US1800385A - Vacuum loader and stacker - Google Patents

Vacuum loader and stacker Download PDF

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Publication number
US1800385A
US1800385A US403892A US40389229A US1800385A US 1800385 A US1800385 A US 1800385A US 403892 A US403892 A US 403892A US 40389229 A US40389229 A US 40389229A US 1800385 A US1800385 A US 1800385A
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Prior art keywords
cans
vacuum
valve
stacker
pressure
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US403892A
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Edgar S Hayes
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    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B66HOISTING; LIFTING; HAULING
    • B66CCRANES; LOAD-ENGAGING ELEMENTS OR DEVICES FOR CRANES, CAPSTANS, WINCHES, OR TACKLES
    • B66C1/00Load-engaging elements or devices attached to lifting or lowering gear of cranes or adapted for connection therewith for transmitting lifting forces to articles or groups of articles
    • B66C1/02Load-engaging elements or devices attached to lifting or lowering gear of cranes or adapted for connection therewith for transmitting lifting forces to articles or groups of articles by suction means
    • B66C1/0237Multiple lifting units; More than one suction area
    • B66C1/025Divided cups
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B66HOISTING; LIFTING; HAULING
    • B66CCRANES; LOAD-ENGAGING ELEMENTS OR DEVICES FOR CRANES, CAPSTANS, WINCHES, OR TACKLES
    • B66C1/00Load-engaging elements or devices attached to lifting or lowering gear of cranes or adapted for connection therewith for transmitting lifting forces to articles or groups of articles
    • B66C1/02Load-engaging elements or devices attached to lifting or lowering gear of cranes or adapted for connection therewith for transmitting lifting forces to articles or groups of articles by suction means
    • B66C1/0212Circular shape
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B66HOISTING; LIFTING; HAULING
    • B66CCRANES; LOAD-ENGAGING ELEMENTS OR DEVICES FOR CRANES, CAPSTANS, WINCHES, OR TACKLES
    • B66C1/00Load-engaging elements or devices attached to lifting or lowering gear of cranes or adapted for connection therewith for transmitting lifting forces to articles or groups of articles
    • B66C1/02Load-engaging elements or devices attached to lifting or lowering gear of cranes or adapted for connection therewith for transmitting lifting forces to articles or groups of articles by suction means
    • B66C1/0256Operating and control devices
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B66HOISTING; LIFTING; HAULING
    • B66CCRANES; LOAD-ENGAGING ELEMENTS OR DEVICES FOR CRANES, CAPSTANS, WINCHES, OR TACKLES
    • B66C1/00Load-engaging elements or devices attached to lifting or lowering gear of cranes or adapted for connection therewith for transmitting lifting forces to articles or groups of articles
    • B66C1/02Load-engaging elements or devices attached to lifting or lowering gear of cranes or adapted for connection therewith for transmitting lifting forces to articles or groups of articles by suction means
    • B66C1/0281Rectangular or square shape

Definitions

  • My invention refers to the canning art and more particularly to a devicewhich is intended to handle a large number of cans at once for the purpose of moving them about or transferring them from one place to another.
  • canneries more particularly in salmon canneries
  • the principal object of my invention is to provide a device which will pick up a large number of cans Without the need of hand handling the same.
  • a further object is to provide a device which will make the transportation of cans, Vfor a limited distance, a very economical operation.
  • a further object is to provide a device that A still further object ofimy invention is to provide means for lifting a large number of cans, even though their upper surfaces may not form a single plane.
  • Figure 2 is a detail in section of one of the can engaging members.
  • I Figure 3 is 'a fragmentary view illustrating the valving arrangement for the control of my device. f
  • Figure 4 is a vfragmentary view showing one corner only ⁇ of my machine -in bottom plan view to illustrate the spacing and arrangement of my can engaging members.
  • Figures 5 and 6 are diagrammatic views illustrating the valve connections and the method of operation.
  • numeral l0 designates the main body portion of my device. Separated slightly from member 10 by the distance piece 12, 1s the bottom plate 14. This separation provides for the chamber 16 which serves as a header to distribute either vacuum pressure or positive air pressure to the various tips. Secured into bottom" plate 14 at regularly spaced intervals illustrated in Figure 4, such as will accommodate a desired size can, are a purality of tips 18.
  • tip 18 has immediately below its threaded portion, a shoulder, which provides a definite stop when' the tip is screwed in place. Holes 2O are provided for the engagementof a teat wrench.
  • the lower end of tip 18 has an outwardly extending annular ledge 24 which supports a gasket 25. Surrounding the lower end 24 is a heavy slidable member 26, which is recessed so that the ledge 24 may have ample room for movement without becoming air bound as member 26 moves up and down.
  • the upper end of member 26 is bored to provide a snug sliding fit on tip 18.
  • a small'hole 30 is member 18.
  • a plug member 36 is adapted to securely maintain the washer 34 in position and is provided with a feathered edge 38, which will prevent the ⁇ metal of member 36 coming in contact with the can top when it is desired to use the device.
  • Member 36 has a centrally drilled hole 40 and thus a sage way is provided clear through the vdevice to the chamber 16. Plug 36 ma enga e member 26 in any manner that wil provice a secure fastening. I have found that screwing member 36 in position by means of a teat wrench using the holes 42, is a very convenient method. I have found it desirable to use the same wrench on both members 18 and 36.
  • piston 46 Secured, preferably centrally, with member 10 and extending upwardly therefrom, is a cylinder 44 having therein the piston 46 which may be of any conventional type and a piston rod 48.
  • piston rod i 48 is formed as a hook or more preferable, as
  • an eye 50 which is adapted to engage a traveling carriage 52 which may be sup orted from any conventional type of over ead trackage as indicated by 54.
  • braces 56 which engage the fitting ⁇ 58 at the upper end of cylinder 44, and are secured to body member 10 as by the cap screws at 60.
  • My machine for its most successful operation, should be supplied with a pressure air line as 62 and a negative pressure or vacuum line 64. Both lines are controlled by the ordinary type of three-way valves 76 and 66 respectively.
  • I provide tubes 68 and 70 respectively. The valves are controlled by revolving tube 68 or 70 upon their supporting brace members 56, which in turn transmit the necessary reciprocating motion to the handles 79 and 69 of the valves 76 and 66 respectively by means of the arms 72 and 73 which are fixedly secured to tubes 68 and 70 and the connecting bars 74 and 75.
  • FIG. 3 A 4better understanding of the valving arrangement can be had by studying Figure 3. rllhis shows the vacuum line valve 66 in its proper relationship to the vacuum line 64 and the pressure air line 62. Valve 76 is positioned diametrically opposite valve 66. In Figure 3 I have shown the connecting pipe 8O as straight, where in eiiect it is curved, in order to pass half around cylinder 44. Leadf ing downwardly to chamber 16 is a'pipe 81.
  • my device is moved by any convement means, as by the overhead trolley, illustrated to a place directly over the cans it is desired to move.
  • Valve 76 is then turned to the'exhausting position permitting the trapped air in cylinder 44 to escape. This will lower the head member 10 until the rubber disks 34 are in engagement with the top of the cans.
  • Valve 66 is then turned to the position which will connect the vacuum hose 64 with pipe 8l. A vacuum is then quickly created within the chamber 16, which in turncommunicates it to the plurality of tips. This w1ll cause the cans to adhere firmly to the can engaging members.
  • Valve 76 is now turned to a position which will admlt air under pressure to cylinder 44.
  • the entire cylinder moves upwardly carrying with it all the cans adhering to the can engaging members.
  • valve 76 is again operated to lower the en tire machine until-the cans come to rest.
  • the vacuum line is shut olf by valve 66 and air from pipe 62 is passed through pipe 81 and ⁇ the chamber 16. This gives a very quick contra-action andbreaks the vacuum almost immediately.
  • the machine may then be lifted by manipulating valve 76 leaving the cans in their new position.
  • One of the outstanding features of this method is that the cans will be placed in their new position in exactly the same relationship and arrangement as that in which they were originally picked up and can thus be handled a number of times without any necessity for rearranging them.
  • a can handling device consisting of a body member; a bottom plate; a pressure distributing chamber; a plurality of can engaging members having a tip provided with a small hole therethrough secured to said l'bottom plate; a slidable member disposed co-axially with said tip; a resilient disk and a plug member slidable mem er; means adapted to produce a negative pressure at each can engaging member, a vacuum controlling valve, a fluid pressure controlling valve, a source of fluid vunder pressure and means adapted to support having a small hole therep through ada ted to secure the ⁇ disk to the4 ing a small hole therethrough, adapted to secure the disk to the slidable member; a piston; a piston rod; a cylinder secured to said cured to said bottom plate and communicat-A ing with said chamber; an annular ledge formed on each of said tips; a slidable member adapted to rest on said ledge and capable of sliding upwardly on said tip; a cupped disc

Description

April 14;,''931. E s. HAYES n VACUUM LOADER @ND STACKER 2 Sheets-Sheet `l Filed Oct. 31. 1929 "illlllllllm kINVENTOR E aan BY'S Hayes r- 7M ATTORNEYS April 14, 1931. E, 5 HAYES 1,800,385
VACUUM LOADER AND STACKER Filed Oct. 3l. 1929 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 lo 66 a4 EX H605 7' -FJL -E E .INVENTOR Edgar BYS. Mages ATTORNEYS Patented Apr. 14,- 1931 EDGAR s. HAYES, or SEATTLE, WASHINGTON VACUUM LOADER AND STACKER Application ld October 31, 1929. Serial No. 403,892.
My invention refers to the canning art and more particularly to a devicewhich is intended to handle a large number of cans at once for the purpose of moving them about or transferring them from one place to another. In canneries, more particularly in salmon canneries, it is necessaryl to handle the large number of cans filled daily, .a num-y ber of times. In the past it has required a large amount of hand labor, as normally each can must be picked up by the hands of the Workman one or two at a time, as for instance, when the cans come from the machine lines Where they have been filled and the covers put in place, it is necessary to stack the y cans on a truck where they are conveyedto the point of delivery and then rehandled again. This often takes place five or six times in the course of the various operations necessary to ll the can with produce and prepare it for its final delivery to the trade. In salmon canneres the cans are usually stacked in a metal frame work called a cooler. This is done in order toy make it possible to handle quite a large number of cans as a unit once they have been stacked thereon. With the use of my device however, all hand handling of filled cans is eliminated.
Further, it is not necessary to use the metal coolers or trays which are expensive, are constantly needing repair and, require a large amount of storage space when they are not in use. Therefore,
The principal object of my invention is to provide a device which will pick up a large number of cans Without the need of hand handling the same.
A further object is to provide a device which will make the transportation of cans, Vfor a limited distance, a very economical operation.
A further object is to provide a device that A still further object ofimy invention is to provide means for lifting a large number of cans, even though their upper surfaces may not form a single plane.
ther and more specific objects will be apy parent from the following description taken in connection with the accompanying drawings, wherein Figure 1 is an elevation of my device,
partly in section to better illustrate certain parts.
Figure 2 is a detail in section of one of the can engaging members.
I Figure 3 is 'a fragmentary view illustrating the valving arrangement for the control of my device. f
Figure 4 is a vfragmentary view showing one corner only `of my machine -in bottom plan view to illustrate the spacing and arrangement of my can engaging members.
Figures 5 and 6 are diagrammatic views illustrating the valve connections and the method of operation.
Referring to the drawings throughout which like reference numerals indicate like parts, numeral l0 designates the main body portion of my device. Separated slightly from member 10 by the distance piece 12, 1s the bottom plate 14. This separation provides for the chamber 16 which serves as a header to distribute either vacuum pressure or positive air pressure to the various tips. Secured into bottom" plate 14 at regularly spaced intervals illustrated in Figure 4, such as will accommodate a desired size can, are a purality of tips 18.
eferring to Figure 2, tip 18 has immediately below its threaded portion, a shoulder, which provides a definite stop when' the tip is screwed in place. Holes 2O are provided for the engagementof a teat wrench. The lower end of tip 18 has an outwardly extending annular ledge 24 which supports a gasket 25. Surrounding the lower end 24 is a heavy slidable member 26, which is recessed so that the ledge 24 may have ample room for movement without becoming air bound as member 26 moves up and down. The upper end of member 26 is bored to provide a snug sliding fit on tip 18. A small'hole 30 is member 18.
drilled approximately through the center of The bottom surface of member 26 is machined to accommodate the disk 34 which I normally prefer to make of a resilient material, such as rubber, althou h I believe it will be apparent that bakelite or micarta, or even spring metal might be employed. A plug member 36 is adapted to securely maintain the washer 34 in position and is provided with a feathered edge 38, which will prevent the `metal of member 36 coming in contact with the can top when it is desired to use the device. Member 36 has a centrally drilled hole 40 and thus a sage way is provided clear through the vdevice to the chamber 16. Plug 36 ma enga e member 26 in any manner that wil provice a secure fastening. I have found that screwing member 36 in position by means of a teat wrench using the holes 42, is a very convenient method. I have found it desirable to use the same wrench on both members 18 and 36. y
Secured, preferably centrally, with member 10 and extending upwardly therefrom, is a cylinder 44 having therein the piston 46 which may be of any conventional type and a piston rod 48. The upper end of piston rod i 48 is formed as a hook or more preferable, as
an eye 50, which is adapted to engage a traveling carriage 52 which may be sup orted from any conventional type of over ead trackage as indicated by 54.-
In order to provide maximum rigidity with the minimum weight, I have provided a plurality of braces 56, which engage the fitting `58 at the upper end of cylinder 44, and are secured to body member 10 as by the cap screws at 60. Y
My machine, for its most successful operation, should be supplied with a pressure air line as 62 and a negative pressure or vacuum line 64. Both lines are controlled by the ordinary type of three- way valves 76 and 66 respectively. In order to facilitate the convenient manipulation of the valves of my machine, I provide tubes 68 and 70 respectively. The valves are controlled by revolving tube 68 or 70 upon their supporting brace members 56, which in turn transmit the necessary reciprocating motion to the handles 79 and 69 of the valves 76 and 66 respectively by means of the arms 72 and 73 which are fixedly secured to tubes 68 and 70 and the connecting bars 74 and 75.
A 4better understanding of the valving arrangement can be had by studying Figure 3. rllhis shows the vacuum line valve 66 in its proper relationship to the vacuum line 64 and the pressure air line 62. Valve 76 is positioned diametrically opposite valve 66. In Figure 3 I have shown the connecting pipe 8O as straight, where in eiiect it is curved, in order to pass half around cylinder 44. Leadf ing downwardly to chamber 16 is a'pipe 81.
pas-
der or y the alternate setting, may discharge through pipes 83 and 84, any pressure that has been built up within cylinder 44.
In Figure 4 I have illustrated in some detail the most desirable location ofthe can engaging members. Cans in a cannery are normally stacked in staggered rows and it is only by so stacking them that uniform spacing, which is very desirable in the operation of my device, can be definitely assured.
Method of operation In operating my device it is assumed that means have been provided for stacking the cans in staggered rows tight together. This may be accomplished by any one of the well known methods such as having a wide conveyor belt which carries the cans up against a sto This part is normal cannery equipment an I have made no showing of it in my drawings.
Having the cans in the staggered row arrangement, my device is moved by any convement means, as by the overhead trolley, illustrated to a place directly over the cans it is desired to move.
Valve 76 is then turned to the'exhausting position permitting the trapped air in cylinder 44 to escape. This will lower the head member 10 until the rubber disks 34 are in engagement with the top of the cans.
Valve 66 is then turned to the position which will connect the vacuum hose 64 with pipe 8l. A vacuum is then quickly created within the chamber 16, which in turncommunicates it to the plurality of tips. This w1ll cause the cans to adhere firmly to the can engaging members.
Valve 76 is now turned to a position which will admlt air under pressure to cylinder 44. As the piston 46 is fixed in its horizontal relationship, the entire cylinder moves upwardly carrying with it all the cans adhering to the can engaging members.
The device complete with the adhering cans may now be transported about. When the desired new location for the cans has been reached, valve 76 is again operated to lower the en tire machine until-the cans come to rest. At th1s point the vacuum line is shut olf by valve 66 and air from pipe 62 is passed through pipe 81 and` the chamber 16. This gives a very quick contra-action andbreaks the vacuum almost immediately. The machine may then be lifted by manipulating valve 76 leaving the cans in their new position. One of the outstanding features of this method is that the cans will be placed in their new position in exactly the same relationship and arrangement as that in which they were originally picked up and can thus be handled a number of times without any necessity for rearranging them.
I have found at times that for some reason or another, oftentimes unevenness of floors, etc., all of the cans will not have their tops in the same horizontal plane and one of the objects of providin the'automatic` sliding adjustment of mem r 26 upon member 18 is to take up any such unevenness. This sliding feature is also an advantage in that the operator need not put any appreciable pressure .on the top of the cans, as would ensue if the can engaging members were fixed to the head 10.
Another point where attention to detail is essential, is the feature of having either hole 30 or hole 40 of rather small cross-sectional area, the reason being that oftentimes there may be a blank space in a group of cans and by having the suction orifice 30 for instance, quite small, even though it be not covered, the loss in suction will not unbalance the system and cause all of the cans to drop. In fact my device will operatewith quite a number of cans missing. This small orifice. in turn requires the air pressure to break the vacuum quickly as above described.
The foregoing description and the accompanying drawings clearly disclose a preferred embodiment of my invention but it will be understood that this disclosure is merely illustrative and that such changes in the invention may be made as are fairly within the scope and spirit of the following claims:
What I claim is:
1. A can handling device consisting of a body member; a bottom plate; a pressure distributing chamber; a plurality of can engaging members having a tip provided with a small hole therethrough secured to said l'bottom plate; a slidable member disposed co-axially with said tip; a resilient disk and a plug member slidable mem er; means adapted to produce a negative pressure at each can engaging member, a vacuum controlling valve, a fluid pressure controlling valve, a source of fluid vunder pressure and means adapted to support having a small hole therep through ada ted to secure the `disk to the4 ing a small hole therethrough, adapted to secure the disk to the slidable member; a piston; a piston rod; a cylinder secured to said cured to said bottom plate and communicat-A ing with said chamber; an annular ledge formed on each of said tips; a slidable member adapted to rest on said ledge and capable of sliding upwardly on said tip; a cupped disc secured to said slidable member and providing a resilient engagement with an article to be raised; and a source of negative pressure.
In witness whereof, I hereunto subscribe my name this 26th day of October, A. D.
EDGAR S. HAYES.
' ilo
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Cited By (7)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2530385A (en) * 1944-07-11 1950-11-21 American Mach & Foundry Bowling pin raising and lowering mechanism
US2574131A (en) * 1946-11-13 1951-11-06 Howard P Steinbrecher Block material handling machine
US2840415A (en) * 1955-09-27 1958-06-24 American Hatchery Engineers In Egg handling apparatus
DE1123447B (en) * 1957-11-12 1962-02-08 Unilever Nv Vacuum lifting head
US3076561A (en) * 1958-03-06 1963-02-05 M S Bowne Vacuum transfer device for material in a plastic state
US3159418A (en) * 1962-03-01 1964-12-01 Hansen Jphigen Jensen Electromagnetic and vacuum lifter
CN105645245A (en) * 2016-01-10 2016-06-08 信阳同合车轮有限公司 Negative pressure type lifting appliance for tubular workpiece and operation method thereof

Cited By (7)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2530385A (en) * 1944-07-11 1950-11-21 American Mach & Foundry Bowling pin raising and lowering mechanism
US2574131A (en) * 1946-11-13 1951-11-06 Howard P Steinbrecher Block material handling machine
US2840415A (en) * 1955-09-27 1958-06-24 American Hatchery Engineers In Egg handling apparatus
DE1123447B (en) * 1957-11-12 1962-02-08 Unilever Nv Vacuum lifting head
US3076561A (en) * 1958-03-06 1963-02-05 M S Bowne Vacuum transfer device for material in a plastic state
US3159418A (en) * 1962-03-01 1964-12-01 Hansen Jphigen Jensen Electromagnetic and vacuum lifter
CN105645245A (en) * 2016-01-10 2016-06-08 信阳同合车轮有限公司 Negative pressure type lifting appliance for tubular workpiece and operation method thereof

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