US1969892A - Sectionally supported air-cooled wall - Google Patents

Sectionally supported air-cooled wall Download PDF

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Publication number
US1969892A
US1969892A US588158A US58815832A US1969892A US 1969892 A US1969892 A US 1969892A US 588158 A US588158 A US 588158A US 58815832 A US58815832 A US 58815832A US 1969892 A US1969892 A US 1969892A
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Prior art keywords
refractory
supporting
tile
supported
shelf
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US588158A
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Lanyon Samuel Herbert
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Chicago Fire Brick Co
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Chicago Fire Brick Co
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    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F27FURNACES; KILNS; OVENS; RETORTS
    • F27DDETAILS OR ACCESSORIES OF FURNACES, KILNS, OVENS, OR RETORTS, IN SO FAR AS THEY ARE OF KINDS OCCURRING IN MORE THAN ONE KIND OF FURNACE
    • F27D1/00Casings; Linings; Walls; Roofs
    • F27D1/0003Linings or walls
    • F27D1/004Linings or walls comprising means for securing bricks

Description

Aug. 14, 1934. s. H.'LANYON SECTIONALLY SUPPORTED AIR COOLED WALL Filed Jan. 22, 1932 2 Sheets-Sheet l kj'amue S; H. LANYON SECTIONALLY SUPPORTED AIR COOLED WALL Aug. 14, 1934.
Filed Jan. 22, 1932 2 Sheets$heet '2 [RF/671827" Y eri lar zz on Patented Aug. 14, 1934 1,969,892 SECTIONALLY SUPPORTED Am-cooLEn WALL Samuel Herbert Lanyon, San Francisco, assignor to Chicago Fire Brick Company, Chicago, 111., a corporation of Illinois Application January 22, 1932, Serial No. 588,158
12 Claims.
My invention relates to sectionally supported refractory walls for furnaces of the type in which air cooling is accomplished by passing a current of air between the refractory wall and the outer casing wall.
One purpose of this invention is to provide a wall of this character in which the longitudinal line of the joints between substantially all of the horizontal rows of refractoryblocks is somewhat higher at the surface exposed to the hot gases of the furnace than at the opposite or air cooled surface. This feature is of considerable advantage in structures of this character since it tends to provide an automatic seal against the hot gases escaping outwardlythrough any poorly fitting horizontal joints between the blocks. This, it is believed, is evident when one considers the fact that the hot gases are lighter than the cooler gases and that therefore they do not travel downward with the same degree of ease that they travel upward or horizontally.
Another advantage of this type of structure lies in the fact that with the horizontal joints between the refractory blocks sloping downwardly and outwardly there is a tendency for these joints to remain well filled with the material which may spall off of the inner surface of the refractory wall.- This is particularly noticeable at the expansion joints where, in a straight horizontal joint, it is a well known fact that the expansion material tends to work .out into the furnace.
Another advantage of this type of structure lies in the fact that it permits the use of standard fire brick unanchored to the wall and holds them in place by gravity merely by the fact that the outer end is lower than the inner end.
Another object' of the invention is to provide a simple supporting structure for the refractory wall consisting of metal brackets and supporting members on the steel framework so arranged that one of the supporting members engages the lower end of the bracket and receives both load and outward thrust while the other supporting memher engages the top of the bracket and carries no load but only an inward thrust.
A further object of the invention is to provide refractory block carrying brackets which are free to move in all instances to the proper position longitudinally of the wall undisturbed by the outer casing wall and also which are relatively small with.respect to the sections supported thereby, and permits sections carried by the brackets to be directly above or below the higher or lower section.
Another and more specific object of the invention is to provide a supporting structure for the refractory blocks consisting of brackets provided with shelves and arranged one directly above the other together with an anchoring bar interconnecting the brackets to which certain of the refractories are secured. This combination permits of extreme flexibility in the depth of the sections supported by any bracket without the necessity of changing the bracket design or size in any manner.
It is also an object of this invention to provide a supporting superstructure for the refractory walls which permits the use of a substantial percentage of standard fire brick shapes without weakening the holding of the wall to its supporting structure.
It is also an object of this invention to provide a supporting bracket which is designed to transfer inward thrust to an upward resisting member, outward thrust and load to a lower resisting member and which is provided with a shelf to carry a superimposed load which shelf slopes downwardly from its free end toward the thrust and load resisting members. so
It is also a purpose of the invention to provide in combination a refractory tile having substantially parallel upward and lower surfaces one of said surfaces being recessed to provide pockets, and a metal stirrup provided with' end portions to fit in said pockets and projecting outwardly from the end of the tile to engage a metal supporting member. 1
Further it is an'object of this invention to provide certain of the refractory tile used in this outwardly sloping wall with projecting cleats on their upper rear edges to serve as stops for holding the other brick thereon together with means for. anchoring the tile having the cleats to the supporting structure. 95
Other objects of the invention will appear as the description proceeds in connection with the accompanying drawings wherein the preferred form of the invention is shown. It is believed to be clear, however, that the description and drawings are illustrative only and that various minor modifications may be made without departing from the scope of the invention as outlined herein and as hereinafter claimed.
In the drawings- Fig. 1 is an interior view of a portion of a furnace wall with part of the refractories broken away to show the supporting structure;
Fig. 2 is a vertical section taken through the wall illustrating the supporting structure;
Fig. 6 is a perspective of the anchoring stirrup;
and
Fig. 7 is a fragmentary section of the anchoring refractories showing the provision made for receiving the stirrup.
Referring now in detail to the drawings, the furnace wall is made up of a plurality of vertical running I beams 10, and on the interior flanges of these beams there are secured supporting members such as 11 and 12 which are arranged in pairs the lower member 12 being a heavy angle iron so as to be capable of supporting a load while the upper member 11 is much lighter in structure. The I beams carry an outer casing wall by means of the channel beams indicated at 13 running horizontally at spaced intervals between the I beams. This outer insulation wall 14 which is shown made of common brick, it will be noted, lies entirely outside the supporting members 11 and 12 upon which the brackets 15 rest. It is obvious that I may employ an outer seal casing if desired instead of the insulating wall 14 or in combination with it.
As is shown most clearly in Fig. 2, the brackets 15 support the refractory wall 16 upon the shelf portions 17, these shelf portions sloping upwardly from the bracket casting to their free ends. This structure leaves ample air space between the refractory wall and the outer casing wall, and, of course, either horizontal or vertical baflling of this space may be provided if desired.
I have shown in Figs. 1 and 2 an example of horizontal bafiling wherein the common brick 18 are supported on a series of cross bars 19 which cross bars are carried at their outer ends of the their supporting members 11 and 12 so that in setting up the furnace wall these brackets may be arranged in vertical rows and pushed longitudinally so as to make a tight joint between horizontally adjacent refractories. The brackets 15 are preferably arranged approximately one above the other and interconnected by vertical bars or angle irons 21 which preferably are de tachable in a simple manner. I
The manner shown of attaching the angle irons 21 to the brackets consists in fitting them in sockets cast on the bracket as indicated at 22 in Figs. 1. 2, and 4. Each bracket is also provided at 23,0n its under surface with a socket that permits enough vertical movement of the angle iron 21 to enable it to be removed from the lower socket 22 and thus taken out.
The refractory elements used consist of a shelf tile 25, common fire brick 26, an anchoring tile 27, a wedge-shaped anchoring tile 28, and a common fire brick key block 29. The shelf casting 25, as shown most clearly in Fig. 5, is molded with a recess 30 into which the'shelf 1'7 fits and is also provided with a groove 31 to receive the rib 32 on the shelf thus positively lining the refractory on the shelf. At the top of the shelf tile at the back edge, there is provided anupwardly projecting cleat 33 which, as shown most clearly in Fig. 2, serves as a stop against which a common refractory brick 26 rests.
With the shelf block recessed as it is, the shelf itself is fully protected against the heat from the furnace.
The joint made by the cleat 33 and the top of the shelf tile with the common fire brick prevents any air infiltration and furthermore insures the fire brick against becoming dislodged or moved out of position.
The anchor tile 27 are preferably of rhomboidal shape and are also provided at their back edges with the projecting cleat 34 similar to cleat 33 on the shelf tile. In addition, these tile are provided with the grooves 35 having pockets at their inner ends as indicated at 36, see Fig. "I, to receive the tips 37 on the metal stirrup 38. These metal stirrups 38 extend around the angle bars 21 somewhat loosely so that the bars may be removed in the manner hereinbefore described. However, these stirrups serve to effectively anchor the tile 27 against movement outwardly into the furnace and, of course, the metal bar 21 prevents their movement away from the furnace. There is, however, very little likelihood of such movement because of the tipping of the shelves 17 and the refractory supported thereby.
Tile 28 are constructed similarly to tile 27 except that no projecting cleat is found at the back end and also tile 28 is wedge shaped as indicated in the cross section shown in Fig. 2.
The tile 29 is the common key refractory used in furnace work and just serves to close the space between the top of tile 28 and the bottom of tile 25 together with the expansion joint material shown at 39 in Fig. 2. These tile 29 can be removed from within the furnace to permit ready removal of any section of the furnace wall.
Also, by removal of the bar 21, tile 28 can be removed from the back to permit repairs to be made from the back side of the furnace wall.
The construction just described provides for an ideal method of staggering the joints throughout the refractory wall. The vertical joints, as shown clearly by Fig. 1, extend only the depth of a brick at any point without being broken.
The short castings forming the brackets 15 effect a considerable saving in cost and further provide for extreme flexibility under the requirements of furnace size. The only change necessary to which the depth of a section supported by any bracket is the change in the length of the angle bar 21 which is a comparatively minor change.
This structure also permits the use of standard fire brick for about sixty-five per cent of the refractory wall which effects a considerable saving in any furnace installation.
The expansion joint, it is clear, slopes to the outside of the furnace so that the material therein will not crumble and fall into the furnace. This expansion joint also runs all the way through the wall unbroken thus giving a much better seal than is obtained where this joint may be offset or inaccessible to complete filling.
From the above description, it is believed that the construction and advantages of this device will be clear to those skilled in this art.
Having thus described one specific form of my invention, what I claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent is:
1. In a sectionally supported furnace wall, a framework having horizontally running supporting memb'ers arranged in pairs, brackets supported by saidpairs of members, the upper member of each pair receiving inward thrust only from the brackets, and the lower one receiving both load and outward thrust, and
. ing entirely outside the blocks, and stirrups about the bar interlocked with certain of said blocks.
3. In a sectionally supported furnace wall, a
framework, block-carrying brackets. carried framework, block carryin bracketscarried thereby, one bracket vertically spaced from another, a metal bar connecting said brackets, re-
fractory blocks carried by said brackets, saidmetal bar lying entirely outside the blocks, said blocks having most of their horizontal joint surfaces sloping downwardly away from the heated side toward said bar, each section terminating near the top with a wedge-shaped block of such angle that when placed on said sloping surface its top will be substantially level, and a metal retaining stirrup holding said block to said bar.
5. In sectionally supported walls for furnaces, a supporting structure having a plurality of shelf members projecting toward the furnace chamber, and refractory blocks supported on .said shelves, the shelves supporting said refractories with their fire receiving endshigher than the opposite ends thereof, and wedge shaped blocks against the under sides of the shelves.
6. In sectionally supported walls for furnaces, a supporting structure having a plurality of shelf members projecting toward the furnace chamber, and refractory blocks supported on said shelves, the shelves supporting said refractories with their fire receiving ends higher than the opposite ends thereof, and rows of oppositely disposed wedge shaped blocks one against the under side of said shelves and the other directly beneath the first row.
'IL'In aectionally supported walls for furnaces, a supporting structure having a plurality of shelf members projecting toward the furnace chamber, and refractory blocks supported on said shelves, the shelves supporting said refractories with their fire receiving ends higherthan the opposite ends thereof, and rows of oppositely disposedwedgeshapedblocks one againsttheunder side-of said shelves and. the other directly belower row of wedge shaped blocks.
a. In mummy supported walls roifurnaces,
a supporting structure having a plurality of shelf.
members projecting toward the furnace chamber, and refractory blocks supported on said shelves, the shelves supporting said refractories.
with their fire receiving ends higher than the opposite ends thereof, said refractory wall including one or more rows of free refractory blocks and refractory blocks below them having stops at their'ou'ter upper edges for holding said free refractory blocks.
9. In sectionally supported walls for furnaces,
a supporting structure having a plurality of shelf members projecting toward the furnace chamber, and refractory blocks supported onsaid shelves, the shelves supporting said refractories with their fire receiving ends higher than the opposite ends thereof, said refractory wall including one or more rows of free refractory blocks and refractory blocks below them having stops at their outer upper edges for holding said free refractory blocks, said shelves supporting anchoring means to which said stop carrying blocks are secured.
10. In sectionally supported walls for furnaces, a supporting structure having a plurality of shelf members projecting toward the furnace chamber, and refractory blocks supported on said shelves, the shelves supporting said refractories with their fire receiving ends higher than the opposite ends thereof, said shelves being interconnected vertically by anchor bars and metal stirrups connecting said anchor bars to certain of said refractory blocks.
11. As an article of manufacture, a refractory tile having substantially parallel rectangular upper and lowersurfaces and substantially parallel rectangular end faces, the side faces being parallelograms, one of. the first mentioned surfaces being recessed from one end to receive a holding member, and said upper face having an upstanding cleat across the end where the plane of the upper surface makes an obtuse angle with the end.
12. In a sectionally supported wall for furnaces wherein a refractory inner wall made up of refractory block is supported from an outer frame- -work, the combination with a supporting bracket having means for mountingsit on the framework and having a shelf sloping upwardly away from the bracket, of a refractory block thereon recemd on its bottom side to receive the shelf, said block having its top surface sloping substantially paralleltotheshelf,and havinganupstanding shoulder at the end adjacent said bracket and commonfirebricklaidonsaidblockandresting againstsaid summer. I
m mas-aamon.
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Cited By (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20080184632A1 (en) * 2007-02-07 2008-08-07 West Virginia University Thermal protection apparatus and method for ISO containers

Cited By (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20080184632A1 (en) * 2007-02-07 2008-08-07 West Virginia University Thermal protection apparatus and method for ISO containers
US7464504B2 (en) 2007-02-07 2008-12-16 West Virginia University Thermal protection apparatus and method for ISO containers

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