method of the present invention is predicated upon the Pokémon trading card game rules and procedures but is distinguished by having educational content associated with such cards.

Description

    RELATED APPLICATIONS
  • This application claims priority from U.S. Provisional Patent Application No. 60/177,848 filed on Jan. 25, 2000. The entire disclosure of the provisional application is considered to be part of the disclosure of the accompanying application and is hereby incorporated by reference.[0001]
  • FIELD OF THE INVENTION
  • The present invention is directed to an educational trading card game and method, and in particular, is directed to trading cards depicting important historical figures, events and locations which serve to teach students the historical significance of such people and events in world history. [0002]
  • BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • The trading of various different types of cards has stirred the imagination of children and young adults throughout the decades. Recently, the Pokémon trading card game has generated much interest, as well as concern. The game of Pokémon was created in Japan and became widely popular in the United States in 1998. There are presently over 150 different kinds of Pokémon, with each different Pokémon having different powers and abilities. One goal of the Pokémon trading card game is to capture and train wild Pokémon so that such Pokémon do battle with other Pokémon. Competitors in the Pokémon trading card game play a card game much like other card games wherein each has a deck of cards, cards are drawn and held in one's hand and the cards are played when the player's turn comes around. Pokémon trading cards are different in certain respects, however, given that the cards with Pokémon on them are similar to game pieces in chess or checkers in that once a person has played such cards from their hand, such cards stay on the table and continue to effect the game's outcome. Another difference between a regular card game and a trading card game like Pokémon is that every player makes his or her own personalized deck of cards. A part of the enjoyment of such game is the making of different decks that reflect different themes and enable the player to try out different game strategies. [0003]
  • Pokémon cards are often traded between children to complete collections of such cards or to obtain cards that are perceived as needed for their personal card decks. Certain cards are produced in limited numbers and are therefore rare. For example, there is a limited number of holographic foil cards produced, and such rarity commands a higher price for such cards when traded. Thus, not all Pokémon cards are as easy to obtain as others, with some cards being common and other cards being more rare, indicated by different geometrical shaped icons on the face of each card. Each Pokémon has its own special fighting abilities. Although Pokémons come in many shapes and sizes, even the smallest Pokémon is capable of launching a fierce attack. Some Pokémon grow or evolve into more powerful creatures. One goal of Pokémon is to collect each of the available cards. [0004]
  • In Pokémon, there are three different ways of winning. Typically, at the start of the game, the players set aside six of their cards as prizes and every time one of an opponent's Pokémon is knocked out, a player is able to take one of such prizes. When all six prizes have been taken, the game is won. Another way of winning is if an opponent has no Pokémon left to fight against a player's Pokémon. Finally, a third way to win is if an opponent's deck is out of cards at the start of his or her turn. [0005]
  • In Pokémon, there are four basic types of cards including the basic Pokémon, evolution cards, which make a particular Pokémon bigger and more powerful, energy cards, which provide particular Pokémon cards with energy needed to use in attacking the opponent, and finally, trainer cards, which are one shot cards that do something once and are then discarded. [0006]
  • Along with the phenomenon of Pokémon, there has been significant public criticism of how the Pokémon trading card game has affected children. Complaints include that Pokémon encourages children to gamble due to the prize card rules. Reports indicate that some children are spending up to $100.00 just to buy certain ultra-rare Pokémon cards. Others argue that Pokémon cards do not appear to have any long-term value. Indeed, many school districts have banned Pokémon trading cards due to the negative effects experienced in the education of children preoccupied with the Pokémon trading card game. [0007]
  • There is therefore a long-felt, but unsolved need for an educational tool which children and young adults can use to learn fundamental subjects, including history, science, geography, etc. in a fun and entertaining context. [0008]
  • SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • The present invention is directed to a trading card game and method which is designed not only to be fun and entertaining for children and young adults, but is also educational in nature. Although various educational fields can be encompassed by the general concept of the present invention, for explanation and illustrative purposes the following discussion will emphasize one particular field, history, as a representative example of how the trading card game is played and the various identifying characteristics of the devices and methods employed. Thus, in one embodiment, an historical trading card game, hereinafter referred to as “Historicon” involves the use of a plurality of cards having graphic or photo illustrations of various historical figures and/or scenes reflecting important individuals and events having a significant impact on the history of man. The cards serve as a learning tool to teach children and young adults the hallmarks or keywords of such historical figures and events, enabling players (or as otherwise referred to herein as students or participants) to debate the significance of particular individuals and events in a historical context. [0009]
  • One aspect of the invention is admittedly to replicate in many respects the popular Pokémon trading game with the important distinction that, unlike the Pokémon trading game, the present invention is directed to an educational tool. The present inventor has found that children playing the trading card game of the present invention, especially those previously exposed to the Pokémon trading card game, are adept at playing the trading card game invention and not only enjoy the game playing process, but also learn considerable amounts and retain such information to a far greater extent than as compared to traditional wrote book learning experiences. Indeed, one advantage of the present invention is that students, with little or no prompting from teachers and parents, play the trading card game of the present invention to such an extent that historical characters and events are learned almost effortlessly. Out-of-school dialog between students concerning interesting historical events and individuals opens up an entirely novel educational approach well suited for post X-generation individuals who have so many opportunities that divert them from educational tasks. [0010]
  • In one embodiment of the present invention, historical card figures are separated into a plurality of categories such as leaders (kings, queens, emperors, presidents, etc); explorers (Columbus, Magellan, Lief Erickson, etc.), cultural contributors (authors, artists, musicians, philosophers, etc.); warriors (warlords, conquerors, generals, etc.); inventors (Alexander Graham-Bell, Thomas Edison, etc.); and scientists (Einstein, Heisenberg, Bohr, Galileo). It will be understood by those of skill in the art that various other categories can also be presented and used without departing from the scope and spirit of the present invention. [0011]
  • As will be appreciated, some historical figures left their mark in more than one of the above referenced areas and thus may appear on more than one card. For example, Leonardo Da Vinci was well known an artist, inventor and scientist. Historical figures may also be portrayed in different periods of their life and so may appear on more than one card. For example, George Washington was a prominent figure in the French Indian War, the American Revolution and as a the first President of the United States. [0012]
  • With respect to the plurality of possible layouts for trading cards of the present invention, the discussion below is again illustrative only of one particular embodiment and one of skill in the art will therefore appreciate and understand, with the guidance provided herein, that other formats can be adopted having equally effective results. In one embodiment of the present invention, the top of every card has a character's name as well as an “historical impact” (“HI”) score printed thereon. The HI score is based on criteria and determined out of total possible score (i.e. historical impact score of Christopher Columbus of 65 out of a possible 250). Below the name of the historical figure is presented a picture or other illustration of such figure. Other information is also provided below such picture describing either the type of historical and/or geographic region from which the historical figure derives from or had an impact on. Further information is supplied on the card including a listing of key words or hallmarks which the character is known for in history. For example, a Christopher Columbus card may have a listing of key words such as “Santa Maria”, “Admiral of the Seas” and “New World”. These key words may also correspond to with additional cards, for example “Civilization Connection” or “Energy” cards. Civilization connection or energy cards are chosen to have a particular numerical impact score, for example 100 of 250. Apart from individuals, particular events, especially particularly significant historical events, are termed “Wonders” and are given a higher score, i.e., 125-150 out of 250. [0013]
  • On the face of the trading cards of the present invention, a symbol or dot is placed corresponding with the type of energy card used. Moreover, also included on the card is one or more trivial facts and a numerical sequence number, for example “1:25”. [0014]
  • The trading cards of the present invention may be printed in various card colors to further heighten a child or young adults attention and to make the game more interesting. Background colors of the cards, however, are preferably selected to correspond to the type and nature of a particular card. For example, red may be used for ruler/leaders; white may be used for explorers; gray may be used warriors, etc. [0015]
  • Another category of trading cards of the present invention are termed “Civilization Connection cards” and or “Energy cards”. Such cards connect a particular historical figure depicted on yet another set of cards with particular events, artifacts, trends, etc. during an historical period. For example, the American Civil War may be a key word for a leader such as Lincoln, warriors such as General Lee, Sherman and Grant, etc. Moreover, such civilization connection cards may be directed to specific historical events such as the Gettysburg Address or the Emancipation Proclamation. Such cards are similar in nature to the above-referenced figure cards, for example, “leader energy”, “explorer energy”, “culture energy”, “warrior energy”, etc. Additional energy cards can be provided for trade, economy, scientific discovery, etc. [0016]
  • It is also within the scope of the present invention to have educational trading cards that correspond to a hallmark or key words found on particular individual's cards, thus providing a way to teach concepts not necessarily associated directly with particular historical figures. For example, animal domestication, hieroglyphic writing, the French-Indian Wards, Pythagorean Theorem, DNA, etc. are directed to concepts deemed important in human history. Indeed, such conceptual breakthroughs in history may also form the subject matter of an additional category of cards. [0017]
  • In one embodiment, as with the Pokémon trading card game, it adopts in terms of rules, game playing strategies, etc. Particular cards may carry a more historical way and/or have more impact that others. Moreover, the cards may have an evolutionary type of component to this which is similar to concepts provided in the Pokémon trading card game. [0018]
  • Another category of cards encompassed within the present invention are so-called “Wonder cards” which are special energy cards which describe wonders of the world at various time periods (for example, ancient times, the middle ages, the Renaissance and modern times) having particular historical significance. For example, the ancient wonders of the world can be compared with other later wonders created by man throughout history such as the Great Wall, Taj Majal, the Golden Gate Bridge, etc. These Wonder cards are designed to have more historical impact than others during the playing of the card game. [0019]
  • The present inventors incorporate by reference the well known Pokémon trade card game and rules associated therewith. Such rules can be found, for example, on the Internet at “http://www.wizards.com/Pokémon/Rules”. The entirety of the Pokémon trading card game and rules associated therewith, card playing strategies, league play, collection strategies, etc., are therefore incorporated herein by this reference. Also incorporated herein in their entireties by this reference are trading card games encompassed by various U.S. patents, for example, U.S. Pat. No. 5,662,332 entitled “Trading Card Game and Method of Play”; U.S. Pat. No. 5,201,525 entitled “Card Game Utilizing Baseball Trading Cards”; U.S. Pat. No. 5,356,293 entitled “Sexually-Transmitted Disease Awareness Program Package”; U.S. Pat. No. 5,741,137 entitled “Educational Cards Teaching Emotional Expressions”. The above-referenced U.S. patents describe various methods of playing a trading card game and such general principles are incorporated herein by reference as being useful in structuring various different types of trading card games predicated upon the educational emphasis of the present invention as further described herein. [0020]
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • FIG. 1 is a representative example of an Historicon card of the present invention illustrating Christopher Columbus as an important historical figure; [0021]
  • FIG. 2 is a representative example of another trading card of the present invention indicating a so-called “energy” card depicting caravel vessels in a “war and defense” category. [0022]
  • FIG. 3 is a representation of the two sides of an Historicon card with various components and positions of the same depicted. [0023]
  • FIG. 4 illustrates an Historicon scenario card with various components depicted thereon.[0024]
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT
  • As discussed in the Summary of the Invention, the present invention is directed to an educational trading card game similar in many respect to the Pokémon trade card game. Indeed, Applicants incorporate by reference the format, information and trading card game strategies and procedures and rules involved in the Pokémon game in playing the Historicon game of the present invention. As will be understood by those of skill in the art, although the present invention has been described by reference to historical trading cards, similar types of educational trading cards can be provided for various areas such as: science (e.g. explaining principles, concepts, figures, theories, (evolution, physics, chemistry, biology) etc. through graphic illustrations and numerical and word-based educational representations); Mathematical Fields (e.g. theorems, proofs, Euclidean geometry, trigonometry, calculus, etc.) Politics; Art; Architecture; Business; Law; Medicine; Literature and Philosophy. As one will appreciate, the various colors, particular wording, particular numerical weighing of importance, etc. can be varied without departing from the scope and intent of the present invention. [0025]
  • It will be further understood that although the present invention has been particularly described with respect to children and young adults and is illustrated with historical trading card examples, other applications may appeal to older adults and thus, the present invention provides an educational tool whereby medical students, law students, business students, etc. can acquire the requisite knowledge in their particular fields through a game playing method and system. [0026]
  • Also incorporated herein by reference is U.S. Pat. No. 5,662,332 to Garfield. The present invention shares many characteristics with respect to the trading card game and method of play described in the Garfield patent, with the notably distinction that the Garfield patent is not directed to an educational tool for children, young adults and adults depending upon the subject matter being incorporated into the method and system. [0027]
  • It is contemplated that the present invention can be used on existing and readily available electronic devices, such as computers, video games, electronic games, and on interactive networks utilizing computer software and text. Such electronic devices can visually display the cards and enable the players to manipulate the cards and execute turns as described hereinabove. Commercially available electronic communication devices can also be provided to enable players to communicate with each other over long distances. [0028]
  • Still another version of the present game and method can be played using a playing board having pathways on it divided into squares on which the players can move. The pathways are preferably surrounded by colored areas and when two players meet on the same square in a land area, they dual by playing their own deck of cards against each other in accordance with the rules herein set forth or referred to by reference. [0029]
  • Unlike the method set forth in the Garfield patent, the method of the present invention does not necessarily rely upon designating one or more game components being brought into play by rotating such game components from an original orientation to a second orientation. Moreover, the present method does not necessarily require that each player take one or more cards from an opposing player and place such cards on a playing surface. Whether significant differences exist between the present invention and that described in the Garfield patent include, in one embodiment, the elimination in the present invention of the altering of the state of a game element; the elimination of any defense elements that defend against a state-altering element and the absence of any modifying effect on other game elements as well as applicable rules during playing of a particular trading card game using the present invention. Most importantly, however, the present invention is principally directed to the dissemination and retention of useful historical knowledge by players whereas the Pokémon game is merely for entertainment purposes. The present method can therefore be seen to be directed to a method for educating children and young adults in an entertaining fashion whereas the Pokémon game is not at all directed to an educational tool. [0030]
  • The present invention, referred to herein as “Historicon”, was created to be instructive as well as fun; an educational tool as well as a game. [0031]
  • Historicon is a tool to understand and identify the persons, events, trends, creations, discoveries, that have made impacted and influenced their world. Historicon playing cards provide for the: comprehension and learning stimulation found in traditional educational flash cards; presentation of images and statistics; collecting fascination found in sports cards; and tactics and game play capability found in strategy card games. [0032]
  • One aspect of the present invention provides people with a tool to understand, interpret, gauge, learn about the things that have shaped their world. Historicon assists students not only to find answers to questions, but to explore and begin asking questions. For example, Historicon addresses the questions that always seem to come at the end and beginning of a year, a decade, a century, a millennium, an age. It is important to ask questions on what has shaped these times. [0033]
  • For example: [0034]
  • who has impacted history in the past year?[0035]
  • what event has marked the past decade?[0036]
  • what is the most important invention of the century?[0037]
  • who has had the most lasting influence in the past thousand years?[0038]
  • Many people can only gauge the answers to these questions on their own experience and education. Even with experience and education these are still difficult questions to answer. Historicon Playing Cards, on one level, illustrate how rich the tapestry of human history is, and how the answer and questions are as numerous and as rich as human history. Historicon Playing Cards first identify a range of human influence, and on another level become an entertaining simulation or game. Players address questions that relate to History, as well as impact the way we think today. [0039]
  • For example: [0040]
  • did Beethoven has as much cultural impact as Elvis?[0041]
  • who made a greater impact on science Copernicus or Einstein?[0042]
  • who was the greater leader of men Caesar, Napoleon or Washington?[0043]
  • who was the more creative inventor da Vinci or Edison?[0044]
  • who was the greatest female leader Cleopatra or Elizabeth I?[0045]
  • was the English victory over the Spanish Armada significant today?[0046]
  • why is the Domesday Book important [0047]
  • is Columbus really the greatest explorer?[0048]
  • who is John Locke? Adam Smith? Mary Wollstonecraft?[0049]
  • Why are these people important?[0050]
  • Although the present invention can be presented on a computer, on-line, etc., it will generally be described herein in a card playing embodiment. Thus, in one embodiment, there are 3 types of Historicon Playing Cards: 1) Historicon Character Cards 2) Historicon Event Cards and 3) Historicon Scenario Cards. All cards have the same backing with the Historicon logo. Extensions to the game may have specialized backing. Within the above card classifications are a variety of other species which will be described below. [0051]
  • In one particular embodiment, Historicon Character Cards are the main component cards of the present invention. These cards contain characters or subjects used in game play. Although historical characters are preferably used, other embodiments of the game may include mythological characters, characters from literature and legend, animals and plants etc. [0052]
  • FIG. 3 shows a representative character card of the present invention and with respect to the components of the historicon character card, the cards themselves deal with the interaction of human history: art, music, science, exploration, government and war. [0053]
  • The backing of the Historicon Playing Cards is preferably standard on all the cards, however (Historicon Character Cards, Event Cards, Scenario Cards). [0054]
  • Extensions to the Historicon Playing Cards may show added details, e.g., Mythology series, Botany series, etc. as used herein. The term “Extension” will be understood to mean various possible variants, add ons, alternative Rules, that may be used in practicing the present invention. [0055]
  • In a preferred embodiment, the names of characters in the main Historicon Playing Card game are Historical characters (Scientists, Explorers, Monarch etc. . . . ) that span the range of human history. [0056]
  • Extensions of the Historicon Playing Cards may, however, contain names other than Historical characters: such as gods and goddesses in mythology characters in Legends Fictional character in Literature, Animals, Plants etc. . . . [0057]
  • As discussed in the rules section, Historicon characters in extensions games will not interact with Historical figures since mythological, legendary, and fictional characters actions and accomplishments are not on the same level, and are played as separate game. For example, who had more impact on weather forecasting? It would not make sense to compare a historical meteorologist and a god of Thunder. [0058]
  • The present invention identifies those individuals who have dominated and have had an impact and influence in their time and/or on the future. One aspect relates to ranking historical figures on their immediate and lasting importance/influence/impact on history, both positively and negatively. [0059]
  • Although one will appreciate that various weighing and value judgments can be made, the following particular examples illustrate the more general concepts of the present invention. For example, in one embodiment, a 3-point system is used to weigh an individual's importance in their own lifetime (0-75 points), influence on history since their time (0-75 points), and specific impacting contributions to history (0-100 points). The best score a figure can receive is 250 points. [0060]
  • Extensions for Historicon Playing Cards may have different Importance/influence/impact names. The mythology/legend series there might be “M.I.” for Mythological Importance or “M.P.” for Mythological Power and a different set of criteria. For example: How much a god or goddess influenced the development, philosophy of a culture or the power or importance a god or goddess held in a cultures mythology. [0061]
  • An historical picture or drawing is preferably depicted on each card. Moreover, each card typically has a theme related color, and a place or nation where the cards character made his/her impact influence. This can be a place, city, a country or a continent(s). [0062]
  • The card also contains more specific details which relates to a theme or title, for example, specific titles would be: [0063]
  • Leaders: Monarch, King, Queen, Emperor, Empress, Sultan, Statesman, Senator, President, Chief, Captain etc. [0064]
  • Warriors: General, Commander, Captain, Vizier, Admiral etc. [0065]
  • Scientist: Astronomer, Chemist, Mathematician, Physicist etc. [0066]
  • Inventors: Transportation, Industry etc. [0067]
  • Explorers: Travelers, Aviator, Astronaut etc. [0068]
  • Culture: Artist, Author, Philosopher, Musician, Entertainer etc. [0069]
  • Extensions for Historicon Playing Cards may contain different specific information in the Nation and Theme Title Section. For Example a Mythology series may utilize this area for describing a specific mythology, for example, Norse Mythology, Greek Mythology. A Literature series may indicate what piece of literature a character is from, for example (Captain Nemo) Twenty Thousand Leagues . . . Jules Verne. Animals and Plant series may indicate a specific species, or scientific classification, or region of abundance. [0070]
  • The present invention also preferably identifies contributions and events that historical characters have created and taken part in. For example, an Event/Contribution section of the Historicon Character Card lists the characters contributions and/or the events the character influenced and/or took part in. [0071]
  • In one particular embodiment, there are 6 icons which reflect the themes used in Historicon and an aspect of Historicon which recognizes Wonders of the World or Wonders of human achievement. [0072]
  • These icons are placed appropriately next to the specific contribution or event listing corresponding to the individual. [0073]
  • Extensions of the Historicon Playing Cards may have Event/Contribution Icons overlap. For example, a Historicon Extension series which focuses on animals and plants may also relate to science. If animals played an important part of history, such as Elephants in the Punic Wars, then possibly the War/Defense Event Theme Icon may also apply next to that specific Event/Contribution Listing. The same can be said with animals in literature (Dogs in Call of the Wild by Jack London or Whales in Herman Melville's Moby Dick). If a plant is used for the manufacturing of certain industrial products, then the Invention/Industry Icon may apply next to that specific Event/Contribution Listing. [0074]
  • Events/Contributions Listing, the specific contributions, events, and milestones which relate to specific individuals is set forth. For example, Contributions/Events can be categorized as: [0075] Leadership: Historical Documents; Acts of Leadership; Nations and Empires; Government Ideology; Specific Decisions; Reigns of Distinction. War & Defense: Wars; Battles; Weapons Science: Discoveries; Ideas; Movements. Inventions Industry: Inventions; Industries; Technologies. Exploration: Discovery of Place; Ages of Exploration Culture: Music; Books; Artwork; Ideas; Philosophy; Movements.
  • Extensions of Historicon Playing Cards can display a variety of items in the Event/Contributions Listing section. For example, for plants and animals, their scientific names can be written: Kingdom.. Phylum.. Family.. Genus.. Species; Mythology may contain the god or goddess, patron city or temple, power of nature, special ability or weapon, tool etc. [0076]
  • In one embodiment, Contribution/Event Scores are listed next to the individuals Events/Contribution Listing. Since these are listed from least to greatest impact or influence an Event/Contribution Score is illustrated that corresponds thereto. [0077]
  • Scores are preferably incremented by 25, 50, 75, 100, and in rare occasion, 125. Occasionally characters who have contributed in one area (literature, science, exploration) may begin with a high score for achievement of 50 and decline by 10's for lesser achievements: 30, 40, 50. Additional points are added to these Scores by Historicon Event cards, which are also ranked by influence and importance. There is no limit to the contributions or events a person may have listed. Events/Contribution Listings are ranked top down from least to greatest in importance. In some instances an individual may have a singular impact which mark his or her influence, others may have several. [0078]
  • Some characters may make a single contribution, or take part in a specific event. These Characters Score may be weighted by the significance of the specific contribution or role in the event. [0079]
  • The Historicon Theme section illustrates how some characters left their mark in many areas. A card may therefore have different Event/Contribution Theme Icons that correspond with these Events/Contributions. Other characters may have left their impact and influence in a single field (Theme) and Events/Contributions Icons are then only represented from that field (Theme). Some characters will actually have multiple cards, representing the variety of impacts they made in their lifetime. For example Leonardo da Vinci was a scientist, artist, and inventor among other things. He may be featured in 3 separate cards each featuring his contributions to each of these themes. [0080]
  • A further aspect of the present invention is directed to Character or Subject Fact/Text Fields. This section contains text that corresponds to the character represented. Text can contain historical fact, quotations, unknown tid-bits etc. Somewhere in the text can also show the birth/death date of the character. In one embodiment a code is used having a 5-digit number code that is specific to the Historicon Character Card. For example all Queen Elizabeth—Historicon Character Cards may have a Code Number of 47129. One aspect of the use of the 5 digit code is to facilitate use in Internet play. The ratio of cards may represented in an area of the card to indicate, for example, the number out of total number of Historicon Character Cards; the number out of cards in specific Theme: Leader Cards, Warrior Cards, Explorer Cards etc. . . . This area may also indicate whether a card is rare—meaning that due to the significance of the card there may be less of that card than others. [0081]
  • Historicon Event Cards are essentially the reflections of the Event/Contribution Listings on the Historicon Character Cards. Typically, Historicon Event Cards serve several purposes: [0082]
  • 1. Historicon Event Cards match with Event/Contribution Listings on the Historicon Character Cards, providing greater depth of understanding on the Events and Contributions made by the people on the Historicon Figure Cards. In other words, this card has added text which explains a characters contributions or a summary of the events the character influenced or took part in. [0083]
  • 2. Historicon Event Cards add to the play-ability of the Historicon Playing Card Game by adding additional information and points to a Historicon Character Cards Event/Contribution Scores. [0084]
  • 3. Some Historicon Event Cards will be Historicon Character Card specific such as Inventions and Discoveries made by a single person. For example: Thomas Edison: The Lightbulb. [0085]
  • 4. Some Historicon Event Cards will be shared by many Historicon Character Cards. Events such as the Industrial Revolution, Age of Exploration, Renaissance, Wars, Battles etc. will be shared by many Historicon Character Cards. [0086]
  • Additional Event Score ranks Events and Contributions on their impact and influence on human history. Lesser events, contributions and achievements may receive different scores, e.g., +10 or +15, whereas greater events, contributions and achievements may receive +25 or +50. When Historicon Event Cards are matched with the Event Contribution Listings on the Historicon Character cards the two scores are added for game play. [0087]
  • In addition to a Picture/Drawing Image, each card also has a Text section gives more explanation of the actual Event/Contribution etc. [0088]
  • A Title of the Historicon Event Card corresponds to the type or Theme of the Event Card. If the Event Cards contribution is the Spanish Armada, the Event Cards Theme is War and Defense. The Title at the Bottom of the Historicon Event Card will read Event Card: War Defense. Historicon Event Cards also correspond with the color given with the Event/Contribution Theme Icon. [0089]
  • a. Example Leadership/Government Event Cards are as follows: [0090] Hammurabis Code Justinians Code Imperial Code Edict of Paris Legal Code of Taiho Capitulary of Herstal Admonito generalist Ordinatio Imperii Code Napoleon Declaration of Independence Bill of Rights Constitution Declaration of the Rights of Man Gettysburg Address New Deal The Prince The Spirit of Laws Common Sense Communist Manifesto Federalist Papers
  • b. List of example War/Defense Event Cards: [0091] Battle of Hastings On War (Clausewitz) Armor Spanish Armada Art of War (Sun Tzu) Chariot Battle of Kadesh Walls Cavalry Battle of Marathon Towers Longbow Persian Wars Castles Catapults
  • c. List of example Science/Technology Event Cards: [0092] Heliocentric Theory Decimal System Microscope Unified Theory Pythagorean Theorem Telescope Natural Selection Mayan Calender Electricity Continental Drift pi DNA Laws of Motion Speed of Sound Elements
  • d. List of example Invention/Innovation/Industry Event Cards: [0093] Printing Press Wright Flyer Bessemer Steel Lightbulb Model T Child Labor Laws Toothbrush Steam Engine Textile Industry Computer Railroad Assembly Line Radio Kayak Factory System Silk Road Hanseatic League Hudson Bay Company Wealth of Nations Royal Exchange NY Stock Market
  • e. List of example Exploration/Discovery Event Cards: [0094] H. M. S. Beagle Circumnavigation Ptolemys Map Santa Maria New World Compass H. M. S. Discovery Moon Landing Longitude Apollo 11 Mount Everest Chronometer Kon Tiki Source of the Nile Lateen Sail
  • f. List of example Cultural Event Cards: [0095] Reformation Mona Lisa Book of Kells Globe Theater Gregorian Chants The Odyssey 9th Symphony Renaissance Sistine Chapel Kabuki Theater Buddhism Don Quixote Hamlet Divine Comedy Messiah
  • In yet a further embodiment, Wonder Cards are used to represent specialized Event Cards. Wonder cards celebrate the creations and achievements of humans which can only be described as wonders. Wonders do not only encompass structures and monuments that are one of a kind, but human achievements as well. [0096]
  • Wonders are extremely unique, and only on occasion may correspond with a Historicon Character Card. In this way Wonder cards themselves may be Extensions themselves to the Historicon Playing Card game. List of examples which can be considered as Wonder Cards is the 7 ancient wonders of the world: [0097] The Pyramids Hanging Gardens of Babylon Temple of Artemis at Ephesus Statue of Zeus at Olympia Mausoleum at Halicarnassus Colossus at Rhodes Lighthouse of Alexandria
  • Other possible wonders include: [0098] Royal Tombs of Petra Moche Pyramids Tomb of Pakal, Palenque Angkor Wat Stonehenge Ziggurrat of Ur Temple of Karnak Temple of Abu Simbel The Parthenon Pyramid of the Sun Buddhist Caves, Ajanta Monks Mound, Cahokia Timbuktu Great Temple of the Aztecs Minoan Palace at Knossos Palace at Nineveh Palace of Persepolis Colosseum at Rome Hadrians Wall Great Zimbabwe Walls of Babylon Great Wall of China Masada Chinese Canals Roman Aqueducts Roman Roads Chaco Road System Inca Roads & Bridges Great Sphynx Egyptian Obelisks Olmec Heads Nazca Lines Easter Island Great Library of Oracle of Delphi Alexandria
  • Modern: [0099] Flatiron Building Brooklynn Bridge Panama Canal Biffel Tower Sydney Opera House Sistine Chapel Shakespeares Globe Hoover Dam Golden Gate Bridge Statue of Liberty Empire State Building Alaskan Highway
  • Historicon Playing Cards presently may be broken down into a variety of themes. For example, in one embodiment, six themes depict particular aspects of human cultural history. The Wonder Card, the 7th card, brings in the extraordinary feats of human achievement. [0100]
  • As an example of the Themes used in the present invention, the following is presented. [0101]
  • A. Leadership/Government
  • The Leadership Theme encompasses those who have impacted history through the leadership and governing of peoples, clans, tribes, city-states, countries, nations, republics, empires etc. These may be monarchs, kings, queens, emperors, empresses, pharaohs, sultans, dictators, chancellors, prime ministers, presidents, senators, statesman, politicians, governors, mayors, chiefs, etc. . . The Leadership Theme category also includes those who have helped change and shape government, and influence and create leaders through ideas, action and law. This includes revolutionaries, patriots, ambassadors, diplomats, lawyers, political writers and thinkers etc. . . . [0102]
  • Many leaders were influential leaders in war as well as in politics and may have a Historicon Character Card for both the Leadership Theme as well as the Generals/Warriors Theme. Example George Washington, Napoleon I, Andrew Jackson, Simon Bolivar etc. . . . [0103]
  • Some leaders were patrons of the arts and culture, profited from colonization, trade, and exploration, and dabbled inthe sciences. These interests which crossover to other themes are recognized by multiple Event Theme Icons on their Historicon Character Card Event/Contribution Listing (see Graphic 4.) or a separate Historicon Character Card for that Theme. [0104]
  • The Leadership Theme does include those who influenced history in a negative way. These characters although the cause of tremendous damage on history still impacted history and cannot be ignored. [0105]
  • A List of character examples in a Leadership Theme Category include: [0106] Elizabeth I George Washington Thomas Paine Mehmed II Simon Bolivar Alexander Hamilton Isabella I Napoleon I Ben Franklin Sargon I Peter the Great Benjamin Disreali Cleopatra Alexander the Great Karl Marx Oliver Cromwell Moses Voltaire Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Thomas Jefferson Caesar Catherine the Great George Marshall
  • B. Warriors/Generals
  • The Warrior/General Theme encompasses those who have impacted history through the leadership in battle, war, for gain or defense of their peoples, clans, tribes, city-states, countries, nations, republics, empires etc. The characters primarily for this Theme category are Commanders, Generals, Admirals, Captains, Colonels, Warriors, Soldiers, but may contain characters from other Theme categories especially the Leadership Theme category, since it is the leaders who either directly engage in war, make policy that leads to war, or become leaders of people from the spoils of war. This Theme category also contains those who have helped change and shape the face of war, and influence and create conflict through ideas and action. This includes writers, thinkers, scientists, inventors etc. . . . For example the policies of religious thinkers have led to numerous wars (The Crusades), and Alfred Nobels invention of smokeless gunpowder, and dynamite change the face of war forever. The results of war led to many innovations which benefitted society through innovations in science for example blood transfusions. Some master works of Literature have been directly inspired by the horrors of war. [0107]
  • Many characters in the Warriors/Generals/Captains took part in expeditions and voyages of exploration. These items which crossover to other themes are recognized by multiple Event Theme Icons on their Historicon Character Card Event/Contribution Listing or another a separate Historicon Character Card for that Theme. [0108]
  • The Warrior Theme does include those who influenced history in a negative way. These characters although the cause of tremendous damage on history still impacted history and cannot be ignored. [0109]
  • A List of character examples in Warrior Theme Category include: [0110] Napoleon I Hannibal Queen Boudicca Charles Martel Joan of Arc Stonewall Jackson Frederick the Great Geronimo Molly Pitcher Attila the Hun Marc Antony Montezuma John Paul Jones Francis Drake W. T. Sherman Rommel Zhukov Patton
  • C. Science
  • The Science Theme encompasses those who have impacted history through scientific achievement, exploration and discovery. The characters primarily for this Theme category are Geologists, Botanists, Meteorologists, Zoologists, Naturalists, Astronomers, Biologists, Chemists, Physicists, Paleontologists, Mathematicians, and Physicians etc. The science of Geography is examined in more detail in the Explorers Theme, as is Political Science which is covered in the Leadership Theme, economics in the Invention Theme. [0111]
  • Science Theme characters may overlap with characters from other Theme categories especially the Invention Theme category, since many scientific discoveries lead to inventions and innovations. There may be overlap as well with the Explorer Theme, since many expeditions are accompanied by scientists or accomplished through science. These items which crossover to other themes are recognized by multiple Event Theme Icons on their Historicon Character Card Event/Contribution Listing, or another a separate Historicon Character Card for that Theme. [0112]
  • A List of character examples in Science Theme Category include: [0113] Albert Einstein Ben Franklin Leonardo da Vinci Marie Curie Galileo Gregor Mendel Copernicus Galen Louis Pasteur Ibn Sina William Harvey Isaac Newton Charles Darwin Edward Jenner Descartes Pythagoras Hypatia Archimedes Leeuwenhoek Robert Goddard Charles Lyell Kepler Carl Jung Elizabeth Blackwell Fibiola Pascal Thomas Jefferson Francis Bacon Carl Linnaeus Niels Bohr
  • D. Inventors/Innovators/Industry
  • The Inventors/Innovators/Industry Theme encompasses those who have created inventions to improve the way we live and those who have turned these inventions into industries which have impacted the way we live. The characters primarily for this Theme category are the inventors and giants of industry. In the middle this Theme also cover Business and Economics and the characters who transport ideas and goods from place to place. [0114]
  • The Invention Theme encompasses primarily inventors; inventors and innovators in communications and transportation fields; innovators, or those who have improved and spread an invention to wide public use; industry, or those dealing with materials, goods, energy, process, product, social and economics of workers and consumers; and those dealing with the transport of goods and ideas; traders and merchants, and those who set up colonies and business ventures as well; businessmen and investors. [0115]
  • Invention Theme characters may overlap with characters from other Theme categories especially the Science Theme category, since many inventions come from science. There may be overlap as well with the Explorer Theme, since many explorers and travelers are the vessels of goods, and ideas which inspire invention, innovation, and industry. These items which crossover to other themes are recognized by multiple Event Theme Icons on their Historicon Character Card Event/Contribution Listing, or another a separate Historicon Character Card for that Theme. [0116]
  • A list of character examples in Invention/Innovation/Industry Category include: [0117] Johann Gutenberg Thomas Edison Marco Polo Archimedes Alexander G. Bell J. P. Morgan Eli Whitney Leonardo da Vinci Carnegie Lorenzo de Medici Robert Fulton Henry Ford Wilbur Wright Orville Wright Carl Benz Henry Bessemer Edmund Cartwright Adam Smith Robert Owens John Maynard Keynes James Watt Walter Raleigh Thomas Gresham Daguerre Ben Franklin John Eckert Alfred Nobel Michael Faraday Petrus Peregrinus Marconi
  • E. Explorers
  • The Explorers Theme encompasses those who have impacted history through exploration and discovery. The characters primarily for this Theme come from almost all the other Theme categories. Leaders occasionally enter strange and unknown lands and open the world to a greater understanding as did Alexander the Great. Leaders also fund expeditions in the name of territorial gain, riches, and occasionally scientific discovery, such as Henry the Navigator, Queen Isabella, Queen Elizabeth, and Queen Victoria. Warriors are often named explorers because they are the ones opening a region for colonization as in the case of Cortes and Pizzaro. Scientists are often named explorers because they accompany expeditions and voyages of discovery as in the case of Charles Darwin. In the Invention/Industry category traders and merchants are often the one who also carry tales of foreign places and in the end labeled by history as travelers and adventurers as in the case of Marco Polo. [0118]
  • The Explorer Theme Category encompasses the field of geography and may include characters which have produced maps, instruments, and written on the field of geography. The Explorer Theme Category also encompasses those who have done pioneering feats- for example solo flight across the Atlantic, first to summit Mount Everest, set foot on the Moon, reach the South Pole, row across the Atlantic etc. Explorer Theme characters may overlap with characters from other Theme categories. These items which crossover to other themes are recognized by multiple Event Theme Icons on their Historicon Character Card Event/Contribution Listing, or another a separate Historicon Character Card for that Theme. [0119]
  • A list of character examples in Explorer Theme Category include: [0120] Ferdinand Magellan Marco Polo Henry the Navigator Christopher Columbus James Cook Isabella Vasco da Gama Francis Drake Richard Burton Edmund Hillary Coronado Zheng He Erik the Red Lief Ericson Charles Darwin Daniel Boone Zeb. Pike Neil Armstrong Hernan Cortes Abel Tasman Livingstone Amelia Earhart Pedro Cabral Mercator Ptolemy Peary Adm. Byrd
  • C. Culture
  • The Culture Theme encompasses those who have impacted history through the beauty and intelligence of culture. The characters primarily for this Theme category are Artists, Architects, Musicians, Writers of Literature, Poetry and Plays, Entertainers, Philosophers and Thinkers. [0121]
  • Culture Theme characters may overlap with characters from other Theme categories especially the Leadership Theme category, since many Leaders are patrons of the arts. Leaders are also inspired, enshrined and dethroned by the works of the Cultural Theme. Warriors may cross paths with the Culture Theme in negative ways since art is destroyed, censored or stolen in times of war. However war has inspired masterpieces of art music and writing. These items which crossover to other themes are recognized by multiple Event Theme Icons on their Historicon Character Card Event/Contribution Listing (see Graphic 4.), or another a separate Historicon Character Card for that Theme. [0122]
  • A list of character examples in Culture Theme Category include: [0123] William Shakespeare Michelangelo Lorenzo de Medici Christopher Wren Beethoven P. T. Barnum Homer Cezanne Erasmus Frank Lloyd Wright Bach Sarah Bernhardt John Milton Monet Petrarch Martin Luther King Jr. Brothers Grimm Mozart Leonardo da Vinci Gandhi Lucretia Mott Seneca Handel Rembrandt
  • The examples provided in the above lists are in no way complete, nor show the best of each Theme category. They are examples of what one might find in the Historicon Playing Card Game. [0124]
  • While various embodiments of the present invention have been described in detail, it is apparent that further modifications and adaptations of the invention will occur to those skilled in the art. However, it is to be expressly understood that such modifications and adaptations are within the spirit and scope of the present invention. [0125]

Claims (3)

What is claimed is:
1. A method of playing an historical educational trading card game involving two or more players, comprising:
a plurality of trading cards having historical events or figures depicted thereon, said cards having identifying characteristics selected from the group consisting of numerical or alphanumerical representations, color, particular shaped logos, shape of card and size of card; and
a set of rules for playing said card game whereby the object of the game is for a player to win the most trading cards from each of at least one other opponent player.
2. An educational trading card game involving two or more players, comprising:
a plurality of trading cards having historical events or figures depicted thereon, said cards having identifying characteristics selected from the group consisting of numerical or alpha-numerical representations, color, particular shaped logos, shape of card and size of card;
at least three theme cards wherein the theme depicted on at least one of said cards is selected from the group consisting of leadership/government; warriors/generals; science; inventor/innovators/industry; explorers and culture.
3. The trading card game as set forth in claim 2, wherein said card has features depicted thereon substantially similar to those set forth in FIG. 4.
US09/769,104 2000-01-25 2001-01-24 Educational trading card game and method Abandoned US20020043764A1 (en)

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US20030234492A1 (en) * 2002-06-24 2003-12-25 Martin Myren Game card system
US20040036220A1 (en) * 2002-08-21 2004-02-26 Konami Corporation Card game
US20040063077A1 (en) * 2002-09-27 2004-04-01 Claudia Swartz System and method for encouraging an understanding of visual art
US20040120284A1 (en) * 2002-05-10 2004-06-24 Interdigital Technology Corporation System and method for prioritization of retransmission of protocol data units to assist radio-link-control retransmission
US20040180313A1 (en) * 2003-03-14 2004-09-16 Judah Isaacs Anatomical pocket model
US20050003331A1 (en) * 2003-05-02 2005-01-06 Stephenie Menzies System and method for studying a subject area, such as art
US20050082759A1 (en) * 2003-10-20 2005-04-21 Scotty Strahan Great white shark cards
US20050151320A1 (en) * 2000-06-01 2005-07-14 Gress Edmund A. Method and apparatus for card game
US20050151321A1 (en) * 2003-12-15 2005-07-14 Ann Hennessy Motivational cards
US20050156382A1 (en) * 2000-06-01 2005-07-21 Gress Edmund A. Method and apparatus for card game
US20050192114A1 (en) * 2003-12-16 2005-09-01 Pixl Golf Company Interchangeable alignment system for golf putters
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WO2006016863A1 (en) * 2004-07-07 2006-02-16 Gress Edmund A Method and apparatus for card game
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US20060220317A1 (en) * 2005-03-31 2006-10-05 Mr. Zachariah Edwards Trading Card Game using Historical Figures from World History
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US20070031797A1 (en) * 2005-08-08 2007-02-08 Mendelson Andrew J Mathematical sports learning cards, games and methods of use thereof
US7207569B1 (en) 2004-07-20 2007-04-24 Lynn Taylor Haston Interactive game system
US20070126224A1 (en) * 2005-12-01 2007-06-07 Judah Isaacs Clipboard with an integral three dimensional display
US20070145686A1 (en) * 2005-12-23 2007-06-28 Adam Wisniewski Multiple choice card game
US20080036149A1 (en) * 2006-08-14 2008-02-14 Janice Maryan Hughes Method and apparatus for a trick-taking card game that uses rank-modifying cards
US20080153073A1 (en) * 2006-12-21 2008-06-26 Gen-Tnao Hsia Educational card game and method of play
US7469901B1 (en) * 2005-09-22 2008-12-30 Hilliard Michael J Battle play card game
US20090295088A1 (en) * 2007-08-01 2009-12-03 Chan John Lap Man System and device for determining personality type
US20100156048A1 (en) * 2006-10-17 2010-06-24 Edmund Gress Role-playing game
US20110316231A1 (en) * 2010-06-23 2011-12-29 Eric Johns Miniature model skirmish game mechanic
US20120313323A1 (en) * 2011-06-10 2012-12-13 Brookhaven Science Associates, Llc Quark Matter Card Games
US8636517B1 (en) * 2010-02-11 2014-01-28 Theodore Stoner Educational game for enhanced word learning when matching similar words in different languages
US8651869B1 (en) 2011-12-01 2014-02-18 Angel L. Lassalle Educational game
US8733760B1 (en) * 2012-11-21 2014-05-27 André Fontana Game and method of playing a game
WO2014143771A1 (en) * 2013-03-15 2014-09-18 Amplify Education Inc. Literature card game
US9227148B2 (en) 2013-02-26 2016-01-05 Mattel, Inc. Toy apparatus
US20170036119A1 (en) * 2015-08-04 2017-02-09 Hothead Games, Inc. Virtual card play based interactive gaming experiences
US9616327B2 (en) 2013-02-26 2017-04-11 Mattel, Inc. Toy apparatus
US20170169065A1 (en) * 2015-12-10 2017-06-15 Microsoft Technology Licensing, Llc Extensibility of collectable data structures
US20170236449A1 (en) * 2016-02-12 2017-08-17 Catlilli Games Educational card games and methods of play
US9919213B2 (en) 2016-05-03 2018-03-20 Hothead Games Inc. Zoom controls for virtual environment user interfaces
US10004991B2 (en) 2016-06-28 2018-06-26 Hothead Games Inc. Systems and methods for customized camera views in virtualized environments
US10010791B2 (en) 2016-06-28 2018-07-03 Hothead Games Inc. Systems and methods for customized camera views and customizable objects in virtualized environments
US10156970B2 (en) 2012-02-06 2018-12-18 Hothead Games Inc. Virtual opening of boxes and packs of cards
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US20050156382A1 (en) * 2000-06-01 2005-07-21 Gress Edmund A. Method and apparatus for card game
US20050151320A1 (en) * 2000-06-01 2005-07-14 Gress Edmund A. Method and apparatus for card game
US20020165794A1 (en) * 2001-03-26 2002-11-07 Tsunekazu Ishihara System and method for electronic business transaction of trading cards
US6993500B2 (en) * 2001-03-26 2006-01-31 Nintendo Co., Ltd. System and method for electronic business transaction of trading cards
US20040120284A1 (en) * 2002-05-10 2004-06-24 Interdigital Technology Corporation System and method for prioritization of retransmission of protocol data units to assist radio-link-control retransmission
US20030234492A1 (en) * 2002-06-24 2003-12-25 Martin Myren Game card system
US20040036220A1 (en) * 2002-08-21 2004-02-26 Konami Corporation Card game
US20070045962A1 (en) * 2002-08-21 2007-03-01 Konami Corporation Card game
US7144013B2 (en) * 2002-08-21 2006-12-05 Konami Corporation Card game
US6896520B2 (en) * 2002-09-27 2005-05-24 Artapalooza, Llc. System and method for encouraging an understanding of visual art
US20040063077A1 (en) * 2002-09-27 2004-04-01 Claudia Swartz System and method for encouraging an understanding of visual art
US7255564B2 (en) * 2003-03-14 2007-08-14 Innovative Premiums, Inc. Anatomical pocket model
US20040180313A1 (en) * 2003-03-14 2004-09-16 Judah Isaacs Anatomical pocket model
US20050003331A1 (en) * 2003-05-02 2005-01-06 Stephenie Menzies System and method for studying a subject area, such as art
US7147561B2 (en) 2003-08-20 2006-12-12 Nintendo Co., Ltd. Game system having a plurality of game machines for competing for card data
US20050082759A1 (en) * 2003-10-20 2005-04-21 Scotty Strahan Great white shark cards
US20050151321A1 (en) * 2003-12-15 2005-07-14 Ann Hennessy Motivational cards
US20050192114A1 (en) * 2003-12-16 2005-09-01 Pixl Golf Company Interchangeable alignment system for golf putters
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US7207569B1 (en) 2004-07-20 2007-04-24 Lynn Taylor Haston Interactive game system
US7258343B2 (en) * 2004-07-23 2007-08-21 Bandai America Incorporated Card game and methods of play
US20060017229A1 (en) * 2004-07-23 2006-01-26 Kazumoto Hayakawa Card game and methods of play
US20060202423A1 (en) * 2005-03-11 2006-09-14 Konami Corporation Battle card game
US20060220317A1 (en) * 2005-03-31 2006-10-05 Mr. Zachariah Edwards Trading Card Game using Historical Figures from World History
US20070031797A1 (en) * 2005-08-08 2007-02-08 Mendelson Andrew J Mathematical sports learning cards, games and methods of use thereof
US7469901B1 (en) * 2005-09-22 2008-12-30 Hilliard Michael J Battle play card game
US7717468B2 (en) 2005-12-01 2010-05-18 Innovative Premiums Inc. Clipboard with an integral three dimensional display
US20070126224A1 (en) * 2005-12-01 2007-06-07 Judah Isaacs Clipboard with an integral three dimensional display
US20070145686A1 (en) * 2005-12-23 2007-06-28 Adam Wisniewski Multiple choice card game
US20080036149A1 (en) * 2006-08-14 2008-02-14 Janice Maryan Hughes Method and apparatus for a trick-taking card game that uses rank-modifying cards
US7644925B2 (en) * 2006-08-14 2010-01-12 Janice Maryan Hughes Method and apparatus for a trick-taking card game
US8181963B2 (en) 2006-10-17 2012-05-22 Edmund Gress Role-playing game
US8469361B2 (en) 2006-10-17 2013-06-25 Edmund Gress Role-playing game
US20100156048A1 (en) * 2006-10-17 2010-06-24 Edmund Gress Role-playing game
US20080153073A1 (en) * 2006-12-21 2008-06-26 Gen-Tnao Hsia Educational card game and method of play
US7950664B2 (en) * 2007-08-01 2011-05-31 Chan John Lap Man System and device for determining personality type
US20090295088A1 (en) * 2007-08-01 2009-12-03 Chan John Lap Man System and device for determining personality type
US8636517B1 (en) * 2010-02-11 2014-01-28 Theodore Stoner Educational game for enhanced word learning when matching similar words in different languages
US20110316231A1 (en) * 2010-06-23 2011-12-29 Eric Johns Miniature model skirmish game mechanic
US20120313323A1 (en) * 2011-06-10 2012-12-13 Brookhaven Science Associates, Llc Quark Matter Card Games
US8651869B1 (en) 2011-12-01 2014-02-18 Angel L. Lassalle Educational game
US10156970B2 (en) 2012-02-06 2018-12-18 Hothead Games Inc. Virtual opening of boxes and packs of cards
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US8733760B1 (en) * 2012-11-21 2014-05-27 André Fontana Game and method of playing a game
US9616327B2 (en) 2013-02-26 2017-04-11 Mattel, Inc. Toy apparatus
US9227148B2 (en) 2013-02-26 2016-01-05 Mattel, Inc. Toy apparatus
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US9789388B2 (en) 2013-02-26 2017-10-17 Mattel, Inc. Toy apparatus
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US20170036119A1 (en) * 2015-08-04 2017-02-09 Hothead Games, Inc. Virtual card play based interactive gaming experiences
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US20170169065A1 (en) * 2015-12-10 2017-06-15 Microsoft Technology Licensing, Llc Extensibility of collectable data structures
US20170236449A1 (en) * 2016-02-12 2017-08-17 Catlilli Games Educational card games and methods of play
US9919213B2 (en) 2016-05-03 2018-03-20 Hothead Games Inc. Zoom controls for virtual environment user interfaces
US10004991B2 (en) 2016-06-28 2018-06-26 Hothead Games Inc. Systems and methods for customized camera views in virtualized environments
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