US1858681A - Rotary pump - Google Patents

Rotary pump Download PDF

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Publication number
US1858681A
US1858681A US341301A US34130129A US1858681A US 1858681 A US1858681 A US 1858681A US 341301 A US341301 A US 341301A US 34130129 A US34130129 A US 34130129A US 1858681 A US1858681 A US 1858681A
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Prior art keywords
bucket
pump
liner
shaft
rotor
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Expired - Lifetime
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US341301A
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John A Olson
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    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F04POSITIVE - DISPLACEMENT MACHINES FOR LIQUIDS; PUMPS FOR LIQUIDS OR ELASTIC FLUIDS
    • F04CROTARY-PISTON, OR OSCILLATING-PISTON, POSITIVE-DISPLACEMENT MACHINES FOR LIQUIDS; ROTARY-PISTON, OR OSCILLATING-PISTON, POSITIVE-DISPLACEMENT PUMPS
    • F04C15/00Component parts, details or accessories of machines, pumps or pumping installations, not provided for in groups F04C2/00 - F04C14/00
    • F04C15/0003Sealing arrangements in rotary-piston machines or pumps
    • F04C15/0034Sealing arrangements in rotary-piston machines or pumps for other than the working fluid, i.e. the sealing arrangements are not between working chambers of the machine
    • F04C15/0038Shaft sealings specially adapted for rotary-piston machines or pumps
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F04POSITIVE - DISPLACEMENT MACHINES FOR LIQUIDS; PUMPS FOR LIQUIDS OR ELASTIC FLUIDS
    • F04CROTARY-PISTON, OR OSCILLATING-PISTON, POSITIVE-DISPLACEMENT MACHINES FOR LIQUIDS; ROTARY-PISTON, OR OSCILLATING-PISTON, POSITIVE-DISPLACEMENT PUMPS
    • F04C2/00Rotary-piston machines or pumps
    • F04C2/30Rotary-piston machines or pumps having the characteristics covered by two or more groups F04C2/02, F04C2/08, F04C2/22, F04C2/24 or having the characteristics covered by one of these groups together with some other type of movement between co-operating members
    • F04C2/40Rotary-piston machines or pumps having the characteristics covered by two or more groups F04C2/02, F04C2/08, F04C2/22, F04C2/24 or having the characteristics covered by one of these groups together with some other type of movement between co-operating members having the movement defined in group F04C2/08 or F04C2/22 and having a hinged member
    • F04C2/44Rotary-piston machines or pumps having the characteristics covered by two or more groups F04C2/02, F04C2/08, F04C2/22, F04C2/24 or having the characteristics covered by one of these groups together with some other type of movement between co-operating members having the movement defined in group F04C2/08 or F04C2/22 and having a hinged member with vanes hinged to the inner member

Definitions

  • the third object is to produce a high pressure pump which will be free running due to the use of ball bearings, and which will have its ball bearings outside of its packings.
  • the fourth object is to construct a rotary vpump whose shaft is subject tobending deflections, and which will not destroy the packing in the pump by reason of such deflections.
  • Figure 8 is a diagram showing the areas affected by the various pressures.
  • Fig. 9 is The fifth object is to provide a pump whose adiagrammatic view showing the forces acting upon the bucket.

Description

May 17, 1932.
J. A. OLSON ROTARY PUMP Filed Feb. 2o, 1929 fxw /QTrDR/vex/ 2 Sheets-Sheet l May A17,- `1932. J. @OLSON- 4,858,681
ROTARY PUMP Filed F'eb. 20, 1929 '2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Patented May 17, 1932?` 4.UNrraD STATES JOHN OLSON, OF PORTLAND, OREGON ROTARY PUMP Application led February 20, 1929. Serial No. 341,301.
This invention relates generally to high pressure pumps, 'and especially to pumps for handling cohesive and abrasive iiuids.
The main object of this invention 'is to provide a new form of pump capable of operating at high pressures over extended periods of time without showing undue deterioration from wear or from the action of the fluids being pumped. v
Thesecond object is to produce a rotary pump having balanced buckets, that is to say in which the buckets are so constructed as to balance the pressures on the opposite sides of same so as to minimize the friction and wear on the contacting parts.
The third object is to produce a high pressure pump which will be free running due to the use of ball bearings, and which will have its ball bearings outside of its packings.
The fourth object is to construct a rotary vpump whose shaft is subject tobending deflections, and which will not destroy the packing in the pump by reason of such deflections.
25 wearing parts are so constructed as to be easily renewed, and'in which the wear on these particular kparts is reduced to a minimum. f
These, and other objects, will become more apparent from the specification following as illustrated in the accompanying drawings, in which:
Figure 1 is a longitudinal section through the pump. Figure 2 is a transverse section through the pump taken along the line 2-2 in Figure 1. Figure 3 is a perspective `7iew of a bucket. Figure 4 is a perspective view of the liner for the cylinder. Figure 5 is a fragmentary internal view of the liner. Figure 6 is a-transverse section through the pump showing the positions of the various buckets as they travel around the interior of the cylinder lining, with the cylinder omitted. Figure 7 is a side elevation of my new form of bucket in which a portion of its area is exposed to the low pressure side.
Figure 8 is a diagram showing the areas affected by the various pressures. Fig. 9 is The fifth object is to provide a pump whose adiagrammatic view showing the forces acting upon the bucket.
Similar numbers of reference refer to similar parts throughout the several views.
Referring-in detail to the drawings, the pump itself consists of a cylinder member 10 which is provided with a base 11 to which it can be bolted to a suitable support by means of the bolts 12. rlhe interior surface 13 of the cylinder '10is provided with a cylindrical liner 14 having a group of holes 15 constituting outlet ports and a second group of holes 16 constituting inlet ports.
Passing through the liner 14 is the pump shaft 17 which is eccentric with relation to the liner 14 and journals inthe ball bearings 18 which are positioned around the' reduced ends 19 of the shaft 17. The ball bearings 18 are mounted in the housings 20 whose flanges 21 are bolted against thev cover plate 22, which, in turn, bears against the side of the cylinder `10. The side 23 of the plate 22 projects a short distance into the housing 2O and forms a seat for one side 24 of a spring packing element whose opposite side 25 bears against the face 26 of the housing 20. The
face 26 is formed on an inturned flange 27 Which does not touch the shaft 17. y
Within the elements 24 and 25 are, the soft packing rings 28 which are compressed against the side of the shaft by means of the spring 29 whose ends engage the washers 30.
It will be observed that the covervplate 22 Y isalso separated from the shaft 17, as is the flange 27, so that the entire shaft 17 floats between the two opposite bearings 18.
' It will also be seen thatany deflection of the shaft 17 caused by lateral pressures eX- erted thereon will not affect the seal of the packing elements. Since the elements 24 and 25 are rotatable with relation to their contacting faces 23 and 26, as well as radially movable with relation thereto, the above mentioned deflections will merely cause a departure from a true circular path, as far as the elements 24 and 25 are concerned, and since there is no relative movement between the soft packing 28 and the shaft 17 there is clearly no wear between these parts. A pervum fect seal is maintained at all times and the pressure with which the element 25 bears against the face 26 is proportional to the pressure on the liquid' being confined by the packing, as is well understood.
Within the housing 20 and against the inner sidevof each bearing 18 is an inturned felt ring flange 31, and secured on the outer end of each housing 20 is a felt ring retaining cap 32. The felt rings 33 serve to hold the lubricant toward that portion of the shaft 17 which is immediately supported by the bearings 18.
Between the felt ring flange 31 and the flange 27 isan open space 34 through which any leakage of oil or fluid handled by the pump may be drawn away through the port 35..
The cylinder 10 of the pump is provided with two enlargements 36 and 37 which start atthe shoulders 38 and 39 and terminate at the outlet opening 40 and the inlet openings 41 respectively. The enlargement 36 lies directly outside of the holes 15 and the enlargement 37 lies directly outside of the holes 16. An inlet pipe 42 connects with the inlet opening 41 by means of a flange 43.v The outlet pipe 44 is connected at the outlet opening by means of the flange 45.
rlihe rotor 46 is cylindrical in form and secured to the shaft 17 by means of a key 47. The rotor 46 is also provided with cutout portions 48 whose sides 49 are approximately radial. Adjacent to each face 49 and formed in the side of the rotor 46 are the recesses 50 which constitute clearance for the arms of the impellers or buckets about to be described.
Passing through the rotor 46 and connecting opposite recesses 50 is a pin 51 on which are mounted the arms 52 of the bucket 53 whose cuter surface 54 is an arc struck from thevcenter of the pin 51 which practically intersects an arc forming the inner side 55 of the `bucket at a point 56 where the bucket engages the interior of the liner 14. In order to balance the pressures on the bucket and prevent an undesirable outward thrust, due to the added forces of centrifugal action and pressure being built up within the pump, it is desirabletoextend a li 57 on the outer edge of the bucket on the side of the face 54, not only to increase its wearing surface, but for a purpose which will be more fully explained hereafter.
rlhe face 58 of each recess 50 is concentric i `"with the face 54 and is provided with a gravity, plus the centrifugal force,l plus the outward fluid pressure exerted on the bucket (as shown in' Figure 7) will hold the bucket in close-relation to the inner surface 61 of the liner 14. The cycle of operation as to suction and discharge positions, of the buckets is quite similar to numerous existing devices of this character, which may be briefly stated as follows:
As a bucket travels in the direction indicated in Figure 6 as soon as it passes the last intake opening 16 it will exert a direct pull against all of the intake ports 16 in proportion to the'increasing area adjacent to the recess in which the'bucket is operating, constituting the suction stroke of the bucket, and as soon as the point 56 of the bucket passes the lowermost` portion of the liner 14, after which the operating space becomes more restricted, owing to the eccentric relation of the rotor and liner, there is set up a compressing action which forces the fluid ahead of the bucket 53 t0 pass out'through the holes 15 and ultimately through the pipe 44.
Itwill be noted in Figure 7 that by this construction there are developed several -distinct and different pressure areas (as shown somewhat diagrammatically in Figure 8) namely a relatively low outward pressure area 62, a small area of higher outward pressure 63 and a large balanced pressure area 64, the reasons for which balancing are set forth clearly in Figure 7.
lt is desirable'to provide a set screw 65 in the b ase l1 for maintaining the relation between the cylinder 10 and the lining 14.
lit will be noted in Figure 5 that there is shown the relative proportions of the liner 14, the lip 57 and the holes 16. rlhere are two objects in making the holes 16 staggered and of small size and greaterlnumbers than are usually employed, the first being to better support vthe bucket in its rotation against the face 61, and the second to reduce the effective port area presented to the bucket at any one instant. In other4 words, the problem of balancing the bucket is greatly simplified by scattering the port areas over a relatively large portion-of the circumference of the liner 14.
I claim: y. 3
1. In a'rotary pump the combination of a rotor casing having a cylindrical lining mounted therein, a cylindrical rotor eccentrically mounted within said lining, said rotor having pockets formed in the side thereof, each ofsaid pockets having an arcuate bucket hinged therein, the curves of said buckets being concentric with their axes, each of said buckets having a radially outwardly extending lip formed along one; edge thereof adapted to en age the interior of said lining, a portion o? the trailing edge of llO said lip lying outside of the outermost curve 'of said bucket.
sesl
2. A high pressure pum consisting of a. casing having inlet and out etports, a cylindrical lining mounted in said casing, a cylindrical rotor eccentrically mounted within said liner, said rotor having a pluralit of pockets formed therein, the trailing si e of each pocket havin an arcuate surface, a bucket hinged withln each pocket having the arcuate side fitted to the trailing side of said pocket, said arcuate bucket side having a lining engaging lip on its rearward outermost edge the maJor portion of which extends outside of the curvature of the bucket.
t JOHN A. OLSON.
US341301A 1929-02-20 1929-02-20 Rotary pump Expired - Lifetime US1858681A (en)

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Cited By (9)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2621604A (en) * 1948-05-04 1952-12-16 Peter A Battagla Rotary pump
US2636479A (en) * 1950-05-29 1953-04-28 Frederic C Ripley Sr Flowmeter
US2639171A (en) * 1950-06-07 1953-05-19 Westinghouse Electric Corp Shaft seal apparatus
US2674953A (en) * 1950-03-18 1954-04-13 Lyall T Conde Rotary pump
DE1728180B1 (en) * 1968-09-06 1972-08-24 Schlang & Reichart Maschf Rotary piston pump
US3689208A (en) * 1969-05-23 1972-09-05 Franz P Nebel Rotary piston machine
US4009973A (en) * 1975-08-21 1977-03-01 Applied Power Inc. Seal for hydraulic pumps and motors
US4201526A (en) * 1976-12-06 1980-05-06 Eugenius Brochstein Pivoted blade between rotor and stator having arcuate sections
US4526141A (en) * 1983-02-15 1985-07-02 The Commonwealth Of Australia Drive arrangement for internal combustion engine

Cited By (9)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2621604A (en) * 1948-05-04 1952-12-16 Peter A Battagla Rotary pump
US2674953A (en) * 1950-03-18 1954-04-13 Lyall T Conde Rotary pump
US2636479A (en) * 1950-05-29 1953-04-28 Frederic C Ripley Sr Flowmeter
US2639171A (en) * 1950-06-07 1953-05-19 Westinghouse Electric Corp Shaft seal apparatus
DE1728180B1 (en) * 1968-09-06 1972-08-24 Schlang & Reichart Maschf Rotary piston pump
US3689208A (en) * 1969-05-23 1972-09-05 Franz P Nebel Rotary piston machine
US4009973A (en) * 1975-08-21 1977-03-01 Applied Power Inc. Seal for hydraulic pumps and motors
US4201526A (en) * 1976-12-06 1980-05-06 Eugenius Brochstein Pivoted blade between rotor and stator having arcuate sections
US4526141A (en) * 1983-02-15 1985-07-02 The Commonwealth Of Australia Drive arrangement for internal combustion engine

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