US2081417A - Furnace wall construction - Google Patents

Furnace wall construction Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US2081417A
US2081417A US680716A US68071633A US2081417A US 2081417 A US2081417 A US 2081417A US 680716 A US680716 A US 680716A US 68071633 A US68071633 A US 68071633A US 2081417 A US2081417 A US 2081417A
Authority
US
United States
Prior art keywords
hanger
blocks
bricks
support
block
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Expired - Lifetime
Application number
US680716A
Inventor
Antill Philip Washington
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
AMERICAN ARCH CO
Original Assignee
AMERICAN ARCH CO
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Application filed by AMERICAN ARCH CO filed Critical AMERICAN ARCH CO
Priority to US680716A priority Critical patent/US2081417A/en
Application granted granted Critical
Publication of US2081417A publication Critical patent/US2081417A/en
Anticipated expiration legal-status Critical
Expired - Lifetime legal-status Critical Current

Links

Images

Classifications

    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F27FURNACES; KILNS; OVENS; RETORTS
    • F27DDETAILS OR ACCESSORIES OF FURNACES, KILNS, OVENS, OR RETORTS, IN SO FAR AS THEY ARE OF KINDS OCCURRING IN MORE THAN ONE KIND OF FURNACE
    • F27D1/00Casings; Linings; Walls; Roofs
    • F27D1/0003Linings or walls
    • F27D1/004Linings or walls comprising means for securing bricks

Description

P. W. ANTILL FURNACE WALL CONSTRUCTION Filed July 1'7, 1933 4 Sheets-Sheet l ATTORNEYS P. w. ANTILL 2,081,417
May 25, 1937. v
FURNACE WALL CONSTRUCTION Filed July 17, 1953 4 Sheets-Sheet 2 4 Sheets-Sheet 3 ATTO R N EYS P. w. ANTILL FURNACE WALL CONSTRUCTION Filed July 17, 1933 May 25, 1937.
xiv
May 25, 1937.
P. w. ANTILL FURNACE WALL CONSTRUCTION.
Filed July 17, 1955 4 Sheets-Sheet 4 ATTORN EY$ rlllllllllllll Patented May 25, 1937,
PATENT OFFICE FURNACE WALL CONSTRUCTION Philip Washington Antill, Ridgefleld Park, N. 1.,
assignor' to American Arch Company, New
York, N. Y., acorporation of Delaware Application July 17, .1933, Serial No.680,'116 20' Claims. (01. 1z -1o1) This invention relates to wall construction and more particularly to refractory furnace wall structures, and is especially concerned with metallic supporting, securing and maintaining means or elements, such as hangers, tie bars, gripping elements, and the like, particularly adapted to the support and positioning of belts or zones of blocks of a wall structure or refractory'bricks of a furnace wall of the sectional type, wherein the structure may comprise a plurality of vertically superposed, horizontally extending, individually supported, and separately expansible wall sections, each section of which may be made up, if desired, of a plurality of courses of bricks.
Specifically, the invention relates to metallic supports or hanger means, adapted for'engagement with an exterior supporting structure, such as the outer wall of a double or hollow furnace wall construction, for hanging or supporting the refractory or inner wall, in sections, therefrom; and tie bars or brick engaging. means adapted to cooperate with such hangers for the lateral positloning or retention of the bricks asagalnst dislodgment. Inother words, the present invention relates primarily to the metallic supporting and retaining parts of a sectionally supported wall,
and especially to certain particular forms of brick hangers and tie bars, or similar metallic parts, of several different tyD S,'s0me of which are adapted to be readily interchangeable, that is, capable of substitution one for another, and all of which are adapted for ready replacement, renewal, inspec tion or repair; the present application containing matter divided from, and being a continuation, in part, of my prior filed, but copending, applications, identified as follows: application on Furnace wallconstruction, Serial No. 152,768, filed December 6, 1926, issued Sept. 26, 1933 as Patent No. 1,927,909; application on Furnace walls, Serial No. 170,202, filed February 23,1927,
issuedDecember 19, 1933 as Patent No. 1,939,646;
and application on Refractory furnace walls,
Serial No. 547,047, filed'June 26, 1931, issued September 4,1934, as Patent No. 1,972,838.
In a general way, the primary objects of the invention include: the improvement of hollow furnace walls of the sectional type; the provision of such walls of lessdifliculty of construction and repair, and, at the'same time, greater stability and strength than those heretofore commonly in use; the direct utilization of the v primary strength members ofthe outer or supporting wall portion in the supporting structure for the inner wall; the provision of an improved wall structure capable of ready installation in sections and of easy 'renewal as to the sections thereof and asto the individual parts of each section; provision for proper cooling of the wall and the supporting structure thereof; the provision of novel types of .supporting means including hanger or tie bar 5 means, and more specifically, the further provision of such metallic members arranged to be disposed entirely outside of the refractory wall itself; the improving of sectionally supported walls from the standpoint 01' construction, erection, repair and inspection; andthe accomplishment of the foregoing purposes in large part by improved forms of metallic hangers and tie bars for wall construction.
The nature, objects and advantages of the pres- 5 cut invention may perhaps be more clearly understood after a brief reference to prior art practice. Such prior practice has contemplated'a sectional wall in which each horizontally extending belt or section of thewall was composed of a plurality of laterally adjacent, aligned, vertical tiers of bricks, with the bricks of each tier having slots threaded onto a vertical flange or flanges of an upright bar, which latter had upper and lower outwardly projecting arms ,for support'fromand positioning by an outside structure; in which wall construction the bars ot alternate wall sections had to be laterally offset, relative to each other, so as not to cause interference between the vertical bars of one horizontal wall section and the vertical bars of the next superjacent and subjacent horizontal wall sections. Among the difliculties of such prior practice were the problems of brick replacement and supporting-bar replacement, since the burning out of one brick of a tier, adjacent the lower portion of a section, would necessitate removal from the bar of all the superjacent bricks ofthat' tier; while the replacement ofa bar itself necessarily involved thedisturbance of the entire vertical tierof bricks'carried by such bar. Like- 40 wise, damage tc a brickretaining flange, or to the foot member of a bar (on which the tier was supported) necessitated replacement .of the entire member being made for cooperation with andlateral support against a similar subjacent hanger member; the provision of a special type of divided hanger member, for ease of assembly and repair; the provision 'of interengaging hangers and brick tie bars, particularly by a construction of tie bar which is capable of embracing or removably engaging either a single hanger member or a plurality of them; the interfitting of the hanger members and tie bars in such manner'that some freedom for relative movement, particularly in a vertical direction, is provided, not only to care for expansion and contraction of the refractory wall, but also to provide for the ready replacement of bricks and tie bars, and to make possible the utilization of bricks of different vertical thickness; employment of brick tie bars in such manner as to make the lateral support or positioning of the bricks independent of their vertical support on the feet of the hangers, and the supporting of the said tie bars laterally by means of the hangers and vertically by means of the bricks themselves; the provision of such tie bars arranged to secure or retain a single brick or a plurality of bricks, and either in one row or course of the section or in a plurality of rows or courses; the provision of hanger and tie bar members which cooperate with the bricks in such manner as to permit not only relative adjustment between the sections of the wall but also some freedom for expansion between individual bricks of a section, and some freedom of adjustment or movement between the bricks and the metallic elements; and the construction of the tie bars and hangers in such manner that certain bricks of a section may receive support from a plurality of hangers, or that a plurality of bricks, either laterally or vertically considered, may receive sup port from a single hanger.
By such features of the invention, together with other details of construction which will hereinafter appear, I not only obviate thedisadvantages of the prior art, such as hereinbefore mentioned, but also attain numerous advantages, among which might be mentioned: the possibility of placing the bricks of the several courses of a wall section in alternately staggered arrangement, so as to have broken joints (viewed from the inner face of the wall); thepractical feasibility of having irregular joints between the laterally. abutting faces of adjacent bricks of a course, to facilitate expansion and contraction, while maintaining the wall tight as against ingress of air or egress of gases; the possibility of reducing thenumber of hangers necessary for a given wall area, and tying fewer of the bricks to the hangers for lateral support, since the irregular joints between abutting faces of adjoining blocks may be utilized for lateral support of certain of the blocks.
How the foregoing and other objects and advantages such as may be incident to the invention or as may occur to those skilled in the art are attained, will be evident from the following description, taken in the light of the accompanying drawings, in which drawings:-
Figure 1 is an elevation of a portion of a horizontally extending belt or zone of a vertical,fur-
nace wall or refractory lining, illustrating one embodiment of the improved supportingmeans or hangers and retaining means or tie bars, with the refractory bricks or blocks in supported or retained position; Figure .2 is a plan view taken on th line 22 of Figure 1, more clearly illustrating the metallic parts, making up thelpresentinvention, with the three upper rows of bricks of the section removed; and Figure 3 is afragmentary, somewhat enlarged, view taken approximately on the line 33 of Figure 1, with-certain parts broken away and others shown in section,
in the next superjacent section.
and showing also the interrelation between the lower part of an upper wall section and the upper part of a subjacent wall section, Figures 1 to 3 thus illustrating one general embodiment of the 'tion; and Figure 8 is a view approximately on the line 88 of Figure 7, and showing the relationship of the adjacent wall sections of this embodiment, in a manner similar to the illustration of Figures 3 and v Figures 9, l0 and 11 illustrate a fourth general embodiment of the invention; Figure 9 substantially corresponding to Figure '7, and being taken on the line 9-9 of Figure 10; Figure 10 being a view substantially corresponding to Figure 8, and being taken on the line Ill-40 of Figure 9; and Figure 11 illustrating a half-bar tie member, which may be substituted, in appropriate locations, for the tie members seen in Figures 9 and 10.
The first embodiment of the invention supported therefrom, with an air space 4 between,
the two; the outer wall or wall portion 2 having structural members such as horizontally extending steel beams 26.; although it should be understood that the sectional refractory wall 3 may be supported simply from a. suitable structural work (suclras 2a) per se, if a hollow or double wall arrangement is not required.
Figure 1, which is a view of the refractory wall, from the inside of the furnace, illustrates a portion of a horizontally extending belt or section, which section, in the embodiment shown, comprises a series or course of supporting bricks or base blocks I3, and preferably a plurality of alternate rows or courses composed, respectively, of tied and filler blocks l8, Illa, and of intermediate blocks H; the section being topped off by a course or row of L-shaped blocks l9 adapted to make a vertically sliding joint at 20 with the base blocks I3 of a superjacent wall section, smaller blocks 2| and a sand or other seal 22 being provided in the gap between the L-blocks l9 of a subjacent section and theblocks l8, I8a,
Such an arrangement of blocks in each section, and relative arrangement between the sections, forms a part ings orj hanger members 5, each of which has,
at the top, an outwardly extending head portion the base of the main web "I of the hanger and the lateral bracket-like portions ll, forms a pair of pockets or recesses I2, adapted toreceive and support the base blocks I3, and to retain them in position at each side of the main vertical web Ill. An indentation or other suitable face portion l4 at the back of the foot of each hanger is positioned to bear against a shoulder I5 on the subjacent hanger, for lateral support' and positioning.
, From the foregoing it is clear that a wall section is supported on a series of base blocks l3 carried on the shelf or foot means 9 of a series of hangers 5. The spaces 12, into which the ends of the base blocks I3 fit, and which I may term fpockets, or more broadly recesses, are
preferably formed of such a height, between the bottom surface of the plate or bracket-like portions II and the top surface of the foot or shelf means 9, as to form a relatively snug fit with the ends of the base blocks l3, so that said blocks cannot tilt" downwardly toward the inner side of the furnace under the weight of the superimposed bricks of the section. In other words, the
base blocks 13 (as best seen in Figure '3) are maintained by the plates 9 and H, as against tilting under, the weight of the superimposed blocks which are carried by the base blocks.
Thus the blocks of a section receive proper vertical support, in a level position. v
For the retention of the tied or secured blocks It; as against lateral displacement, I provide tie members 23, 24, each of which has a pair of depending lugs 25 engaging sockets or verticalholes 26 in the ears 2'! of. the said bricks l8. The tie members or bars 23, which are alternated, vertically, with the ties 24, are of such a length as to engage the lateral flanges l6 of adjacent hangers 5, and the shorter tie bars 24 are kept in their proper position (with the bricks which they engage) and supported as against lateral displacement, by the vertical rods 28, each'of which rods extends through one vertical series of the alternating tie members 23, 24, and rests at the bot tom upon one of the blocks l3.
Blocks I811, not so tied, are
positioned in pairs between pairs of tiedblocks l8, and secured as against lateral displacement by means of the 1F regular joints between the abutting faces of laterally adjacent blocks, for example by means of the recesses 29 and the shoulders 30. Mating faces of each pair of blocks may also be-recessed as at 3|, for the reception of insulating material, such as asbestos or the like.
The second embodiment of the invention In the second form of the invention, which involves advantages similar to the first, I further simplify the metallic supporting and retaining elements, while atthe same time reducing the number of difierent parts employed as well as reducing the total number of tie bar elements required for a given wall area. As before, the brick work may takevarlous forms, but for purposes of'illustration, I have shown a refractory.
' construction in-Figure 5 similar tothat before which leave upstanding ribs 33, tending to protogether form one tie. bar) to slidably engage the discussed, and as itis not per sea part of the present invention it need not here be further described, j
The hanger members 5a are in general similar to hangers 5 in the first form, but I. provide the foot or shelf means 19a thereof with grooves or slots 32 extending longitudinally of the wall, 30 vide a more stable-support for the base blocks l3, which may have some irregularity or warping in their construction. Alternatively, the grooves 32 may be utilized for" asupporting metallic base strip for the base blocks l3, as will be later described in connection with the third embodiment of the invention. 1
In place of the elements 23, 24 and 28 for tyingthe bricks (as in Figures 1 to'3) I employ a single form of element 23a (illustrated in Figure 6). This element instead of being located between a pair of hanger bars, straddles or embraces the outer edge of the hanger, and preferably has recesses 34 cut in the two bar portions 35, 35 (which main vertical web I!) of the hanger. The two bar portions 35 are joined together, and in fact may be cast integral with two upstanding webs 36.
.The single tying unit, thus formed, has two lugs, or pins 31 extending upwardly and two exv tending downwardly, and the bar unit as a whole is curved or bent, approximately into the shape ofv a V, and the lugs are mounted onthe forwardly From the foregoing it is clear that my improved also bf material and novel advantage in providing for the greatest ease and the lowest cost in initial installation, repair, inspection, and replacement, in assuring theadequate shieldingof the metallic parts 'fromthe furnace heat, in providing unusually clear and unobstructed room. for circulation of around the metallic parts for cooling them and for preheating the air, and in extending arms of the V, in position to be inter engaged with the aperture 25a of. the tied bricks.
' The third embodiment of the invention Zn this form of the invention, as seen in Figures 1 and 8, the refractories and the outer or supporting wall structure may be similar to those heretofore shown, since these do not per 'se form part of the present invention, but for the sake of illustrating the adaptability V of the various hangers and tie bars, I have disclosed a modified type of tied block l8b; also modifications in the L-blocks [9a, cap blocks 2 la and seal 22a and 22b. I have also illustrated a different shapeofbase block I 3a, although it should be understood that base blocks similar to those hereinbefore described may be employed.
The hanger members 5b may, as shown, cooperate with a different form of supporting beam 2b, and, in general, the upper ends of these "'hangers"are similar to those hereinbefore dewith pockets or recesses [2a of a modified shape and differently located, as compared with those heretofore discussed. In this form of hanger, the foot 9b, instead of extending forwardly into the wall, terminates at the rear face of the block [9a, and it is joined to the upper plate H by a rear wall 38, instead of by an extension 'of the main web (as at H] in the prior constructions). In the recess 32a I may place a supporting metallic strip 39, which may extend straight through for support on several hangers. Thus the base block l3a may run straight through, from one side of the hanger to the other, or a series of small base blocks may be used, since some of them may receive part of their support from the metal shelves or strips 39.
An extremely simple bent tie bar 2317 may be used with this construction, straddling the rear of flange ID of the hanger, and having only two lugs, which may be in the form of downwardly bent arms 40, for engagement with the bricks.
In this type of construction, the rear wall 38 of the socket of one hanger abuts against the shoulder l5 of the next hanger, for positioning and for support transversely of the wall. Although the metallic parts of'this form of the invention may be made to be interchangeable with parts of the previously described embodiments, this form has. an added advantage over the prior forms in that the full normal thickness of the refractory furnace wall is interposed, at all points, between the inner face of the wall and the metallic parts. Thus no metallic part of the supporting and retaining structure is extended into the refractory wall itself, and no such parts are closer to the inside of the furnace than the full ,thickness of the refractory bricks.
The fourth embodiment of the invention The metallic structures of the fourth embodiment, shown in Figures 9 to 11, although of a more built up nature, and thus more readily facilitating replacement of parts, are just as stable in their support and securing of the refractories, and are equally adaptable to the various refractory arrangements. The refractories shown in these' views are similar to those illustrated in association with the third form, and need not here be further described.
The hangers, indicated generally at 50, are each made in two pieces, to wit: a bracket part 4| and a vertical bar part 42. The bracket element 4| is generally triangulated in nature, not only for strength but for other'purposes, as hereinafter brought out.
The bracket 4| has a rear hook 61b for engagement with a beam 26, and. a front hook or recess 43, preferably flanged at 44, for wedgingly guiding and receiving the lateral lugs or abutments 45 on the main web IU of the hanger bar 42. The element 4! is also preferably lightened by an aperture 46, and is provided with a front flange 4! and a top flange or shelf means 48. The front flange serves to position and laterally support the rear wall 38 of the foot portion of a superjacent hanger; and the top flange 48 serves to position walls.
and support the dividing partitions or bafiles 49, which serve to separate the air space 4a into a series of air passages, between the outer and inner 1 Each hanger bar 42, when supported by its racket portion 4|, serves to carry one or more bricks 13a of a section, by means of a socket-like pocket or recess l2b, which 'is formed by the upper and lower plates l I and 9b, the rear wall 38,
embrace the flanging IGa. of the hanger.
and the dividing web or downward extension Illa of the main/hanger web l0. Although the main web may thus be carried down, as indicated at Illa in Figure 10, and connected integrally with the bottom shelf or foot 9b, the lateral flanges i611 of the hanger terminate (as in the prior constructions) just above the base block I311.
The tie bars 50, of this construction, instead of being bent to embrace the outside edge of the main web I0, are substantially straight and each such bar has an upstanding stiffening web 5| which may lie against the inner side of the hanger, and hook-like portions or webs 52 which The tie bar may thus be slipped over the end of the hanger member, with the downwardly projecting tie bar lugs 53 extending into the apertures 54 of the bricks.
For use adjacent corners of the furnace, or in any other place where an individual tie bar for a single brick is desired, I may cut off such a bar, or provide a single ended bar, such as shown in Figure 11. It will readily be seen that with either the single or double ended construction, removal of a tied brick may be accomplished by simply slipping the tie bar upwardly along the hanger flanges until the lug 53 is clear ofthe brick aperture, and then pulling or knockin the brick out of the wall; it being possible to do this without disturbing the other bricks, if desired, since the staggered arrangement of bricks assures a support for those bricks which surrounda brick that is being replaced.
From all of the foregoing it will now be evident that the invention involved in the various forms of my metallic hanger members and tie bars goes far toward removing the disadvantages and problems of the prior art and attains all of the objects and advantages hereinbefore stated. It will furthermore be seen that the several forms of supporting hangers may be used with various arrangements of refractories, and so also may the various forms of tie bars; and. that the several different forms of tie bar mechanism may be employed with any one' of the types of hanger members, the T-shaped cross sectional form of the hangers being well adapted to the alignin and outside lateral-support of the refractories, as well as for cooperation with either the spanning or the embracing or the gripping type of tie bar. In addition, these metallic parts may be chiefly made, as integral castings, of iron, steel, or other metal.
I 1. For a sectionally-supported multi-block wall, a metallic hanger member comprising a main body part with means formed to secure the same on a support, and a plurality of vertically spacedapart block engaging portions, thelower of said portions being positioned to give vertical support to a block and the upper of said portions being extended laterally from the main body part to overlie and engage an upper. portion of the same block whereby to hold the block on said lower portion as against tilting of the block.
2. For a sectionally-supported multi-block wall, a metallic hanger member comprising a vertically elongated main body portion, means adjacent the upper end thereof formed to hangingly engage a support, and means adjacent the lower end thereof formed to provide a laterally open recess for embracingly engaging a wall block.
3. For a sectionally-supported multi-block wall,
a metallic hanger member comprising a vertically elongated main body portion, means adjacent the a metallic supporting lateral support therefrom.
4. For a sectionally-supported multi-block wall, a metallic hanger member comprising a vertically elongated main body portion, means adjacent the upperend thereof formed to hangingly engage a support, meansadjacent the lower end thereof formed to support a wall block, and hanger positioning means adjacent the upper end thereof formed as an abutment to. engage and laterally support a lower portion of a similar superjacent hanger.
5. For a sectionally-supported multi-block wall, member for blocks of a section comprising a body portion with means for securing the same to a support, and upper and lower block engaging portions positioned in spaced-apart relation and" extending laterally to form recess means therebetween for receiving portions of a plurality of adjacent blocks of a horizontal course, the said l wer portion lying approximately horizontally to provide vertical support. for such blocks and the said upper por-. tion being positioned to overlie an upper face of such blocks whereby to hold them in seated position on said lower portion.
6. For a sectionally-supported multi-block wall,
a metallic supporting member for blocks of a.
section comprising a body portion with means for securing the same to a support, and upper and lower block engaging portions positioned in spaced apart relation and extendinglaterally to' form recess means therebetween for receiving portions of a plurality of adjacent blocks of a horizontal course, the said lower portion lying approximately horizontally to provide vertical 1 support for such blocks and the said upper portion being positioned to overlie an upper face of such blocks whereby to hold them in seated position on said lower portion, and the main body portion being also elongated in a vertical direction with a substantially flat face adapted to abut and positionsuperposed courses of blocks when placed on said first mentioned course.
'7. A metallic hanger member of the character described, comprising a vertically elongated main body portion, of substantially T-shapedcross section, means adjacent thetop thereof formed to hanglngly engage a support, and a plurality of horizontally extending block engaging plate means formed thereon at vertically spaced-apart locations.
8. A hanger for the support of bricks of a refractory wall having suspension means at its upper end, brick supporting means at its' lower end, and means for engaging another hanger.
9. For asectionally-supported multi-block wall,
a divided hanger member, one part of which comprises a substantially vertically elongated bar member and the adjoining part of which comprises a bracket or frame member, the first mentioned part having a readily separable hanging connectionfrom the second mentioned part, and
the second mentioned part having means of movable interlocking fit with a supporting structure.
10. For a sectionally-supported multi-block wall, a divided hanger member, one part of which prising a pair of bar-like tioned part having a readily separable hanging connection from the second mentioned part and having means adjacent the bottom for supporting a wall block, and the second mentioned part having means of movable interlocking fit with a supporting/structure.
11. For a renewable wall structure, a metallic hanger member having means whereby it may be supported in upright position adjacent to the outer face of a multi-block Wall, said member having a laterally open socket formed with upper and lower elements adapted to receive and engage a portion of a wall block for gripping support thereof.
12. For. a. sectionally-supported multi-block wall, a metallic hanger member comprising a vertically elongated main body portion, means adjacent the upper end thereof formed to hangingly engage a support, shelf-like means adjacent the lower end thereof and formed to support a block of the wall, and alrecess or grooving in such shelf a means.
13. For a multi-brick wall of the type which is .sectionally supported, by vertical hangers or the like, a brick retaining tie bar comprising a substantially horizontally elongated metallic body portion with means of vertically sliding engagement with a hanger and having vertically extending brick-engaging lug means longitudinally offset from said means of hanger engagement.
14. A horizontal tie bar, for bricks of furnace wall-construction, having a pair of'verticallyextending brick-engaging lugs and its end portions extended there-beyond with means for engagement with a wall-supporting member.
15. A tie member for furnace wall blocks, comportions having web means between them,- and block-engaging lug means on said bar portions, said portions being bent in a horizontal plane. to engage part of a vertically-extending wall supportingstruct'ure.
16. A tie-member, for laterally securing a furnace wall structure to-a vertically extending supporting structure, comprising a substantially elongated body portion, which is relatively narrow in its overall transverse dimension, having three elements for vertically sliding engagement with-associated structures, a pair of said elements being located adjacent the ends of the body, and one intermediate the ends, whereby the pair may engage one of said structures, and the intermediate one may engage the other structure, for lateral interlock of the two structures.
17. For sectional furnace wall construction having vertically spaced horizontally extending "supmember, the said two parts having interlocking sockets, and the first of said two parts having adjacent the base a brick receiving socket.
18. For sectional furnace wall construction having vertically spaced horizontally extending supporting beams, av divided hanger member, one part of which is a substantially vertical elongated bar member, and the adjoining part of which is a substantially triangular frame member, the said two parts having interlocking sockets, the said triangular part having an upper and outer point of triangulation provided with a support engaging element for co-operation with a supporting beam.
19. A hanger or bracket,- for the support of blocks of a refractory wall,-having means formed thereon to hangingly engage a support and having means formed thereon to provide a. laterally open recess or pocket shaped to receive a portion of a wall block, said pocket having superimposed faces with the bottom block-supporting face located adjacent the level of the bottom of the pocket opening.
20. A metallic wall-brick supporting bracket for a sectionally supported refractory well, said bracket having support means whereby it may be carried by a member external to the refractory wall and having a plurality of superposed plate-like elements extending laterally to underlie and overlie a block of said wall for effecting a rigid support of such block and any superjacent blocks which may be carried thereon.
\ PHILIP WASHINGTON ANTILL.
US680716A 1933-07-17 1933-07-17 Furnace wall construction Expired - Lifetime US2081417A (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US680716A US2081417A (en) 1933-07-17 1933-07-17 Furnace wall construction

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US680716A US2081417A (en) 1933-07-17 1933-07-17 Furnace wall construction

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US2081417A true US2081417A (en) 1937-05-25

Family

ID=24732227

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US680716A Expired - Lifetime US2081417A (en) 1933-07-17 1933-07-17 Furnace wall construction

Country Status (1)

Country Link
US (1) US2081417A (en)

Cited By (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2820349A (en) * 1953-09-14 1958-01-21 Alva N Cooper Wall elements
US2868009A (en) * 1954-11-26 1959-01-13 Laclede Christy Company Suspended furnace wall construction
US4522003A (en) * 1982-04-19 1985-06-11 Manten Co., Ltd. Tiles and arrangement for setting tiles
US20040040236A1 (en) * 2002-08-27 2004-03-04 James Adams Dual function connector
US20160178281A1 (en) * 2013-09-20 2016-06-23 Refractory Intellectual Property Gmbh & Co. Kg Refractory ceramic lining brick and corresponding refractory ceramic lining

Cited By (6)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2820349A (en) * 1953-09-14 1958-01-21 Alva N Cooper Wall elements
US2868009A (en) * 1954-11-26 1959-01-13 Laclede Christy Company Suspended furnace wall construction
US4522003A (en) * 1982-04-19 1985-06-11 Manten Co., Ltd. Tiles and arrangement for setting tiles
US20040040236A1 (en) * 2002-08-27 2004-03-04 James Adams Dual function connector
US20160178281A1 (en) * 2013-09-20 2016-06-23 Refractory Intellectual Property Gmbh & Co. Kg Refractory ceramic lining brick and corresponding refractory ceramic lining
US10281150B2 (en) * 2013-09-20 2019-05-07 Refractory Intellectual Property Gmbh & Co. Kg Refractory ceramic lining brick and corresponding refractory ceramic lining

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US3132447A (en) Multiple support refractory arch and wall construction
US2369100A (en) Furnace wall
US2341971A (en) Sectionally supported wall
US2081417A (en) Furnace wall construction
US2281951A (en) Furnace wall
US2446766A (en) Furnace arch or roof construction
JP4921963B2 (en) Furnace ceiling and support member for furnace ceiling
US2553393A (en) Furnace wall structure
US2118641A (en) Kiln furniture
US2585552A (en) Refractory curtain
US2150459A (en) Insulating refractory wall
US2660050A (en) Sectionally supported furnace wall
US3328014A (en) Veneer furnace wall construction
US2127842A (en) Furnace construction
US1443487A (en) Furnace arch for boilers
US3313254A (en) Furnace roofs
US1806809A (en) lan yon
US2143280A (en) Suspended furnace wall
US2186577A (en) Furnace wall structure
US2818035A (en) Unit expansion furnace walls
US1626982A (en) Fire-arch structure
US2294788A (en) Furnace wall construction
US1972838A (en) Refractory furnace wall
US1760121A (en) Refractory arch construction
US1506458A (en) Furnace arch for boilers