US1977857A - Mattress tufting machine - Google Patents

Mattress tufting machine Download PDF

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Publication number
US1977857A
US1977857A US671220A US67122033A US1977857A US 1977857 A US1977857 A US 1977857A US 671220 A US671220 A US 671220A US 67122033 A US67122033 A US 67122033A US 1977857 A US1977857 A US 1977857A
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Prior art keywords
mattress
frame
tufting machine
frames
elements
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Expired - Lifetime
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US671220A
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Edward L Mcroskey
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Edward L Mcroskey
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    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B68SADDLERY; UPHOLSTERY
    • B68GMETHODS, EQUIPMENT, OR MACHINES FOR USE IN UPHOLSTERING; UPHOLSTERY NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • B68G15/00Auxiliary devices and tools specially for upholstery
    • B68G15/005Worktables or workframes
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T29/00Metal working
    • Y10T29/48Upholstered article making
    • Y10T29/482Tufting

Description

Oct. 23, 1934. McRQSKEY 1,977,857
MATTRESS TUFTING MACHINE Filed May 15. 1933 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 INVENTOR.
Jil /WA flfQPm/ar BY ATTORNEYS.
Oct. 23, 1934. MCROSKEY 1,977,857
MATTRESS TUFTING MACHINE I Filed May 15 1933 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENTOR.
9 ATTORNEYS.
Patented Oct. 23, 1934 1,977,857 mrrmsss ror'rmc. MACHINE Edward L. McRoskey, San Francisco, Calif. Application May 15, 1933, sci-mm. 671,220
14 Claims.
The present invention relates toimprovements mattress tufting machines, and its principal object is to provide certain refinements in connection with the mattress tufting machine described in my co-pending application, 534,946,1i1ed May 4, 1931.
The machine described in the co-pending application consists of two co-acting frames adapted to be clamped upon a mattress from opposite sides and mounted in such a manner that the two frames with the mattress there-between may be freely swung on supporting pivots for easy access to the compressed mattress for tufting operations.
One of the frames is movable relative to the other so that the spacing between the frames may be increased for allowing the mattress to be inserted and removed. While the said machine is built in such a manner that it is substantially balanced about the axis of rotation when the two frames are in mattress-compressing position, the frames are not balanced when one of the frames is moved relative to the other, and the further the frame is moved the further the center of gravity shifts from the axis of rotation. It is the purpose of the present invention to provide improvements in said machine which cause the two frames to be balanced about the axis of rotation at all times.
It is a further object of the present invention to provide improved means for effecting movements of one frame relative to the other.
A further object of the invention is to provide, in connection with the moving means for one of the frames, a means for automatically Serial No.
shutting off the driving means when the movableframe reaches one of its end positions.
A still further object of the invention is to arrange the automatic shut-off in such a manner as not to interfere at any time with the free revolving movement of the mattress-compressing frames.
Further objects and advantages of my invention will appear as the specification proceeds.
The preferred form of my invention is illustrated in the accompanying drawings in which Figure 1 shows a side view of my mattress tufting machine; I
Figure 2 a top plan view of the same;
Figure 3 a transverse section taken along line 33 of Figure 1;
Figure 4 an enlarged longitudinal section through the machine taken along line 4=-4 of Figure 5; and
Figure 5 a transverse section through the machine taken along line 55 of Figure 4.
While I have shown only the preferred form of my invention, I wish to have it understood that various changes or modifications may be made within the scope of'the claims hereto attached without departi g from the spirit of the invention.
Referring to the drawings in detail, a. frame 1 somewhat longer than the regular length of a mattress is pivotally supported in bearings 2 and 3 of the legs 4 and 5 by means of trunnions 6 and 7 projecting from the ends of the frame, the trunnions being arranged somewhat above the center of gravity of the frame 1. The latter frame carries in its central portion a compression member 8 comprising a frame-work substantially corresponding to the shape of the mattress and provided with a plurality of spaced cups 9, the spacing of the cups corresponding to the desired spacing of the tufts in the mattress. The cups are formed with central holes indicated at 10 through which a needle may be introduced for guiding a tufting string through the mattress.
Each end of the frame has disposed thereon housings l1 and 12, and above the two housings there is provided a second frame 13 substantially corresponding in shape to the first frame 1 but arranged in such a manner that the compression member 14 of this frame and its cups 15 are presented downwardly, the cups l5 registering with the cups 9 of the first frame. The second or upper frame 13 is guided for movement toward and away from the first frame by means of uprights 16.
The upper frame is supported relative to the lower frame by means of links 17 pivotally engaging the upper frame as at 18 and supported ,by crank arms 19 projecting from the shafts 20 mounted in the two housings 11 and 12. Rotary motion is imparted to one of the shafts 20 as shown in Figure 5, by means of a worm gear 21 meshing with a worm 22 on a longitudinal shaft 23, which latter is provided with a gear 24 meshing with a pinion 25- on the shaft 26. The latter shaft again has a cog wheel 27 meshing with a cog wheel 28, which latter meshes with a pinion 29 on the shaft 30, which extends axially through the trunnion 7 and is connected through the flex- 105 ble joint 31 with a motor 32. The cog wheel 28 is sufficiently wide to mesh with both the cog wheel 27 and the pinion 29.
The shaft 20 at the opposite end of the machine is actuated by a similar worm drive from 1 the shaft 23 which extends throughout the length of the machine.
It will be seen that when the motor becomes active the two shafts 20 are revolved through the trains of gear previously described, which causes the crank arms 19 to rotate and to lift the frame 13 away from the frame 1 on one-half of its revolution while on the other half of the revolution the crank arms return the upper frame toward the lower frame. v
While the two frames might be substantially balanced about the axis of rotation when they are in mattress-clamping position, it will be readily understood that each movement of the upper frame would shift the center of gravity and would tend to throw the entire device out of balance. To overcome this undesirable feature I provide counter-weights 33 at opposite ends of the lower frame, and I also provide means for moving the counter-weights in response to movements of the upper or movable frame so that proper balance is maintained about the axis of rotation at' all times and for all possible positions of the movable frame. For this purpose I provide at opposite ends of the machine U-shaped members 34 adapted to be slidably received in the housings 11 and 12, the baseof each U-shaped member carrying the counter-weights 33, while the legs of each member are provided with teeth 35 so as to form rack rods which engage with pinions 36 and 37 supported on the shafts 20 and 38 respectively. The pinion 36 is loose on the shaft 20 while the pinion 37 may be fixed to the shaft 38. Parallel to the legs 34 of the U-shaped member I provide a second set of rack rods 39 which are fastened to the upper frame as at 40, and which also engage with the two pinions 36 and 3'7 so as to face the rack rods of the U-shaped member. The rack rods are suitably guided so as to be retained in engagement with the pinions when the upper frame 13 moves upward. The rack rods 39 also move upward and impart rotary motion to the pinions 36 and 3'7, which impart move-' ment in the opposite direction to the U-shaped members which carry the counterweights 33 so that each movement of the frame 13 is accompanied' by a corresponding movement in the opposite direction of the counterweights 33. The counterweights are held to the U'-shaped members by means of set screws 41, which allow the counter-weights to be adjusted on the U-shaped members.
-The journal 7 is provided with a wheel 42 having spaced grooves in the peripheral surface thereof which are adapted to be engaged by-a stop member 43 for holding the' lower frame against rotation in certain desired positions.
The motor is controlled by means of switch buttons 44 and 45, the former being for stopping the motor and the latter for starting the motor manually. I also provide an automatic stop in the switch member 46 adaptedto be actuated by a revolvably mounted cam 4'7 mounted co-axially with a worm gear 48 driven by a worm 49, which receives motion from the shaft 30 through the gears 50 and 51. The timing of the drive for the cam 4'7 is such that it automatically opens the switch 46 when the movable frame 13 reaches one of its end positions.
The operation of the device is as follows: The movable frame 13 is first moved, through the train of gears described and the cranks 19 and the links 1'7, away from the lower frame,'substantially into the dotted line position shown in Figure 1. The lower frame in the meantime i s prefplied. Now the operator presses the button 45.
for again starting the motor and the movable frameis made to approach the frame 1 until the cups 15 beginto contact the upperfside of the mattress. In some cases it might be desired to stop the motor at that time and to once more ad- Just the mattress to make sure that the latter is properly positioned relative to the two frames. It may even be considered desirable to turn over the entire harness consisting of the two frames so as .to'make the movable frame take the load of the mattress and to effect more perfect positioning of the opposite side of the mattress which has now become the upper face. After proper positioning of the mattress has been assured, the compressive movement of the movable frame is continued'until the movable frame reaches its extreme compressive position. The mattress is now firmly compressed between the two frames and the points at which the tufting is to be done are clearly indicated by the opposing cups which at the same time place the mattress under compression at the points where the tufts are to be applied. The operators will now proceed with the tufting which operation may be carried out in any approved manner.
After the tufting has been completed the movable frame is moved away from the stationary frame by the means already described, and the movable frame comes automatically to a stop as soon as it reaches its extreme end position. The tufted mattress is now removed and the machine is ready to receive the next mattress.
It will be seen that during'the entire movement of the movable frame the entire harness is balanced due to the movement of the counterweights so that it may be revolved about the axis of rotation without effort and will retain any positionto which it may be moved bythe operator.
I claim:
1. In a mattress tufting machine, a mattress supporting element, means for revolvably mounting the same, a second element movable relative to the first element and adapted for coaction therewith in clamping a matt ess between the elements, a counterweight on the first element for holding the two elements in balanced relation about the axis of rotation when the two elements are in mattress clamping position and means for moving the counterweight in response to movements of the second element for maintaining a balanced relation of the elements for differentpositions of the second element. a
2. In a mattress tufting machine, two mattress .clamping elements, means for revolvably supporting the same, one of the elements being movable relative to the other, and means for maintaining balance of the two elements about the axis of rotation for different positions of the movable element.
3. In a mattress tufting machine, a mattress supporting element, means for mounting the same with freedom of revolving motion about an axis offset from the plane of the supporting element,
a second element movable relative to the first element and adapted to coact therewith in clamping a mattress between the elements, a counterweight for the second element associated with the first element, and means for moving the counterweight in response to movements of the second element whereby the two elements are maintained in balance about the axis of rotation for different positions of the second element.
4. In a mattress tufting machine, a mattress supporting element, means for mounting the same with freedom of revolving motion, a second element movable relative to the first element and adapted to coact therewith in clamping a mattress between the elements, power driven means including a crank and a connecting link for imparting movement to the second element and automatically operating means for rendering the latter means inactive when the second element reaches one of two end positions.
5. In a mattress tufting machine, a mattress supporting element having journals projecting therefrom, bearings for the journals, a second element movable relative to the first element and adapted to coact therewith in clamping a mattress between the elements and power-driven means including a crank associated with the first element, a link connecting the crank to the second =element and a shaft extending axially through one of the journals for imparting movement to the second element,
6. In a mattress tufting machine, a mattress supporting element, means for revolvably mounting the same, a second element movable relative to the first element and adapted for coaction therewith in clamping a mattress between the elements and means for moving the second element comprising a crank associated with the first element, a link connecting the crank and the second element and means for revolving the crank.
7. In a mattress tufting machine, a mattress supporting element, means for revolvably mounting the same, a second element movable relative to the first element and adapted for coaction therewith in clamping a mattress between the elements and means for moving the second element comprising a crank associated with the first element, a link connecting the crank and the second element, means for revolving the crank and means for automatically stopping the crank when the second element reaches one of its end positions.
8. In a mattress tufting machine, a mattress supporting element, means for revolvably mounting the same, a second element movable relative to the first element and adapted for coaction therewith in clamping a mattress between the elements, a bar mounted underneath the first element and parallel thereto and counter-weights adjustable on said bar for holding the two elements in balanced relation about the axis of rotation when the two mattresses are in mattress clamping position.
9. In a mattress tufting machine, an elongated frame having a mattress supporting element mounted thereon intermediate its length, means for revolvably mounting the frame at the ends thereof, a second frame movable relative to the first frame and having a reciprocal element adapted for coaction with the first element in clamping a mattress between the two elements, and counter-weights for the second frame for holding the mattress compressing elements in balanced relation about the axis of rotation when the said elements are in mattress clamping position, the counter-weights being disposed at the ends of the frame so as to clear the mattress com pressing elements.
10. In a mattress tufting machine, a mattress supporting element, means for revolvably mounting the same, a second element movable relative to the first element and adapted for cooperation therewith in clamping a mattress between the elements, 'a U-shaped member having legs movable in the first element and a cross bar underneath the first element, a counterweight on said bar, teeth on the legs of the U-shaped member, toothed bars extending from the second element in parallel relation to the legs of the U-shaped member and pinions between the legs and the toothed bars for effecting reciprocal movement of the counterweight when the second element is moved.
11. In a mattress tufting machine, an elongated frame having a mattress-shaped compression member thereon intermediate its length, a second rectangular frame movable relative to the first frame and having a reciprocal mattressshaped compression member adapted for coaction with the first member in clamping a mattress between the members, and a counter-weight on the second frame for holding the two frames in balanced relation about the axis of rotation when the two frames are in mattress clamping position.
12. In a mattress tufting machine, an elongated frame having a mattress-shaped compression member thereon intermediate its length, a second rectangular frame movable relative to the first frame and having a reciprocal mattressshaped compression member adapted for coaction with the first member in clamping a mattress between the members, and a counterweight on the second frame for holding the two frames in balanced relation about the axis of rotation when the two frames are in mattress clamping position, the counterweight being adjustable in a direction transversely to'the, axis of rotation.
13. A mattress tufting machine comprising a support; a lower mattress indenting frame mounted at its ends to turn about a horizontal axis upon the support; an upper mattressindenting frame mounted to turn with and to move laterally relatively of the lower frame and said axis; means for moving the upper frame to a selected position of lateral adjustment relatively of the lower frame; and means for palancing the frames in any position to which they are turned about said axis, irrespective of the position of lateral adjustment of the upper frame relatively of said axis.
14. A mattress-tufting machine comprising a support; a lower mattress-indenting frame mounted at its ends to turn about a horizontal axis upon the support; an upper mattress-indenting frame mounted to turn with and to move EDWARD L. MOROSKEY.
US671220A 1933-05-15 1933-05-15 Mattress tufting machine Expired - Lifetime US1977857A (en)

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