US1978075A - Wood block flooring - Google Patents

Wood block flooring Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US1978075A
US1978075A US55038531A US1978075A US 1978075 A US1978075 A US 1978075A US 55038531 A US55038531 A US 55038531A US 1978075 A US1978075 A US 1978075A
Authority
US
Grant status
Grant
Patent type
Prior art keywords
block
blocks
tongues
edges
series
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Expired - Lifetime
Application number
Inventor
Samuel D Butterworth
Original Assignee
Josephine M Butterworth
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Grant date

Links

Images

Classifications

    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E04BUILDING
    • E04FFINISHING WORK ON BUILDINGS, e.g. STAIRS, FLOORS
    • E04F15/00Flooring
    • E04F15/02Flooring or floor layers composed of a number of similar elements
    • E04F15/022Flooring consisting of parquetry tiles on a non-rollable sub-layer of other material, e.g. board, concrete, cork
    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E04BUILDING
    • E04FFINISHING WORK ON BUILDINGS, e.g. STAIRS, FLOORS
    • E04F15/00Flooring
    • E04F15/02Flooring or floor layers composed of a number of similar elements
    • E04F15/04Flooring or floor layers composed of a number of similar elements only of wood or with a top layer of wood, e.g. with wooden or metal connecting members
    • E04F15/041Flooring or floor layers composed of a number of similar elements only of wood or with a top layer of wood, e.g. with wooden or metal connecting members with a top layer of wood in combination with a lower layer of other material

Description

( )Ctf 23 1934- s. D. BUTTERWQRTH 1,978,075

WOOD BLOCK FLOORING Filed July 13. 1931 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 LAR-5 y E E, 5/ ATTQRNEYS Patented Oct. 23, 1934 PATENT oFElcE WOODVBLOCK FLOORING Samuel D. Butterworth, Detroit, Mich., assigner to Josephine M. Butterworth, Detroit, Mich.,

and C. P. Gable Application July 13, 1931, Serial No. 550,385

9 Claims.

My invention relates to improvements in block flooring and more particularly to wood block ilooring preferably laid in a mastic adhesive having a novel interlocking arrangement of the blocks and improved means for retaining the blocks in position by adjacent blocks.

In forming and assembling wood block oors in the past, many elaborate tongue and groove interlocking joints have been employed to securely join the blocks together. Many of these blocks are costly to manufacture and difficult to assemble and lay. My invention is directed to overcoming the difficulties of manufacturing these blocks by providing a wood block having suitable interlocking `members which are inexpensive to manufacture and easy to assemble which has certain novel `features in its design which cooperate to make an improved and lasting floor.

It is an object of my invention to provide an improved tongue and groove arrangement for wood block flooring.

Another object of my invention is to provide improved means for retaining wood blocks in position in a Wood blockfloor, and for assembling the blocks in position. v

Another object of my invention is toprovide a Wood block floor wherein each block is held down on all sides thereof by adjacent surrounding blocks. f

Another object of my invention is to provide blocks for use in ooring having interlocking tongues and grooves on allsides` thereof.

Another object is to provide blocks having interlocking tongues and grooves on all sides formed atthe base of the blocks, the tops of the blocks abutting all of the adjacent blocks when laid in position to present a smooth and unbroken floor surface.

A further object is to provide tongues on all sides of a block for iiooring which extend beneath all of the surrounding immediately adjacent blocks.

A still further object is to form the grooves of the wood blocks of predetermined size to allow sliding of the tongues therein during assembly of the block floor. i i v Yet another object of my invention is to provide an interlocking metallic base which may be readily and economically applied to a Wood block having plane sides, edges, and top and bottom surfaces. i i

Further objects and advantages of my invention `will readily becomeapparent throughout a (Cl. lZtl-8) reading of the following detailed description in which:

Fig. 1 is'a fragmentary plan view of a section of Wood block flooring of my invention assembled in position.

Fig. 2 is an'enlarged cross sectional view of the block floor of my invention taken on the line 2 2 of Fig.`1.

Fig. 3 is an enlarged' plan blocks. y

Fig. 4- is an enlarged bottom view of the block shown in Fig. 3.

Fig. 5 is a planview of a section ofa modified form of ooring of my invention,

Fig..6 is an enlarged cross sectional viewofthis modified form of block flooring taken on theline 6-6 of Fig. 5. i

Fig. 'Tis an enlarged plan View of one ofthe series A blocks of the modication illustrated in Fig.5. M .i

iFig.A 8 is an enlarged bottom View of the block illustrated in Fig. 7.

Fig. 9 is an enlarged plan View of one rof the series B blocks used in the modification illustrated in Fig. 5.

Fig. 10 is a bottom view of the block illustrated in Fig. 9. 4 i i Fig. 11 is a fragmentary plan view of a section of wood block flooring of a still further modification of my invention, illustrating blocks laid in a herringbone design.

Fig. 12 is an enlarged plan view of one of the series of blocks employed in the modification of Fig. 1l known as a right block.

Fig; 13 is a bottom view of the block illustrated innig. 12. 1

Fig. 14 is an enlarged plan View of` oneof the other series of blocks used in the modification of my invention illustrated in Fig. l1 and known as a left block. i

Fig. l5 is a bottom view of the block illustrated inFig. 14.

Fig. 16 is an enlarged cross sectional view of the oor taken on the line 16-16 of Fig. 11. i.

` Referring now to the drawings in Ydetail in which like numerals designate like parts throughout the several views, the flooring of my invention of the type illustrated in Figs. 1 to 4, is made up of square wood blocks 20 having plane sides and edges and also plane top and bottom surfaces. An interlocking and fastening plate 21 of any suitable light metal such as tin for example is secured to the bottom of the block by fastening devices, adhesive or in any other suitable manner.

View of one ofthe The plate 21 is cut as best shown in Fig. 4 tol or any other suitable material.

have projecting tongues 22 and 23 which extend beyond the edges of the blocks on all four sides. The tongues 22 at the lower and right hand side of the interlocking plate 21 (as viewed when looking at the bottom of the block in the position indicated in Fig. 4 in the drawings) project beyond the edge of the block at the centerline of the block.

A square corner tongue 24 in the upper left hand corner projects beyond the upper and loft hand side edges a distance equal to that of the projection of the tongues 23 which also project beyond the upper and left hand side edges. The dimension A-A of the interlocking bottom plate and tongues 23 and 24 is slightly less than the size of the block, which small clearance is allowed between the edges of the adjacent plates of the adjacent blocks when they are laid in a mastic adhesive to receive portions of the mastic, Grooves or slots 25 are formed between the projecting tongues 23 and 24 at the left hand and upper side and these grooves are framed at their inner edges by the center portion of the interlock plate 2l which is smaller than the wood block as shown in Fig. 4. These grooves are adapted to receive the wider and less protruding tongues 22 of the adjacent blocks. The spaces between the tongues 224 and 23 and the lower and right hand sides of the blocks form grooves or slots 26 which are adapted to receive the tongues 23 and 24 of the 1 adjacent blocks when they are assembled as illustrated inI Fig. 1..

The grooves 25 are of a size Wide enough to receive the tongues 22 and allow a sliding movement therein to facilitate assembly of the blocks in the manner hereinafter described. This width has been found to be preferably the width of the tongue 22 plus two times the amount which the tongues 22 projectY beyond the edge of the block plus a small additional clearance to allow for slight manufacturing variations in the blocks and tov allow a groove to receive mastic or other adhesive when used. The blocks are preferably laid in a mastic or other suitable adhesive 30 which may be applied to a sub-iioor 31 of wood, concrete, As each block is put down the protruding tongues of the lightmetal interlocking plates 21 are nailed to the subfloor or secured thereto by any other suitable fastening devices. For the purpose of illustrating the manner of assembling the blocks. ofmy invention as illustrated in Fig. l a group of the blocks in thisview have been arbitrarily nmnbered 1 to 4 respectively and are laid. i-n the following order and manner.

Block 1 for example, may be first laid down in a layer of mastic which is spread on the sub-floor or may be appliedy to the bottoms of the block by dipping and the tongues 22, 23 and 24 of the block nailed down in position;v block 2 will then be placed in position adjacent the lower edge of the block 1. by interlocking. they ends of the tongues 23 and 24 with the respective grooves 26 of the block 1 with the. left and right hand side edges of the blocks 1 and 2. in alignment with each other.

. The block is dropped into place when the tongues 23 and. 24 havebeen pushed into the groove 26 far enough for the edges-of the-wood blocks 20 to abut each other. The metal tongues may be sprung` up. slightly toy prevent digging or scraping up of the mastic. This procedure is preferable when layingr the blocks in a mastic to prevent scuing and. smearing of the mastic-and to prevent it from accumulating at the block joint. After the block 2 isin position the protruding tongues 22, 23 and projecting. portionsl of the tongue 24 may be nailed down to the sub-floor. The block 3 is then moved into position adjacent the block 2 by interlocking the tongue 22 of the block 3 with the groove 25 of the block 2 with the side edges of the blocks 2 and 3 in axial alignment and dropped into place when the adjacent edges of the blocks 2 and 3 abut each other. The protruding tongues of the plate 2l of the block 3 may then be nailed down to the sub-floor. The block 4 (shown exploded out of final position in the drawings) will neXt be laid and it is the laying of this fourth block that utilizes the advantage of the particular dimension of the groove 25 in proportion to the width of the tongue 22. This allows the block to be moved in two directions to engage the protruding tongues on both sides with the adjacent blocks l and 3. The block 4 is placed close to blocks 1 and 3 and either of the tongues 22 thereof may be interlocked with either the groove 25 of the block 1 or the groove 25 of the block 3 and the block 4 pressed or slid in one direction toward the blocks 1 or 3 as the case may be until the side edges abut. This is shown by the dotted lines in Fig. l wherein the first step of moving the block 4 in position has been accomplished by interlocking with the block 3. The block 4 may then be moved toward the block l to interlock the tongue 22 of the block 4 with the groove 25 of the block l. This sliding movement will be allowed because of the width of the groove 25 which is wide enough to accommodate movement of the tongue 22 a distance equal to the amount of the projection of the tongue 22 and the amount of movement which will be required to place the blocks in position abutting both the block 1 and block 3. All of the blocks in the floor will be laid in the same manner. It is the combination of the wide groove 25 with the tongue 22 which allows the proper degree of sliding to facilitate assemblage of the fourth block in each instance and allows the block to be slid first in one and then the other direction. The block 4 may then be fastened onto the floor by nailing of the projecting tongues 23, 24 as were the blocks l, 2 and 3 and further series of blocks laid.

A modified form of my invention illustrated in Figs. 5 to 10 consists in two series of blocks, one having protruding tongues and the other having suitable grooves to receive the same which shall be referred toin the following description as series A and B respectively. The blocks in series A are illustrated in Figs. '7 and 8 and include a metal interlocking plate of tin or other suitable light metal 28 which is fastened to the bottom of the wood block 20 by any suitable fastening devices or by the use of adhesive. As illustrated in the bottom view of the block in Fig. 8 the metal plate 28 is square, of slightly lesser width than the block 20 to allow a slight clearance between the plates 28 when the blocks are assembled in position to receive mastic therebetween. The plate 28' is offset to protrude beyond the upper and right hand edges of the block (viewed from the bottom with the block in the position illustrated in Fig. 8) to form elongated tongues 29 on the upper and right hand side edges and grooves 30 on the left hand and lower sides thereof. A tongue 31 is extended out from the plate 28 and protrudes beyond the bottom edge of the block 20 at its center a distance equal to the protrusion of the tongues 29 at the upper and right hand side edges. The series of blocks referred to as the series B and illustrated in Figs. 9 and lO include a metal plate 32 which is fastened to the bottom of the block 20 in a manner similar to that of the plate 28 of the seriesl A blocks and is of the same size as the plate 28 and olf set to protrude beyond the right hand and upperside edges of theblock as viewed with the block in the position illustrated in Fig. to form grooves 33 at the lowerand left hand side edges, an elongated tongue 34 at the right `hand side edge-and similarly protruding tongues 35 and 36 atV the upper edge thereof. A groove or slot 37 is formed in the plate 32 near the center of the upperside edge of theblock. Thegroove 37 is adapted to receive the tongues 31 of the blocks of the series .A and is of a width equal to the width of the tongue 31 plus the Adistance which the tongues 31 protrude beyond the edge of the block plus-a slight additional amount for clearance and facilitates sliding of the block when assembled in position. The tongues 31 of the series A blocks are slidable relative to the grooves 37 of the series Biblocks y The blocks are shown in assembled position in Fig. 5, four of the blocks having been arbitrarily numbered 1 to 4, and are laid in the following manner. Block 1 is placed on the sub-floor in the mastic and the protruding tongues 28 and 31 thereof may be nailed to the sub-floor if so desired. Block 2 of the series A is placed in position in alignment with the block 1, the side edges of `the `block abutting each other and the tongues and 36 extending under the series A block 1 into the grooves 30 `thereof with the tongue 31 of the series A block extending under the block 2 into the groove 37 thereof. Block 2 may be secured in position by nailing down the protruding tongued edges 34 and 36 ofthe plate 32. `The block 3 may then be placed in position abutting the block 2 with the tongue 34 thereof, extending under the block 2 into the groove 30 thereof and theprotruding tongue portions nailed down in position. `The block 4 of the series A may then be `placed in ,positionby interlocking the tongue 31 with the groove 37 ofthe block 3 so that the lower edge of the block 4 abuts the upper edge of the block 3. The block- 4 may then be slid into position abutting the block 1 by reason of the width of the groove 37 formed in the attaching plate of series B blocks which is slightly greater than the amount of projection of the tongues 29 and the depth of the grooves 30 of the series A blocks.

It is apparent that the sliding movement of the fourth block allowed by the wide grooves or slots 37 after the initial interlocking, facilitates assemblage of this block without scuiiing and piling up of the mastic or adhesive which might otherwise occur.

The modification of my invention illustrated in Figs. 1l and 16 is somewhat similar to the first modification described and illustrated in Figs. 1 to 4. The' difference between this modification and the first is in the use of rectangular blocks arranged in a series of rights and lefts and adapted to be laid in a herringbone design.

The right blocks as illustrated in Figs. 12 and 13 (indicated byR) have metallic interlocking plates 40 suitablyfastened to the lower side of f. the wood blocks 41 by anygsuitable fastening devices or by adhesive. The plate 40 of the block 41 is offset and protrudes (as viewed in Fig. 17) beyond the left hand side edgeand bottom edge of the block to form elongated tongues 42 and has a pair of grooves or slots 43 cut therein between the tongues at the left hand side and one at the center of the bottom edge thereof as shown in the drawings. A pair of side tongues 44 project beyond the right hand side edges of the block diametrically opposite the left hand sidegrooves 43 thereof and an uppertongue` 45 protrudesbe` yond the upperredge of the block diametrically oppositethe' botto-m groove 43 of the lower edge of the block. The width of the groove 43 should be sufficient to allow sliding of the blocks in assembly and is preferably equal to the width of one of the tongues 44 or 45 plus twotimes the distance of their projection beyond the side-edges of the' Woodblock 41 plus a slight clearance so that the interlocking plateV 40lwill not abut the interlocking plates of the left hand block or with other interlocking plates of adjacent right hand blocks but will allow a space for variations in the manufacture of the blocks and for mastic to be received between the edges of the attaching and interlocking plate. The width of the grooves 43 in proportionto the tongues 44 and 45 is thus definitely determined for the same reason as previously given and described for the rst modification, namely to facilitate assemblage of the block and allow sliding of the blocks relative to the adjacent blocks in two directions, that is, after one side or end has been interlocked with the adjacent block they `may be moved toward the other adjacent block.

The left series of blocks is illustrated in Figs. 14 and 15 (indicated by L) have metallic interlocking and attaching plates 46 suitably fastened to the bottom of the blocks and offset relative to the side edges of the blocksto form projecting elongated tongues 47 on the right hand and lower side edges thereof and a pair of grooves or slots 48 are cut' between the tongues 47 in the same manner as are the grooves 43r of the right hand blocks. Side tongues 49 extend beyond the left hand side edge of the block diametrically opposite` the side grooves 48 of the right hand side of the block and a tongue 50 projects beyond the top edge of the block and is diametricallyopposite the bottom groove 48 at the lower edge of the block. The grooves 48-are of the same width as the grooves 43 of the left hand block, and for the same purpose.

In laying the blocks of this modification in a herringbone design the procedure is similar to that of the other modifications in that the first block marked 1 in the drawing of Fig. 11 for purprotruding tongues 42, 44 and 45 which protrudeA on all four sides thereof. Block 1 is one of the right hand series of blocks, and therefore block 2, one of the left hand series of blocks, will then be placed in position with its upper tongue50 extending under the block 1 of the right hand series and into the groove 43 thereof, the blocks being placed in position so that the uppermost edge of block land right side edge of block 2 as viewed` in Fig. 11 are in alignment. Block 3, a right hand block,.is then placed in position byinterlocking the upper tongue 45 thereof with the groove 48 of the block 2 of the left hand series and with the `tongue 45 in engagement with the side edge of the groove 48 away from the block 1. The block 3 may then be slid into position toward the block l so that its upper long side will abut Y the lower long side of the block 1. This step is facilitated because of the sliding` movement ale lowed by the width of the' groove 48 yin the plate 46 of the block 2. The block 4, a left hand block, may then be placed in position by engaging the tongue 50 at the upper end thereof with the groove 43 of the block 3 so that the upper end of the block 4 abuts the lower side edge `of the block 3 and the block may then be slid upwardly,

to the right toward the block 2 until it is in abutment therewith, with the tongue 49 of the block 4 engaging the groove 48 of the block 2 and with the lower long edge of the block 2 in abutment with the upper long edge of the block 4. This last described position of the block 4 is indicated by the dotted lines. In this fashion all of the blocks may be laid and then fastened to the supporting base if desired. It is apparent that when the next row of right hand blocks are laid that the upper right side edge of the block 4 will engage two blocks, including the block 5 with the tongue 49 of left hand block 4 engaging the groove 43 of right block 5.

The blocks of my invention are economical to manufacture, easy to assemble and form a firm floor which is securely maintained in place. The blocks used may be readily manufactured because of lack of elaborate tongue and grooves in the wood blocks themselves, the blocks having plane sides, edges and top and bottom surfaces are easily cut on ordinary machines or planers. The interlocking and fastening plates may be A readily out or stamped out on suitable presses being flat and of light metal. The plates may then be readily attached to the flat bottom surface of the blocks. The first and last described forms, Figs. l and l1 respectively, have tongues protruding beyond the edges of the blocks on all four sides and grooves receding beneath the edges of the blocks on all four sides. Each and every block is therefore held down by all of the surrounding adjacent blocks on all sides thereof making a secure and strong iloor.

The light 'metal side tongues are well adapted to be nailed to the sub-floor or otherwise attached thereto by suitable fastening devices. When laid in a mastic, nailed down and further held down by the adjacent blocks on all sides, the blocks are immovable and a permanent floor of great strength and durability results.

The novel arrangement of the grooves so that they are the exact width necessary to slide the 4th block in place is extremely advantageous. This arrangement is a necessity in laying and assembling blocks in position which have tongues protruding beyond the edges of the blocks on all four sides. This is true whether laying square blocks in ordinary square design as shown in Fig. 1, or in laying rectangular blocks in herringbone design, the laying of the herringbone design requiring two series of reversely arranged right and left blocks.

The metal plates at the bottom of the blocks substantially cover the entire surface of the floor below the blocks leaving only narrow grooves between the periphery of each plate to receive mastic or any other well known adhesive used and allow it to ilow al1 around the plates and reach the portions of the underside of the wood blocks left exposed to aid in binding the blocks to the sub-floor.

It is apparent that when desired, such blocks may be assembled in position without mastic by nailing the projecting tongues only as when applying the blocks to a wood sub-floor.

I also contemplate securing the blocks of my invention in position by mastic or other adhesive without nailing if so desired. When laid in mastic or adhesive in this manner I prefer to use an all wood block that has a wood veneer bottom in place of the metal interlocking and fastening plate described, such Wood veneer bottom being of similar design and having like tongues and grooves.

I claim:

1. A floor block having a metal member secured to the base, tongues extending from said member beyond the edges of the block on two adjacent sides thereof and recesses cut in said member diametrically opposed to said tongues and receding beneath the edges of the block on the opposite adjacent sides thereof, the width of said recesses being equal to the width of one tongue plus twice the distance which the tongue extends beyond the side edge of the block plus a slight additional clearance.

2. A rectangular floor block having a metal member secured to the base, a pair of tongues extending from said member beyond the edge of the block on one of the long sides thereof, another tongue projecting beyond the edge of the block on one of the short sides thereof, a pair of recesses cut in said metal member diametrically opposed to the pair of tongues and receding beneath the edge of the block on the other long side thereof and another recess cut in said member and receding beneath the edge of the block at the other short side thereof, diametrically opposed to the tongue on the opposite short side thereof, the width of the recess being equal to the width of the tongues plus twice the distance which the tongues extend beyond the side edges of the block and an additional small amount for clearance.

3. A plurality of blocks adapted to be assembled to form a cor, each block having a base plate secured to the bottom of the block, tongues extending from said plate beyond the edges of said blocks and recesses formed in said plate receding beneath the edges of said blocks to receive the protruding tongues of the adjoining blocks the respective outer edges forming the tongues and grooves of said metal plate being parallel to the respective adjacent edges of the floor block, said recesses being wide enough to permit transverse sliding of the tongues in the recesses.

4. A plurality of blocks adapted to be assembled to form a floor, each block having a base plate secured to the bottom of the block, tongues extending from said plates beyond the edges of said blocks and recesses formed in said plate intermediate the tongues receding beneath the edges of said block to receive the tongues of adjacent blocks, the width of said recesses being equal to the width of the tongues received therein plus twice the amount which the tongue eX- tends beyond the block.

5. A plurality of blocks adapted to be assembled to form a floor, each' block having a base plate secured to the bottom thereof, tongues extending from said plate beyond the edge of said block on all sides thereof and recesses formed in said plate and receding beneath the edges of said block which receive the protruding tongues of the adjacent blocks and permit sliding of the tongues in two directions the respective outer edges forming the tongues and grooves of said metal plate being parallel to the respective adjacent edges of the floor block.

6. A block floor including a supporting base, a layer of blocks thereon having interlocking plates secured to the bottom of each block, a plurality of projections extending outwardly from said plates beyond the side edges of the blocks, a plurality of complementary recesses in said plate for receiving the projections of adjoining blocks, the Width of said recesses being determined by the width of one of the projections plus twice the amount of its projection beyond the edge of the block and means to secure the plates to the supporting base.

'7. A flat wood block having straight edges, a metal base secured to the bottom of the block and being provided with projections extending beyond the side edges of the block, and complementary recesses in said base for receiving the projections of the bases of adjoining blocks the respective outer edges forming the tongues and grooves of said metal plate being parallel to the respective adjacent edges of the floor block, said recesses being of a width to permit sliding of the received projections transversely therein, said projections being adapted to have attaching devices extended therethrough to fasten the block to a sub-floor, the fastening devices and projections being covered by the adjoining wood blocks. j

8. A block iioor made up of two series of right and left assembled blocks, the blocks having metal plates secured to the bottoms thereof of substantially the same dimension as the bottom of the block and oiset to project beyond two adjacent sides of the block and recede beneath the opposite adjacent sides of the block, tongues formed in the plates of one series of the blocks at one of the receding sides thereof and extending beyond the edge of the block and recesses formed in the plates of the blocks of the second series at one of the projecting edges thereof and adapted to receive the tongues of the blocks of the second series.

9. A block floor made up of two series of assembled right and left blocks, the blocks having metal plates secured to the bottoms thereof of substantially the same dimension as the bottom of the block and offset to project beyond two adjacent sides of the block and recede beneath the opposite adjacent sides of the block, tongues formed in the plates of one series of the blocks at one of the receding sides thereof and extending beyond the edge of the block, recesses formed in the plates of the blocks of the second series at one of the projecting edges thereof and adapted to receive the tongues of the blocks of the second series and said recesses being equal to the width of the

US1978075A 1931-07-13 1931-07-13 Wood block flooring Expired - Lifetime US1978075A (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US1978075A US1978075A (en) 1931-07-13 1931-07-13 Wood block flooring

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US1978075A US1978075A (en) 1931-07-13 1931-07-13 Wood block flooring

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US1978075A true US1978075A (en) 1934-10-23

Family

ID=24196957

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US1978075A Expired - Lifetime US1978075A (en) 1931-07-13 1931-07-13 Wood block flooring

Country Status (1)

Country Link
US (1) US1978075A (en)

Cited By (18)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2807057A (en) * 1955-05-25 1957-09-24 Sectional Flooring Corp Flooring
US2914815A (en) * 1955-08-17 1959-12-01 Alexander Verna Cook Interlocked flooring and method
US4090338A (en) * 1976-12-13 1978-05-23 B 3 L Parquet floor elements and parquet floor composed of such elements
US7155871B1 (en) 2005-12-29 2007-01-02 Tru Woods Limited Floor plank
US20070163194A1 (en) * 2005-12-29 2007-07-19 Tru Woods Limited Floor tile
US20100068451A1 (en) * 2008-09-17 2010-03-18 David Richard Graf Building panel with wood facing layer and composite substrate backing layer
US7877956B2 (en) * 1999-07-05 2011-02-01 Pergo AG Floor element with guiding means
US20110265946A1 (en) * 2010-04-29 2011-11-03 Chao Kang Pien Method and apparatus for floor planks
CN102312543A (en) * 2011-02-08 2012-01-11 张志宏 Self-locking flock piece
US8544233B2 (en) 2000-03-31 2013-10-01 Pergo (Europe) Ab Building panels
US8615952B2 (en) 2010-01-15 2013-12-31 Pergo (Europe) Ab Set of panels comprising retaining profiles with a separate clip and method for inserting the clip
US8627631B2 (en) 2000-06-20 2014-01-14 Flooring Industries Limited, Sarl Floor covering
US8661762B2 (en) 1995-03-07 2014-03-04 Pergo (Europe) Ab Flooring panel or wall panel and use thereof
US8745949B1 (en) 2013-04-12 2014-06-10 Chao Kang Pien Method and apparatus for flooring
US8978334B2 (en) 2010-05-10 2015-03-17 Pergo (Europe) Ab Set of panels
US9032685B2 (en) 1995-03-07 2015-05-19 Pergo (Europe) Ab Flooring panel or wall panel and use thereof
US9322162B2 (en) 1998-02-04 2016-04-26 Pergo (Europe) Ab Guiding means at a joint
US9464443B2 (en) 1998-10-06 2016-10-11 Pergo (Europe) Ab Flooring material comprising flooring elements which are assembled by means of separate flooring elements

Cited By (51)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2807057A (en) * 1955-05-25 1957-09-24 Sectional Flooring Corp Flooring
US2914815A (en) * 1955-08-17 1959-12-01 Alexander Verna Cook Interlocked flooring and method
US4090338A (en) * 1976-12-13 1978-05-23 B 3 L Parquet floor elements and parquet floor composed of such elements
US8661762B2 (en) 1995-03-07 2014-03-04 Pergo (Europe) Ab Flooring panel or wall panel and use thereof
US8875465B2 (en) 1995-03-07 2014-11-04 Pergo (Europe) Ab Flooring panel or wall panel and use thereof
US9032685B2 (en) 1995-03-07 2015-05-19 Pergo (Europe) Ab Flooring panel or wall panel and use thereof
US9322162B2 (en) 1998-02-04 2016-04-26 Pergo (Europe) Ab Guiding means at a joint
US9464443B2 (en) 1998-10-06 2016-10-11 Pergo (Europe) Ab Flooring material comprising flooring elements which are assembled by means of separate flooring elements
US7877956B2 (en) * 1999-07-05 2011-02-01 Pergo AG Floor element with guiding means
US9255414B2 (en) 2000-03-31 2016-02-09 Pergo (Europe) Ab Building panels
US9260869B2 (en) 2000-03-31 2016-02-16 Pergo (Europe) Ab Building panels
US9677285B2 (en) 2000-03-31 2017-06-13 Pergo (Europe) Ab Building panels
US9316006B2 (en) 2000-03-31 2016-04-19 Pergo (Europe) Ab Building panels
US9611656B2 (en) 2000-03-31 2017-04-04 Pergo (Europe) Ab Building panels
US9534397B2 (en) 2000-03-31 2017-01-03 Pergo (Europe) Ab Flooring material
US8544233B2 (en) 2000-03-31 2013-10-01 Pergo (Europe) Ab Building panels
US8578675B2 (en) 2000-03-31 2013-11-12 Pergo (Europe) Ab Process for sealing of a joint
US9068356B2 (en) 2000-06-20 2015-06-30 Flooring Industries Limited, Sarl Floor covering
US9624676B2 (en) 2000-06-20 2017-04-18 Flooring Industries Limited, Sarl Floor covering
US8793958B2 (en) 2000-06-20 2014-08-05 Flooring Industries Limited, Sarl Floor covering
US8627631B2 (en) 2000-06-20 2014-01-14 Flooring Industries Limited, Sarl Floor covering
US9394699B1 (en) 2000-06-20 2016-07-19 Flooring Industries Limited, Sarl Floor covering
US8631625B2 (en) 2000-06-20 2014-01-21 Flooring Industries Limited, Sarl Floor covering
US9234356B2 (en) 2000-06-20 2016-01-12 Flooring Industries Limited, Sarl Floor covering
US9388586B1 (en) 2000-06-20 2016-07-12 Flooring Industries Limited, Sarl Floor covering
US9856657B2 (en) 2000-06-20 2018-01-02 Flooring Industries Limited, Sarl Floor covering
US9376823B1 (en) 2000-06-20 2016-06-28 Flooring Industries Limited, Sarl Floor covering
US8904729B2 (en) 2000-06-20 2014-12-09 Flooring Industries Limited, Sarl Floor covering
US9388585B1 (en) 2000-06-20 2016-07-12 Flooring Industries Limited, Sarl Floor covering
US9482013B2 (en) 2000-06-20 2016-11-01 Flooring Industries Limited, Sarl Floor covering
US9334657B2 (en) 2000-06-20 2016-05-10 Flooring Industries Limted, Sarl Floor covering
US7322159B2 (en) 2005-12-29 2008-01-29 Tru Woods Limited Floor plank
US7458191B2 (en) 2005-12-29 2008-12-02 Tru Woods Limited Floor tile
US20070163194A1 (en) * 2005-12-29 2007-07-19 Tru Woods Limited Floor tile
EP1803869A1 (en) 2005-12-29 2007-07-04 Tru Woods Limited Floor plank being a laminate of two layers of flexible plastic sheet material laminated together in offset relationship
US7155871B1 (en) 2005-12-29 2007-01-02 Tru Woods Limited Floor plank
US20070175137A1 (en) * 2005-12-29 2007-08-02 Tru Woods Limited. Floor plank
EP1811103A1 (en) 2005-12-29 2007-07-25 Tru Woods Limited Floor tile being a laminate of two layers of flexible plastic sheet material laminated together in offset relationship
US20100068451A1 (en) * 2008-09-17 2010-03-18 David Richard Graf Building panel with wood facing layer and composite substrate backing layer
US9464444B2 (en) 2010-01-15 2016-10-11 Pergo (Europe) Ab Set of panels comprising retaining profiles with a separate clip and method for inserting the clip
US9115500B2 (en) 2010-01-15 2015-08-25 Pergo (Europe) Ab Set of panels comprising retaining profiles with a separate clip and method for inserting the clip
US8631623B2 (en) 2010-01-15 2014-01-21 Pergo (Europe) Ab Set of panels comprising retaining profiles with a separate clip and method for inserting the clip
US8615952B2 (en) 2010-01-15 2013-12-31 Pergo (Europe) Ab Set of panels comprising retaining profiles with a separate clip and method for inserting the clip
US8268110B2 (en) * 2010-04-29 2012-09-18 Advance Vinyl Floor Manufacturing Corp. Method and apparatus for floor planks
US20110265946A1 (en) * 2010-04-29 2011-11-03 Chao Kang Pien Method and apparatus for floor planks
US8978334B2 (en) 2010-05-10 2015-03-17 Pergo (Europe) Ab Set of panels
US9593491B2 (en) 2010-05-10 2017-03-14 Pergo (Europe) Ab Set of panels
EP2484845A2 (en) 2011-02-08 2012-08-08 Sunstate Import/Export, Inc. Self locking flooring panels
CN102312543A (en) * 2011-02-08 2012-01-11 张志宏 Self-locking flock piece
US8534023B2 (en) 2011-02-08 2013-09-17 Sunstate Import/Export, Inc. Self locking flooring panels and related methods
US8745949B1 (en) 2013-04-12 2014-06-10 Chao Kang Pien Method and apparatus for flooring

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US3436888A (en) Parquet floorboard
US3279138A (en) Surface finishing panel
US3267630A (en) Flooring systems
US2430200A (en) Lock joint
US3286428A (en) Wall of building blocks with spaced, parallel wooden panels and steel connector plates
US3045294A (en) Method and apparatus for laying floors
US5117603A (en) Floorboards having patterned joint spacing and method
US890436A (en) Matched flooring.
US3579941A (en) Wood parquet block flooring unit
US5430985A (en) Building block wall connector strip and method of assembling a block wall utilizing such strip
US7413374B2 (en) Overlapping secured mat system
US5381638A (en) Building structure formed of lightweight interfitting panels
US1888611A (en) Flooring and the like
US2276071A (en) Panel construction
US1823039A (en) Jointed lumber
US3619964A (en) Flooring panels
US1540128A (en) Composite unit for flooring and the like and method for making same
BE1010339A3 (en) Floor covering comprising hard floor panels and method for producing them
US1622104A (en) Block flooring and process of making the same
US2849758A (en) Faced honeycomb building material
US2894292A (en) Combination sub-floor and top floor
US4744194A (en) Method of laying tile-like flooring members on a floor
US3518800A (en) Flooring system
US7516588B2 (en) Floor covering and locking systems
US6802166B1 (en) Component or assembly of same and fixing clip therefor