US1922851A - Self-loading dump-body - Google Patents

Self-loading dump-body Download PDF

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US1922851A
US1922851A US608405A US60840532A US1922851A US 1922851 A US1922851 A US 1922851A US 608405 A US608405 A US 608405A US 60840532 A US60840532 A US 60840532A US 1922851 A US1922851 A US 1922851A
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loader
arm
latch
hoist
dump
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US608405A
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William S Howard
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B Nicoll & Company Inc
Nicoll & Co Inc B
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Nicoll & Co Inc B
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    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B60VEHICLES IN GENERAL
    • B60PVEHICLES ADAPTED FOR LOAD TRANSPORTATION OR TO TRANSPORT, TO CARRY, OR TO COMPRISE SPECIAL LOADS OR OBJECTS
    • B60P1/00Vehicles predominantly for transporting loads and modified to facilitate loading, consolidating the load, or unloading
    • B60P1/04Vehicles predominantly for transporting loads and modified to facilitate loading, consolidating the load, or unloading with a tipping movement of load-transporting element
    • B60P1/06Vehicles predominantly for transporting loads and modified to facilitate loading, consolidating the load, or unloading with a tipping movement of load-transporting element actuated by mechanical gearing only
    • B60P1/14Vehicles predominantly for transporting loads and modified to facilitate loading, consolidating the load, or unloading with a tipping movement of load-transporting element actuated by mechanical gearing only with cables, chains, or the like

Definitions

  • This invention relates to devices for handling material, and particularly to material-transporting dump-bodies, such as are used on automobile trucks, having mechanical means for loading material into the body.
  • Afurther object of the invention is to provide such a dump-body with control means, operated by a single lever in one direction or the other, to govern the application of the power to operate the loading means or to dump the body.
  • a further object of the invention is toprovide a material-holding body with means for loading the body and means for dumping the body, and to provide a common power mechanism which 5 is always connected with both the dumping and loading means, and may be made to operate these means selectively by the operation or release 01 certain locking mechanism.
  • Fig. 1 is a fragmentary diagrammatic side elevation showing the invention applied to an automobile truck
  • Fig. 2 is a view of the structure shown in Fig. 1. with the loader in normal travelling position;
  • Fig. 3 is a view of the structure shown in Fig. 1, when the body is in dumping position;
  • Fig. 4 is a section on the line 4-4 of Fig. 2;
  • Fig. 5 is a section on the line 5-5 of Fig. 1;
  • Fig. 6 is a section on the line 6-8 of Fig. 1;
  • Fig. 7 is a section on the line 7-7 of Fig. 1.
  • the truck shown in Fig. 1 is provided with a chassis 11.
  • a dump-body 12 is mounted on a frame 13, which is pivotally mounted on a shaft 14.
  • This shaft 14 is carried by bearings on the chassis 11 as illustrated in Fig. 5.
  • the frame 13 is provided with cross braces 17.
  • a loader 15 is pivotally mounted at 16 on an arm 18, which extends forward and is pivotally connected with the dump-body 12 by means of a shaft 20.
  • the holder 15 is shown as a bucket having a strap 22 extending around its lower portion, to provide reinforcement, but any suitable material-holding device may be substituted for the loader bucket 15.
  • a similar arm 18 connects the opposite side of the bucket with the dump-body, but since the construction is the same on both sides of the truck, the illustration of one side only is necessary.
  • a stop 24 is secured to each side of the loader bucket 15.
  • a spring 26 is connected at 28 to the arm 18, and is connected at its other end to a bracket 30, which is secured on the side of the loader bucket 15. The spring 26 holds the loader bucket in position so that the stop 24 rests against the arm 18, as shown in Fig. 1, which limits fur- 100 ther contraction of the spring. When the loader is in the position shown in Fig. 1, it is in a convenient position for receiving material from receptacles handled by men standing on the street.
  • An arm 19 is pivotally mounted on the shaft 105 20. This arm 19 is behind the arm 18 in Fig. l, but is clearly shown in Figs. 2, 3 and 5. A similar arm 19 is provided on the opposite side of the truck.
  • An angle member 21 is secured to each arm 19, and each angle member 21 extends under the corresponding arm 18, so that upward movement of the arms 19 will cause the adjacent arms 18 to move in the same manner. However, the arms 18 may remain in raised position after the arms 19 are lowered, but as long as the angle members 21 are supporting the arms 18, the arms 18 will move downwardly with the arms 19.
  • a bracket 32 is secured to each arm 19, and a hoist cable 34 is connected with each bracket 32 for raising the arms 19.
  • brackets 35 which extend under the arms 19 and limit the downward travel of these arms. With the parts in the positions shown in Figs. 1 and 5, each arm 19 is supported by one of the brackets 35, and each arm 18 is supported by one of the angle members 21.
  • the dump-body 12 is provided with a door 36, which is hinged to the body at 38 which is normally held locked in closed position by a latch 40.
  • a door 36 which is hinged to the body at 38 which is normally held locked in closed position by a latch 40.
  • the opening in the top of the body 12 through which material is loaded into the body is covered by a door 42, which is hinged to the body at 44.
  • the door 42 is operated by links 46 and 48, which are pivoted together at 50.
  • the link 46 is pivota'lly connected at 52 with the door 42, and the link 48 is pivotally connected at 54 with the body 12. Similar links 46 and 48 are connected at the other side of the truck with the door 42.
  • the links 46 and 48 are mounted in position so that the arm 18 will strike a roller 51 carried by the pivotal connection 50 when the loader rises.
  • the links 46 and 48 will be moved into the position shown by dotted lines, and the door 42 will be opened so that the loader may deposit material through the opening in the top. of the body.
  • An abutment 56 is secured to the upper portion of the body 12, and a roller 58 contacts with this abutment to cause the loader bucket 15 to dump.
  • the roller 58 is mounted on the forward end of the loader bucket 15, so that when the roller 58 encounters the abutment 56, the loader bucket 15 will rotate about the pivotal connection 16 and shift into an inclined position to discharge the contents of the loader bucket into the body.
  • the spring 26 will return the loader bucket 15 to normal position as the roller 58 moves away from the abutment 56.
  • a similar abutment 56 is provided on the other side of the body and cooperates with a similar roller 58 on the other end of the bucket.
  • any suitable hoist mechanism may be provided for moving the dump-body 12 into an inclined dumping position, such as shown in Fig. 3.
  • the hoist mechanism is of the hydraulic type, but mechanical, pneumatic, electrical, or other mechanism may be used.
  • a cylinder 60 is secured to the chassis 11, and a plunger 62 is slidably mounted in the cylinder 60.
  • a sheave 64 is rotatably mounted on one end of a shaft 66, which is carried by the plunger 62. 'A similar sheave 64 is mounted on the other end of the shaft 66.
  • a bracket 68 is secured to the forward end of the dump-body 12, and a sheave 70 is rotatably mounted on the bracket 68.
  • a similar bracket and sheave are provided on the other side of the truck body.
  • a sheave 72 is rotatably mounted on the forward upper portion of the body.
  • the cable 34 is connected with the chassis at 75, and passes over the sheave 64, thence downwardly and around the sheave 70, thence upwardly and over the sheave 72, and thence to the bracket 32 on the arm 19, with which it is connected. It will be understood that the sheaves and cable connections on the other side of the body are identical.
  • the loader bucket 15 occupies the position shown in Fig. 2.
  • the loader bucket 15 is held in this position by a latch 78, which engages with a lug on the arm 18 to prevent the arm from returning to its lowered position, shown in Fig. 1.
  • the latch 78 is pivotally mounted at 80 on the body 12. In the preferred embodiment of the invention this latch 78 is mounted on the inside of the body 12, and a slot 82 is provided through which the end of the latch extends to engage the lug on the arm 18. The slot 82 limits the travel of the latch 78. When the latch 78 is at the upper end of the slot 82, the lug on the arm 18 will pass clear of the latch. When the latch 78 is at the lower end of the slot 82, a lug 84 (see Fig. 4), which is secured to the arm 18, will engage the latch 78 and prevent the loader bucket 15 and arm 18 from returning to lowered position.
  • the engaging end of the latch '78 is tapered, as shown in Fig. 1, in the same manner as an ordinary door latch, and if the lug 84 engages the latch 78 while the loader bucket 15 and arm 18 are moving upwardly, the latch will ratchet over the lug.
  • the latch 78 is operated by a'. lever 86, which is connected with a rod 88.
  • the rod 88 extends forwardly through the front wall of the dump-body 12, and connects with a crank arm 90, which is secured to a rock-shaft 92 (see Fig. 7).
  • the rock-shaft 92 is rotatably mounted in brackets 94, which are secured to the outside of the front wall of the body 12.
  • the rock-shaft 92 operates similar latch mechanism on both sides of the truck.
  • the rock-shaft 92 is operated by a handle 96.
  • a spring 98 is connected with the handle 96, at a point above the axis of the rock-shaft 92.
  • the spring 98 is connected at its lower end with the body 12, at a point so that the center line of the spring 98 will cross the axis of the rock-shaft 92 when the handle 96 is operated to move the latch 78 from one end to the other of the slot 82.
  • This action of the spring 98 in throwing over center causes the spring to hold the handle 96 in the position occupied when the latch 78 is set to clear the lug 84, or in the position occupied when the latch 78 is set in position to hold the loader bucket 15 and arm 18 in the raised position shown in Fig. 2.
  • Locking means are provided to hold the body 12 against movement toward dumping position.
  • This locking means includes hooks 100, which are secured to a rock-shaft 102, as shown in Fig. 6.
  • the hooks 100 engage a cross-bar 104,
  • the rockshaft 102 is rotatably mounted in bearings 106, which are attached to the frame 13, on which the body 12 is carried.
  • IA crank arm 108 is mounted on each end of the rock-shaft 102 for rotation with the rock-shaft.
  • a handle 110 is secured to the rock-shaft 102, and this handle -110 is operated to rotate the rock-shaft 102 when the operator wishes to release the hooks 100 from the cross-bar 104' so that the body 12 may be hoisted to dumping position.
  • the latch 40 which holdsthe door 36 against opening, operates in a slot in a bracket 112.
  • a similar latch 40 is provided at the other side of the door 36.
  • Each of these latches 40 is connected with one of thecrank arms 108 by a link 114.
  • the lower side of each latch 40 is formed with a sloping surface. As each latch moves rearwardly, the sloping lower face passes across the lower end of the slot in the member 112, which supports the latches 40. The rearward ends of the latches 40 will therefore move down. This operation of the latches 40 is clearly illustrated by comparing Figs. 2 and 3 of the drawing.
  • Locking means are provided for preventing operation of the loader by holding the arms 19 against operation.
  • This locking means includes hooks 116, each of which is secured to a sleeve 117.
  • the sleeves 117 are rotatably mounted on the shaft 14.
  • Each of the hooks 116 is provided with a recessed face so that the hook can move into a position with the upper side of the recess over one of the angle members 21, and the lower side of the recess under the adjacent bracket 35.
  • the hook 116 is shown in such a position in Fig. 8, and when the hook 116 is in this position the angle member 21 and bracket 35 are hooked together so that it is not possible for the arm 19 to rise.
  • Each hook 116 is operated through a connecting link 118, which connects the latch 40 with a crank arm 120 secured to the sleeve 11! (Figs. 1 and 5).
  • the hook 116 is disengaged from the angle member 21, and the arm 19 is free to rise.
  • the connecting link 118 will hold the hook 116 in position to prevent the angle member 21 and arm 19 from rising.
  • the handle 1 10 operates the hooks 100 and 116 and the latch 40, so that, when the handle 110 is in one position, the hook 116 will lock the body against movement toward dumping position and the latch 40 willprevent the door 38 from opening, but the hook 116 will not prevent operation of the loader.
  • the hook 100 When the handle '110 is shifted into another position, the hook 100 will be disengaged from the cross-bai- 104, and the latch 40 will be released, so that the body may be dumped, but the hook 116 will lock the loader against operation. It is thus impossible to operate the loading and dumping means simultaneously, and the locking means are interconnected so that movement of either into locking position releases the other, and'vice-versa.
  • the truck is driven to the point of loading, with the parts in the position shown in Fig. 2.
  • the hoist is then operated to move the arm 19 upward until the angle member 21 of the arm 19 engages under the arm 18 and lifts the weight of the loading means from the latch 78.
  • the handle 96 is then operated to move the latch 78 into the upper end of the slot 82.
  • the hoist is then lowered and the loader bucket 15, together with the arms 18 and 19 by which it is operated, move downwardly by gravity until the arms 18 and 19 contact with the brackets 35. These brackets prevent further downward movement and the parts are supported in the positions shown in Fig. 1.
  • the loader bucket 15 is now filled with material by receptacles handled by men standing on the street, or in any other suitable manner.
  • the hoist is operated to raise the loader bucket into the position shown by dotted lines in Fig. 1. Since the hook 100 is engaged with the cross-bar 104, the sheave 70 can not move upward, and operation of the hoist mechanism can only move the hoist cable 34 to operate the arms 19 and 18, and the loader bucket 15.
  • the handle 96 is shifted to move the latch 78 into the lower end of the slot 82.
  • the hoist is now lowered, and the arm 19 will move into the position shown in Fig. 2, but the latch '78 will engage with the lug on the arm 18 and prevent the arm 18 and the loader bucket 15 from moving down with the arm 19.
  • the loader bucket 15 is thus held in the position shown in Fig. 2, and the truck is ready to travel.
  • the handle 110 When the truck reaches its destination where the material in the body is to be dumped, the handle 110 is shifted to disengage the hook 100 from the cross-bar 104 and to disengage the latch 40 from the bar 36. This operation of. the hook 100 and latch 40 will operate the connecting link 118 and move the hook 116 into position to hook the arm 19 to the frame bracket 35 so that the loading means are locked against operation in the manner previously described.
  • the hoist is now operated, and since the arm 19 and bracket 32 can not move, the hoist cable 34 is fixed at both ends and the sheave 70 will be raised so that the body 12 is moved into an inclined dumping position, as shown in Fig. 3.
  • the hoist will be lowered, the body returning to its normal position by gravity.
  • this invention provides a self-loading dump truck, in which the same power mechanism is used forthe-dual purpose of operating the loading means or for dumping the truck body.
  • a hydraulic hoist is shown for supplying power, but obviously mechanical, pneumatic, electric or other power means may be substituted, and other changesandmodificationsmaybemadein the operating mechanism without departing from the spirit of the invention as set forth in the appended claims.
  • a dump truck including a chassis; a dump body pivotally mounted on the chassis; a loader mounted on the body and operatable to raise ma terialtothetopofthebodvanddischargesaid material into the body; releasable locking means to prevent movement of the body toward dumping or to prevent operation of the loader; a hoist mounted on the chassis; and a flexible tension member connecting the hoist to both 7 the body and the loader, so that the hoist will operate either the body or the loader, whichever is not locked against operation.
  • a dump truck including a chassis; a dump body pivotally mounted on the chassis; a loader mounted on the body and operatable to raise materialtothetopof thebodyanddischarge said material into the body; means for raising the body to an inclined dumping position; means for raising the loader; a hoist mounted on the chamis; a sheave on one of the raising means; a
  • A'dump truck including a chassis; a dump body pivotally mounted on the chassis adjacent the rear end of the body; a sheave rotatably mounted on the forward end of the body; a loader on the body; support means on which the loader is operatable to raise a load into position ior discharge into the body; releasable locln'ng means to prevent movement of the body toward dumping position and to prevent operahon of the loader; a hoist mounted on the chassis; and a flexible tension member extending from the hoist, around the sheave on the body, and then to the loader, so that operation of the hoist will dump the body or operate the loader, depending on the position of the locking means.
  • a dump truck including a chassis; a dumpbody pivotally mounted on the chassis adjacent the rear end ofthe body; a sheave rotatably mounted on the forward end of the body; a
  • loader on the means on which the loader is operatable to raise a load into position for discharge into the body releasable locking means for preventing movement of the body toward dumping position; other releasable locking means for preventing operation of the loader; a. hoist mounted on the chassis; a flexible cable extending from the hoist, around the sheave on the body, and then to the loader, so that operation of the hoist will dump the body or operate the loader, depending on which of the locking means is in locking position; and connectiing means between the locking means for releasing each "of the locking means when the other is moved into locking position.
  • a dump truck comprising in combination, a chassis, a body mounted on the chassis and tiltable about an axis near the rear end of the chassis, a loader at the rear end of the body, arms supporting said loader and pivoted to the sides of the body near the front end thereof, auxiliary arms pivoted to the sides of the body and extending rearwardly, elements on said auxiliary arms which lie beneath said loader arms for raising them, sheaves on the sides of the body near the top and near the front end thereof, sheaves on the sides of the body at the lower front corners thereof, a power hoist, flexible tension members passing over said upper sheaves and lower sheaves, said flexible members being attached at one end to the rear ends of the auxiliary arms and at the other end being operatively connected to said power hoist, and means for selectively locking said auxiliary arms to the body or releasing them whereby either the body or the arms and loader may be operated.
  • a dump truck comprising in combination, a chassis, a tiltable body mounted thereon, a loader for said body mounted for vertical movement irom a point near the grozmd where it is charged to a point above the body where it is discharged, a meave under the free end ofsaid body, a flexihie tension member passing under said sheave and adapted to support and raise said body through said sheave when required, a power hoist, operative connections between said power hoist and said loader and between the hoist and said flexible tension member for raising said body, and means for selectively placing the eiiective action of said hoist upon either said body or said loader, the existence or lack of relative movement between said flexible tension member and said bodysupporting sheave determining which part will be raised.

Description

W. S. HOWARD SELF LOADING DUMP BODY Filed April 30 1932 4 Sheets-Sheet l Aug. 15, 1933. w s, HOWARD SELF LOADING DUMP BODY Filed April 50, 1932 4 Sheets-Sheet 3 Q ATTOR Y Au 15, 1933. S A D 1,922,851 SELF LQADING DUMP 150m Filed April 30, 1952 4 Sheets-Sheet 4 INVENT R EEBYM 5 ATTORNEY Patented Aug. 15, 1933 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE SELF-LOADING DUMP-BODY Application April 30, 1932. Serial No. 608.405
6 Claims.
This invention relates to devices for handling material, and particularly to material-transporting dump-bodies, such as are used on automobile trucks, having mechanical means for loading material into the body.
In the collection of ashes, garbage, refuse and various other kinds of material, it is desirable to use trucks or trailers having covered bodies. Covers over the body of the truck cause inconvenience, however, owing to the repeated opening and closing whichis required when collecting material in house to house service. As a result of this inconvenience, the covers are generally left open and not used, with the result that 5 dust from ashes blows over the street, and papers from refuse-collection trucks are often scattered along the entire route of the truck. particularly in windy weather. Since these collection trucks are almost always loaded from receptacles at the 0 street level, much time and effort are expended in manually hoisting the receptacles to the top of the truck bodies before their contents can be dumped into the body.- It is highly desirable to provide a material-transporting body with a cover, and with mechanical loading means, into which the material may be loaded at street level and hoisted into the body. the cover being lifted automatically as the loader moves into position to discharge the material into the body. Trucks provided with such bodies have been built, but
they have been complicated and therefore expensive. The provision of mechanical loading means, in particular, has added to the cost of such trucks, and for this reason loaders on collection trucks have not come into wide use. A serious other fixed or movable support. Afurther object of the invention is to provide such a dump-body with control means, operated by a single lever in one direction or the other, to govern the application of the power to operate the loading means or to dump the body.
A further object of the invention is toprovide a material-holding body with means for loading the body and means for dumping the body, and to provide a common power mechanism which 5 is always connected with both the dumping and loading means, and may be made to operate these means selectively by the operation or release 01 certain locking mechanism.
Other objects and advantages of the invention will appear or be pointed out as the description proceeds.
In the accompanying drawings, forming a part hereof:
Fig. 1 is a fragmentary diagrammatic side elevation showing the invention applied to an automobile truck;
Fig. 2 is a view of the structure shown in Fig. 1. with the loader in normal travelling position;
Fig. 3 is a view of the structure shown in Fig. 1, when the body is in dumping position;
Fig. 4 is a section on the line 4-4 of Fig. 2;
Fig. 5 is a section on the line 5-5 of Fig. 1;
Fig. 6 is a section on the line 6-8 of Fig. 1; and
Fig. 7 is a section on the line 7-7 of Fig. 1.
The truck shown in Fig. 1 is provided with a chassis 11. A dump-body 12 is mounted on a frame 13, which is pivotally mounted on a shaft 14. This shaft 14 is carried by bearings on the chassis 11 as illustrated in Fig. 5. The frame 13 is provided with cross braces 17.
A loader 15 is pivotally mounted at 16 on an arm 18, which extends forward and is pivotally connected with the dump-body 12 by means of a shaft 20. The holder 15 is shown as a bucket having a strap 22 extending around its lower portion, to provide reinforcement, but any suitable material-holding device may be substituted for the loader bucket 15. A similar arm 18 connects the opposite side of the bucket with the dump-body, but since the construction is the same on both sides of the truck, the illustration of one side only is necessary.
A stop 24 is secured to each side of the loader bucket 15. A spring 26 is connected at 28 to the arm 18, and is connected at its other end to a bracket 30, which is secured on the side of the loader bucket 15. The spring 26 holds the loader bucket in position so that the stop 24 rests against the arm 18, as shown in Fig. 1, which limits fur- 100 ther contraction of the spring. When the loader is in the position shown in Fig. 1, it is in a convenient position for receiving material from receptacles handled by men standing on the street.
An arm 19 is pivotally mounted on the shaft 105 20. This arm 19 is behind the arm 18 in Fig. l, but is clearly shown in Figs. 2, 3 and 5. A similar arm 19 is provided on the opposite side of the truck. An angle member 21 is secured to each arm 19, and each angle member 21 extends under the corresponding arm 18, so that upward movement of the arms 19 will cause the adjacent arms 18 to move in the same manner. However, the arms 18 may remain in raised position after the arms 19 are lowered, but as long as the angle members 21 are supporting the arms 18, the arms 18 will move downwardly with the arms 19. A bracket 32 is secured to each arm 19, and a hoist cable 34 is connected with each bracket 32 for raising the arms 19.
One of the cross braces 17 of the frame 13 is provided with brackets 35 which extend under the arms 19 and limit the downward travel of these arms. With the parts in the positions shown in Figs. 1 and 5, each arm 19 is supported by one of the brackets 35, and each arm 18 is supported by one of the angle members 21.
The dump-body 12 is provided with a door 36, which is hinged to the body at 38 which is normally held locked in closed position by a latch 40. When the body 12 is raised to inclined dumping position, such as shown in Fig. 3, and the latch 40 is released in a manner later to be described, the weight of the door 36 will cause it to open into the position shown.
The opening in the top of the body 12 through which material is loaded into the body is covered by a door 42, which is hinged to the body at 44. The door 42 is operated by links 46 and 48, which are pivoted together at 50. The link 46 is pivota'lly connected at 52 with the door 42, and the link 48 is pivotally connected at 54 with the body 12. Similar links 46 and 48 are connected at the other side of the truck with the door 42.
The links 46 and 48 are mounted in position so that the arm 18 will strike a roller 51 carried by the pivotal connection 50 when the loader rises. When the arm 18 rises into the position shown by dotted lines 'in Fig. l. the links 46 and 48 will be moved into the position shown by dotted lines, and the door 42 will be opened so that the loader may deposit material through the opening in the top. of the body.
An abutment 56 is secured to the upper portion of the body 12, and a roller 58 contacts with this abutment to cause the loader bucket 15 to dump. The roller 58 is mounted on the forward end of the loader bucket 15, so that when the roller 58 encounters the abutment 56, the loader bucket 15 will rotate about the pivotal connection 16 and shift into an inclined position to discharge the contents of the loader bucket into the body. The spring 26 will return the loader bucket 15 to normal position as the roller 58 moves away from the abutment 56. A similar abutment 56 is provided on the other side of the body and cooperates with a similar roller 58 on the other end of the bucket.
Any suitable hoist mechanism may be provided for moving the dump-body 12 into an inclined dumping position, such as shown in Fig. 3. In the preferred embodiment of the invention the hoist mechanism is of the hydraulic type, but mechanical, pneumatic, electrical, or other mechanism may be used. A cylinder 60 is secured to the chassis 11, and a plunger 62 is slidably mounted in the cylinder 60. A sheave 64 is rotatably mounted on one end of a shaft 66, which is carried by the plunger 62. 'A similar sheave 64 is mounted on the other end of the shaft 66.
A bracket 68 is secured to the forward end of the dump-body 12, and a sheave 70 is rotatably mounted on the bracket 68. A similar bracket and sheave are provided on the other side of the truck body. A sheave 72 is rotatably mounted on the forward upper portion of the body. The cable 34 is connected with the chassis at 75, and passes over the sheave 64, thence downwardly and around the sheave 70, thence upwardly and over the sheave 72, and thence to the bracket 32 on the arm 19, with which it is connected. It will be understood that the sheaves and cable connections on the other side of the body are identical.
From the above description it will be apparbody against movement toward dumping position.
When the truck is in transit, the loader bucket 15 occupies the position shown in Fig. 2. The loader bucket 15 is held in this position by a latch 78, which engages with a lug on the arm 18 to prevent the arm from returning to its lowered position, shown in Fig. 1.
The latch 78 is pivotally mounted at 80 on the body 12. In the preferred embodiment of the invention this latch 78 is mounted on the inside of the body 12, and a slot 82 is provided through which the end of the latch extends to engage the lug on the arm 18. The slot 82 limits the travel of the latch 78. When the latch 78 is at the upper end of the slot 82, the lug on the arm 18 will pass clear of the latch. When the latch 78 is at the lower end of the slot 82, a lug 84 (see Fig. 4), which is secured to the arm 18, will engage the latch 78 and prevent the loader bucket 15 and arm 18 from returning to lowered position. The engaging end of the latch '78 is tapered, as shown in Fig. 1, in the same manner as an ordinary door latch, and if the lug 84 engages the latch 78 while the loader bucket 15 and arm 18 are moving upwardly, the latch will ratchet over the lug.
The latch 78 is operated by a'. lever 86, which is connected with a rod 88.
The rod 88 extends forwardly through the front wall of the dump-body 12, and connects with a crank arm 90, which is secured to a rock-shaft 92 (see Fig. 7). The rock-shaft 92 is rotatably mounted in brackets 94, which are secured to the outside of the front wall of the body 12. The rock-shaft 92 operates similar latch mechanism on both sides of the truck.
The rock-shaft 92 is operated by a handle 96. A spring 98 is connected with the handle 96, at a point above the axis of the rock-shaft 92. The spring 98 is connected at its lower end with the body 12, at a point so that the center line of the spring 98 will cross the axis of the rock-shaft 92 when the handle 96 is operated to move the latch 78 from one end to the other of the slot 82. This action of the spring 98 in throwing over center causes the spring to hold the handle 96 in the position occupied when the latch 78 is set to clear the lug 84, or in the position occupied when the latch 78 is set in position to hold the loader bucket 15 and arm 18 in the raised position shown in Fig. 2.
Locking means are provided to hold the body 12 against movement toward dumping position. This locking means includes hooks 100, which are secured to a rock-shaft 102, as shown in Fig. 6. The hooks 100 engage a cross-bar 104,
which is secured to the chassis 11. The rockshaft 102 is rotatably mounted in bearings 106, which are attached to the frame 13, on which the body 12 is carried. IA crank arm 108 is mounted on each end of the rock-shaft 102 for rotation with the rock-shaft. A handle 110 is secured to the rock-shaft 102, and this handle -110 is operated to rotate the rock-shaft 102 when the operator wishes to release the hooks 100 from the cross-bar 104' so that the body 12 may be hoisted to dumping position.
. The latch 40, which holdsthe door 36 against opening, operates in a slot in a bracket 112. A similar latch 40 is provided at the other side of the door 36. Each of these latches 40 is connected with one of thecrank arms 108 by a link 114. Operation of the handle 110 to disengage the hooks 100 from the cross-bar 104, so that the body 12 may be raised into dumping position, also operates the latches 40 through the connecting links 114. The lower side of each latch 40 is formed with a sloping surface. As each latch moves rearwardly, the sloping lower face passes across the lower end of the slot in the member 112, which supports the latches 40. The rearward ends of the latches 40 will therefore move down. This operation of the latches 40 is clearly illustrated by comparing Figs. 2 and 3 of the drawing.
Locking means are provided for preventing operation of the loader by holding the arms 19 against operation. This locking means includes hooks 116, each of which is secured to a sleeve 117. The sleeves 117 are rotatably mounted on the shaft 14. Each of the hooks 116 is provided with a recessed face so that the hook can move into a position with the upper side of the recess over one of the angle members 21, and the lower side of the recess under the adjacent bracket 35. The hook 116 is shown in such a position in Fig. 8, and when the hook 116 is in this position the angle member 21 and bracket 35 are hooked together so that it is not possible for the arm 19 to rise. By hooking angle member 21 to bracket 35 in this manner, the shaft 14 is relieved of the strain which otherwise would be placed upon it, of holding arm 19 against rising.
Each hook 116 is operated through a connecting link 118, which connects the latch 40 with a crank arm 120 secured to the sleeve 11! (Figs. 1 and 5). When the latch 40 is in position to hold the door 36 closed, the hook 116 is disengaged from the angle member 21, and the arm 19 is free to rise. when the latch 40 is moved into the position shown in Fig. 3, so that the door 36 .is free to open, the connecting link 118 will hold the hook 116 in position to prevent the angle member 21 and arm 19 from rising.
From the above description it will be apparent that the handle 1 10 operates the hooks 100 and 116 and the latch 40, so that, when the handle 110 is in one position, the hook 116 will lock the body against movement toward dumping position and the latch 40 willprevent the door 38 from opening, but the hook 116 will not prevent operation of the loader. When the handle '110 is shifted into another position, the hook 100 will be disengaged from the cross-bai- 104, and the latch 40 will be released, so that the body may be dumped, but the hook 116 will lock the loader against operation. It is thus impossible to operate the loading and dumping means simultaneously, and the locking means are interconnected so that movement of either into locking position releases the other, and'vice-versa.
1 and 2. With the parts in this position the link 114 passes above the axis of the rock-shaft 102 and the pull exerted by the 11m; 114 tends to rotate the crank arm 108 and rock-shaft 102 clockwise in Figs. 1 and 2, and thus holds the handle 110 against the front of the body 12.
The complete operation of the invention will be understood from the following description of the operation' ofthe mechanism on one side of the truck and shown in Figs. 1, 2 and 3.
The truck is driven to the point of loading, with the parts in the position shown in Fig. 2. The hoist is then operated to move the arm 19 upward until the angle member 21 of the arm 19 engages under the arm 18 and lifts the weight of the loading means from the latch 78. The handle 96 is then operated to move the latch 78 into the upper end of the slot 82. The hoist is then lowered and the loader bucket 15, together with the arms 18 and 19 by which it is operated, move downwardly by gravity until the arms 18 and 19 contact with the brackets 35. These brackets prevent further downward movement and the parts are supported in the positions shown in Fig. 1. The loader bucket 15 is now filled with material by receptacles handled by men standing on the street, or in any other suitable manner.
when the loader bucket 15 is filled, the hoist is operated to raise the loader bucket into the position shown by dotted lines in Fig. 1. Since the hook 100 is engaged with the cross-bar 104, the sheave 70 can not move upward, and operation of the hoist mechanism can only move the hoist cable 34 to operate the arms 19 and 18, and the loader bucket 15.
After the last load of material has been dumped into the body, and it is time for the truck to travel, the handle 96 is shifted to move the latch 78 into the lower end of the slot 82. The hoist is now lowered, and the arm 19 will move into the position shown in Fig. 2, but the latch '78 will engage with the lug on the arm 18 and prevent the arm 18 and the loader bucket 15 from moving down with the arm 19. The loader bucket 15 is thus held in the position shown in Fig. 2, and the truck is ready to travel.
When the truck reaches its destination where the material in the body is to be dumped, the handle 110 is shifted to disengage the hook 100 from the cross-bar 104 and to disengage the latch 40 from the bar 36. This operation of. the hook 100 and latch 40 will operate the connecting link 118 and move the hook 116 into position to hook the arm 19 to the frame bracket 35 so that the loading means are locked against operation in the manner previously described. The hoist is now operated, and since the arm 19 and bracket 32 can not move, the hoist cable 34 is fixed at both ends and the sheave 70 will be raised so that the body 12 is moved into an inclined dumping position, as shown in Fig. 3.
After the material in the body 12 has been dumped, the hoist will be lowered, the body returning to its normal position by gravity.
From the foregoing description it will be apparent that this invention provides a self-loading dump truck, in which the same power mechanism is used forthe-dual purpose of operating the loading means or for dumping the truck body.
collection trucks used in house to house service butmay alsobeusedwithany kindofma'terialhauling devices in any kind of service.
A hydraulic hoist is shown for supplying power, but obviously mechanical, pneumatic, electric or other power means may be substituted, and other changesandmodificationsmaybemadein the operating mechanism without departing from the spirit of the invention as set forth in the appended claims.
I claim:
1. A dump truck including a chassis; a dump body pivotally mounted on the chassis; a loader mounted on the body and operatable to raise ma terialtothetopofthebodvanddischargesaid material into the body; releasable locking means to prevent movement of the body toward dumping or to prevent operation of the loader; a hoist mounted on the chassis; and a flexible tension member connecting the hoist to both 7 the body and the loader, so that the hoist will operate either the body or the loader, whichever is not locked against operation.
2. A dump truck including a chassis; a dump body pivotally mounted on the chassis; a loader mounted on the body and operatable to raise materialtothetopof thebodyanddischarge said material into the body; means for raising the body to an inclined dumping position; means for raising the loader; a hoist mounted on the chamis; a sheave on one of the raising means; a
flexible tension member passing from the hoist,-
over said sheave, and connected with the other of said raising means; and means for prevenifing operation of either of the means, so that operation of the hoist will operate the other of the raising means.
3. A'dump truck including a chassis; a dump body pivotally mounted on the chassis adjacent the rear end of the body; a sheave rotatably mounted on the forward end of the body; a loader on the body; support means on which the loader is operatable to raise a load into position ior discharge into the body; releasable locln'ng means to prevent movement of the body toward dumping position and to prevent operahon of the loader; a hoist mounted on the chassis; and a flexible tension member extending from the hoist, around the sheave on the body, and then to the loader, so that operation of the hoist will dump the body or operate the loader, depending on the position of the locking means.
4. A dump truck including a chassis; a dumpbody pivotally mounted on the chassis adjacent the rear end ofthe body; a sheave rotatably mounted on the forward end of the body; a
loader on the means on which the loader is operatable to raise a load into position for discharge into the body; releasable locking means for preventing movement of the body toward dumping position; other releasable locking means for preventing operation of the loader; a. hoist mounted on the chassis; a flexible cable extending from the hoist, around the sheave on the body, and then to the loader, so that operation of the hoist will dump the body or operate the loader, depending on which of the locking means is in locking position; and connectiing means between the locking means for releasing each "of the locking means when the other is moved into locking position.
5. A dump truck comprising in combination, a chassis, a body mounted on the chassis and tiltable about an axis near the rear end of the chassis, a loader at the rear end of the body, arms supporting said loader and pivoted to the sides of the body near the front end thereof, auxiliary arms pivoted to the sides of the body and extending rearwardly, elements on said auxiliary arms which lie beneath said loader arms for raising them, sheaves on the sides of the body near the top and near the front end thereof, sheaves on the sides of the body at the lower front corners thereof, a power hoist, flexible tension members passing over said upper sheaves and lower sheaves, said flexible members being attached at one end to the rear ends of the auxiliary arms and at the other end being operatively connected to said power hoist, and means for selectively locking said auxiliary arms to the body or releasing them whereby either the body or the arms and loader may be operated.
5. A dump truck comprising in combination, a chassis, a tiltable body mounted thereon, a loader for said body mounted for vertical movement irom a point near the grozmd where it is charged to a point above the body where it is discharged, a meave under the free end ofsaid body, a flexihie tension member passing under said sheave and adapted to support and raise said body through said sheave when required, a power hoist, operative connections between said power hoist and said loader and between the hoist and said flexible tension member for raising said body, and means for selectively placing the eiiective action of said hoist upon either said body or said loader, the existence or lack of relative movement between said flexible tension member and said bodysupporting sheave determining which part will be raised.
S. HOWARD.
US608405A 1932-04-30 1932-04-30 Self-loading dump-body Expired - Lifetime US1922851A (en)

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Cited By (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2541965A (en) * 1946-09-14 1951-02-13 James D Whitson Truck loader
US2586554A (en) * 1946-06-28 1952-02-19 Elgin Sweeper Co Street-sweeping machine
US2832488A (en) * 1955-07-05 1958-04-29 Ernest F Kamin Refuse vehicle
US3175712A (en) * 1961-06-06 1965-03-30 Dempster Brothers Inc Material handling equipment

Cited By (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2586554A (en) * 1946-06-28 1952-02-19 Elgin Sweeper Co Street-sweeping machine
US2541965A (en) * 1946-09-14 1951-02-13 James D Whitson Truck loader
US2832488A (en) * 1955-07-05 1958-04-29 Ernest F Kamin Refuse vehicle
US3175712A (en) * 1961-06-06 1965-03-30 Dempster Brothers Inc Material handling equipment

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