US2111901A - Wrapping and packaging machine - Google Patents

Wrapping and packaging machine Download PDF

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US2111901A
US2111901A US31630A US3163035A US2111901A US 2111901 A US2111901 A US 2111901A US 31630 A US31630 A US 31630A US 3163035 A US3163035 A US 3163035A US 2111901 A US2111901 A US 2111901A
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Prior art keywords
carton
arm
sheet
stack
folding
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US31630A
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Edward F Ness
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MORRIS PACKAGING EQUIPMENT Co
MORRIS PACKAGING EQUIPMENT COM
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MORRIS PACKAGING EQUIPMENT COM
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Priority to US31630A priority Critical patent/US2111901A/en
Priority claimed from US15034837 external-priority patent/US2152970A/en
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    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B65CONVEYING; PACKING; STORING; HANDLING THIN OR FILAMENTARY MATERIAL
    • B65BMACHINES, APPARATUS OR DEVICES FOR, OR METHODS OF, PACKAGING ARTICLES OR MATERIALS; UNPACKING
    • B65B11/00Wrapping, e.g. partially or wholly enclosing, articles or quantities of material, in strips, sheets or blanks, of flexible material
    • B65B11/06Wrapping articles, or quantities of material, by conveying wrapper and contents in common defined paths
    • B65B11/18Wrapping articles, or quantities of material, by conveying wrapper and contents in common defined paths in two or more straight paths
    • B65B11/20Wrapping articles, or quantities of material, by conveying wrapper and contents in common defined paths in two or more straight paths to fold the wrappers in tubular form about contents
    • B65B11/22Wrapping articles, or quantities of material, by conveying wrapper and contents in common defined paths in two or more straight paths to fold the wrappers in tubular form about contents and then to form closing folds of similar form at opposite ends of the tube
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B65CONVEYING; PACKING; STORING; HANDLING THIN OR FILAMENTARY MATERIAL
    • B65BMACHINES, APPARATUS OR DEVICES FOR, OR METHODS OF, PACKAGING ARTICLES OR MATERIALS; UNPACKING
    • B65B11/00Wrapping, e.g. partially or wholly enclosing, articles or quantities of material, in strips, sheets or blanks, of flexible material
    • B65B11/06Wrapping articles, or quantities of material, by conveying wrapper and contents in common defined paths
    • B65B11/18Wrapping articles, or quantities of material, by conveying wrapper and contents in common defined paths in two or more straight paths
    • B65B11/26Wrapping articles, or quantities of material, by conveying wrapper and contents in common defined paths in two or more straight paths to fold the wrappers in channel form about contents and then to close the ends of the channel by folding and finally the mouth of the channel by folding or twisting

Description

March 22, 1938. E. F. NESS 2,111,901
WRAPPING AND PACKAGING MACHINE Filed July 16, 1935' e Sheets-Sheet 1 March 22, 1938. E. F. NESS I 2,111,901
WRAPPING AND PACKAGING MACHINE Filed July 16, 1955' 6 Sheets-Sheet 2 March 22, 1938. E. F. NESS WRAPPING AND PACKAGING MACHINE Filed July 16, 1935 6 Sheets-Sheet Z March 22, 1938. E. F. NESS WRAPPING AND PACKAGING MACHINE Filed July 16, 1935 6 Sheets-Sheet 4 March 22, 1938. E F, N Ess 2,111,901
WRAPPING AND PACKAGING MACHINE Filed July 16, 1936- 6 sheets-sheets PIE-.15 04 5113.15 13152.5 04,
1 1 I I; a 1
March 22, 1938. m :55 2,111,901
WRAPPING AND PACKAGING MACHINE Filed July 16, 1935 e Sheets-Sheet 6 Fl 1 E T 131 .139 94 PATENT 1 orrlcs wmrrmo m racmonve momma T mm o ward F. Neel, Toledo, Ohio, aaaignor to blurhglng Equipment Company, Toledo, hio, a corporation of Ohio im m July 16, 1935, Serial No. 31.630
16 Claims.
This invention relates to machines for wrapping individual prints or bars of butter, oleomargarine, and'the like, with flexible sheet material, thereafter arranging the wrapped bars in a predeterminedmanner and packaging them in cartons, and an objectis to produce a new and improved machine of the above character, which is relatively simple in construction and automatic in operation and has the novel features of arrangement hereinafter described.
Other objects of the invention are to produce a simple and eflicient conveying mechanism by which the prints are individually advanced to the wrapping mechanism, to enable inspection and replacement of damaged prints or bars; to produce a new and improved sheet feeding and severing device by which the sheet material is printed and fed continuously to position of use, the printing being predetermined'withrespect to the sev ering operation so that each severed segment contains printed matter in the desiredposition,
the sheet feeding mechanism operating continuously in such manner as to avoid buckling; to produce an improved wrapping mechanism which militates against damage to the prints or bars during the wrapping operation and insures that the sheet material will be retained folded during subsequent operations; to improve the carton feeding mechanism in such manner that any damage to a carton blank during the feeding will not injure the carton or render the folded carton unsightly; to provide a new and improved device for stacking the prints or bars in a relatively simple manner and so that no damage to the bars results; and to provide simple and efficient carton closing mechanism which enables the carton to be closed quickly and insures against damage tothe contents-during such operation.
Further objects and advantages of the invention will hereinafter appear, and, for purposes of illustration but not of limitation, an embodiment of the invention is shown in the accompanying drawings, in which:
. Figure 1 is a vertical sectional elevation partly diagrammatic of a machine for wrapping prints or bars of butter, oleomargarine, or the like, stacking the wrapped bars in a predetermined manner and then packaging the stackin a carton; I
5 Figure 2 is a top .plan view of the'machine shown in Figure 1 with the carton feed removed;
Figure 3 is an enlarged vertical section diagrammatically showing the primary print feed and the. conveyor for conveying the individual 56 prints a vertically moving ram;
sheet material against the prints or bars; -5
Figure 6. is a vertical sectional view showing the housing through whichfthe bars or prints are moved vertically partially to wrap the sheet material thereabout; j
Figure! is a fragmentary view of one of the 10 end folding plates and a portion of the housing through which the individual bars are moved to eflfect'folding of the sheet material; V
Figure 8 is an elevation partly in section showing diagrammatically the apparatus for folding -15,
the sheet materialabout the individual prints or bars:
arm for folding the rear flap of the parchment or sheet material against the underside of the print 2o or bar; I Figures 10, 11, 12, 13, and 14 are-perspective views of an end portion of a print or bar showing successively the steps of folding the sheet material thereabout; 25
Figures 15 and 16 are side elevations partly in section showing the final folding operations of the sheet material about the bar, Figure 16 showing the manner of moistening the overlapping flaps for retaining them in position; 30 Figure 17 is a diagrammatic elevation partly in section showing the mechanism for stacking the wrapped prints orbars: and advancing the stackinto engagement with the carton to the carton elevatorfand th'e pusher for advancing the 35 stack partially enclosed by the carton;
Figures 18, 19 and 20 are side-elevations partly in section showing diagrammatically the folding of the panels against the sides of the stack;
Figure 21 is a top plan view showing the mech- 40 anism for folding the end flaps of the carton against the stack; a
Figure 22 is a sectional elevation showing the devices for breaking the lips on the end'tl-lcks;
Figure 23 is a fragmentary detail elevation 45 Figure 26 is a view in elevation showing the 86 Figure a sectional. elevation showing the gripper for bowing the uppermost panel of the carton for facilitating and insuring the insertion of the adjacent lip inside the carton;
Figure 2'? is a longitudinal sectional elevation showing the shelf for raising the stack and carton, for folding the side panels, and also showing the devices for folding the end flaps; and Figure 28 is a plan view of a carton blank. The illustrated embodiment of this invention comprises a machine on which are placed individual bars or prints of butter, oleomargarine, or other similar semi-plastic materials. The operator ordinarily takes these prints from a. printing machine, which forms the bars of the desired sizes, and places them on a conveyer A, which advances them to another conveyor B, which moves at a higher-rate of speed than the primary feed, spacing them an appropriate distance apart. From the conveyor B the individual prints are moved vertically through a wrapping device C which operates to wrap each print with a sheet of relatively thin flexible material such as parchment paper. The wrapped prints are then advanced to a stacker D, which arranges four prints in a symmetrical stack. A
carton feeding device E delivers a carton blank in upright position into the path of movement of the stack of wrapped prints. During the further advancing movement of the stack, the carton is wrapped about it by the carton folding mechanism F, whereupon the package is discharged from the machine.
Referring particularly to the drawings, it will be understood that only so much of the operating mechanism is shown to enable those skilled in this art fully and adequately to understand the nature and operation of the invention. Effort has been made to omit unnecessary detailed disclosure of parts which tend only to obscure the real invention, but, on the contrary, as many of the parts have been shown diagrammatically to facilitate understanding of the structure and operation of the machine as possible. The primary feed A, to which the individual bars Ill of butter, oleomargarine, or the like, preferably of one-quarter pound size, are delivered, comprises a movable table II reciprocating between stationary guides II on which opposite ends of the prints l0 are disposed. A step-by-step mo tion is imparted to the table II by a rocker arm l2 having a roller l3 at its upper end operating in a vertical guide M. This serves to reciprocate the table II longitudinally. At predetermined points in the swinging movement of the arm i 2, the table is raised or lowered; raised during the advancing movement and lowered during the retracting movement. This is accomplished by an arm l5, which is pivotally connected at its lower end to a horizontal arm 16, which is movable with a horizontally swinging arm H. The upper end of the arm I5 has a cam surface l8 and carries a roller l9, which is adapted to move vertically in a guide 20. Connected to the lower end of the rocker arm I2 is a rod 2| and connected to the lower end of the arm I! is a rod 22, the opposite end of which may be driven in any suitable manner to eifect the desired movement. It should be noted that the arm I1 is fixed to a shaft 23, to which is flxed a vertical arm 24, from which extends a link for operating an arm similar to the arm l5 adjacent the forward end of the table, a link 26 extending from the upper portion of the arm l5 cooperating with the link 25 and effecting the desired motion.
'Ihe prints II are thus advanced step-by-step toward-an elevator or pusher 21, passing beneath a guide 28 disposed above a stationary platform 23. The prints II are pushed upon the platform 20, the foremost print being moved beyond the rear edge of the platform, whereupon the elevator 21 engages its upper surface and pushes it downwardly to the chain conveyor B. A bell crank 3| is driven in any suitable manner by a rod 3] and engages the lower end of the elevator 21 to impart the vertical reciprocatory movement thereto.
The chain conveyor comprises a pair of chains 32 spaced laterally from each other. Disposed on the chains are shelves or platforms 33 secured at one end to a stop member 34. Adjacent the opposite end of the shelf 33 is another stop member 35. The elevator 21 lowers the individual prints l0 so that opposite end portions thereof rest upon the platforms 33. The lugs 34 and 35 afford a safety measure so that the operator replacing a bad print will not place it on the chain conveyor incorrectly. It will be understood that the prints must be placed properly upon the chain conveyor so that the ram, which raises them, as will hereinafter appear, operates in timed relation to the chain, and if the prints are not properly disposed on the conveyor, they will not be engaged by the ram.
The chain conveyors are trained over sprockets disposed at opposite ends in the usual manner, and, as shown in Figure 4, the shaft 36 on which the rear sprocket is mounted, has a small gear 31 meshing with a large gear 38 to which is fixed a smaller sprocket 39 to receive a chain drive 40 driven in any suitable manner so that the chain conveyor B moves at three times the rate of speed of the primary feed A. It will be understood that by spacing the prints in the manner effected by the chain conveyor, each print may be inspected by an operator, and if one print is damaged, or otherwise unsuitable for wrapping, it can be replaced by another one.
The prints are individually lifted from the chain conveyor B by a vertically movable ram 4|, which, as shown in Figure 8, moves upwardly between the chains 32 and engages the under surface of the print, forcing the same upwardly through the wrapping steps, as will hereinafter appear. Vertical movement is imparted to the ram 4| by a rocker arm 42, the forward end of which is connected by a link 43 to the lower end of the ram, the opposite end of the rocker arm being connected to an eccentric strap 44 engaging an eccentric cam 44 thereby imparting vertical reciprocatory movements to the ram 4i from the rocking movements of the arm 42.
Relatively thin flexible sheet material, such as relatively thin parchment paper, is delivered into the path of vertical movement of the print. In this instance, the sheet material 45 for wrapping the individual prints is fed from a roll 45 passes around a guide roll 46 between printing rolls 41 and 48, over guide rolls 49 and 50 to a pair of driven draw rolls 5| and 5 I and thence to a pair of grip rolls 52, a perforating roll 53 and its cooperating roll 54 being disposed between the draw rolls 5| and grip rolls 52.
The printing roll 48 has diametrically opposed type segments 55 and relieved portions 56, and the roll 41 has a flexible or resilient covering 51 therefor. Ink is supplied to the type segments 55 through rolls 58 and a feeder roll 59, which may be manually or automatically rocked into and out of engagement with a roll 60 operating in an ink bath Ii for delivering the desired amount-of ink to the type segments.
. The grip rolls I2 are driven at a higher pe pheral speed than the draw rolls I in order to maintain the sheet taut at the time of perforating. The perforating roll it, which carries a row ofperforating teeth It, operates at a greater peripheral-speed than either of the pairs of draw roll! Ii and u. The teeth In perforate the sheet material 4! between the'pairs of draw rolls,
whereupon the grip rolls I2 abruptly tear the sheet segment 82 along the line of perforations and feed it forwardly. into the path of movement of the bar or print. One advantage of this operation is that since the sheet. is maintained taut at the time of perforating, no buckling or misalignment of the sheet material takes place.
Heretofore the sheet materialhas been printed separately and then formed into rolls, but this has been objectionable because oftentimes severance will-not take place at the proper point, and some of the printed matter will be omitted-- from the sheet enclosing an individual print.
This objection is eliminated by the above de -1 scribed arrangement in which printing and severing" are accomplished successively without interruption. The operation of the severing roll 53 is timed with respe t to the operation of the printing rolls to insure that severance will take place between the printing. This insures that each print is wrapped with a sheet containing the desired printing matter.
The segment 82 severed from the strip of sheet material 45, is advanced by thegrip rolls 52 to a pair of laterally' spaced supporting fingers 63 (Figure'8) so that as the ram ll moves upwardly it moves the respective print ill into engagement with the underside of the sheet material 62 and .then'moves the same into a housing 64, the width of which is slightly greater than the width of the print i0. It will be noted that the parchment paper of the segment 62 projects beyond the opposite ends of the print it, and during the upward movement of the ram ll the opposite sides'of the segments are first foldeddownwardly,
' as indicated in Figure 10. As the ram 4! continuesits upward movement, end folding plates 65 disposed on opposite sides of the housing 64 operate successively to fold the upper panel down.
wardly against the ends,- leaving the sides extending outwardly as indicated in Figure 11, and thereafter successively folding one flap inwardly and then the other flap over the first flap, as shown in Figures 12 and 13. The above described sheet folding operations are old in the art, and detailed description of the folding plates to accomplish this purpose is not considered necessary.
It should be noted that the front plate 66 of the housing is movable slightly forwardly to comopposite-ends of the print, as shown in Figure 14,
and to support it in its raised position. Arms ill operate in any suitable manner in timed relation to the movement of the ram ll and actuate the fingers Biito and from operative position.
As indicated in Figure 14, the front and rear sides of the wrapping sheet project downwardly beyond the finger O0, and in order to fold the front portion of the sheet against the underside of the print it a folding arm Il- (Figure 9) is pivoted at its lower end at Ii, and has a finger I2 pivoted at its outer end and extending at substantially right angles to the arm. A spring I3 urges the finger 12 against a roller 14 mounted on the plate 68 of the housing 84. It will be noted that the under surface I! of the finger I2 tapers outwardly from the outer end.
In operation, after the fingers 89 have moved inwardly to support the print, the arm 10 is actuated in a counterclockwise direction (Figure 9), and concomitantly the fingers 69 are retracted. Inasmuch as the spring I3 keeps the tapered surface 15 in contact with the roller ll, it will be seen that the end portion of the finger 12 first engages the sheet material beneath the print. and folds the same rearwardiy and then graduallymoves upwardly into engagement with the underside of the print. This operation is of advantage in that it eliminates any liability of tearing the parchment paper or of damaging the print, thereby insuring the desired fold against the underside of the print at each operation in spite of any irregularities in the formation of the print.
As above explained, the fingers is are retracted from the print III, leaving the finger I2 as the support for the print. Thereupon a ram 16, driven in any suitable manner .in timed relation to the operation of the arm 10', moves into engagement with the front side of' the print and advances the same to a shelf i1 having side guides I8. Formed in the shelf" is a row of relatively small holes 19, which communicate with a reservoir or container 80, to which a liquid, such as water under pressure, is delivered through a pipe 8|, so that drops of liquid are forced through the openings 19 sufilcient to moisten the bottom flaps of the sheetmaterial enclosing the print Iii. It will be understood that the ram 16 in advancing the print causes the rear flap abutting the adjacent wall of the housing 64 and which is shown depending in Figure 15, to be folded upwardly against the folded front flap. By molstening, the flaps are adhered, retaining them together and insuring against unfolding during subsequent om erations. It will be apparent that upon reaching the shelf TI the individual print III is entirel wrapped in the parchment paper.
The ram 16 again advances to move two wrapped prints upon a lower shelf 82 of the stacker D, this stroke of the ram being greater than its first stroke. Thereupon the ram 16 retracts to advance the next succeeding print merely to the shelf IT, as above described. After two wrapped prints have been delivered to the stacker D, the latter moves vertically downward to align the upper shelf 83 with the shelf Ti to enable two additional prints to be similarly advanced upon the stacker. Depending from the lower side of the stacker D is a slide 84, which is connected by a link 85 to an actuating arm 86, which is driven in any suitable manner in timed relation to the reciprocatory movement of the ram I5. I
After four wrapped prints have been delivered.
to the stacker D, the same is moved upwardly, as shown by dotted lines in Figure 17. As shown in Figure 2, the shelf 83 is provided with laterally spaced supporting ledges so that the intermediate portions of the bars are free. This enables a ram 66 to engage the front wall of the stack and advance the four prints as a unit from the stacker upon a platform 06 and into engagement with a carton blank 61, which is disposed. in the path of the movement of the stack. The lower end of the carton blank is supported by a pair of laterally spaced bracket members 66.
As shown in Figure 28, the carton I1 is of the usual construction having integral side panels a, b, c and d, and a half panel 6. On opposite sides of the side panel a are end panels I and a, and on opposite sides of the side panel c are end panels h and i. On one side of the half panel e is an end flap 7. An end tuck k is connected to one side of the panel b and has a lip l, and connected to the side d on the opposite side is an end tuck m having a lip 11. It will be understood that the above described carton blank, which is ordinarily coated with parafiin, is of well known construction, and is customarily used for packaging prints of butter, oleomargarine, or the like.
The carton blanks are fed into the path of movement of the stack of wrapped prints or bars by a carton feeding mechanism E. A stack of cartons 81 is supported on this mechanism in vertically inclined position by vertically disposed plates 69 at the lower feeding end and agitator plate 90 at the upper end. A vertically disposed side guide 9I is arranged in pairs on opposite sides of the blanks (only one pair being shown on the drawings). Disposed beneath the stack is an arm 92 mounted on a rod 93 providing a bottom support for the stack.
Disposed at the rear end of the feeding mechanism E adjacent the lower end of the stack is a sector member 94 having a knife edge 95 engageable with the lower edge portion of the lowermost carton. Engageable with the outer surface of the segment 94 is a pair of rollers 96 having rubber-like covers, and arranged between the rollers 96 is a guide member 91. The segment 94 is mounted on a shaft 99, which is driven by a chain 99 in timed relation to the reciprocatory movement of the ram 85 so that a carton will have been fed into the path of movement of the ram 85 when the latter advances.
Also mounted on the shaft 98 is an eccentric strap I00, which is pivotally connected at its upper end to a rod IOI guided by a sleeve I02 and connected at its outer end to the agitator plates 90. As the segment 94 rotates, vibratory movement will be imparted to the plates 90 to militate against the cartons adhering to each other. thereby facilitating and insuring proper feeding actioh.
In operation of the carton feeding mechanism E, it will be apparent that the knife edge 95 of the segment 94 engages the lowermost edge portion of the lowermost carton and moves it from the stack and discharges it between vertically disposed guides I03 and I, the upper portion of the carton resting between these guide members.
An important feature of the carton feeding mechanism E resides in the arrangement of the cartons in stack formation. Contrary to usual practice, the half panel e of the cartons 81 is disposed in the lowermost position and is engaged by the knife blade 95 to draw the individual cartons from the stack. As will hereinafter appear, the half panel e is folded inside the carton, and, consequently, any rupture or tearing which might take place during the withdrawal of individual cartons from the stack will not interfere with the desired appearance of the finished package. Herefore the reverse has been true, and the feeding mechanism has engaged one of the panels, which is disposed on the outside of the folded package, and, consequently, when such imperfections appear, it is necessary to discard the carton and repackage the prints. According to the above arrangement, this difficulty is obviated, and any slight rupturing and breaking of the carton blank in the half panel, does not require discarding of the carton.
As above mentioned, the ram 66 advances the pile or stack of wrapped prints from the stacker D on to the shelf or platform 06 and then into engagement with the vertically disposed carton blank 61, which is supported by the end tuck 11: supported on the stop or bracket 66. The bracket on the opposite side (not shown) is engaged by the end tuck in. The stack and carton are then moved forwardly between the lower portion of the carton guide I04 and its subjacent guide I05, which operates to fold the carton in the manner indicated in Figure 18, the carton panel 0 being in the rear of the stack, the panel b engaging the top of the stack, and the panel (1 the bottom of the stack. The ram 65 continues its advancing movement until the stack and carton are moved upon an elevator platform I06, which is actuated by a pair of bent arms I01 and I00 carried by a stationary bracket I09. Connected to the arm I01 is an actuating rod H0, in this instance driven by a cam mounted on the shaft III engaging a lever II2 on the lower end of the rod IIO, the shaft III being driven from a shaft IIS by beveled gears Ill. The cam and its lever I I2 are so chosen as to operate in timed relation to the movement of the ram 65 so that after a carton and stack have been delivered to the elevator I06, the same commences its upward'movement.
After the stack and its carton have been moved upon the elevator I06, a half panel folding arm II5 swings upwardly engaging the underside of the panel e and folds the same against the front of the stack. The half panel folder I I5 is mounted on the same shaft on which the arm I06 pivots and has an actuating extension I I6 connected to an operating rod I I! having a cam lever I I6 in the lower end engaging a cam mounted on the shaft II I.
After the half panel e has been folded the elevator I06 commences its upward movement, whereupon the panel a engages an extension of the carton guide I04, causing the same to be folded downwardly in overlapping relation to the half panel 6. The half panel folder II5 remains inposition until the panel a is in such position as to prevent unfolding of the half panel e.
As the stack and its carton are advanced by the elevator I06 the lip 11. of the tuck m rides over a finger II9 mounted on the outer end of a rod I20 carried by the elevator I06, the rod I20 being fixed and providing a pivotal connection for the rod I08. The finger I I9 is curved at its outer edge and its front edge portion inclines downwardly, as indicated at I2I (Figure 27) in order to guide the lip 11, during its movement upon the elevator platform. The rod I 20 projects beyond the opposite side of the elevator platform and has an upwardly extending finger I22, the upper edge of which is beveled at I23. The end tuck in is guided upon the beveled end I23 of the finger I22. It will be seen that the beveled end I23 terminates in a point I23 and engages the line between the end tuck k and its lip l at which folding is to be accomplished.
During the upward movement of the elevator platform I06 a downward and outwardly inclined stopmember'l24 engages theend tuck m adiacent the lip n, as indicated in Figure 24,110 that as the upward movement continues the finger II3 causes the lip 11. to be, broken, folding the lip upwardly at substantially rightangles to the end tuck m. when the elevator platform I03 reaches its uppermost position the upper portion of the finger I I0 overlaps the stop member I24.
Concomitant with the breaking of the lip n the lip l is broken by engagement with a downwardly and inwardly inclined stop member I23, causing the lip l to extend downwardly at substantially right angles to the end tuck It. To prevent the end tuck It from moving or bowing upwardly, a downwardly and inwardly inclined stop member I23 engages the upper surface of the end tuck k in the region of the finger I22. 0
Further horizontal advancing movement of the stack and its carton is effected by a pair of pusher members I21 (Figures 2 and 17) mounted on a horizontal rod I23, which is driven in any suitable manner in timed relationto the vertical movement of the elevator platform I03.
It will be seen that the pusher members I21 are substantially V-shaped and engage the front upper corner portions of the carton. Just prior to the advancing movement of the pusher members I21, end flap folding fingers I23 and I30 (Figure 21) disposed on opposite sides of the carton, engage end flaps I and a respectively, and move the same inwardly against the opposite ends of the stack, as shown diagrammatically in Figure 21. Any suitable mechanism may be provided for operating the fingers I23 and I30 in timed relation to the movement of the elevator platform I03, the operation of the folding fingers taking place just after the platform has reached its uppermost position. Thereafter the pusher members I21 advance the carton into engagement with pairs of guide fingers I3I and I32 arranged in laterally spaced relation to engage the end flaps h and i respectively,.so that as the carton is advanced-the flaps h andi are thereupon folded inwardly againstthefolded end flaps! and 0 respectively. "It will be noted that one pair of'folding fingers is arranged on opposite sides of the path of carton movement, the fingers of each pair beingarranged in vertically spaced relation (Figure 2'7) It will be understood that the elevator platform I03 remainsin its upper position until the pusher members I21 have advanced the carton sufiiciently so that the lip n of the end tuck m has moved forwardly sufiiciently to engage a guide finger I33 spaced outwardly .from the stop member I24, which cooperates with the finger I33 in holding the lip 11 in the desired upright position. In a similar manner the lip lof the end tuck k is guided during its further advancing movement by the stop member I25 and a finger I34, which is spaced inwardly from the member I25, these two parts retaining the lip l therebetween in its downwardly disposed position.
The pusher members I21 continue the advancing movement of the carton to the end tuck folding mechanism, which operates to force the the end flaps h and f and g and j are held in folded position by spring fingers I35 (Figure 25), which are arranged horizontally and extend inwardly slightly into the path-of movement of the carton after the carton has passed the folding fingers I31 and I32 sui'ilcient to engage and hold the end flaps fromunfolding. These fingers are flexible and occupy a very small space.
The mechanism for folding. the lips inside of the carton comprises a lower curved guide I33 to guide the lip l, the end tuck It being engaged by an arm- I31 pivoted at its upper end at I33.
In opposed relation to the guide I33 is an up-/ wardly curved guide I33, which guides the movement of the lip n, an arm I40 engaging the end tuck m for this purpose. The arm I40 is pivoted at its lower end at I 4I. For actuating the arms I31 and I40, a rocker arm I42 is pivoted between its ends at I43, and a link I44 is pivoted to one end of the rocker arm I 42, and at its upper end is pivoted to the arm I31 adjacent its pivot I33. A link'l45 is pivoted at one end to the arm I40 adjacent its pivot and at its opposite endto the rocker arm I42. For actuating the arm I42, a rod I43 is connected to one end of the rocker arm and has a strap I41 on its lower end engaging an eccentric mounted on the shaft III (Figure 1).
To open the carton sufilciently to insure insertion of the lip n inside the carton, a pair of grippermembers I43 mounted on arod I43 are actuated by an arm I50, the outer end of which is pivoted at I3I.
cam I33 for actuating it. Carried by the rod I43 between the gripper members I 43 is an arm I34 having a leaf spring I33 on its underside. The spring I35 engages the top panel b of the carton and presses the carton against its support. The
Thearm Iisactuatedbya rod I32, which extends downwardly to engage a' gripper arms I43, as shown in- Figure 26, incline downwardly and outwardly, so that upon engagesimultaneously both arms I40 and I31, operating in opposite directions. swing the end tucks m and k inwardly toward the stack, the lips n and l riding over their respectiveguidesbeing thereby forced inside the carton. It should be noted that the guide I33 is notched to receive the carton so that, the lower edge of the carton is below the guiding surface of the guide I33, thereby affording an unrestricted path for the movement of the lip 1 inside the carton.
Upon the next advancing movement of the pusher members I21, the succeeding carton pushes the carton which has already been entirely closed, to a downwardly inclined chute or guideway I53 to discharge the finished package from the machine.
It is to be understood that numermis changes in details of construction, operation and arrangement of'parts may be effected without departing from the spirit of the invention, especially as defined in the appended claims.
What I claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent 'is: I
1. In a machine of the class described having means for wrapping a substantially rectangular bar of butter or the like with fiexiblesheet material whereby one side is closed by overlapping portions of the sheet material, a platform adapted to receive the wrapped-bars with the over-. lapped portions lowermost, and means associated with said platform for moistening said overlapped portions of sheet material for militating against unfolding. r
2. In a machine of the class described having mechanism for wrapping individual bars of but-- ter, oleomargarine, or the like, with relatively flexible sheet material, and mechanism for stacking a predetermined number of wrapped bars in a symmetrical pile, and means intermediate said wrapping means and stacking means for moistening certain overlapped portions of sheet material on each bar for militating against unfolding thereof.
8. In a machine of the class described, carton folding mechanism comprising a support for the carton with its end tucks and lips extending outwardly therefrom in opposite directions, means for moving said support vertically, and means operable during the vertical movement of said support for breaking the lips at substantially right angles to the end tuck on opposite sides of the carton.
4. In a machine of the class described, a guide, a stacker having a pair of vertically spaced shelves movable at substantially right angles to said guide, and means adapted to advance a wrapped bar along said guide, retract and then advance another wrapped bar and the foremost bar onto one shelf of the stacker, e stacker thereupon moving vertically to positio the other shelf for receiving other bars.
5. In an article wrapping and packaging machine, means to wrap an article with relatively flexible sheet material, said means including a folding arm, a cam surface on one side of said arm tapering outwardly from the outer end thereof, a roller with which said cam surface engages, yieldable means to hold said cam surface and roller in engagement, and means for bodily moving said arm relative to said roller thereby gradually to move same into engagement with an article for folding a portion of the sheet material.
6. A machine for wrapping and packaging bars of butter or the like comprising means for wrapping each bar with a relatively thin flexible sheet material, a support, a stacker in advance of said support, a pusher, means to operate the pusher to deliver one bar to the support, retract to engage another bar and then advance both bars to the stacker, means to move the stacker relative to the support to enable two additional bars to be delivered thereto to form a stack, said stacker moving means actuating same vertically away from said support, and separate means to discharge the stack of bars from the stacker when in such vertically disposed position.
7. A machine for wrapping and packaging bars of butter or the like comprising a support, a stacker in advance of said support, a pusher adapted to deliver one bar to the support, retract to engage another bar and then advance both bars to the stacker, means to actuate said stacker to lower same into position to receive two additional bars advanced by said pusher, said stacker actuating means elevating the stacker to a position above said support after said bars have been delivered thereto, and separate means for discharging the stack from the stacker when in elevated position.
8. In a machine of the class described, folding mechanism for a carton having opposed end flaps, one connected to one edge of the carton body and the other at a diagonally opposed edge, and each,
end flap having an end tuck for insertion into the carton body, said mechanism comprising a carton support, diagonally opposed curved end tuck guides, a bulging member opposed to said support and engageable with opposed side portions of the carton adjacent one guide for bowing the end of the carton, a presser member engageable with the carton for pressing same against the other guide and operable concomitantly with said bulging member, and means for folding the end flaps to cause the end tucks to move along said guides for insertion into the carton body.
9. In a machine of the class described, folding mechanism for a carton having opposed end flaps, one connected to one edge of the carton body and the other at a diagonally opposed edge, and each end flap having an end tuck for insertion into the carton body, said mechanism comprising a carton support, diagonally opposed curved end tuck guides, a bulging member opposed to said support and engageable with op posed side portions of the carton adjacent one guide for bowing the end of the carton, the other guide being notched to receive the end edge portion of the carton to facilitate insertion of the respective end tuck, a presser member resiliently engageable with the carton for pressing same against the other guide and operable concomitantly with said bulging member, and means for folding the end flaps to cause the end tucks to move along said guides for insertion into the carton body.
10. In a machine of the class described, folding mechanism for a carton having opposed end flaps, one connected to one edge of the carton body and the other at a diagonally opposed edge, and each end flap having an end tuck for insertion into the carton body, said mechanism comprising a carton support, diagonally opposed curved end tuck guides, means opposed to said support and engageable with opposed side portions of the carton adjacent one guide, means engageable with the carton for pressing same against the other guide and operable concomitantly with said side portion engaging means, and means for folding the end flaps to cause the end tucks to move along said guides for insertion into the carton body.
11. In a machine of the class described having means for wrapping a bar of butter or the like with relatively thin flexible sheet material, said wrapping mechanism including a folder for folding a portion of the sheet against the bar, said folder comprising an arm engageable with the sheet at a point away from the bar, means to advance said arm along the bar, and cam means acting against one side of said arm for gradually moving said arm closer to the bar thereby to fold the sheet thereagainst.
12. In a machine of the class described having means for wrapping a bar of butter or the like with relatively thin flexible sheet material, said wrapping mechanism including a folder for folding a portion of the sheet against the bar, said folder comprising an arm engageable with the sheet at a point away from the bar, means to advance said arm along the bar, a cam surface on said arm, and means cooperating with said surface for gradually moving said arm closer to the bar for folding the sheet thereagainst.
13. In a machine of the class described having means for wrapping a bar of butter or the like with relatively thin flexible sheet material, said wrapping mechanism including a folder for folding a portion of the sheet against the bar, said folder comprising an arm engageable with the sheet at a point away from the bar, means to advance said arm along the bar, a cam surface on the outer side of said arm, a stationary roller engageable by said cam surface, and spring means urging said arm against said roller, said cam surface being designed gradually to move the arm flatly against the bar for folding the sheet thereagainst.
14. In a packaging machine, means for supporting a plurality of carton blanks in stack formation, means engaging a side flap of each carton for successively ejecting individual cartons from the stack, and a series of means for folding each carton blank operable to dispose said side flap on the inside of the folded carton whereby any damage to'such flap will not be visible in the folded carton.
15. In a packaging machine, means for supporting a plurality of carton blanks in stack formation, each blank having a plurality of side panels and a flap connected to one of the side panels which, when the carton is folded, is disposed in the inside, a rotatable sector member adjacent the lower end of the stack, a knife member carried by said sector member and engageable with the lowermost carton blank for electing same from the stack, means in close juxtaposition to said sector member for guiding each carton blank ejected by said knife, means to advance a stack of butter bars, means to support each carton blank with said flap disposed in lowermost position, and a series of means for subsequentlyfoiding the carton about the stack in such manner that said flap is disposed in the inside thereof.
18. The method of producing folded cartons, I
each carton being formed from a blank having a plurality of side panels and a flap connected to one side panel, said method consisting in arranging the carton blanks in stack formation, engaging successively such flap of each carton blank at one end of the stack and ejecting the individual blanks therefrom, and thereafter folding each blank so that such flap is disposed in the inside of the carton, whereby any damage to such flap will not be visible in the folded carton.
EDWARD F. NESS.
US31630A 1935-07-16 1935-07-16 Wrapping and packaging machine Expired - Lifetime US2111901A (en)

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US15034837 US2152970A (en) 1935-07-16 1937-06-25 Print feeding mechanism for wrapping and packaging machines

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Cited By (7)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2592793A (en) * 1945-05-14 1952-04-15 Lynch Package Machinery Corp Wrapping machine for butter and the like
US2608038A (en) * 1941-05-31 1952-08-26 Hoaguesprague Corp Assembling and packing articles
US2778559A (en) * 1952-05-12 1957-01-22 Atlas Boxmakers Inc Blank for packaging of books and the like
US2946165A (en) * 1956-06-12 1960-07-26 Us Automatic Box Machinery Co Method of and machine for forming packages
US3019573A (en) * 1959-04-13 1962-02-06 Union Carbide Corp Insulation wrapping machine
US5379574A (en) * 1992-04-24 1995-01-10 Benz & Hilgers Gmbh Apparatus for packaging individual objects, especially packages, e.g. of prepacked foodstuffs
US5501065A (en) * 1992-04-24 1996-03-26 Benz & Hilgers Gmbh Apparatus for packaging individual objects, especially foodstuff packages

Cited By (7)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2608038A (en) * 1941-05-31 1952-08-26 Hoaguesprague Corp Assembling and packing articles
US2592793A (en) * 1945-05-14 1952-04-15 Lynch Package Machinery Corp Wrapping machine for butter and the like
US2778559A (en) * 1952-05-12 1957-01-22 Atlas Boxmakers Inc Blank for packaging of books and the like
US2946165A (en) * 1956-06-12 1960-07-26 Us Automatic Box Machinery Co Method of and machine for forming packages
US3019573A (en) * 1959-04-13 1962-02-06 Union Carbide Corp Insulation wrapping machine
US5379574A (en) * 1992-04-24 1995-01-10 Benz & Hilgers Gmbh Apparatus for packaging individual objects, especially packages, e.g. of prepacked foodstuffs
US5501065A (en) * 1992-04-24 1996-03-26 Benz & Hilgers Gmbh Apparatus for packaging individual objects, especially foodstuff packages

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