US1873059A - Carton opening and filling machine - Google Patents

Carton opening and filling machine Download PDF

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Publication number
US1873059A
US1873059A US308801A US30880128A US1873059A US 1873059 A US1873059 A US 1873059A US 308801 A US308801 A US 308801A US 30880128 A US30880128 A US 30880128A US 1873059 A US1873059 A US 1873059A
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Prior art keywords
carton
conveyer
cartons
blade
magazine
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US308801A
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Elmer L Smith
Frederic B Fuller
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Package Machinery Co
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Package Machinery Co
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    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B65CONVEYING; PACKING; STORING; HANDLING THIN OR FILAMENTARY MATERIAL
    • B65BMACHINES, APPARATUS OR DEVICES FOR, OR METHODS OF, PACKAGING ARTICLES OR MATERIALS; UNPACKING
    • B65B43/00Forming, feeding, opening or setting-up containers or receptacles in association with packaging
    • B65B43/26Opening or distending bags; Opening, erecting, or setting-up boxes, cartons, or carton blanks
    • B65B43/28Opening or distending bags; Opening, erecting, or setting-up boxes, cartons, or carton blanks by grippers co-operating with fixed supports
    • B65B43/285Opening or distending bags; Opening, erecting, or setting-up boxes, cartons, or carton blanks by grippers co-operating with fixed supports specially adapted for boxes, cartons or carton blanks
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B31MAKING ARTICLES OF PAPER, CARDBOARD OR MATERIAL WORKED IN A MANNER ANALOGOUS TO PAPER; WORKING PAPER, CARDBOARD OR MATERIAL WORKED IN A MANNER ANALOGOUS TO PAPER
    • B31BMAKING CONTAINERS OF PAPER, CARDBOARD OR MATERIAL WORKED IN A MANNER ANALOGOUS TO PAPER
    • B31B2100/00Rigid or semi-rigid containers made by folding single-piece sheets, blanks or webs
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B31MAKING ARTICLES OF PAPER, CARDBOARD OR MATERIAL WORKED IN A MANNER ANALOGOUS TO PAPER; WORKING PAPER, CARDBOARD OR MATERIAL WORKED IN A MANNER ANALOGOUS TO PAPER
    • B31BMAKING CONTAINERS OF PAPER, CARDBOARD OR MATERIAL WORKED IN A MANNER ANALOGOUS TO PAPER
    • B31B2120/00Construction of rigid or semi-rigid containers
    • B31B2120/30Construction of rigid or semi-rigid containers collapsible; temporarily collapsed during manufacturing
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B31MAKING ARTICLES OF PAPER, CARDBOARD OR MATERIAL WORKED IN A MANNER ANALOGOUS TO PAPER; WORKING PAPER, CARDBOARD OR MATERIAL WORKED IN A MANNER ANALOGOUS TO PAPER
    • B31BMAKING CONTAINERS OF PAPER, CARDBOARD OR MATERIAL WORKED IN A MANNER ANALOGOUS TO PAPER
    • B31B50/00Making rigid or semi-rigid containers, e.g. boxes or cartons
    • B31B50/004Closing boxes
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B31MAKING ARTICLES OF PAPER, CARDBOARD OR MATERIAL WORKED IN A MANNER ANALOGOUS TO PAPER; WORKING PAPER, CARDBOARD OR MATERIAL WORKED IN A MANNER ANALOGOUS TO PAPER
    • B31BMAKING CONTAINERS OF PAPER, CARDBOARD OR MATERIAL WORKED IN A MANNER ANALOGOUS TO PAPER
    • B31B50/00Making rigid or semi-rigid containers, e.g. boxes or cartons
    • B31B50/02Feeding or positioning sheets, blanks or webs
    • B31B50/04Feeding sheets or blanks
    • B31B50/06Feeding sheets or blanks from stacks
    • B31B50/062Feeding sheets or blanks from stacks from the underside of a magazine
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B31MAKING ARTICLES OF PAPER, CARDBOARD OR MATERIAL WORKED IN A MANNER ANALOGOUS TO PAPER; WORKING PAPER, CARDBOARD OR MATERIAL WORKED IN A MANNER ANALOGOUS TO PAPER
    • B31BMAKING CONTAINERS OF PAPER, CARDBOARD OR MATERIAL WORKED IN A MANNER ANALOGOUS TO PAPER
    • B31B50/00Making rigid or semi-rigid containers, e.g. boxes or cartons
    • B31B50/74Auxiliary operations
    • B31B50/76Opening and distending flattened articles
    • B31B50/78Mechanically

Description

Aug. 23, 1932. E. L sMlTH ET AL CARTON OPENING AND FILLING MACHINE 8 sheets-snet 1 Filed Sept. 27, 1928 Ausf 23, 1932 E. SMITH ET AL 1,873,059

. CARTON OPENING AND FILLING MACHINE l Filed Sept. 27, 1928 l 8 Sheets-Sheet 2 Z 1%, 1N 1li/lyk.

WW "M A TTORNEYS.

Aug. 23, 1932, E. L. SMITH ET AL CARTON OPENING AND FILLING MACHINE *Filed sept. 27,

1928 8 Sheets-Sheet 3 TORNE YS.

Aug. 23, 1932. E. 1 SMITH ET AL CARTON OPENING AND FILLING MACHINE Filed Sept. 27, 1928 8 Sheets-Shea?l 4 Aug- 23, l932 E. SMITH ET AL 1,873,059

CARTON OPENING AND FILLING MACHINE Filed Sept. 27, 1928 8 SlleeLS-Sllee 5 INVENTO /7/By A?. @0M/v TTORNEYS.

Aug- 23 1932 E. SMITH ET AL 1,873,059

CARTON OPENING AND FILLING MACHINE if By @dun/. 01ML- /Q L/f ATTORNEY Aug. 23, 1932. E. L. SMITH ET AL CARTON OPENING AND FILLING MACHINE Filed Sept. 27, 1928 8 Sheets-Sheet '7 [NVE TOR. Wwgf D @JL/(01,

s-M ATTORNEYS.

Allg. 23, 1932. E, 1 gMlTH ET AL 1,873,059

CARTON OPENING AND FILLING MACHINE y Filed Sept. 27, 1928 8 Sheets-Sheet 8 ATTORNEY/ IN V EN TOR.

Patented Aug. 23, 1932 UNITED STA-TES PATENT OFFICE ELMER L. SMITH AND FREDERIC B. FULLER, F SPRINGFIELD, MASSACHUSETTS, AS-

SIGNORS TO PACKAGE MACHINERY COMPANY, OF SPRINGFIELD, MASSACHUSETTS,

A CORPORATION OF MASSACHUSETTS CARTON OPENING AND FILLING MACHINE Appiication mea september 27, 1928. seran No. 308,801.

This invention relates to machines for opening, filling, closing and sealing cartons supplied in liattened or collapsedform. It has for one object the provision of mecha- :nism by which these successive operations may be performed upon the cartons while the latter are moving continuously through the machine, thus enabling higher speeds to be used than if it were necessary to interrupt the travel of the cartons periodically opposite different operatingmechanisms. It has for a further object the provision of mechanismfor giving to a collapsed carton a preliminary opening serving to break the rigidlity of its creases and to give it a. natural tendency to open in the desired manner. It has for a further obj ect the provision of feeding mechanism for the collapsed cartons which will not deliver a carton 'unless there L is an article in position to be inserted into it.

General description The mechanism which we have devised for the accomplishment of these objects will be ybrieiy described without reference to the drawings, in order to present'the machine in its entirety before considering its details. The cartons are held in collapsed condition upon opposed ledges at the bottom of a vertical magazine from which they are delivered one at a.time by a flat blade rst entering between the walls of the carton and then moving downwardly to snap the carton through the ledges. This snap breaks the rigidity of the folds enough so that the cartons may be opened with uniformity by mechanism acting after the carton is released by the blade.` The blade withdraws from thg carton, depositing it upon guides along which it is moved by feeding arms into a pocket of a continuously moving conveyer.

Gradually closing as the conveyer continues its travel, the walls of these pockets press on opposite corners of the carton to cause it t open. As soon as the carton is fully opened and seated in the pocket, its rear flap on one side is folded and an article is pushed in from a continuously moving adjacent conveyer. All flaps but the upper one on each side are then folded, adhesive is applied to these flaps, the upper flaps are folded, and the carton is'ejected between belts which hold the flaps until the adhesive has had suiiicient time t0 set.

In the embodiment of the invention which we have constructed for commercial use. the continuously moving article conveyer comes from the delivery end of a wrapping machine operating t0 group a stack of articles such as cookies and to wrap them into a hermetically sealed package. In case a wrapped package is not delivered in proper sequence by this machine, we have provided a feelercontrolled mechanism for raising the carton magazine clear of the blade path so that no carton will be fed from it.

The drawings Referring now to the drawings for al detailed explanation of the invention:

Fig. 1 is a side elevation of the machine:

Fig. 2 is an elevation taken from the left in Fig. 1;

Figs. 3 and 4 form together a top plan of the machine;

Fig. 5 is a section on line 5 5 of Fig. -1

`with the glue pot removed;

Fig. 6 is a detail of the gluing device take from the right in Fig. 5 with certain parts broken away;

Fig. 7 is a detail similar to a portion of Fig. 2 but showing the carton feeding blade in a different position of operation;

Fig. 8 is a section on line 8 8 of Fig. 2. illustrating the normal operation of the carton feeding mechanism as the carton feeding blade is about to enter the magazine;

Fig. 9 is a similar view showing the position of the parts with the carton feeding blade withdrawing from the magazine;

Fig. 10 is a view similar to Fig. 8 but showing the lifting of the magazine resulting from the absence of an article;

Fig. 11 is a detail of the carton conveyer;

Figs. 12 to 16, inclusive, are details showin g the action of the conveyer members in opening a carton;

Figs. 17 t0 19, inclusive. are details showing the manner'in which a filled and sealed carton is ejected from the conveyer;

Fig. is a view of a collapsed carton;

Figs. 21 to 26, inclusive, are perspectiva 15 Garten feeding mechanism (Figs. l, 2, 3, 7,

8, .9, and 10)l The cartons a. in the collapsed and tightly creased state in which they are delivered from the carton-making machine are stacked in a magazine in the position shown in Fig. 20, in which the two short flaps l) and QZ at one end and the short flaps b and d at the other end are .lowermost The long iaps c, e, and c', e are on top. Preferably, in order to make folding easier and the package neater, flaps d, e and d', c are made narrower thanthe two remaining iaps at each end.

The magazine for holding the stack of collapsed cartons is formed by four corner angle pieces held together by exterior bands 31 and 32. Ledges 33 extend lengthwise of the cartons and serve to support the stack of cartons resting upon them. In order to permit the magazine to have a slight vertical movement for stopping the feed of cartons whenever there is no article presented for packaging, the band 32 is provided with 40 bosses 34 (Fig. 8) through which pass rods 35 held firmly in place by set screws 36 (Fig. 2). The rods 35 are slidably mounted in guides 37 formed in the upper portion of a bracket 38 arising from the main frame 45 39. The mechanism for reciprocating the rods when no article is present will be considered later. For present purposes, the rods and the magazine can be considered as stationary.

Mounted upon the base 39 at one side of the machine is a bracket 40 (Fig. 2) in which is journaled a shaft 41 driven continuously by means to be described. Spaced from this shaft is a second shaft 42 journaled in a mem- 55 ber 43 pivoted at 44 to the bracket and adjustable for chain tightening purposes by a set screw 45 threaded through member 43 and bearing against the bracket 40. Shafts A 41 and 42 carry sprockets 46 and 47 around 60 which passes a chain 48 traveling continuously in the direction of the arrow in Fig. 7

during the operation of the machine.

Spaced horizontally from each other on the bracket 404 are pivots (Figs. 2 and 7 05 each bearing a bell crank 51'. The two bell cranks have parallelarms connected together by a link 52. The other arm of each bell crank is provided with a pivoted holder 53 in which is fixed a rod 54. The link 52 and the rod 54 form with the bell cranks a parallel motion mechanism whereby the rod may be raised and lowered in a constantly horizontal position. A spring 55 strained between one of the bell cranks and a pin 56 fixed upon the bracket 40 counterbalances the weight of the parts supported by the linkage.

Freely movable upon the rod 54 is a slide 57 to which is fixed the carton feeding blade 58. An arm 59 depending from the slide carries a pivot 60 upon which freely swings a yoke 61 attached to the chain 48 lby pins 62. As the chain rotates the yokewill be carried steadily with it in a continuous path. In Fig. 2 the yoke is traveling to the right along the lower reach ofthe chain, drawing the slide 57 with it. As theportion of the chain to' which the yoke is attached .passes around the right-hand sprocket, the yoke will be drawn upwardly, causing the rod 54 and the slide 57 to rise. On the reverse motion given to the slide as the yoke moves along the upper reach of the chain, the pivot 60 will be below the yoke, as shown in Fig. 7, rather than above it, as shown in Fig. 2. In passing around theleft-hand sprocket, the yoke will again draw the slide downwardly against the smooth pull of the spring 55.

The effect of this portion of the mechanism is to cause the blade 58 to be moved into the side of the magazine as shown in Fig. 7, lowered while in the magazine, and retracted while in its lowered position. As it enters the magazine, the front of the blade,which.is preferably beveled on its bottom as shown, engages the lower side of the long end flaps of the lowermost carton. It will be remembered that the cartons are stacked in the magazine with their long flaps on top. lThe blade is set so that at the time when it strikes the long flaps of the bottom carton, it is just finishing its vertical movement and just starting its horizontal movement, taking for the moment a. motion slanting upwardly towards the stack of cartons. This motion relieves the weight on the bottom wall of the lowermost carton, seats the blade firmly against the upper wall of the carton, and assists in' causing the tapered end of the blade to enter between the upper and lower carton walls.

After this momentary slanting travel, the blade moves horizontally into the bottom carton, spreading its walls somewhat. It then descends with the carton, which has to bend considerably adjacent its edges in order to get by the ledges 33. The blade then withdraws from the magazine andv from the carton, which is held by the sides of angle members 30 acting during this movement of the blade as a carto-n stripping abutment, and deposits the carton on parallel guideways 63 extending from beneath the magazine to the.

right thereof as viewed in Fig. 1.

The opening of the collapsed carton, thus given, is not sniiicient to cause any great permanent change of shape, the carton dropping upon the guideways with much `the same flattened appearance as when itwas placed in the magazine. The rigidity of `the creases, however, has been broken, and-the carton can thereafter be opened merely by -pressing against its opposite edges. lVithout the preliminary opening, an attempt to apply pressure against the opposite edges might result, in a certain proportion of the cases, in buckling both carton walls in the same direction rather than in opening the carton.

Carton open-ing omweg/e7 (Figs. 1, 3 and 11 I0 1.9)

After having been dropped by the blades 58, the cartons are successively7 pushed over the surface of the guideways 63 by oscillating Fingers 65 into the pockets of a continuously running conveyer chain serving both to open the cartons and to carry them past the mechanism which operates to fill them and to close and seal their flaps. The conveyer chain which we have developed for this purpose is entirely self-contained. operating to open and close the pockets and to eject the cartons therefrom b v parts rigidly connected to the conveyer links, no cams or other moving parts being employed.

Shafts 70 and 71 are journaled in standards 72 and 73 arising from the main frame 39. and carry sprockets 7 4 and 7 5 fixed to them. Over these sprockets runs a. conveyer chain composed of rollers 76 centrally mounted on pintles 77 carried at their ends in repeated sel quences of links 78. 7 9 yand 8O (Fig. 11). The

rollers fit between the teeth of the sprockets.

while the links overlie the ends of the sprockshown in Fig. 11 with a tooth of one and a valley of the other uppermost at a given instant. During the straight travel of the chain between the sprockets the rollers 76 travel over a support 67.

Links 78 bear pushers 81 11) having overhanging hook portions 82 adapted to grasp a rear edge of a carton. Links 79 are idle. serving merely7 as parts of the chain. Links 8O bear two devices, a front member83 having a carton seating ledge 81. and an ejector linger 85. The pushers 81 and the front members 83 are in line with the links (see Fig. 3). and are arranged to pass between the two guideways 63. The ejectors 85 are outside the links and pass directly underneath the guideways.

The operation of the conveyer in receiving and opening up a carton is shown in Figs. 12 to 16. In Fig. 12, the pocket is shown just before a collapsed carton is delivered to it by the ngers 65, which occurs as indicated in about the position of Fig. 13. As the chain continues to move, the front member 83, which is carried by the horizontally moving link 80, maintains its upright position. Pusher 81, outstanding from the second link to the rear, is still rotatingwith the shaft as a center as its supporting link passes around the pulley. The rear edge of the carton is gradually raised up from the guideways 63, sliding over the slanting surface of the pusher, and at a position just after that shown in Fig. 14 is engaged by the hook 82. Further approach of the link 78 towards the horizontal causes the two opposite corners of the carton to be pressed together as in Fig. 15. Complete squaring of the carton occurs as soon as the three links 78, 79, and 80 are horizontal. As shown in Fig, 16, the opened carton is firmly grasped by the pusher 81 and the front member 83, being held in this position while it is carried by the conveyer through the filling and sealing mechanisms.`

The conveyer also acts automatically and solely throughl the operation of parts rigidlyv tons as long as the chain continues its straight travel. When one of the links 80 starts to pass around the sprocket at the right as viewed in Fig. 11, the front member 83 is lowered (Fig. 17 disengaging the carton and permitting it to be carried by the pusher 81 along guideways 86. At the same time,

the ejector finger 85 is raised and swung in such an yarc that the carton is pushed clear of the hook 82 and into certain delivery and flap pressing devices which will be described later. The successive stages in this ejecting action will be apparent from Figs. 17 to 19.

Flap closing devices (Figs. 1, 3, .4, 5, 6 and 20 to 2.9)

As the opened carton is being carried along in a. pocket of the conveyer, its end aps are acted upon by various folding devices which will now be described. As soon as the carton has been completely opened, its short rear flap b at that side of the machine from which the blade 58 operates is acted upon by a swinging folder 90 carried/byA the arm 91 of a. rock shaft 92. Immediately thereafter, the front flap 0 runs under the end of a stationary rail 93 and is thereby folded over the previously folded rear flap. The rail 93 is long enough so that it holds the flaps in position until the bottom flap folder operates, and also serves as a backing to prevent movement of is pushed into it.

The carton is at this point charged with al wrapped article by means which will be described later, the charging, as well as the folding operations, taking place while the carton is in continuous motion. When the carton has passed beyond the charging apparatus, its rear flap b on the second end (the end into which the article is inserted) 4 is brought within range of an oscillating folder 94 similar to the rear closer 90, and carried upon an arm 95 mounted on a rock shaft 96.

Shaft 92 has an arm 97, 'and shaft 96 an arm` 98, connected together by a link 99, so that the two folders swing together although they are, to use an electrical analogy, ninety degrees out of phase. This is for the reason that the folder 94 operates on a carton after it has moved from the range of folder 90, and at a time when the folder 90 has to be out o the way of a succeeding carton.

In order to oscillate the two folders periodically in timed relation to the remainder of the mechanism, shaft 96 is provided with a second arm 100 joined by a link 101 with a constantly rotating crank 102 on a shaft 103. At each revolution of the shaft 103, the folders 90 and 94 will be actuated successively. Shaft 103 carries a bevel gear 104 (Fig. 3) meshing with a similar gear 105 on a sleeve 106 loosely mounted on a transverse shaft 107.

As soon as the carton has passed the second rear folder, its long front flap c strikesY a stationary plate 108 which folds it back over the short rear flap b and then holds both flaps until the folding of the bottom flap has progressed sufficiently to make the release of the front and rear flaps safe. The bottom flaps (Z and d are engaged simultane- .ously by stationary plow folders 109 and 110, both being preferably made integral' with the main frame of the gluing device at their own side of the conveyer, and folder 110 being preferably integral with plate 108. Rail 93 and plate 108 are preferably cut away sharply at 111 and 112', respectively (Figs. 25 and 26) so that the bottom flaps d and d may swing bodily about their pivotal creases without interference.

The upper'flaps e and e are now the only ones projecting from the carton ends.- They receive a dab of adhesive from a gluing delvice to be described below, and are then folded down upon the other flaps by folders 113 mounted just beyond the gluing apparatus. Y

Article z'nsertz'ng mecham'sm (Figs. 1, 2, 3, 4,

- 2Q, and 23) `meshes with a 3) driven from sprockets (not shown) at the v wrapping machine and guided by sprockets 116 freely rotatable on the shaft 107. The chains run in slots 117 formed in a stationary shelf 118, upon which the articles slide under the influence of curved pusher plates 119 attached to spaced links on the chain.

Pivoted at 120 (Fig. 4) to a stationary part of the machine is an arm 121 having a pusher head 122 (Fig. 3)v adj ustably clamped to it by a bolt 123. A link 124 (Fig. 4) is pivoted to the arm 121 at 125, and at 126 to an arm 127 projecting from the shaft 96. The pusher is thus caused to'swing in synchronism with the rear flap folders on an arc which extends across the article conveyer to the open side of a carton on the carton conveyer. As the pusher swings towards a carton, its speed on this arc is such that the component of motion parallel to the conveyers| corresponds roughly to the linear speed of the conveyers, so that the pusher maintains its engagement with the rear end of an article while sweeping it sidewaysfrom one of theV plates 119 into the open end of a moving carton (Fig. 22).v Immediately returning from this position, the head 122 passes across the article conveyer in the rear of that plate from the front of which it had just removed an article.

GIZ/wing mechanism (Figs. 1, 5, 6, and 27) its continuous movement. Since the flap is moving, the dauberis also moved longitudinally of thelc'arton conveyer during the short time it is in contact with the iiap.

The glue pot 130 (Fig. 6) is fixed upon the standards 73 which support the shaft 71, and has across its top a plate 131 adapted to overlie the flap e and to hold it in position. The glue dauber 132, bearing a glue applying die 133 of suitable form (here shown as U-shaped) is `carried upon an arm 134 fast upon a sleeve 135 freely rotatable upon a crank pin 136 (Figs. 5 and 6). A second arm 137 also fixed upon thev sleeve 135, is forked at its lower end to embrace a;

square sleeve 138 freely turnable on the shaft 71 to guide the dauber arm 134 as the crank pin is rotated. The crank pin is carried upon a crank arm 139 rotatable on a pivot s haft 140.` A gear -141 on the crank arm meshes with an idler 142, which in turn 71 gear 143 on the conveyer shaft Asthe conveyer shaft 71 is constantly rotated by the conveyer chains, the crank arm 139 will also be constantly rotated. In each cycle, the dauber will be lowered into the` pin. moving for a short distance at the same rate as the flap. In order to avoid the application of glue to the bot-tom surface of plate 131 if no carton is present, the plate is preferably apertured as at 11.4 (Fig. 4)' in substautiallv the same pattern as the die 133,v

but in larger area.

As a matter of convenience in filling and draining the glue pot. a spout 115 is pivoted at 116 at one side of the pot. The pivot is hollow and communicates both with the pot and with the spout. IYhen the spout is up` the adhesive poured into it will fill the glue pot. the sides of the spoilt being above the liquid level. If it is desired to drain the glue pot. the spout is swung downwardly about its pivot. which is below the lowestpoint in the pot. so that all adhesive will run out.

Delirerg/ mechanism (Figs. 1 am? 4) After the top-fiaps of the carton have been glued. the carton is ejected from the conveyor pocket b v the fingers 85 operating in the manner described above. This pushes the carton tiap past the folders 113. and moves the carton between intermittently movable deliverv belts 150. These belts run over idle pulleys 151 and driven pulleys 152. One of the belts passes over a fixed abutment- 153 and the other over an abutment 154 pressed by springs against the belt. B v this means the end flaps of the carton are subjected to a vielding pressure which holds the glued aps until the adhesive has become set. and slight inequalities in the lengths of the packages are accommodated. As they are being carried intermittently by-.the belts. the cartons slide over a delivery table 156 which extends bevoud the belts so that the cartons are stacked in a convenient.position for being removed by the operator.

For rotating the pulleys '152' intermittentlv. they are each provided with a ratchet 157 acted on b v a pawl 158 pivoted on a pawl carrier 159 and pressed towards the ratchet by a spring 160. One of the pawl carriers is provided with an arm.161 joined b v a link 162 with an arm 163 projecting from the shaft 96 which operates the second rear folder 91. A link 16-1 joining the two pawl carriers causes them both to move simultaneously.

(la/fon feed control (Figs. I, 3. 8. 9 and 10) In order to avoid waste, the present machine 1s provided with control mechanism vwhereby no carton'will be fed from the magazine unless a wrapped article is present to be pushed into it. Instead of stopping the movement of the carton feeding parts, themachine prevents .the feeding of a carton byl causing a slight vertical movement of the carton magazine, just sutiicient to cause the carton feeding blade 58 to pass under the lowermost collapsed carton in the magazine rather than between the carton walls. The mounting of the magazine for vertical sliding movement on rods 35 has been described above. The mechanism for causing this motion will now be considered.

Power for moving the magazine is derived from the oscillating mechanism for the fingers which sweep the carton into the conveyer pockets. These lingers are fixed to a rock shaft 170 extending across the machine and are oscillated by a crank 171 (Fig. 1) carried by a shaft 172 and joined to one of the fingers 65 by a connecting rod 173. The shaft 172 bears a sprocket 17 et around which passes a chain 175 driven from a suitable sprocket (not shown) on the wrapping machine with which the present machine is associated. A chain tightening pulley 176 for maintaining this chain under proper operating conditions is shown in Fig. 1.

Through a disk 177 (Figs. 2 and 8) fixed to the shaft 170 extends a pin 178 which in each c vcle of the machine oscillates through an arc best shownn by a comparison of Figs. 8 and 9. In the normal operation of the machine, this pin performs no function. `When, however, no article is presentin the article conveyer, the forked end 179 of a lever 180 is shifted t-o a position directly above the pin when this is in its lowermost position. The lever is pivoted at 181 to a bracket 182 fixed to the rods 35 which carry the magazine, and is concaved at 183 to tit the pin. As the pin moves through its arc, it will. with the lever 180 in thel position of Fig. `9. engage the lower end thereof and move it, together with the bracket 182, the rods 35, and` the magazine.

a suiicient vertical distance so that the lower,y

most carton is above the path of the blade 58.

To rock the lever 180 whenever an article is not in place in the conveyer, its upper end is provided with a smooth contact surface 181 against which bears a similar contact surface 185 on a lever 186l fixed on a shaft 187 journaled in a bracket 188 projecting from the carton magazine. A feeler 189 is fastened to the end of this lever and projects into the path of the end of an article being pushed along the shelf 118 by a pusher plate 119. If an article is present, as in Fig. 8, the levers 18() and 186 will be rocked to bring the end 179 of the former out of the path of the pin 17 8. If no article is present, this motion does not take place, and the magazine is lifted as shown in Figs. 9 and 1 0.

In order to relieve the parts from the full weight-of the magazine, the latter is partially counterbalancedby springs 190 stretched between the bracket 182 and the fiXed bracket 38. Aspring 191, strained between the lever 180 and a pin 192 on the bracket 182, partially counterbalances the weight of the various lever mechanisms to render their movement by the article easier.

Main gearing (Figs. 1 and 3) rear fiap folders, the article charging plunger 122, and the intermittent delivery conveyer. A bevel gear 196 onvthe sleeve 106 meshes with a gear 197 on the shaft 41 which causes motion of the carton opening blade 58. All the mechanisms are by this gearing interconnected so that they operate in timed sequence to eachother and tothe wrapping machine.

Swmmary of operation Assuming the carton magazine to be full of collapsed cartons and a constant succession of wrapped articles to be supplied by the chain pushers 119, the machine operates in the manner which will now be briefiy summarized. The blade 58 moves into the carton magazine, at first in a slightl upward direction and thenihotizontally until it has passed well between the walls of the lowermost collapsed carton. It then moves downwardly, snapping the carton past the opposed ledges 33 and 'thereby effectively breaking the rigidity of the creases. As the blade withdraws from the magazine, the carton is held back by the end walls 30 until it is entirely released and drops onto the guideways 63.

Fingers 65 sweep the carton along these guideways Iand into an open pocket of the conveyer chain,as shown in Fig. 13. As the conveyer moves along continuously,fiap b is bent inwardly by folder 90 and fiap c by folder 93. At substantially the same time, the wrapped article .s is pushed into the open end of the carton by the swinging pusher 122. Flap 'b' is then closed by folder 94 and flap c by the plate 108.

The remaining flaps are handled simultaneously atvboth ends ofthe carton.- The two bottom fla-ps d and "'are turned upwardly by the plows 109 and 110, the outstanding upper fiaps e and e receive a dab of ad:

hesive from the gluing device, and these latter fiaps are finally turned downwardly against the others by folders 113. The action of the conveyer pockets illustrated in Figs. 17 tov 19, then ejects the closed and sealed carton between the delivery belts 150.

Modz'jed delivery mechanisms (Figs. 2.9, 30,

v and 31) Themechanism as described above will operate satisfactorily on most types`o'f cartons, and is desirable'by reason of itsy compactness and simplicity. In this meehanism the last flap is not folded down by the folder 113 until the carton is just being released by the opening conveyer pocket, and where the carton blanks have especialA resilience the glued carton may spring back slightly out of square before it is grip ed by the belts 150. In order to avoid this difficulty we have devised two modifications, one operating by holding the carton firmly in the conveyer pocket until the final fiap is folded belts 150 but spaced further from the shaftk 71. This provides a space between the belts and the folder 113through which the carton passes after the folding of the final Hap. Rails 203, which may be spring pressed if desired, hold the fiaps until the cartons are pushed by ejectors 85 between the belts 202.

The second suggested modification leaves the belts 150 in their original position, but omits the ejectors 85 from the conveyer. Their place is taken by a pair of fingers 205 mounted on a shaft 206 suitably journaled in the machine frame. A gear 207 on this shaft meshes with the gear 141 of one of the gluing devices, being of double the number of teeth sov that the shaft will revolve one-half a revolution during each cycle of the machine. The ends 208 of the arms are curved so that they bear upon the upper rear corner of the carton as shown in Fig. 31. The pressure of the ejector arms against this corner of the carton effectively counteracts any tendency of the carton to collapse, and preserves the squareness of the carton until it is received between the belts 150.

Other modifications of the structure described will doubtless suggest themselves to,

to limit ourselves to the details of mechanism shown.

We claim:

l. A device for setting up collapsed cartons comprising a carton magazine having opposed ledges for supporting a stack of collapsed cartons each having longer flaps on its upper flattened sides than on its lower sides, a blade. and means for moving the blade laterally into the magazine lirst in a slanting direction to press against the upper flaps, then into the carton parallel to its Walls to separate them, and then past the ledges to force the carton between themand break the rigidity of its creases.

:2. A device for settingup collapsed cartons comprising a carton magazine having opposed ledges for supporting a stack of collapsed cartons, a blade, means for moving the blade so as to project it into the lovvermostcarton in the magazine and to remove it therefrom, means for complet-ing the opening of the carton. means for carrying articles into position to be inserted into the opened carton, and means actuated by the absence of an article in said carrying means for rendering the blade inoperative to remove the lowermost carton from the magazine.

3. A device for setting up collapsed cartons comprising a vertically movable carton magazine having opposed ledges for supporting a stack of collapsed cartons, a blade, means for moving the blade to cause it to)enter the lovvermost carton in the magazine and to remove it therefrom, means for completing the opening of the carton, means for vcarrying articles into position to be inserted into the opened carton, and means actuated by the absence of an article in said carrying means for bodily moving the magazine gertically to remove the-lowerni'stcarton fronithe path of the blade.

4. A device for setting up collapsed 'cartons which comprises Opposed ledges for supporting a carton, a blade, means for moving the blade first into the carton, then past the ledges to break the rigidity of the creases of the carton, and then out of the carton to completely7 release it, and a carton opening pocket adapted to exert pressure on opposite corners of the released and recollapsed carton to open it.

5. A device for setting up collapsed cartons which comprises opposed ledges for supporting a carton. a blade, means for moving the blade first into the carton, then past the ledges to break the rigidity of the creases of the carton, and then out of the carton Vto completely release it, a guideivay upon which the release and recollapsed carton may rest, a carton conveyer having devices positionable adjacent the guidevvay for exerting pressure on opposite edges of the recollapsed carton to open it, and means for feeding a recollapsed carton along the guidevvay to the conveyer.

6. A device for setting up collapsed cartons comprising a pair of sprockets, a linked conent chain links so as to partake of the movement of the latter relatively one to another during the motion of the chain.

8. A device for setting up collapsedcartons comprising a pair of sprockets, a linked con-v veyer chain passing around the sprockets. pairs of pocket forming members rigidly connected to the chain links, the two members of each pair having opposed carton corner engaging surfaces and being connected to different chain links so as to partake of the movement of the latter relatively one to another during the motion of the chain, and a series of ejector fingers rigidlyconnected to certain of the chain links.

9. A device'for setting up collapsed cartons comprising a conveyer chain having a sequence of links pivoted together, and co` operating pocket members rigidly secured to remote links.

10. A device for setting up collapsed cartons comprising a conveyer chain having sequence of links pivoted together, a pocket member having a hooked end and rigidly connected to one link, and a second pocket member having a carton-supporting ledge and rigidly connected to a link spaced at least one link from the first-named link.

11. A device for setting up collapsed cartons comprising a conveyer chain having a sequence of links pivotedtogether, a pocket member rigidly connected to one link, a second pocket member rigidly connected to a link `remote from the first link, and an ejector iinger rigidly connected to the second link.

12.'A device for setting up collapsed car` tons comprising a conveyer chain having a sequence of links pivoted together, a pocket member having a hooked end and rigidly connected to one link, a secondpocket member` 12 having a carton-supporting ledge and rigidly connected to a link remote from the first link, and an ejector linger rigidly connected to the second link.

13. A device for'setting up collapsed cartons comprising a pair of continuously rotating spaced sprockets. a conveyer chain running over said spockets and having a s'equence of links pivoted together. a pocket member having a hooked endand rigidly ponnected to one link, and a second pocket member having a', carton-supporting ledge and rigidly connected to a link remote from the first link, the two pocket members presenting parallel carton-grasping Walls when the links are in line but separating to open up the pocket when one of the links is deflected by passing around a sprocket.

14. A device for setting up collapsed cartons comprising a pair of continuously rotating spaced sprockets, a conveyer chain running over said sprockets and having a sequence of'links pivoted together, a pocket member having a hooked end and rigidly connected to one link, and a second pocket member having a carton-supporting ledge and rigidlyconnected to a link remote from the first link, the two pocket members presenting parallel carton-grasping walls when the links are in line but separating to open up the pocket when one of the links is deflected by passing around a sprocket, and an ejector finger rigidly connected to the second named link and projectable into the carton path by the passage of the second link onto a sprocket. v 15. A device for closing the iaps of cartons comprising a continuously moving carton conveyer, a glue pot adjacent the path of the conveyer, a reciprocable glue dauber movable into and out of the glue pot, means for imparting to the glue dauber when raised from the glue pot a motion in the direction of movement of the conveyer, and means for folding the glued flap.

16. A device for closing the liaps of cartons comprising a continuously moving carton conveyer, a glue pot adjacent the path of the conveyer, a reciprocable glue dauber movable int-o and out of the glue pot, and means for imparting to the glue dauber when raised from the glue pot a motion in the direction of movement of the conveyer, a plate for guiding acartonflap into adj acency with lle dauber, and means for folding the glued i3?. A device for closing the iiaps of cartons comprising a continuously moving carton conveyer, a glue pot adjacent the path of the conveycr, a reciprocable glue dauber movableinto and out of the glue pot, and

means for imparting to the gluedauber when raised from the glue pot a motion in the directionof movement of the conveyer, a plate for guiding a carton flap into adjacency with the dauber, said plate being perforated to avoid contact with the dauber in the absence of a carton flap, and means for folding the gluedy flap.

18. A device for filling and closing cartons comprising a continuously moving conveyor provided with carton holding pockets, a second conveyor having a portion of its travel adjacent the first and continuously moving at the same speed, said second con' veyor having a series of members thereon for carrying a succession of articles in registry with the pockets of the lirst conveyor, a pusher movable completely across the second conveyor in front of one of the advancing members to sweep an article into a carton carried by the first conveyor, and back completely across the second conveyor in the rear of said member, all during the continuous movement of both conveyors, and means adjacent the iirstconveyor for folding the remaining flaps of the cartons carried thereby.

19. A carton closing conveyor having means for carrying a succession of cartons with their yflaps open, an oscillating folder at one side of the conveyor movable to close one rear iiap of a carton, means located at a subsequent point of the travel of the conveyor and on the opposite side thereof for introducing an article into the carton, a second oscillating folder located at the second side of theconveyor at a still further point in its travel and positively connected to the first in such a manner that one of the folders is always operative while the other is inoperative, and means for closing the remaining flaps of the cartons.

20. A device for setting up collapsed cartons comprising a carton magazine having opposed ledges for supporting a stack of cartons, a blade, mechanism for moving the blade first into the lowermost carton in the stack,

Vthen past the ledges to draw the carton between them and thereby open the carton partway to its squared up form, and then out of the carton, and an abutment positioned to restrain the carton from moving with the blade during the last-named motion whereby the carton is freed from the blade and permitted vto reassume substantially its original {iattened form but with the rigidity of its creases broken.

21. A device for setting up collapsed cartons comprising a plurality of guides defining a magazine for a stack of cartons and eX- tending partway across the ends to the car-- tons to `determine their endwise position, ledges mounted at an intermediate point of the guides and determining the limit of bodily movement of the stack of cartons, and a bladeA constrained for movement in a path whereby it enters between the guides and between the walls of the'carton immediately supported by the ledges, then moves past the ledges to carry that carton beyond the ledges, and then passes out between the guides whereby the carton is freed.

22. A device for setting up collapsed cartons which' comprises means for opening a carton partway to its squared up form and then completely releasing it so that at reassumes substantially its original attened form but withv the rigidity of its creases broken, and means for opening up the released car- 23. A device for setting u collapsed cartons which comprises oppose ledges for supporting a carton, a blade, means :for moving the blade first into the carton, then past the ledges to draw the carton between them and thereby open the carton partway to its squared up form, and then out of the carton to release it completely and thereby permit it to reassume substantially its original flattened form but with the rigidity of its creases broken, and means for opening up the released carton.

24. A carton handling apparatus comprising a continuously moving conveyor, means for delivering collapsed cartons successively to the moving conveyor in timed relation therewith, and means carried wholly by the conveyor for opening up the collapsed cartons. v

25. A carton handling apparatus comprising a continuousl moving conveyor, means `for delivering col apsed cartons successively to the moving conveyor intimed relation therewith, means carried wholly by the conveyor for opening up the collapsed cartons; and devices positioned alongside the conveyor for closin the carton flaps and inserting articles in t e conveyor during, the movement of the latter.

In testimony whereof we have aiixed our signatures.

ELMER L. SMITH. FREDERIC B. FULLER.

US308801A 1928-09-27 1928-09-27 Carton opening and filling machine Expired - Lifetime US1873059A (en)

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Cited By (25)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2429536A (en) * 1943-10-27 1947-10-21 Gardner Riechardson Company Means for erecting and positioning cartons
US2430878A (en) * 1941-04-12 1947-11-18 Standard Knapp Corp Case packer
US2440866A (en) * 1942-01-12 1948-05-04 Redington Co F B Packaging apparatus having parallel article and container carrying conveyors combined with article pusher, comprising rotating spider with pivotally mounted arms
US2448198A (en) * 1943-08-26 1948-08-31 Nat Folding Box Company Inc Machine for making containers
US2570144A (en) * 1949-07-13 1951-10-02 Nat Folding Box Company Inc Folding box forming machine
US2628542A (en) * 1945-09-17 1953-02-17 Emhart Mfg Co Adjustable conveyer for cartoning machines
US2662356A (en) * 1952-02-28 1953-12-15 Container Corp Carton loading machine
US2695484A (en) * 1949-03-23 1954-11-30 Wilmer Elmer Ellsworth Machine for packaging articles in tubes
US2762274A (en) * 1948-12-31 1956-09-11 Fmc Corp Carton erecting apparatus
US2906075A (en) * 1955-09-29 1959-09-29 Leo G Vogel Box erecting and loading apparatus
US2906392A (en) * 1956-04-30 1959-09-29 Fmc Corp Machine for inserting articles into cartons
US2923112A (en) * 1954-12-01 1960-02-02 Bartelt Engineering Co Machine for filling and closing cartons
US2979873A (en) * 1956-04-30 1961-04-18 Fmc Corp Machine for inserting articles into cartons
US2993314A (en) * 1958-07-07 1961-07-25 St Regis Paper Co Packaging machine
US3007293A (en) * 1952-01-21 1961-11-07 Alexander Donald Method and apparatus for filling and closing cartons
US3043069A (en) * 1960-08-08 1962-07-10 Little Inc A Automatic processing apparatus
US3058271A (en) * 1955-02-03 1962-10-16 King O Matic Equipment Corp Carton feeding, erecting, filling and closing mechanism
US3134309A (en) * 1961-02-06 1964-05-26 H G Weber And Company Inc Apparatus for erecting packing cases
US3300946A (en) * 1963-10-14 1967-01-31 Bartelt Engineering Co Inc Cartoning machine
US3698154A (en) * 1970-03-12 1972-10-17 Gen Foods Corp Packaging apparatus and process
US4891928A (en) * 1988-09-14 1990-01-09 Hayssen Manufacturing Company Carton loading machine
EP0558347A1 (en) * 1992-02-26 1993-09-01 The Mead Corporation Device and method for feeding and opening cartons
US5454215A (en) * 1992-04-14 1995-10-03 A.M.R.P. Handels Ag Case gripping device in an automatic packaging machine
US20080155945A1 (en) * 2005-03-03 2008-07-03 Sidel Participations Machine For Automated Packaging Of Product(S) In A Cardboard Box
US20080196360A1 (en) * 2007-02-15 2008-08-21 Marchesini Group S.P.A. Machine For Packaging Articles into Boxes

Cited By (27)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2430878A (en) * 1941-04-12 1947-11-18 Standard Knapp Corp Case packer
US2440866A (en) * 1942-01-12 1948-05-04 Redington Co F B Packaging apparatus having parallel article and container carrying conveyors combined with article pusher, comprising rotating spider with pivotally mounted arms
US2448198A (en) * 1943-08-26 1948-08-31 Nat Folding Box Company Inc Machine for making containers
US2429536A (en) * 1943-10-27 1947-10-21 Gardner Riechardson Company Means for erecting and positioning cartons
US2628542A (en) * 1945-09-17 1953-02-17 Emhart Mfg Co Adjustable conveyer for cartoning machines
US2762274A (en) * 1948-12-31 1956-09-11 Fmc Corp Carton erecting apparatus
US2695484A (en) * 1949-03-23 1954-11-30 Wilmer Elmer Ellsworth Machine for packaging articles in tubes
US2570144A (en) * 1949-07-13 1951-10-02 Nat Folding Box Company Inc Folding box forming machine
US3007293A (en) * 1952-01-21 1961-11-07 Alexander Donald Method and apparatus for filling and closing cartons
US2662356A (en) * 1952-02-28 1953-12-15 Container Corp Carton loading machine
US2923112A (en) * 1954-12-01 1960-02-02 Bartelt Engineering Co Machine for filling and closing cartons
US3058271A (en) * 1955-02-03 1962-10-16 King O Matic Equipment Corp Carton feeding, erecting, filling and closing mechanism
US2906075A (en) * 1955-09-29 1959-09-29 Leo G Vogel Box erecting and loading apparatus
US2906392A (en) * 1956-04-30 1959-09-29 Fmc Corp Machine for inserting articles into cartons
US2979873A (en) * 1956-04-30 1961-04-18 Fmc Corp Machine for inserting articles into cartons
US2993314A (en) * 1958-07-07 1961-07-25 St Regis Paper Co Packaging machine
US3043069A (en) * 1960-08-08 1962-07-10 Little Inc A Automatic processing apparatus
US3134309A (en) * 1961-02-06 1964-05-26 H G Weber And Company Inc Apparatus for erecting packing cases
US3300946A (en) * 1963-10-14 1967-01-31 Bartelt Engineering Co Inc Cartoning machine
US3698154A (en) * 1970-03-12 1972-10-17 Gen Foods Corp Packaging apparatus and process
US4891928A (en) * 1988-09-14 1990-01-09 Hayssen Manufacturing Company Carton loading machine
EP0558347A1 (en) * 1992-02-26 1993-09-01 The Mead Corporation Device and method for feeding and opening cartons
US5454215A (en) * 1992-04-14 1995-10-03 A.M.R.P. Handels Ag Case gripping device in an automatic packaging machine
US20080155945A1 (en) * 2005-03-03 2008-07-03 Sidel Participations Machine For Automated Packaging Of Product(S) In A Cardboard Box
US7607282B2 (en) * 2005-03-03 2009-10-27 Sidel Participations Machine for automated packaging of products(s) in a cardboard box
US20080196360A1 (en) * 2007-02-15 2008-08-21 Marchesini Group S.P.A. Machine For Packaging Articles into Boxes
US7543425B2 (en) * 2007-02-15 2009-06-09 Marchesini Group S.P.A. Machine for packaging articles into boxes

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