US3202305A - Material handling apparatus - Google Patents

Material handling apparatus Download PDF

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Publication number
US3202305A
US3202305A US7463260A US3202305A US 3202305 A US3202305 A US 3202305A US 7463260 A US7463260 A US 7463260A US 3202305 A US3202305 A US 3202305A
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Prior art keywords
vehicle
body unit
container
fluid pressure
arms
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Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Expired - Lifetime
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William A Herpich
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DEMPSTER SYSTEMS Inc
DEMPSTER BROTHERS Inc
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DEMPSTER BROTHERS Inc
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    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B65CONVEYING; PACKING; STORING; HANDLING THIN OR FILAMENTARY MATERIAL
    • B65FGATHERING OR REMOVAL OF DOMESTIC OR LIKE REFUSE
    • B65F3/00Vehicles particularly adapted for collecting refuse
    • B65F3/02Vehicles particularly adapted for collecting refuse with means for discharging refuse receptacles thereinto
    • B65F3/04Linkages, pivoted arms, or pivoted carriers for raising and subsequently tipping receptacles
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B60VEHICLES IN GENERAL
    • B60PVEHICLES ADAPTED FOR LOAD TRANSPORTATION OR TO TRANSPORT, TO CARRY, OR TO COMPRISE SPECIAL LOADS OR OBJECTS
    • B60P1/00Vehicles predominantly for transporting loads and modified to facilitate loading, consolidating the load, or unloading
    • B60P1/48Vehicles predominantly for transporting loads and modified to facilitate loading, consolidating the load, or unloading using pivoted arms raisable above load-transporting element
    • B60P1/50Vehicles predominantly for transporting loads and modified to facilitate loading, consolidating the load, or unloading using pivoted arms raisable above load-transporting element loading from in front of the vehicle
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B60VEHICLES IN GENERAL
    • B60PVEHICLES ADAPTED FOR LOAD TRANSPORTATION OR TO TRANSPORT, TO CARRY, OR TO COMPRISE SPECIAL LOADS OR OBJECTS
    • B60P1/00Vehicles predominantly for transporting loads and modified to facilitate loading, consolidating the load, or unloading
    • B60P1/64Vehicles predominantly for transporting loads and modified to facilitate loading, consolidating the load, or unloading the load supporting or containing element being readily removable
    • B60P1/6418Vehicles predominantly for transporting loads and modified to facilitate loading, consolidating the load, or unloading the load supporting or containing element being readily removable the load-transporting element being a container or similar
    • B60P1/6427Vehicles predominantly for transporting loads and modified to facilitate loading, consolidating the load, or unloading the load supporting or containing element being readily removable the load-transporting element being a container or similar the load-transporting element being shifted horizontally in a fore and aft direction, combined or not with a vertical displacement
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B65CONVEYING; PACKING; STORING; HANDLING THIN OR FILAMENTARY MATERIAL
    • B65FGATHERING OR REMOVAL OF DOMESTIC OR LIKE REFUSE
    • B65F3/00Vehicles particularly adapted for collecting refuse
    • B65F2003/006Constructional features relating to the tank of the refuse vehicle
    • B65F2003/008Constructional features relating to the tank of the refuse vehicle interchangeable
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B65CONVEYING; PACKING; STORING; HANDLING THIN OR FILAMENTARY MATERIAL
    • B65FGATHERING OR REMOVAL OF DOMESTIC OR LIKE REFUSE
    • B65F3/00Vehicles particularly adapted for collecting refuse
    • B65F3/02Vehicles particularly adapted for collecting refuse with means for discharging refuse receptacles thereinto
    • B65F2003/0263Constructional features relating to discharging means
    • B65F2003/0279Constructional features relating to discharging means the discharging means mounted at the front of the vehicle

Description

1965 G. R. DEMPSTER ETAL 3,202,305

MATERIAL HANDLING APPARATUS 3 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed Dec. 8, 1960 1965 G. R. DEMPSTER ETAL 3,202,305

MATERIAL HANDLING APPARATUS 5 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed Dec. 8, 1960 INVENTORS GEO/96E A-t amp/01,

ATTORNEYS g- 1965 G. R. DEMPSTER ETAL MATERIAL HANDLING APPARATUS Filed Dec. 8, 1960 3 Sheets-Sheet 3 I NVENTORS BY FM t W ATTORNEYS emptying the contents of the container.

United States Patent 3,202,305 MATERIAL nANnLiNo APPARATUS George R. Dempster, Knoxville, Tenn, and William A.

Herpich, Galion, Ohio; Trust Company of Georgia, executor of said George R. Dempster, deceased; said Herpich assignor to Dempster Brothers, Inc., Knoxville, Tenn, a corporation of Tennessee Filed Dec. 8, 1960, Ser. No. 74,632 8 Claims. (Cl. 214-302) trial and residential purposes for collecting trash, garbage, and other lading. In the use of these containers, it is customary to locate a container at a convenient point and then from time to time place lading into the container. Each container may serve as a gathering point for the lading from a surrounding area. After the container has been filled, it is necessary to empty the container in some manner so that the container may thereafter receive additional lading.

Sometimes, comparatively small size containers are used for collecting lading. In this event, it is customary to use a vehicle provided with front end loading mechanism for The vehicle is provided with a large size body into which the lading from each one of the individual small size containers may be dumped. Often the body is equipped with compaction apparatus for compressing the lading within the body. Usually, the vehicle proceeds from point to pointwhere a container is located. The container is picked up from the ground or other supporting surface by the front end loading mechanism and the contents of the container are dumped into the body of the vehicle. Then the front end loading mechanism returns the container to the ground. The vehicle then proceeds to another container where the emptying operation is repeated. After the body on the vehicle is full, the vehicle is driven to a remote location handled by front end loading mechanism. It is customary, when these large size containers are full, to transport the container itself to the point where the lading is to be dumped, and then after the container has been emptied, to

return the container to its original location or to another location for refilling.

In handling these large size containers, it is customary to provide a vehicle with power apparatus by which the container can be loaded onto the vehicle. The vehicle, with the container mounted on it, is driven to a po nt where the lading is dumped from the container, and then thevehicle is driven back to the original location or to another location and then the container is unloaded from the vehicle by operation of the power apparatus.

Large size containers of this nature may be constructed in various ways to serve numerous purposes. For example, the large size containers can be constructed in the form of a dump body, or a tank body, or a closed body having a variety of access doors. Small size containers, likewise, can be built in a variety of ways. For example, they may have top loading access doors or side loading access doors.

In the past, it has been necessary to employ two com- "ice pletely different types of apparatus for handling small size and large size containers. Small size containers can be handled by a motor vehicle provided with front end loading mechanism whereby the vehicle can proceed from container to container and the loading mechanism employed to empty the contents of the containers into the vehicle body. Large size containers, however, can not be handled in this manner. Large size containers usually are serviced by apparatus whereby the container itself can be loaded onto the vehicle and then transported to the desired location for dumping.

One object of this invention is to provide apparatus for handling both small sizeand large size containers.

Another object of this invention is to provide on a motor vehicle apparatus which can load onto and remove from the vehicle a separable body unit which can handle small size containers.

Another object of this invention is to provide 21 separable body unit for a motor vehicle which body unit is equipped with mechanism for dumping the contents of a container into the body unit.

Another object of this invention is to provide a system whereby one motor vehicle can be used to service both small size and large size separate containers.

Another object of this invention is to provide a large size container having a self-contained lading compaction device.

These objects may be accomplished by providing on a motor vehicle apparatus for loading onto the vehicle a separable body unit or, when desired, a large size container. The separable body unit is provided with lifting mechanism including a pair of lifting arms pivoted thereto and movable by power devices which can move the lifting arms from a position in front of the vehicle to an elevated position above the body unit. Movable fork arms are provided on the front of the lifting arms for detachably engaging a smallsize container. 7

The lifting mechanism can be employed to hoist the container from the ground or other supporting surface at the front of the vehicle to a dumping position above the body unit where the contents of the container can be emptied into the body unit. The body unit can be unloaded from the vehicle in order that the vehicle may be used to handle various types of large size containers, when it is desired that large size containers rather than small size containers be serviced.

These large size containers may be provided with a selfcontained compaction device comprising a packer plate assembly, movable ashort distance in reciprocating fashion towards the front and rear of the container. A hydraulically actuated cylinder device is provided for moving the plate assembly. Fluid pressure for actuating the cylinder device is provided by a pump driven by either an electric motor or a gasoline engine which may be mounted on the container.

This type of large size container may be loaded on the motor vehicle and transported to the desired location whereupon it can be unloaded from the vehicle. From time to time, as necessary, lading can be emptied into the container, and the self-contained compaction unit can be FIG. 3 is an enlarged side elevation view of an understructure assembly used in connection with the tilting frame;

FIG. 4 is a rear elevation view of a portion of the understructure assembly shown in FIG. 3;

FIG. 5 is a side elevation view of a container showing portions of a self-contained compaction device in broken lines; and

FIG. 6 is a fragmentary plan View of equipment for providing hydraulic pressure for actuating the compaction device.

In FIG. 1 there is illustrated a type of vehicle 2 to which this invention may be applied. The vehicle 2 may be self-propelled under control of an operator located in a cab 4. The vehicle 2 is equipped with a chassis frame 6 supported by a front wheel and axle assembly 8 and by rear wheel and axle assemblies 1t Th chassis frame 6 should be of sufiicient length to receive thereon and to accommodate a separable body unit 14 the size of a normal truck body. If desired, the chassis frame may be that ofa conventional trailer, separated from the tractor portion of the vehicle, although body unit 14 for handling container, is indicated in FIG.

1 by reference numeral 20, and includes a pair of lifting arms 22 spaced apart a distance substantially corresponding with the width of the cab 4 of the vehicle 2. These lifting arms 22 may be of gooseneck shape or of inverted U-shape so as to extend over the top and downwardly in front and back of the cab 4 at the front portion of the vehicle when theseparable body unit 14 i mounted on the chassis frame 6 of the vehicle 2, as shown in FIG. 1 by broken lines. a v

The lifting arms 22 are pivotallymounted to opposite sides of the body unit 14 at the front thereof. The pivotal mounting may include a shaft 24 journaled on the body unit 14 with the lifting arms 22 fixed on the shaft, or instead, individual stub shafts may be used for each lifting arm. Power device 28, for example conventional hydraulic cylinder assemblies, extend along the sides of the body unit 14 and are pivotally connected thereto at 30. The piston rod of each power device 28 is pivotally rnounted at 32 to a plate 34 fixed on the respective lifting arm 22 adjacent the pivot 24.

The front end ofthe lifting arms 22 are connected by a front torque tube or rod 38 which is journaled to each of the lifting arms 22. On each outside end of the tube 38 there is fixed a lever arm 40. A power device 42, for example, a conventional hydraulic cylinder assembly, is mounted on each of the arms 22 by a bracket 44 so that the power device 42 extends along the corresponding arm 22. The free end of a piston rod 46 of the power device 42 is connected to the corresponding lever arm 40.

A pair of fork arms 5t) are rigidly mounted near the opposite ends of the torque tube 38'. Bumper plates 52 may be fixed to the torque tube 38 so as to engage the bumper 54 of the vehicle 2 when the arms 22 are in the position illustrated in FIG. l

One form of 'small size container which may be employed with the lifting mechanism is indicated by reference numeral 58 in FIG. 1. At opposite ends of the container, and secured to the sides thereof, are open-ended pockets 60 which are of suitable size and shape to receive therein the fork arms 5t) of the lifting mechanism 20.

The necessary equipment for supplying a source of fluid pressure is mounted on the chassis frame 6 at the side of the vehicle 2 and contained within a housing 64. This equipment includes the necessary valves and fluid pumps which may be driven by the power takeoff mechanism of the vehicle 2.

Located on the separable body unit 14 and adjacent the front thereof there are a group of connector members 66 having fluid supply lines in communication therewith to the power devices 28, the power devices 42, and the power device which operates the compaction device inside the body unit 14. Supply lines 68 '(only one of which is shown) connect the fluid pressure supply equipment Within the housing 64 to the respective connector members 66. The supply lines 68 may be disconnected from the connector members 66 so that the separable body unit 14 may be unloaded from the vehicle 2. The supply lines 68 may be connected with their respective connector members 66 when the separable body unit is mounted on the vehicle 2 so as to supply fluid pressure to the power devices located on the body unit 14. The necessary valve members within the housing 64 for controlling the fluid through the lines 68 are under the control of the operator when he is located within the cab 4.

The lifting mechanism 20 is operated as follows in order to dump the contents of a container 58 into the body unit 14. When the body unit 14 is located on the vehicle 2 as illustrated in FIG. 1, the power devices 28 may be actuated under the force of hydraulic pressure to rotate the lifting arms 22 so as to properly align the fork arms 50 for entrance into the sleeves 60 on the container 58 when the container is located on the ground or other supporting surface in front of the vehicle 2. In order to establish a connection between the lifting mechanism 20 and the container, the vehicle 2 is maneuvered into proper position and then the power devices 28 and 42 are operated so that the fork arms 5%) enter and extend through the sleeves 60.

The power devices 28 are operated further to swing the lifting arms 22 upwardly wherein the container 58 is hoisted over the cab 4 and into dumping position at the top and front of the separable body unit 14. Simultaneously, the fork arms 50 are actuated by the power devices 42 to rotate slightly in a counterclockwise direction with reference to FIG. 1, so that the container 58 may be kept tilted slightly toward the vehicle but substantially upright during its swinging movement to the top of the body unit 14. Once the container 58 is above the hopper 16, the fork arms 50 are actuated to rotate in a clockwise di rection far enough so that the container 58 is inverted to dump the contents thereof through the hopper 16 into the body unit 14.

After dumping the contents, the power devices- 42 are operated to rotate the fork arms 50 so that the container 58 will be returned to a substantially upright position. Then, the lifting arms 22 are lowered by proper actua tion of the power devices 28 to set the container 58 down in front of the vehicle 2. The vehicle may be backed up so that the fork arms 50 will move out of the sleeves 60.

The vehicle 2 may then be driven to 'a new location where another full container such as the container 58 is located and the container emptying operation may be repeated. The vehicle 2 may continue from container to container to empty the contents thereof into the body Mounted on the chassis frame 6 of the vehicle 2 is a t ltlng frame 74 (FIGS. 1 and 2). The tilting frame 74 1s 1n such a position as to be disposed directly over the chassis frame 6 and extend lengthwise lfiQIQOf,.- At the rear of the chassis frame 6 at each lateral side thereof is a depending bracket 76. Additional brackets 78 are pivotally mounted at 8-0 to respective ones of the brackets 76. The brackets 78 are connected rigidly with the rear end portion of the tilting frame 74. The tilting frame 74 in this matter is pivotally mounted on the chassis 6 for swinging movement relative thereto as illustrated in FIGS; 1 and 2.

The rear end portion of the tilting frame 74 may be provided with a stabilizing jack if desired or needed, especially for accommodating abnormally heavy loads. One form of jack is shown in FIGS. 1 and 2 and includes a roller 84 mounted with respect to the pivot 80 for raising and lowering movements under control of a suitable power device. In FIG. 1 the roller 80 is shown in a raised position while in FIG. 2, the roller is shown in a lowered position in engagement with the ground.

Adjacent the forward end portion of the tilting frame 74, the chassis frame 6 is provided with depending brackets 86 secured rigidly to the chassis frame 6. Mounted on the lower portions of the brackets 86 for pivotable movement with respect thereto are the lower ends of power devices 88, for example conventional hydraulic cylinder assemblies, having piston rods, the freeends of which are pivotally connected at 90 with opposite sides of the tilting frame 74. The power devices 88 are capable of telescoping movement in raising and lowering the tilting frame 74 relative to the chassis frame 6.

The tilting frame 74 may be formed of channel members which serve as trackways to receive therebetween a carriage 94 for guided movement in reciprocating fashion lengthwise with respect to the tilting frame 74. Reciprocating movement of the carriage 94 may be caused by a power dervice 96 having one end connected to the tilting frame 74 and the other end connected with the carriage 94. Fluid under pressure may be supplied to the power device 96 to cause the carriage 94 to move toward the rear of the tilting frame 74 or toward the front of the tilt ing frame.

Mounted on the carriage 94 is a connecting member or bail member 100 which is pivotally mounted to the carriage 94 at 102. The bail member 100 extends upwardly and rearwardly from the pivotal connection 102 and at its upwardly extending end is provided with a closed or loop section. Because the bail member 100 is mounted on the carriage 94, it will move in reciprocating fashion along the tilting frame 74 as the power device 96 is actuated to move the carriage 94.

In order that the separable body unit 14 might be loaded onto or removed from the vehicle 2 by use of the tilting frame 74, the body unit 14 is provided Withan understructure or subframe assembly such as that illustrated in FIGS. 3 and 4 and represented by reference numeral 106. The subframe assembly 106 includes beam members 108 in the form of runners or skids for supporting the separable body unit 14 upon the top surfaces of the tilting frame 74. The forward ends of the beams 108 are curved upwardly in the form of bows to facilitate the guiding of the body unit 14 onto the tilting frame 74: Legs 110 may be provided at the rear end portion of the subframe assembly 106 to stabilize the separable body unit 14 when it is resting upon the ground or other supporting surface. Suitable braces and ribs 112 may be employed asnecessary to strengthen the subframe assembly 106.

Extending lengthwise of the subframe assembly 106 intermediate the beams 108 is a hook bar 116 which extends preferably throughout the length of the subframe assembly. The hook bar 116 is provided with a plurality of hook stations 118 spaced along the length thereof for engagement of the loop portion of the bail member 100 in moving the separable body unit 14 onto and off of the tilting frame 74. The number and spacing of the hook stations 118 may vary depending upon the length of the subframe assembly 106 and the length of travel of each stroke of the carriage 94. i

Each hook station 118 is formed with a pair of opposed hook surfaces 120 opening downwardlyin position to be overlapped alternately by a shuttle 122. The shuttle 122 is pivoted to the hook bar 116 for swinging movement but normally hangs downwardly in the position shown in FIG. 3.

By proper operation of the cylinder 96 the operator can move the carriage 94 and thus the bail member so that the loop portion of the bail member will engage either the rear or the forward hook surfaces of any one of the hook stations 118. The shuttle 122 allows the loop portion of the bail member 100 to be moved past the hook station 118 without engaging either. one of the hook surfaces 120. However, upon a slight reverse movement of the bail member 100, the loop portion will move the shuttle far enough so that the loop portion may easily slide into and engage one of the hook surfaces 120.

In picking up or loading the separable body unit 14 which is provided with a subframe assembly 106, the vehicle 2 is backed up to the front end portion of the body unit 14 while it is resting upon the ground or other supporting surface. Then upon operation of the cylinder devices 88-, the tilting frame 74 is moved to an upwardly inclined position about the pivot 80. The stabilizing jack may be used so that the roller 84 is lowered into engagement with the ground. This will aid in supporting the load on the tilting frame 74 during the pulling of the body unit 14 onto the vehicle 2. With the tilting frame 74 in an upwardly inclined position, the cylinder 96 is actuated to move the carriage 94 to the rear of the tilting frame 74. The bail member 100 normally is in a raised position with respect to the car riage 94 as shown in FIG. 2. The bail member 100 will be projected below the lower end of the tilting frame 74 and beneath the forward end of the hook bar 116 of the subframe assembly 106.

If the vehicle and the subframe assembly 106 are properly aligned, the loop portion of the bail member 100 Will be in position to engage one of the forward hook stations 118. The angle of the tilting frame 74 may b varied under control of the power devices 88 so as to cause the loop portion of the bail member 100 to engage one of the forward hook surfaces 120.

After the bail member engages one of the hook stations 118 in this manner the operator may then actuate the cylinder 96 to move the carriage 94 towards the front of the vehicle thereby pulling the separable body unit 14 onto the tilting frame .74. Thereafter, the carriage 94 and bail member 100 can be moved rearwardly so that the loop port-ion of the bail member 100 might engage an intermediate or one of the rear hook stations 118. Upon forward movement of the carriage again, the separable body unit 14 will be pulled farther onto the tilting frame 74. As the body unit 14 is pulled on the tilting frame, in step-bystep fashion, the beams 10% will skid along the upper surfaces of the tilting frame 74 and the operator may lower the tilting frame onto the chassis frame 6 of the vehicle by proper manipulation of the cylinders 88.

The power device 96 may be operated as necessary to pull the separable body unit 14 onto the vehicle 2 into the position illustrated in FIG. 1. Thereafter, the lifting mechanism of the separable body unit 14 may be operated as described previously in order to dump the contents of small size containers 58 into the body unit after the supply lines 68 have been connected with the connector members 66.

When it is desired to use the vehicle 2 to handle large size containers of the size of a normal vehicle body, the separable body unit 14 can beunloaded from the vehicle. In order to remove the separable body unit 14 from the vehicle 2, the supply lines 68 are disconnected from the connecting members 66. The power device 96 is actuated to reverse the loading operation wherein the loop portion of the bail member 16% is moved into engagement with one of the rear hook surfaces 120 at one of the rearwardly located hook stations 118. The power device 96 is then actuated to push the separable body unit 14 rearwardly along the tilting frame 74- This reverse movement of the carriage 9d and hail member 1% can be continued step-by-step until the separable body unit 14 has slid off of the tilting frame 74-. The tilting frame '74 can be varied in its angle of tilt in order to facilitate the unloading of the body unit 14.

With the body unit 14 now removed from the vehicle 2, the vehicle is available to be used in servicing relatively large containers. Such large size containers may be constructed in general as the separable body unit 14, only need not be provided with the lifting mechanism 20 or the hopper 16, but instead may be provided with any suitable type of access door through which lading may be deposited into the container.

Such large size containers are provided with the subframe assembly 1% so that they may be moved onto and oil? of the vehicle 2 by use of the tilting frame 74. The loading :and unloading of the large size containers with respect to the tilting frame 74 is identical to that described in connection with the separable body unit 14. If it is desired at any time to use the vehicle 2 to service small size containers, the separable body unit 14 can be loaded onto the vehicle as described above.

In FIG. there is illustrated a type of large size container which may he used with the vehicle 2 and tilting frame 74. The container 130 has provided at the bottom thereof the .su-bframe assembly 105 so that the container may be loaded onto or removed from the vehicle by use of the tilting frame '74.

The container 130 may have closed sides and a top and be provided with suitable access doors through which the lading may be placed into the container. One such door, indicated at 132, may be hinged as necessary to the sides of the container. A large size door 134 is provided at the rear of the container for removal of the lading.

Located within the container 130 and at the front end thereof there is a compaction device including a packer plate assembly 136 extending substantially throughout the width of the interior of the container. The packer plate assembly 136 is mounted on and guided by a rail 138 for movement in reciprocating fashion toward the front and rear of the container. Movement of the packer plate assembly 136 is caused by a power device 146) in the form of a telescopic cylinder having a cylinder member pivotally mounted at 142 to suitable bracing within the container 130, and a piston rod 143 pivotally mounted at 144 U to the lower part of the packer plate assembly 136.

Within a housing 148 at the top of the container 136* there is located the equipment necessary for supplying a source of fluid pressure to the power device 140. Either a gasoline engine or an electric motor 150 is located within the housing 148 and supplies the necessary power to run a fiuid pump 152. Fluid is supplied to the pump 152 from a reservoir 154 through suitable supply lines. Fluid under pressure from the pump 152 is transmitted to a control valve 156, and from the control valve 156, the fluid may be supplied through suitable supply lines to either end of the power device 140.

The large size container 136 may be loaded onto the vehicle 2 by use of the tilting frame '74 and transported to the desired location where it may be unloaded from the vehicle. From time to time, as necessary, lading may be deposited in the container 1361 through the door 132. When appropriate, the compaction device Within the container 130 may be actuated to compress the lading. The gasoline engine or'electric motor 15% may be operated as necessary to drive the pump 150 to provide fluid pressure for operating the power device 140. If an electric motor is used, it will be necesary to locate the container 130 at a point where an electric supply line (from the motor can be plugged into an electrical outlet.

When the power device 1% is actuated, the packer plate assembly 136 will be moved toward the rear of the container 13h to the position shown in broken lines. This will move the lading from the front of the container 139 adj amnt the door 132 and compress the lading at the rear of the container. The power device can then be actuated to return the packer plate assembly 136 to its position adjacent the front of the container 130 so that additional lading may be depositedthrough the door 132. This filling operation may continue from time to time until the container 130 is full.

After the container 13% is full, the vehicle 2 may be employed to transport the container to a location for dumping the contents of the container and then return the empty container to the same locaion or to a new location for refilling. The vehicle 2 in this manner may service several large size containers by transporting them one at a time to the dumping point, and returning them empty to a location for refilling.

The operation of dumping the separable body unit 14, which has been filled with lading from sevenal small size containers, is identical to the operation of dumping one of the large size containers 13d. For example, if the separable body unit 14 is mounted on the vehicle 2, the vehicle is driven to a dumping location. The end wall 70 which is norm-ally fastened closed is unlatched. Then the tilting frame 74 is raised by actuating the power devices 88 so as to tilt the body unit 14 rearwardly while it is held on the tilting frame. As the end wall 70 swings open about hinges at the top thereof, the lading will fall out, and this may be assisted by actuating the compaction device withinthe body unit.

Similarly, ifa large size container is mounted on the vehicle 2, the tilting frame 74 is raised by actuating the power devices '88 so as to tilt the container 130 rearwardly while it is held on the tilting frame. The end wall 134 will swing open about hinges at the top thereof and the lading will fall out, and this may be assisted by actuating the packer plate assembly 136.

The material handling apparatus of this invention has great versatility in servicing containers of various sizes. One vehicle only is necessary, when used in connection with the tilting frame and separable body unit, to empty the contents or transport the contents of both small size and large size containers. For example, during one part of the day the vehicle can be used to service small size containers, and during another part of the day, the same vehicle can be'used to service large size containers.

While the invention has been illustrated and described in a certain embodiment, it is recognized that variations and changes may be made therein without departing from the invention as set forth in the claims.

We claim:

1. In apparatus of the character described, the combination of a vehicle, a separable body unit, means mounting the body unit on the vehicle for bodily detachment and removal from the vehicle, power means on the vehicle for moving the body unit on or oif the vehicle, a pair of lifting arms pivotally mounted on the body unit and movable between one position wherein the arms extend in front of the vehicle when the body unit is mounted on the vehicle and another position, wherein the arms extend above the body unit, said pair of lifting arms being bodily removable from the vehicle with the body unit, fluid pressure actuated means on the body unit for moving the arms between said positions, a source of fluid pressure on the vheiole, and a fluid pressure supply line having a detachable coupling between the source of fluid pressure on the vehicle and the fluid pressure actuated means on the body unit.

2. In a material handling system, the combination of a vehicle, a separable body unit adapted to be loaded on or removed from the vehicle, a pair of lifting arms pivotally mounted to the body unit, means on the lifting arms for detachable engagement with a container, power means on the body unit for moving the Lifting arms to lift the container to an elevated position over the body unit for dumping the contents thereof into the body unit, a container generally of the same size as the body unit adapted to be loaded on or removed from the vehicle when the body unit is not loaded on the vehicle, and means on the vehicle for moving each of the body unit and container onto or off the vehicle.

6. The combination with a vehicle having a chassis hrame, of a separable body unit for the vehicle, a pair of lifting arms pivotally attached at one end to said body unit, fork anms mounted on the other end of the lifting arms, power means on the lifting arms for swinging the fork arms with respect to the lifting arms, power means on the body unit for swinging the lifting arms with respect to the body unit, and a subframe assembly on the body unit supported entirely on the chassis frame and supporting the body unit for movement onto or olf of the vehicle.

4. In apparatus of the character described, the combination of a vehicle, a separable body unit detachably mounted on the vehicle for removal therefrom, power means on the vehicle for moving the body unit onto or oif the vehicle, compaction means inside the body unit for compressing material within the body unit, telescopic cylinder means on the body unit for actuating the compaction means, and a self-contained power device mounted on the body unit and operatively connected with the cylinder means for supplying fluid under pressure to the cylinder means to operate the compaction means.

5. The combination of claim 4 wherein the self-contained power device include-s a pump on the body unit for supplying fluid to the cylinder means, a power operating device for the pump and mounted on the body unit, and means for controlling the supply of fluid from the pump to the cylinder means.

6. In apparatus of the character described, the combination of a vehicle, a separable body unit detachably mounted on the vehicle for removal therefrom, power means on the vehicle for moving the body unit onto or oil? the vehicle, a pair of lifting arms pivotally mounted to the body unit and movable between one position wherein the arms extend in front of the vehicle when the body unit is mounted on the vehicle and another position wherein the arms extend above the body unit, first fluid pressure actuated means on the body unit for moving the arms between said positions, compaction means inside the body unit for compressing material within the body unit, second fluid pressure actuated means on the body unit for actuating the compaction means, a source of fluid pressure on the vehicle, and fluid pressure supply lines having detachable couplings therein for connecting the source of fluid pressure on the vehicle to the first and second fluid pressure actuated means on the body unit to be disconnected upon removal of the body unit from the vehicle.

7. In material handling apparatus, the combination with a motor vehicle including a chassis, a body unit on the chassis adapted to receive material therein, power means for moving the body unit onto and off the vehicle, and an operators cab in front of the body unit, of loading mechanism comprising a frame including arms extending substantially to the front of the body unit, means pivotally mounting the arms on the body unit for swinging movement relative to the body unit about a substantially horizontal axis, extendable power devices on op posite sides of the body unit pivotally connected at one end to the body unit and at the opposite end to the arms for actuating the frame.

8. In material handling apparatus, the combination with a motor vehicle including a chassis, a body unit including a supporting frame mounted on the chassis and adapted to receive material therein, power means for moving the body unit onto and off the vehicle, and an openators cab in front of the body unit, of loading mechanism comprising a frame including arms extending substantially to the front of the body unit, means pivotally mounting the arms on the body unit for swinging movement relative to the body unit about a substantially horizontal axis located rearwardly of the cab, said arms extending upwardly and forwardly from the pivot means, and extendable power devices on opposite sides of the body unit pivotally connected at one end to the body unit and at the opposite end to the upwardly and forwardly extending portions of the arms for actuating the frame, and means forming separable and detachable connections between the supporting frame of the body unit and the chassis for separation and removal of the body unit and loading mechanism from the chassis.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,821,327 9/31 Scott v 214516 2,800,234 7/57 Herpich et al 214-812 2,808,161 10/57 Gentile 2114-602 2,824,658 2/58 Beasley 2l4-302 2,867,339 1/59 Nelson 214517 2,868,398 1/59 Anderson et al. 214--82 2,900,096 8/59 Dempster et al. 214--302 2,906,419 9/59 Visco et a l. 214-602 2,914,119 11/59 Kuhnau v Z1482 2,932,415 4/60 Brown 2l4-82 2,951,600 9/60 Dempster et al. 2l4-8=2 3,013,675 12/61 Schonrock 214--41 3,071,264 -1/ 63 Totaro et al. 214'82 3,083,849 4/63 Mottin 21430=2 OTHER REFERENCES Dempster-Dinosa-ur Folder No. 6,590, Dernpster Brothers Inc., Knoxville, Tennessee; published June 5, 1959 (all page 6) relied on).

HUGO O. SCI-IULZ, Primary Examiner.

GERALD M. FORLENZA, Examiner.

Claims (1)

  1. 6. IN APPARATUS OF THE CHARACTER DESCRIBED, THE COMBINATION OF A VEHICLE, A SEPARABLE BODY UNIT DETACHABLY MOUNTED ON THE VEHICLE FOR REMOVABL THEREFROM, POWER MEANS ON THE VEHICLE FOR MOVING THE BODY UNIT ONTO OR OFF THE VEHICLE, A PAIR OF LIFTING ARMS PIVOTALLY MOUNTED TO THE BODY UNIT AND MOVABLE BETWEEN ONE POSITION WHEREIN THEARMS EXTEND IN FRONT OF THE VEHICLE WHEN THE BODY UNIT IS MOUNTED ON THE VEHICLE AND ANOTHER POSITION WHEREIN THE ARMS EXTEND ABOVE THE BODY UNIT FOR FIRST FLUID PRESSURE ACTUATED MEANS ON THE BODY UNIT FOR MOVING THE ARMS BETWEEN SAID POSITIONS, COMPACTION MEANS INSIDE THE BODY UNIT FOR COMPRESSING MATERIAL WITHIN THE BODY UNIT, SECOND FLUID PRESSURE ACTUATED MEASNS ON THE BODY UNIT FOR ACTUATING THE COMPACTION MEANS, A SOURCE OF FLUID PRESSURE ON THE VEHICLE, AND FLUID PRESSURE SUPPLY LINES HAVING DETACHABLE COUPLINGS THEREIN FOR CONNECTING FOR SOURCE OF FLUID PRESSURE ON THE VEHICLE TO THE FIRST AND SECOND FLUID PRESSURE ACTUATED MEANS ON THE BOYD UNIT TO BE DISCONNECTED UPON REMOVAL OF THE BODY UNIT FROM THE VEHICLE.
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Cited By (19)

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Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4053074A (en) * 1974-10-15 1977-10-11 Pierre Lemaire Device for handling a vehicle-carried container
US4096959A (en) * 1975-10-08 1978-06-27 Industrie-Werke Karlsruhe Augsburg Aktiengesellschaft Garbage collecting and transport vehicle
US4113120A (en) * 1977-02-22 1978-09-12 Pickrell John W Container handling and transporting apparatus
US4227849A (en) * 1978-05-24 1980-10-14 Wayne H. Worthington Refuse collection device
US4934896A (en) * 1988-04-29 1990-06-19 De Filippi Quinto Refuse collection apparatus and method
DE4020221A1 (en) * 1989-06-27 1991-01-03 Edgar Georg Vehicles for gathering of waste
US4986716A (en) * 1988-10-20 1991-01-22 Kellner Ag Refuse collection vehicle
DE4003589A1 (en) * 1990-02-07 1991-08-08 Edgar Georg Refuse collecting vehicle with collectors behind driver's cab
US5562390A (en) * 1995-01-24 1996-10-08 Mcneilus Truck And Manufacturing, Inc. Detachable truck body and handling mechanism
US5690465A (en) * 1995-10-11 1997-11-25 Ledwell & Son Enterprises, Inc. Carcass pick up and delivery motor vehicle
US5938393A (en) * 1995-12-21 1999-08-17 Georg; Edgar Container vehicle with loading means
US20060072993A1 (en) * 2004-10-04 2006-04-06 Delaware Capital Formation, Inc. Refuse collection system and method
US20060285952A1 (en) * 2005-06-14 2006-12-21 Donald Galbreath Vehicle-mounted hoist with stabilizer assembly
US20080314263A1 (en) * 2007-06-21 2008-12-25 Martin Thomas W Method and system for storing and temporarily relocating a trash container
US20100086387A1 (en) * 2008-10-02 2010-04-08 Fought Scott C Trash receptacle loading frame
US20100111656A1 (en) * 2008-11-06 2010-05-06 Wayne Engineering Three piece lift arm apparatus and method
US20100111655A1 (en) * 2008-10-31 2010-05-06 Brian Weeks Apparatus and methods for loading and transporting containers
CN105584759A (en) * 2014-11-13 2016-05-18 陆平 Garbage truck
US9926134B2 (en) 2013-10-01 2018-03-27 The Curotto-Can, Llc Biasing cradle for refuse vehicle

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US2808161A (en) * 1955-02-28 1957-10-01 Samuel V Bowles Refuse truck collecting apparatus
US2824658A (en) * 1955-03-23 1958-02-25 William A Beasley Detachable container and latching hook arrangement for self-loading vehicles
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Cited By (25)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
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US4053074A (en) * 1974-10-15 1977-10-11 Pierre Lemaire Device for handling a vehicle-carried container
US4096959A (en) * 1975-10-08 1978-06-27 Industrie-Werke Karlsruhe Augsburg Aktiengesellschaft Garbage collecting and transport vehicle
US4113120A (en) * 1977-02-22 1978-09-12 Pickrell John W Container handling and transporting apparatus
US4227849A (en) * 1978-05-24 1980-10-14 Wayne H. Worthington Refuse collection device
US4934896A (en) * 1988-04-29 1990-06-19 De Filippi Quinto Refuse collection apparatus and method
US4986716A (en) * 1988-10-20 1991-01-22 Kellner Ag Refuse collection vehicle
DE4020221A1 (en) * 1989-06-27 1991-01-03 Edgar Georg Vehicles for gathering of waste
DE4003589A1 (en) * 1990-02-07 1991-08-08 Edgar Georg Refuse collecting vehicle with collectors behind driver's cab
DE4003589C2 (en) * 1990-02-07 1999-10-14 Edgar Georg Refuse collection vehicle
US5725350A (en) * 1995-01-24 1998-03-10 Mcneilus Truck And Manufacturing, Inc. Detachable truck body and handling mechanism
US5562390A (en) * 1995-01-24 1996-10-08 Mcneilus Truck And Manufacturing, Inc. Detachable truck body and handling mechanism
US5690465A (en) * 1995-10-11 1997-11-25 Ledwell & Son Enterprises, Inc. Carcass pick up and delivery motor vehicle
US5938393A (en) * 1995-12-21 1999-08-17 Georg; Edgar Container vehicle with loading means
US20060072993A1 (en) * 2004-10-04 2006-04-06 Delaware Capital Formation, Inc. Refuse collection system and method
US20060285952A1 (en) * 2005-06-14 2006-12-21 Donald Galbreath Vehicle-mounted hoist with stabilizer assembly
US20080314263A1 (en) * 2007-06-21 2008-12-25 Martin Thomas W Method and system for storing and temporarily relocating a trash container
US7744332B2 (en) * 2007-06-21 2010-06-29 Martin Thomas W System for storing and temporarily relocating a trash container
US20100086387A1 (en) * 2008-10-02 2010-04-08 Fought Scott C Trash receptacle loading frame
US8226343B2 (en) * 2008-10-31 2012-07-24 Brian Weeks Apparatus and methods for loading and transporting containers
US20100111655A1 (en) * 2008-10-31 2010-05-06 Brian Weeks Apparatus and methods for loading and transporting containers
US20100111656A1 (en) * 2008-11-06 2010-05-06 Wayne Engineering Three piece lift arm apparatus and method
US8584362B2 (en) 2008-11-06 2013-11-19 Wayne Industrial Holdings, Llc Three piece lift arm apparatus and method
US9592958B2 (en) 2008-11-06 2017-03-14 Wayne Industrial Holdings, Llc Method of assembling a weldment for refuse truck loading arm
US9926134B2 (en) 2013-10-01 2018-03-27 The Curotto-Can, Llc Biasing cradle for refuse vehicle
CN105584759A (en) * 2014-11-13 2016-05-18 陆平 Garbage truck

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