US1782707A - Road-building apparatus - Google Patents

Road-building apparatus Download PDF

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US1782707A
US1782707A US2951425A US1782707A US 1782707 A US1782707 A US 1782707A US 2951425 A US2951425 A US 2951425A US 1782707 A US1782707 A US 1782707A
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beam
shoe
machine
movement
deposit
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Bayley William
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WILLIAM BAYLEY Co
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WILLIAM BAYLEY Co
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    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E01CONSTRUCTION OF ROADS, RAILWAYS, OR BRIDGES
    • E01CCONSTRUCTION OF, OR SURFACES FOR, ROADS, SPORTS GROUNDS, OR THE LIKE; MACHINES OR AUXILIARY TOOLS FOR CONSTRUCTION OR REPAIR
    • E01C19/00Machines, tools or auxiliary devices for preparing or distributing paving materials, for working the placed materials, or for forming, consolidating, or finishing the paving
    • E01C19/22Machines, tools or auxiliary devices for preparing or distributing paving materials, for working the placed materials, or for forming, consolidating, or finishing the paving for consolidating or finishing laid-down unset materials
    • E01C19/30Tamping or vibrating apparatus other than rollers ; Devices for ramming individual paving elements
    • E01C19/34Power-driven rammers or tampers, e.g. air-hammer impacted shoes for ramming stone-sett paving; Hand-actuated ramming or tamping machines, e.g. tampers with manually hoisted dropping weight
    • E01C19/40Power-driven rammers or tampers, e.g. air-hammer impacted shoes for ramming stone-sett paving; Hand-actuated ramming or tamping machines, e.g. tampers with manually hoisted dropping weight adapted to impart a smooth finish to the paving, e.g. tamping or vibrating finishers
    • E01C19/407Power-driven rammers or tampers, e.g. air-hammer impacted shoes for ramming stone-sett paving; Hand-actuated ramming or tamping machines, e.g. tampers with manually hoisted dropping weight adapted to impart a smooth finish to the paving, e.g. tamping or vibrating finishers with elements or parts partly or fully immersed in or penetrating into the material to act thereon, e.g. immersed vibrators or vibrating parts, kneading tampers, spaders

Description

Nov. 25, 1930. w. BAYLEY 1,782,707

ROAD BUILDING APPARATUS Filed May 11, 1925 6 sheets-sheet 1 Hoz um,

NOV. 25,193()v w. `BAYLEY l 1,782,707

ROAD BUILDING APPARATUS Filed May 11g/1925 e sheets-sheet 2 Y Y Y Nov. 25, 1930. w. BAYLEY ROAD BUILDING APPARATUS V Filed May 1l .1925

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I ROAD BUILDING APPARATUS Filed May 11. 1925 esmassheet 4 @59 @ffy Asa.

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ROAD BUILDING APPARATUS Filed Mayv ll 1925 6 Sheets-Sheet 6" Patented Nov. 25, 1930 WILLIAM nnYLn'sr,4 or SPRINGFIELD, 01110 ROAD-BUILDING APPARATUS Application led May 11,

My invention relates to road making apparatus and more particularly to an automatic machine for compacting and finishing concrete roadwaysoof. predetermined grades and contours. l i

In thel present invention there are. contemplated two' automotive carriages traveling upon the side forms of the concrete road-bed to be built, as guide tracks, and carrying be- 10 tween them an adjustable vibratory beam or shoe arranged transversely of the road-bed, which as the apparatus advances tamps and compacts the plastic concrete with a combined downwardly and forwardly directed stroke,l which strikes off the surplus material to predetermined grade and contour, settling and driving downward the course material and bringing to the surface the finer materials to aiord a smooth impervious surface.

The traveling carriages are .yieldi'ngly connected one4 to the other enabling the machine to spread and contract automatically as the width yof the road varies and to compensate for irregularities in the setting of the side forms. The vibratory tamping means or shoe is further adjustable to vary the transverse contour or crown of the road while in operation, enabling the road surface to be progressively flattened as the machine approaches a curve, and the crown again raised as the machine passes beyond the curve. The carriages are providedwith compensating driving mechanism to enable the negotiation of curves of various radii. At the end of plates, which' operate in close proximity to the side forms to displace inwardly the coarse material. leaving smoothly finished side surfaces. These plates penetrate the paving bed and prevent spilling over the forms. A

The operation lof the machine performs a new method or process of compacting concrete involving something more than mere tamping and produces results not'attainable by hand operations.

The vibratory Acamping shoe or beam 1s inclined upwardly and forwardly, the under surface bemg flat, concave or convex as may 5 be required by the conditions of use and the tamping device are carried spadingcharacter of materials operated upon. This 1925. Serial No. 29,514.

shoe or beam presents in relation with the road bed a convergingmouth in which an excess of Vmaterial collects as the machine advances. The camming action of the inclined shoe in addition to its vibratory movement exerts a squeezing effect upon the mass of material beneath thesh'oe, which gradually increases as the machine advances, thus bringing the small- ,particles of sand and gravel closer together and ej ectingA forwardly the liquid cement and water.4 In the event a surplus amount of sand .and gravel accumulates, such portion -as can .not be compressed below the grade line is` progressively squeezed forwardly, intermixed with the expressed cement and water into a more or less iiuid state. The effect of the process is to bring the sand and gravel, or sand and broken stone, if the latter be used, into close and intimate contact with -only enough cement between to eect the union or adhesion of the particles. It has been found by experiment andpractice, that an excess of cement is detrimental and aords a less durable and less strong body. -A thick bond of cement is not in itself suiiiciently resistant and does not possess the' requisite tensile or compressive strength. When such thick bond is broken, it allows relative grinding movement or inter-attrition of the stone, gravel Aand sand. By closely compacting the materials by the present method whereby the sand and gravel or-stone is separated by only a thin film of cement, a better union is effected and the particles being densely associated yare Aintersupporting and the ce ment bonding is not subjected to the strain and stress as when the particles are more widely separated and the cement bondings thicker. The agitation yof the surplus material squeezed forwardly at each operation of the shoe and the ejection of the liquid cement through the sur lus material making the mixture more uid insures a uni# form' mixture and the thorough coating of every particle with liquid cement; The machine thus to a limited degree supplements* the action of the concrete mixer by insuring uniformity of the mixture as it is incorporatedin the deposited stratum. By the progressive squeezing and compacting operations, the excess moisture is removed from the concrete deposit as the machine advances, leaving the completed body dense, hard and comparatively dry,.and in a condition to set more quickly. This mode of operation, not only affords stronger concrete, but saves cement and time. The saving of cement by this method which insures a thin but uniform coating of the aggregates, not only insures better built roads, but also cheaper roads.

While the tamping or ramming action of the shoe is advantageous in effecting a dense compact deposit, the machine can b e successfully operated without the vibration of the shoe. By holding the shoe down and advancing the machine onto the soft mix' ture, the upturned. face of the shoe forms a converging throat which as the machine advances affords a camming action which forces the material down below the grade level, squeezing the loose material into a dense solid stratum from which the moisture and liquid cement is expressed and slmultaneously striking off the surface with a smoothing or troweling effect. They top stratum of the finished road way will be substantially the same as when tamped, but the dense superstratum will not be so deep, and the coarse materials not so deeply submerged as when the mass is tamped by the vibratory movement of the shoe.

The final action of the trailing edge of v the shoe is to wipe the compressed 'surface with a troweling effect to which end the under surface of the shoe is provided with a final substantially flat surface. For best result, this surface is not exactly level, but is given a small clearance or elevation at its forward edge, so that a final squeezing and smoothing effect is afforded.

The object of the invention is to simplify the structure as well as the means and mode of operation of road building apparatus, whereby such machines will not only be cheapened in construction, but will be more efficient in use, uniform in operation, automatic in action, easily controlled and unlikely to et out of repair.

A furt er object of the inventlonis to provide a tamping movement, which not only exerts downward pressure, compactmg the material and submerging the coarse aggregates, but which at the completion of 1ts downward stroke will affect a forward smoothin movement, striking off'- and advancing tghe surplus material and leaving a smooth uniform finished surface.

A further object of the invention is to provide means for varying the transverse contour of the finished surface, enabling the surface to be finished fiat or crowned to varying degree as may be required.

A further object of the invention is to tion.

provide a floating frame construction, en-

abling the machine to expand and contract to y accommodate variations in the width of thc road-way and inequalities in the setting of the side forms. This feature of adjustability is further designed to enable the machine to be elnployed as a unit of reduced size for constructing concrete roads under traffic, wherein only one lateral half of the road is paved, while traffic is directed over the unpaved half and thereafter the remaining lateral half of the road paving' 1s completed while traffic is using the initially paved porlVhile the apparatus is designed primarily for operating the full width of flic roadwafv, it is so constructed that it may bc -ontracted to any desired lesser width unit. without interference with the operating or driving mechanism.

A further object of the invention is to provide an improved driving mechanism for apparatus of the present character, whereby the carrying wheels at the opposite sides of -the machine are differentially propelled, en-

abling the apparatus to accommodate itself to curvatures of the roadway without slippage and without distortion or straining of the apparatus, and to further provide transmission mechanism for actuating the machine forwardly and rearwardly as may be found necessary.

A further object of the invention is to provide improved spading means for finishing the lateral margins of the roadway and at the same time confining the material on the sides and preventing slipping over the forms, compacting the margin and submerging the coarse materials to not only afford a more pleasing andA finished appearance, but strengthening the marginsof the paving to prevent crumbling. l

'ifh the above primary and other incidental objects in view as will more fully appear in the specification, the invention consisfs of the features of construction, the parts and combinations thereof, and the mode of operation or their equivalents as .hereinafter described and set forth in the claims.

In the accompanyin drawings, wherein 1s shown the preferre but obviously not necessarily the only form of. embodiment of the invention, Fig. 1 is a top plan view of the assembled machine, illustrating the rela tive location of the various parts. Fig. 2 is an .end elevation. Fig. 3 is an enlarged plan view of one end of theassembled machine, illustrating the several driving trains of'mechanism. Fig. 4 is a rear elevation, of the right hand carriage with the side frame in section just back of the shoe, wherein the tamping means is shown aligned throughout to produce a flat surface. Fig. 5 is a similar View showing the tamping beam or shoe only,

and adjuste to provlde a crowned surface.

, surfacing shoe only,

l Fig. 6 is a detail view of a tamping beam or compr1s1ng a single contmuous section, extendmgA from one side of the road surface'to the other, and contoured.

for producing an arcuate crowned surface.- Figs. 7 and 8 are detail transversesectional views illustrating the beam adjusting means, by which it is medially raised and lowered .to vary-the crown or transverse con-tour of the finished surface. Fig. 9 is a detail sectional view of the yielding central joint,between the inner ends of the tamping bar or shoe sections. Fig. 10 is a diagrammatic view illustrating the. path of travel of the heel point of the tamping beam or shoe, throughout successive strokes. Fig. 11 is a 'detail rear elevation of the gear transmission devices. Fig. 11a is a detail side elevation of the gear transmission looking withlarrows Z on Fig. 3. Fig. 12 is a' detail sectional view of the telescopic main frame. Figs 13 and 13a, 13" and 13c illustrate a modilication of the tamping beam actuating mechanism. Fig. 14is two diagrammatic illu's' trations of the tamping beam movement at its heel under control of the mechanlsm shownin Fig. 13 and 13a. Fig. v15Iis a rear elevation of the two carriages of the machine in distended relation, and carrying a one piece rigid beam having its lower side arcuate. The carrying wheels are omitted to avoid complication. Fig. 15a is an end view of the beam shown in Fig.' 15, showing the end plate and the spader plate, the latter in lowered position. Fig. 15b is a View similar to 15El illustrating a- 'differently mounted spader plate. Fig. 16 is a view similar to Fig. 15 but with the two carriages telescoped as closely together as possible, and with the rigid beam shaped on the under side for finishing a road of conic section.

Fig. 17 is similar to Fig. 16, it shows, however, the-carrying wheels, and shows a rigid beam notched off at one end and a temporary form laid inside of one edge of the paving bed in order to surface a more narrow road way than the machine is contemplated for. Fig. 17:1l is an end view of the structure shown in Fig. 17. Fig. 18 is similar to Fig. 15 except that it shows the machine narrowed and the beam shaped for a conic sectioned road. Fig. 19.21 is similar to Fig. 16, but with'the machine narrowed. Fig. 19 is a rear view of the machine without the telescopic arrangement, both carriages being secured rigidly to a one piece frame member.

It shows 'the beam notched off on one end, and arranged'` and its operating mechanism: it also shows a flexible slicker attached to the vibrating shoe. Fig. 23y shows two partial 'front views of-a strike plate and of-agitating lingers optionally and adjustably usable in connection with the shoe. Fig. 24 is a diagrammatical illustration of the shoveling movement of the point of the lingers or plate shown in Fig. 22 and Fig. 23, when the machine is moving forward. v Fig. 25 is a diagrammatical illustration of the movement of the rear end of the flexible slicker plate, shown in Fig. 22, when the machine is moving forward. Fig. 426 is a diagrammatical;illustration of the movement of the rear end of the flexible slicker plate shown on Fig. 22 when the machine is moving backward and the movement of the shoe is the same as when the machine is moving forward. t

ALike parts are indicated by similar characters ofreference throughout the several views.

The present apparatus is designed to travel under its own power 4in bridging relation across the surface of the roadway to be fin-l ished and employing the side forms, containing the concrete deposit, as guide tracks.

While the ordinary wooden from boards` commonly employed to define the lateral marginfof the roadway and to confine the deposit of concrete in a semi-fluid or plastic stage, if sufficiently strong and well braced, may be employed for such guide track purposes, for' economy as well as ease of operation, there are preferably employed metal flanged side forms, 1 1, which serve the double purpose' of guide tracks and concrete form sides. These side rails or forms 1, are provided with base flanges projecting Voutwardly therefrom and resting upon'the road-bed and also with out-turned angle flanges 3, whichform the track for thecarrying wheels of the machine. The concrete material is deposited intermediate the side rails or forms 1-'1, from the. usual mixer. The quantity so deposited is slightly in excess of the maximum requirement to fill the form to the desired and established grade. The present machine traveling upon the side rails or form sides 1-1 follows the concrete mixer and while the material is yet in a semi-.fluid or plastic stage it progressively advances over the deposit of concrete tamping and compacting the matev rial to' uniform grade and contour, striking ofl' the surplus material and leaving the surface smoothly finished.

The main frame ofthe apparatus consists of two traveling carriages 4 and 5,- interconnected by pipe sections 6 and 7 One ofthe pipe sections 7 is telescopically arranged within the pipe section 6, permitting thereby a limited range of movement of thetraveling carriages 4 and 5 toward and from each other transversely of the road-bed. Each of the traveling carriages comprises a body portion formed from spaced channel bars 8, interconnected'in spaced relation by truss bars or by connecting plates from which extend dependent leg portions 9, to which are suitably journalled carrying wheels. The carriage 4 is provided with two double flanged carrying wheels 1t) while the other carriage has one double flanged wheel 10 and an unflanged wheel The flanges 11 of the carrying wheels 1() are flared or tapered to enable the carrying wheels to more easily negotiate curved sections of the track rail or side forms 1. The innermost flange of the carrying wheels is of less thickness than the outer flange, thereby minimizing the disturbance of the material near the form. The forward and unfianged wheel 10"* of the carriage 5 is of wide face lo allow the lnachine to negotiate curves and the two double flanged wheels of the carriage 4 guides the travel of the ma.-

- chine along the paving bed. Connected to the primary or propelling carriage 4 are two standards or pipe sections 6, connected end to end, and having interposed therebetween, the head or supportingT plate 12, provided with bearings for the operating shafts. Correspending plates 13 are provided at the opposite ends of the respective pipe sections 6 and fixedly secured thereto. The pipe sections 6 may be varied in length and diameter in accordance with the span of the apparatus. However, for roads of the usual width, standard nine inch pipe sections have been found quite suitable. Such sections are used for economy of construction and to afford the necessary rigidity and strength to resist the strains, torsion and tension to which the apparatus frame is subjected in operation. It will be understood, however, that in lieu of interconnecting sections of pipe, frame members of differently shaped cross area may be employed. Pipe sections are employed because of their great strength to resist torsion. All of the principal bearings for the machine A are carried to pipe 6 and the back thrust of the shoe 21 must be resisted and transmitted to carriage 4 by the pipe 6. Connected to the second carriage 5 is a fianged pipe section 7, of less diameter arranged telescopically within the section 6. The telescropic sections 6 and 7 are provided with anti-friction rollers 14 and 15, which facilitate the to and fro adjustment-to compensate for variation in the spacing of the track rails or side forms 1. The antifriction roller 14, engages exteriorily of the telescopic pipe sections 7 through openings in the exterior pipe section 6. At the same time the second set of anti-friction rollers 15 located interiorily of the sliding pipe section 7 adjacent its inner extremity engage the interior of the pipe section 6 through suitable openings in the inner pipe 7.

Mounted in suitable adjustable bearings in the head plates 12 and 13, is a drag shaft 16, on which are journalled for rocking movement independent of the drag shaft, a plurality of downwardly and rearwardly extending drag bars 17. These drag bars are loose upon the drag shaft 16, but the latter is capable of limited rocking movement to effect the adjustment of the tamping shoe or beam as will be described. The bearing of the shaft 16 can be adjusted up and down to vary the angle of the working face of the beam 21.

At their rearward and lower ends the drag bars 17 are connected by links 18 with rock arms 19 upon a rock shaft 20,'mounted in suitable bearings in the head plates 12 and 13. The link 18 and arm 19 comprise in effect a toggle joint connection, which under thc rocking movement of the shaft 2() vibrates the drag bars, actuating such barsin their downwardly and forwardly stroke with great pressure. For simplicity and economy ol' manufacture, the drag bars 17, each comprise a pair of angle bars arranged in spaced rclation, interconnected by transverse bolts with intermediate spacers. In the drawing three of such drag bars or pairs of angle bars have been shown.

Suspend-ed beneath the oscillatory drag bars 17 is the tamping beam or shoe21,formed in two angularly adjustable sections, connected by an adjustable joint 22. This joint is of concave-convex form, wherein one of the sections is somewhat reduced at its eX- tremity and fits within a recess or groove formed by marginal flanges 23 on the opposing member, the two sections being held together by tie bolts 24 carrying helical compression springs 25, against the yielding resistance of which the sections of the beam 21 are adjustable to a limited angular relation with each other. Projecting shield plates 26 carried by one of the beam sections and overlapping the joint, serve to close the marginal opening between the beam section when angularly adjusted. The lip or flange 23 on the lower side of the tamping beam maintains close engagement in the rabbet of the opposing beam section, Where it is held under the tension of the spring 26 in all positions of adjustment of the beam section. This method of connecting the two sections of the beam 21 together affords a tight joint on the bottom and also allows the outside section neXtto carriage 5 to be easily disconnected by removing the bolts 24 and spring 25', in which case this section comes away from the other along with the outside lengths of pipe6 and shafts 16 and 20, which have been provided with couplings 16a and 20a for this urpose. The beam sections 21 are provide with vertically disposed hanger plates.

These hanger platesextend intermediate the angle bars forming the drag bars 17. The plates 27 at the opposite ends of the tamping -beam and pertaining to the terminal drag links 17 are suspended on transverse studs 28, mounted in the parallel angle bars forming the drag link and extending through corresponding holes in the suspension plate 27, which holes are suiiicientl'y large to permit the necessary play and compensating movethrustplate 29 is shown'operating in a slot 30 in the 'shoe or beam, while the forward thrust late overlaps the forward marginal edge o the beam-or shoe 21. This beam or shoe is inclined upwardly and forwardly with the forward margins elevated a considerable distance above the road-bed, while ever.

ings. By the to and fro adjustment of the hand lever 38, the drag shaft 16 is rocked to the heel of the shoe or beam is finished with a smoothing surface 31, substantially horizontally disposed, and parallel with the finished surface of the roadway. The hanger plate pertainingto the middle drag link 17 differssomewhat in its mounting from those at the ends ofthe beam.` Instead of being' suspended directly from the drag link 17 as are the terminal hanger plates 27, the medial plate 27"l is suspended from twol rock arms or bell crank levers V'32 and 33. The bell crank lever 32 is keyed or otherwise fixedly mounted upon the drag shaft 16. The

second bell crank lever 33 is pivotally mount'- ed upon a. transverse stud 34 carried by the drag link 17 The ,hanger plate 27"l has slotted connections 35 with the rock arms of the bell crank levers 32 and 33, so that 'asl ythese bell crank levers are oscillated, the

hanger plate 27 and with it the tamping -beam or shoe section` 21, are raised and lowered. The bell crank levers 32 and 33 are caused to oscillate in unison by an intermediate connecting link 36, which transmits the rocking movement of the drag shaft 16 to the rearward elevating crank lever 33. The drag shaft- 16 is manually rocked by means i .of a lever 38, secured to 'the shaft 16 and engageable with the usual notchedsegment 39,

1n various positions of oscillatory adjust-- ment. This notched segment 39 is secured to one pair of drag links 17 and oscillates with them. The lever 26 can be operated as the machine is beingpropelled along the road. way, one notch in a given distance. It is possible to .do this adjusting automatically how- A simple way is shown inthe dra-win turn raise and lower the medial ortion of the tamping beam or shoe 21 byexing the joint 22 thereby varying the .crown of the finished road surface and its lateral inclination.' A By this adjustment the respective secl tions of the tamping beam or shoe 21 may be alined throughout toi produce a trans.- versely level orl uniform {inished'surface as Shown in Fig. 4, or the center of the beam or shoe may be elevated to various altitudes producing the transversely crowned or later-` ally inclined surface shown in Fig. 5, and this can be done while the machine is in action. The finished surface is produced in either flat or variously contoured crowned form, by striking off the surplus material the rocking movement of the shaft 20 which is transmitted through the toggle connections 18 and 19 to the vibrating drag bars 17.

For economy of manufacture and convenience of control, the power transmission feature by which the shaft 20 is given a rocking movement and the apparatus as a whole propelled forwardly or rearwardly as may be required, are concentrated upon and, adjacent to the primary carriage 4. On this traveling carriage 4 is located a suitable engine or motor 40, preferably ofthe explosive type, but which may be of any suitable and convenient character. This engine or motor 40 is connected by a chain belt with a drive sprocket 41 upon a power shaft 42, mounted in suitable bearings upon the carriage 4. The power shaft 42 carries intermediate the bearing brackets 43, a pair of interconnected sliding gear pinions 44. The gears 44 having driving engagement with the shaft 42 are slidable thereon by the shift lever 45 into and out of mesh with two gea-rs 46-46, 'ournalled upon the bearing brackets 43 and lnterconnected eccentrically by a wrist pin 47,1011 which is journalled the connecting rod or pitman 48. This connecting rod or pitman 48 is pivoted at its opposite end to arock arm` 49, upon' the rock shaft 20. The` rotation of the power shaft 42 driven by the engine 40 is transformed by the crank and pitman connection with thelgears 46 into rocking movement transmitted to the shaft 20 by which` the drag 1in-k- 17 and tamping beam or shoe section 21 are given a rising and falling movement as the machine progresses. These parts are operatively connected and disconnected by the shifting movement of the driving gear pinions 44, controlled by the shift lever 45.

Mounted upon the power shaft 42 beside the sprocket wheel 41 is another sliding gear pinion 50,`slidable into and out of driving engagement with an idler gear 52 to which is lconnected a second gear pinion 53, meshing with a gear 54, upon a power transmission shaft 55 extending in alignment with, but

disconnected from the power shaft 42, or, into and out of engagement with the face of the .gear 54. Connection through-gear 54 gives ast speed and connection through gear 52 affords slow speed. By operation ofthe shift lever 45,-the gear pinion'O keyed upon the power vshaft 42 is slidinglyadjusted into and out of mesh with the gear 52, and clutch engagement with gear 54, thereby establishing driving connection between the power shaft 42 and transmission shaft 55. In an intermediate or central position of the shift lever, the shafts 42 and 55 are disconnected. The transmission shaft is mounted in a suitable bracket 56 upon a frame of the apparatus. It carries a pair of interconnected sliding gear pinions 58, controlled by a shift lever 59. The shift levers 45 and 59 are operated from the side of the machine by reciprocatory operating rods 60 and 61, having at'their extremities, handles by which the rods are reciprocated to shift the respective gears into and out of driving engagement, and are locked in position by slots in plate 43. The sliding gear pinion 58 constitutes the reversing and neutral means. lVlien shifted toward the right in Fig. 1 and Fig. 3, one yof the gear pinions 58 is intermeshed with a spur gear 62, upon a counter` shaft 63. When shifted in the opposite directions, the other driving gear pinion 58 is caused to intermesh with an idler 64 meshing with a gear 65 'corresponding to the gear 62 and mounted upon the same countershaft 63, but serving to drive such counter shaft 63 in the opposite direction. The counter shaft 63 carries intermediate the gears 62 and 65, a gear pinion 66, which intermeshes with the primary driving gear 67, of a differential or'compensating gear train, contained within the differential housing 68. This differential or compensating gear train may beef any ordinary construction, such as the compensating or differential gear mechanism of a motor vehicle, but of course of proportionate size and strength to the work to be performed. This differential mechanism serves to drive the shaft and shaft 71 extending in opposite direction from the differential housing 68, in unison, but permits the oppositely disposed shaft 70 and 71 to rotate independently to compensate for the differential travel of the carriages 4 and 5 when following a curved path of travel. The shafts 70 and 71 extend transversely of the machine and are provided with bearings in the head plates 12 and 13. Each of these shafts is provided with a stainlard flexible coupling 72, which compensates for any unalignment or distortion incident to twisting strains to which the frame of the apparatus may be subjected. These. couplings 72 may be of any approved form. The usual type being a heavy disc of rubber or rubberized fabric or a succession of thin metal laminations, bolted between opposite coupling heads, the connections of which with the intermediate iexible disc are offset to permit a limited amount of angular distortion. Furthermore, the bearings of these shafts as well as the drag shaft 16 and rock shaft 20, in the bearing heads 12 and 13 are provided with universally mounted journal boxeswhich likewise compensate for a limited amount 'fof distortion"'of the machine frame. The shaft 71 is provided with a coupling 71n for disengagement when shafts 16 and 20 are disconnected. The shafts 70 and 71 are provided at their extremities with gear piniens 73 intermeshing with fears 74, indented on sprocket shafts 75 carrlcd by the 4respective traveling carriages 4 and 5. The

shaft 75 of the traveling carriage 5 is elongated at 76 and has splined engagement with the driven gear 74. This permits the traveling carriage 5 to have floating movement toward and from the carriage 4 as the width of the roadway and the spacing of the track forms 1 vary, while maintainingI driving engagement between the gear 74 and sprocket shaft 75, through the entire range of such lateral movement of the traveling carriage. During such lateral shifting movement of the carriage 5, permitted by tlie telescopic relation of the pipe section 7, within the pipe 6, the extension 76 of the sprocket shaft 75 has similar reciprocating movement through the gear 74. which maintains its driving engagement with the shaft extension through its entire range of movement. The shaft 75 of each of the traveling carriages 4 and 5 carry a sprocket wheel 77 over which passes a chain belt 78 engaging driving sprockets 79 upon the arrying wheels 10 and 10". The sprocket chain 7 8 passes around idler sprockets 80 and 8i intermediate its engagement with the car rying wheel sprockets 79. By this means power is transmitted to the carrying wheels to propel the apparatus either forwardly or rearwardly according to the position of the shift lever 59, and the intermeshing engagement of the gear pinions 58. \Vhen the shift lever 59 is operated toward the left in Figs. 1 and 3 to intel-mesh one of the gear pinions 58 with the idler gear 64. from which motion is transmitted through the gear 65, the machine is propelled forwardly. Upon reverse movement of the shift lever 59, by which the other gear pinion 58 is intermeshed with the gear 62, thereby driving the counter-shaft 63 in reverse direction, the mechanism is propelled rearwardly. When the lever 59 is in central position the machine is in neutral. The operation of the shift lever 51 moving the gear pinion 50 into and out of mesh with the gear 52 and 54 or stopping midway, serves to drive the machine either fast or slow or arrest its travel when the shift lever 51 is in an intermediate or neutral position. By disconnecting the gear pinion 44 from the crank gears 46 by the operation of the shift lever 45 and leaving the shift levers 51 and 59 in operative position, the appara tus may be moved under its own power from place to place without the operation of the tamping beam or shoe.

The tamping beam or shoe 21 being inclined upwardly and forwardly. in angular relation with the plane of the finished surface, accumulates beneath it a surplus of material as at 82, which'as the shoe or tamping llo beam advances is crowded downward toward the plane of the finished surface by the cammlng action of the beam further assisted by 'the downward and `forward thrust of the beam or shoe, which is effected under great pressure by the toggle vconnection withthe rock shaft. By this means, the surplus material is crowded downward below the lane of the finished surface and the body o concrete isincreasingly compacted under pressure. The action of the shoeor beam submerges the coarse aggregates, allowing theV finer portions of the mixture torise to the surface. -In addition to the compression and compacting action due to the camming action of the shoe or bar,'and to the ramming incident to the repeated downward thrust movementof the bar or shoe, the body of concrete operated upon is subjected to a further smoothing or final wiping action in a forward -direction `at the completion of the thrust movement, because of thelslow movement of the toggle joint when on the dead center, thus giving in effect a smooth troweled finish. The path oftravel of the heel of the tamping beam or shoe thru a succession of thrust strokes as the machine advances is diagrammatically illustrated in 10. It will be noted in'this diagram that the lift of the' heel of the shoe or beam is substantially vertical, .while its downward stroke is diagonally forwardly and down-wardly, which stroke is followed by a horizontal advance movement coincident with the finished surface of the roadway. The successive forward sliding.`

movements of the shoe or beam at the level of the finished surface overlap each other so that the entire surface is subjected to this final ironing out-lor troweling effect. w

In Figs. 2 and 3 the projecting end, of the rack shaft 20 has a hand lever 59 which is used when the machine has advanced .forwardly over all of the material that has been deposited on the paving bed and the operator is not satisfied with-the quality of its work. ',He then throws the shaft 20 out of gear by the use of the lever 45. This leaves the shaft 20 entirely free toI` be4 operated by thehand 'lever 59,l by depressing the lever 39 to the frontA yhe turns the shaft 20, lifts the arms 19, links 18 and the shoe 21. The machine can npw be moved backward over the work with the-shoe held up. When he has retracted the apparatus as far as 'necessary,he again throws the shaft20 into Agear and repeats the former work operations, or he can raise the lever 59 which will lowerthe shoe 21 onto the bed and lock it down by the toggle joints."l

He can then advance the machine. over the work and trowel the surfacewith the'wholey weight of the machine holdingthe shoe' down to its work.

At the opposite ends -of the tamping beam or shoe 21 are-mounted plates 83 extending forwardly of the shoe or tamping beam and closing the ends of the convergent space beneath the beam to retain therein the, accumulation of surplus material. Pivotally mounted upon the ends of the 'beam or shoe and forming extensions of the retaining end plate 83, are adjustable extensions 84 wliich can be of any desired shape and which project intermediate the body of concrete and the track rails or side forms 1 4in close relationship with the lattcr or may be raised above the plane of the depositwhen passing obstructions. These adjustable extensions plates .serve as spaders, being vibrated up and down with a progressivelyadvancing.movement to agitato the lconcrete material adjacent to the form sides, serving to displace inwardly the coarse aggregates and breaking air pockets,

enabling the finer portions of theV concrete The tamping beam or shoe 84 shown in Fig.

6 is continuous throughout, its under side being contoured to either parabolic or arcuate form to produce a road surface of predetermined transverse curvature." This shoe or beam 84 is'substituted for the beam 21 and is adapted tobe bolted directly to the drag links 17. Bosses 85 are provided upon the 'beam 84 for this purpose. It must be understood that the center hinged sectional shoe 21 which can be adjusted for' straight or crowned top surfaces, vis only used to surface a straight or prismatic sectioned surface.

It is' the present practice in road-building to crown thestraight-away portion of the road by elevating the centerline above the side margins and to gradually decrease the altitude of such crowns to'- a flat surface'` on curves of the road-way. It is for this reason that the elevating and lowering mechanism is provided for 4the center of the tamping beam 'or shoe only. 'It-will be understood, however, that the same raising and lowering mechanism provided at the center of the apparatus may be duplicated at -either or both ends, in which case one end ofthe beam or shoe may be raised o r lowered to afford an inclined or,bankedsurface for curves of the road. In such casethe outside margin of the road would be constructed higher than the inside margin. lhis might be done either by raising the end of the tamping beam or shoe at the outer side of the curve or by lowering it at the inner side of the curve. 1f such elevating means is provided at only one end ofthe beam, such end would be elevated above the intcrnudiatc or norlnal position when traversing the outside of the curve, and would he lowered below such internuuliate or normal position when traversing the inside of a road curve. '1

ln Fig. 125 there is illustrated a slightly diil'erent form of the tamping means or shoe actuating means, wherein the beam is given a compression stroke throughout substantially its full width instead ofxthe rocking movement before described and the beam or shoe is given a somewhat longer forward sliding movement at the termination of its down stroke. In this construction, the shaft 16 corresponding to the shaft 1G ot' the previous construction is given a rotary movement and is provided with eccentrics 8G. upon which the forward ends of the drag links 17 arc mounted. rlhe rear ends ot these drag links are connected directly to the rock arm 19 upon the rock shaft 20', without the intermediary of the link 18 previously described. In this construction, the r\ar end or heel of the shoe or beam is raised and lowered hy the oscillation of the arm 19', while at the. same time the front end of the beam is raised and lowered by the rotation of the eccentric 8G, the shoe or beam; being given a forward stroke simultaneously by the action of the eccentric and rock arm, additional to the stroke or movement. imparted by the travel of the apparatus. The path of travel of the heel of the beam or shoe in both forward and rearward movement is defined diagrannnatically in Fig. lt. showing the movement of point $1 while advancing and while backing.

Figs. Yl5 to [9l inclusive illustrate the adaptation ol' the present road making machine to road-beds of ditt'erent widths. ln lfig. l5. the machine is shown extended by the telescopic extension of the. sliding pipe section 7, to accommodate the. machine. to a road-hed ol extreme width. In this figure, the clamping beam or shoe is shown continuous throughout its length, and not sectional or jointed as before described, and furthermorc. the shoe corrcsl-mnds in length with the road-bed. Fig. 1li shows the sliding telcscopic l'ramc section retracted for operation upon a. road-hed of normal width. In Fig. 17, the machine. is shown operating upon a road-bed of less than normal or standard width, in which case, an auxiliary or supplemental form side 90 confining the concrete deposit to the prescribed width while one of the traveling carriages, in this instance, the carriage F, travels upon a. track rail 1, located in spaced relation with the auxiliary form side 90 and beyond the margin of the roadbed. In this case, the traveling beam or shoe is reduced in thickness through that portion which overhangs the auxiliary form side 90 to afford the necessary clearance, and a special spading blade 84 is carried upon the tamping beam or shoe at a point coincident with the auxiliary side form 90. For roadbeds ot' less than standard width, the tubular frame section 7 is withdrawn from the outside or second section (i, and inserted into the. primary section of the pipe 6 when the narrow machine possesses the same features of znljustability as the wide machine, as shown in Fig. 18. In such case the traveling carriage 5 may ride upon the side form 1, which contines the concrete deposit in lieu of a rail or side form spaced outside the margin of the road-bed as shown in Fig. 17. Figs. 18 and 19a show the machine applied to narrow pavement or driveway, or half roadway construction, in which one of the pipe sections 6 forming the frame or supporting structure is removed, thus making the stand ard machine of less width. By employing the single pipe section 6, thus reducing the machine structure to less size, and providing an inwardly spaced form side 92, as shown in Fig. 19. beyond which the reducing extremity of the beam o1' shoe overhangs in somewhat the same manner as shown in Fig. 17, the machine may be used for making side-Walks or connmratively narrow concrete deposits. The machine is thus quite fiexible in its adaptation to pavements of different widths and design. being operable with equal facility over a wide range of transverse dimensions. Fig. 19, however, shows a machine of simpler construction, the telescopic feature being omitted` and both carriages 4 and 5 bolted fast to the single pipe G.

'l`o further insure thorough agitation of the mixture, aml to assure uniform coating ol' all particles with a thin film of cement, and to further break up hard piles and relieve any air pockets which might occur in the deposit, the vibrating shoe 21 has been shown in Fi". 20, provided with a series of adjustable agitating lingers or blades. The agitating tingers 93 are provided in a series spaced one from the other, immediately in advance of the upwardly and forwardly inclined compressor shoe 21, but need not be connected directly to the shoe 21. The agitator fingers 9? are carried by a rock shaft 94 lnountcd in suitable supporting brackets 95. extending forwardly ol the conipressor shoe 21. They are oscillated into and out of operative position by means ot a hand lever 91S. engageable in different positions of adjustment with ay segment plate 97. The fingers 93 may be straight or plough shaped or right and left twisted. and may be adjusted to an extreme position in which they will project below the grade level as shown by solid lines, or they may be elevated to different degrees, in which they will engage and agitate the accumula- 'tion of surplus material, before it is acted is progressively forced forwardly thru theaccumula-tion' of surplus material. The actions of the agitator fingers 93 stirs and intermixes this accumulation of surplus material and the expressed -water v and-liquid cement', into a fluid mixture of comparatively thin consistency. This insures every particle of the-aggregate receiving the thin coating or film of theliquid cement. As the compressor shoe acts upon this mixture the moisture and thin excess cement is again squeezed forwardly. to be mixedwith further material by the action of the agitator lingers 93. In addition to the agitatorfingers 93, there is provided an adjustable gage plate 98, which servesto strike off the excess material, preliminary to its engagement by the compressor shoe 21. This plate 98 may be adjusted vertically to different heights of the established grade level. As the shoe 21 is raised and lowered with its forward thrusting'movement, -the striking off or gage plate 98 is likewise given a rocking movement, or shovel movement by which the accumulation of excess material is progressively advanced, allowing only so much to passbeneath the lower edge of suchstriking oft' and gage plate'198, as can be accommodated beneath the lvibrating shoe 21, and compressed below the grade level by the action thereof.. i

-In Fig. 22 there is shown a modiication of` the operating means` for the vibrating tamping beam orA shoe. In lieu of the swinging' drag bars operated by toggle link connectlons heretofore described, the pressure shoe or tamping beam 21a in Fig. 22 is operated by direct pressure in a vertical direction, byv means of an eccentric 99 carried upon a revoluble shaft 100. This shaft 100 is journalledin hanger arms 101 carried by the main frame `of the machine.- The eccentric 99 is connected through a de endent arm or' strut 102, with the tamping eam or shoe 21a. The eccentric cam shoe transmits a direct vertical or 4up and down movement to the shoe. However, to give to the shoe a forward thrust move-l ment, simultane`ously with its up and down movement, an oscillating link 103 is` 'pivoted to the hanger arm 101 at one end and to the dependent arm or strut 102 at its opposite end. As the eccentric 99 rotates, 1t

oscillates the arm 102, to and fro in a fore and aft direction about the pivotal connection of such arm 102, with the rocking link 103. vThis link 103 oscillates aboutl its pivotal connection with the hanger arm 101, to accommodate the vertical movement of the arm 102 as the eccentric reaches the top and bottom of its orbit. The combined oscillatory and vertical movement transmitted to the shoe 21, by the eccentric 99, causes .the shoe to describe a path of travel diagrammatically illustrated in Figs. 24;, 25 and 26. i Attached to-the front'of the shoe 21, is anadjustable gauge plate 98, similar to that illustrated in Figs. 20 and 21. This plate may be either continuous .as shown iny 98a Fig. 23,

o r itvmay be serrated or toothed as shown at 98b in the same ligure. The path of travel of this gauge plate or agitating plate is illustrated in dotted lines in Figs. 26, at 96, asv though the machine was standing still. Howl ever, as the machine advances, as at 96,the successive strokes Vof the gauge plate will overlapA each other in the manner diagrammatically illustrated -in Fig. 24, performing a shoveling movement. -At the rear of the shoe 21, there is shown a slicker ortrowel plate 104, which is given an elliptical path of travel by the combined vertical and oscillatory movements of the shoe. However, as the machine advances, thistrowel plate or slicker 104. describes a pathof travel suchas diagrammatically shown in Fig. 25, wherein it advances in line with the established grade, throughout a part of its stroke, then rises and returns in an elevated position to repeat its advanced troweling stroke in overlapping relation with the previous stroke. However, upon reversal of the direction of travel of the machine, -this trowel plate 104, will depossessing a climbing over or mixingmovement, as shown diagrammatically in ig. 26, wherein it will lbe elevated throughout a greater portion of its stroke, and through that portion in which the shoe is depressed, the slicker plate will have a short wiping action on the nished surface. It performs a sliding movement which advances the top material-the distance of the stroke'of the machine. This is a veryvaluable mixing movement. y

-Ordinarily the machine may be operated continuously in a forward direction. However, if to correct inequalities in the finished surface due to unequal distribution of the material and to meet otherunusual operating conditions, it is found desirous to rework4 the surface, the machine may be reversed and driven backward and forward alternately. This movement may be effected with the Ashoe working or with the shoe held upor l down, or'up while backing and down while going forward, over the same surface as often as may be found desirable, without interference with the previously deposited and compressed material and without disturbing .its finished surface. The motion transmittir g mechanism is such that, in either of the .formsof two operating mechanism described, the shoe during the reverse movement of the machine will have asliding action and effect its rearward strokes while elevated, and will Vscribe a somewhat different path f travel 4- obvious and easily understood.

contact the road-bed through a very much shorter stroke, but in reverse direction, agreeing with that with which the road-surface was originally finished.

As shown in the drawings and heretofore described, the machine will accommodate itself readily to any ordinary curves. However, if it be necessary that the machine negotiate curves of' unusually short radii, the front carrying wheel 10a is unflanged and is of comparatively wide face, so that it may be capable of a greater range of lateral to and fro adjustment relative to the side form for the track rail, while maintaining its engagement therewith. Such use of a plain wheel 10 of wide tread in lieu of one of the flanged carrying wheels 10 is quite Also the wheels of the carriage 5 can be brought close in a fore and aft direction than is shown in these drawings, or they can be entirely displaced by a single wheel directly'under the center of the pipe 7 by splining pipe 7 into pipe 6.

rom the above description it will be apparent that there is thus provided a device of the character described possessing the particular features of advantage before enumerated as desirable, but which obviously is susceptible of modification in its form, proportions, detail construction and arrangement of parts without departing from the principle involved or sacrificing any of its advantaires.

hile in order to comply with the statute, the invention has been described in language more or less specific as to structural features, it is to be understood that the invention is not limited to the specific details shown, but that the means and construction herein disclosed comprises the preferred form of several modes of putting the invention into effect and the invention is, therefore, claimed in any of its forms or modifications within the legitimate and valid scope of the appended claims.

Having thus described my invention, I claim:

l. In a road making machine of the character described, a traveling main frame adapted to span a deposit of concrete material, downwardly and rearwardly inclined drag bars pivoted thereto at their forward ends, a vibratory tamping beam carried by the drag bar having an upwardly and forwardly inclined working face, and means for transmitting to the rear ends of the bars a swinging motion material-ly below the level of their pivotal connection in unison with the advance of the machine, thereby giving to such beam repeated rocking thrust movement initially in a downwardly and finally in a forwardly direction in which the rear margin of the beam is given a greater range of move 1 ment than the front margin of the beam by which the concrete is subjected to a compacting stroke and then to a smoothing stroke.

2. In a road making machine of the character described, a traveling main frame adapted to span a deposit of concrete material, a beam having an up and down tampmg motion carried by the frame and extending transversely across the concrete deposit, mounting for the beam having swinging motion about an axis located materially above the level of the working face of the beam, whereby the beam is given a downwardly and forwardly directed thrust movement about said axis, said beam being inclined upwardly and forwardly and having constantly varying engagement with the deposits of material as the machine moves forwardly to exert camming pressure thereon by which the material is compressed and excess material and moisture squeezed therefrom in a forwardly direction and means for actuating the beam.

3. In a road making machine of the character described, a traveling main frame adapted to span a deposit of concrete or the like, and a strike oit beam carried by the main frame extending transversely across the deposit of material and inclined upwardly and forwardly therefrom, affording a convergent recess for excess material collected beneath the beam as the machine advances, a swinging support for the beam, the axis of which is so located above the working surface that the beam engages the road surface at an angle of approximately 45 degrees, a rock arm connected with the free end of the support and approaching substantially dead center relation as the beam reaches the limit of its stroke, the inclined surface of the beam serving to progressively compress the material to grade and expel forwardly the moisture and excess liquid cement into the collected mass in front of the machine and means for transmitting to such beam intermittent forwardly directed tamping thrusts by the oscillation of said rock arm.

4. In a road making machine of the character described, a traveling main frame adapted to span a deposit of concrete or the like, and a strike oif beam capable of intermittent downward and forward thrust movement carried by the main frame extending transversely across the deposit of material and inclined upwardly and forwardly therefrom, throughout the forward portion of the beam, a movable support for the beam guiding the beam into engagement with the road surface at an angle of approximately 45 degrees, and toggle link means for actuating the beam, the rearward portion of the beam being extended in approximate parallel relation with the plane of travel of the machine.

5. In a road making machine of the character described, a traveling main frame adapted to span a deposit of concrete or the like, a tampbeam carried thereby'and extending transversel across the deposit, and

actuating means or transmitting to said beam, a to and fro motion in a direction downwardly and forwardly inclined to the road bed surface whereby the 4beam is given an initial downward and forward thrust movement and a subsequent -forward substantially1 horizontal movement substantially in the direction'ofA travel of the machine.

6. In a road making machine of the character described, a traveling main frame the transverse' contour of the finished road' ing concrete road-Ways consisting` in displacing the excess moisture and liquid cement by intermittentdownward and forward angular thrust compression vof surplus aggregate above and belowV the grade line under progressively increasing squeezing pressure by which an excess quantity of the displaced moisture and liquid cement is progressivelyA urged forwardly in the mass preparatory to its compression.

8. In a road making machine of the character described, a traveling main frame, adapted to span a deposit of concrete or the like, a beam carried thereby and extending transversely of the path of travel of the traveling main frame, a rock arm operatively connected with the beam, means for oscillating the rock arm to raise and lower the beam, and guiding means directing the impinging movement of the beam in a forward anddownward direction at an acute angle with the surface of the road bed, therear margin of said-beam being contoured to agree with v way, the forward margin of the beam being elevated to receive there-beneath a body of surplus material to be compressed as the machine advances.

9. In an apparatus of the character described, two carriages each including a mounting frame and carrying wheels travelingr in approximately parallel paths on 'opposite sides of a deposit of concrete or the like, and an intermediate telescopically adjustable frame by which said carriages are yieldingly connected'for movement. toward and from each other simultaneously withtheir advance travel, and concrete treating means carried thereby.

'10. In anapparatus of the character described, a traveling main frame formed in two telescopically adjustable sections for spanning a deposit of vconcrete or the'like,

concrete treating means `carried thereby, a

transverse actuating shaft slidinvly mounted upon said frame to compensate for the relative movement of `its sections, and carrying wheels operative at opposite sides of the concrete deposit the respective sections of the main frame being automatically adjustable simultaneously with their advance travel to compensate for varying widths of the deposit.

1 1. In an apparatus .of the character described,.an expansible and contractible traveling mam frame for spanning a deposit of concrete or the like including a pair of independent travelling carriages, a tubular telescopic tie member connecting the carriages for unison travel, and its telescopic movement enabling the relatlve adjustment of the carriages to and from each other, guide tracks for said frame, on opposite sides of the con- 'crete deposit, carrying Wheels upon said travelling.. carriages engaging the guide tracks, said frame automatically yieldmg to compensate for variation 1n the spaclng of the guide tracks in unison with the advance movement of the frame, and concrete treatmg means carrled by sa1d travehng frame.

12. In an apparatusof the character described, a traveling main frame adapted to span a deposit of concrete or the like, carrying wheels at one end of the mainframe,

an auxiliary travelling frameoperativelyconnectedv with the opposite end of -the main frame, carrying Wheels for.'said auxiliary frame, said main-frame and auxiliary frame .being adjustable laterally toward and from` each other in unison with the advance movement of the main frame to compensate forvariations in thewidth of the deposit operated over, means for effectingv the automatic adjustment of said travelling frame, and concrete treating means carried by the mainframe.

13. In an apparatus of the characterdescribed, a travelingl main frame, adapted to span a deposit of concrete or the like, in-

cluding a pair of traveling carriages telescopically engaged tie sec-tions carriedV by the .respective carriages, said carriages being adjustable laterally towardand from each other in unison with the advance movement of the main `frame to compensate for variations in the Width of the deposit operated over, carrying wheels'for said carriages, guide tracks for said carrying wheels guiding said carriages toward and from each other in accordance with variations of width of the deposlt and concrete treating." means carried,

by the main frame.

14. In an. apparatus-of the character described, two traveling carriages, arranged in parallel spaced relation telescopic tie yieldingly connecting the carriages one to the other for unison travel' but lpermitting the carriages to be automatically relatively adjusted one toward the other simultaneously with their advance travel, and concrete treating apparatus carried thereby.

15. In an apparatus of the character dcscribed, two traveling carriages arranged in parallel spaced relation, two tubular frame members being telescopically arranged and free for relative longitudinal adjustment by which the carriages are permitted to automatically move toward and from each other in a lateral direction relative to their paths of travel, said adjustment being effected by the advance movement of the carriage, and concrete treating means carried by the apparatus.

16. In an apparatus of the character described, a self propelled traveling main frame adapted tospan a deposit of concrete or the like, a vibratory tamping beam arranged transversely of the path of travel, a swinging carrier therefor oscillating about an axis in front of and materia-ll above the level of the working face of the eam, whereby said beam swings through an arc intersecting the surface operated upon at a point inclined approximatel 45 degrees from said axis, the thrust of sai beam being downwardly and forwardly and rocking beam upon the frame momentarily holding the beam depressed in an approximate condition of rest at the limit of its thrust movement.

17. In an apparatus of the character described, a traveling main frame adapted to span adeposit of concrete or the like, a series of oscillatory drag bars pivotallv mounted upon the main frame and extending downwardly and rearwardly therefrom, a tamping beam carried by the lower rea-r ends of the drag bars, and a rock arm operatively connected with the drag bar and operative toward and from an approximate dead center position for intermittently swinging the bars downwardly and'forwardly to thrust the beam against the concret/e deposit in an angular direction in relation with the grade line as the apparatus advances.

18. In an apparatus of the character d scribed, a traveling main frame, adapted `o span a deposit of concrete or the like, a tamping beam carried by the main frame and arranged transversely of the path of travel, drag bars for said am extending downwardly and rearwardly and having pivotal connections at their upper and forward end with the main frame, toggle links operatively connected with the tamping beam and means for actuating the toggle links to intermittently thrust the tamping beam downwardly and forwardly in an angular direction in relation with the grade line upon the concrete deposit spanned by the apparatus.

19. In an apparatus of the character described, a traveling main frame, adapted to span a deposit of concrete or the like, a vitherefor, downwardly and rearwardly in-v clined arms on which the beam is mounted, and means for vertically swinging said arms for transmitting to said beam an alternating up and down movement in which the beam engages the material in a downuuirdly and forwardly directed thrust movement intersecting the plane of operation at an inclination of approximately 45 degrees.

20. In an apparatus of the character described, a traveling main frame, adapted to span a deposit of concrete or the like, a tamping beam carried by the main frame and arranged transversely of the path of travel, guiding means directing the beam in a forwardly and downwardly inclined direction, and actuating means for transmitting to the beam to and fro motion in such inclined direction and operating to momentarily hold the beam at the limit of its downward thrust movement during a limited advance movement incident to the travel of the apparatus.

21. In an apparatus of the character described, a traveling main frame, adapted to span a deposit of concrete or the like, a tamping beam carried by the main frame and arranged transversely of the path of travel, oscillatory drag bars upon which the beam is supported, a rock shaft and links transmitting motion from the rock shaft to the oscillatory drag bars to effect an up and down swinging movement of the beam additional to the advance movement of the beam incident to the travel of the apparatus.

22. The herein described process of treating concrete deposits consisting in subjecting the deposit to alternating vertical compression strokes and wiping strokes in substantially the plane of the finished surface, such alternating compression and wiping strokes being delivered in overlapping relation.

23. The herein described method of treating concrete deposits consisting in accumul tinf1r a surplus of material, adding to the accnA ulated mass an excess quantity of liqu'- cement extracted from a portion of the deposit theretofore operated upon, intermittently subjecting such surplus material to progressive compression and subjecting the compressed material to wiping action intermediate successive periods of compression.

24. In an apparatus of-'the character described, a traveling main frame, adapted to span a depositof concrete, a tamping beam arranged transversely of the path of travel of the apparatus, said beam having an upwardly and forwardly inclined under surface and to the rear of such inclined surface having an under surface extending in approximate parallel relation with the plane of travel of the apparatus and actuating mechanism for transmitting to the said beam an alternating 'up and down movement'and scribed', a traveling main frame, adapted toA for momentarily holding the beam at the limit ofits downstroke and effecting an advance movement of the beamvwhile in down position. i'

25. In anapparatus of the character delimited advance movement of the traveling main frame while thebeam is in its down l position, thereby affording an -advance wiping movement of the beam coincident with the finished surface of the road bed.

26. In -an apparatus of the character described, a traveling main frame, adapted to span a deposit of concrete, a'tamping beam arranged transversely of the path oftravel of the apparatus, said beam having an upwardly and forwardly inclined under surface andl a flexible trailing portion disposed rearwardly of the inclined surface in approximate parallel relation with the plane of travel of the apparatus, `ind means for transmitting to said beam ai up and'down. movement followed by an advance movement while the beam is in down posit-ion.

27. In an apparatus of the character described, a traveling main frame, adapted to span a deposit of concrete, a tamping beam arranged transversely of the path of travel of -the apparatus, supporting and guidingmeans for said beam upon which the beam is mounted for up and down swinging motion about an axis of oscillation'in advance of the beam and means for actuating the beam into downward and forward thrust .engage- 4ment with the deposit, and for retracting the beam subsequent to such thrust engagement, said actuating means operating. to

hold the'beam 'momentarily in its depressed position during a limited advance of the ap- `paratus to effect a wiping action of the beam span a deposit of concrete "or the like, av beam, w

upon the deposit coincident withthe finished surface of the roadbed." 28. In an apparatus of the character described, a traveling main frame adapted to carried thereby and arranged transversely of the path of travel and utilized to strike off all surplus material to predetermined rade and means for transmitting to the leam'an' up and down swinging motion about a center `ofoscillation'above and in advance of the beam in'an angularly disposed path downwardly and forwardly inclined relative i i to the'finished surface of the roadway, the

under surface of said beam being inclined plane of the travlel and in a planehsubstantially perpendicular to the downwardly and lforwardly inclined, path of travel of the eam.

29. In an apparatus .of the character described, a-traveling main frame adapted to i -span a deposit of concrete or the like, a beam carried thereby and arranged transversely of the path of travel and utilized to strike ofi' all surplus material to a predetermined grade, saidbeam havingan angularly disposed under surface, the forward ortion of which is inclined upwardly and orwardly, the rear portion of which is extended in approximately parallel relation with the plane of travel and' means'for giving to the beam an alternating y up and down motion and for holding the beam momentarily in its depressed position with its rear parallel portion coinciding with the grade line during a limited advance move'- ment of the traveling main frame.

30. In an apparatus of the character described, a traveling main frame adapted to span a deposit of concrete or the like, a beam having a vertical vibratory motion carried 4thereby and arranged transversely of the path of travel. and utilized to. strike olf surplus material to a predetermined grade, .means for actuating the beam, said beam having' an angularly disposed under-surface, the forward portionof which is inclined upwardly and forwardly relative-to the established level of the nished surface of the deposit, and a flexible trailing rear portion of the beam extended in approximately parallel relation with the plane of travel.

31. The combination with a' traveling road -making machine, of a strike off beam carried thereby extending transversely of the path of travel of the apparatus, said beam being concave in a longitudinal direction on its under surface and transversely beveled on los suchnnder surface and means forchanging thel longitudinal' curvature of said beam. `simultaneously with the advance travel of.'

the machine.

32. In an apparatus' of the character described, a travelingxmain frame adapted to span a deposit of concrete or the like, a tamping' beam carried thereby in transverse relation with the path of travel of the apparatus',

means for transmitting to the beam alternating downward thrust and retractive motionf and means for differentially adjusting different portions of the beam to change its contour and thereby vary the transverse contour Vof the finished surface of said deposit. y

33. In anap aratus of the character delscribed, a trave ing main frame adapted to span a deposit of concrete orthe like, a tamping beam carried thereby in transverselyT in clined relation with the lane of travel, actuating means for transmitting to such tamping beam alternating downward thrust and retractive movement and adjusting means for nating downward thrust and retractive movement, and adjusting means operable during the travel of the machine for raising and lowering the beam to progressively vary its inclined relation with the plane of operationas the machine progresses.

35. In an apparatus of the character described, a traveling main frame adapted to span a deposit of concrete or the like, a flexible tamping beam carried thereby in transverse relation to the path of travel, actuating means for transmitting to such tamping beam alternating downward thrust and retractive movement, and means for medially flexing the beam to vary the transverse contour of the finished surface of the concrete deposit in unison with the advance travel of the Vmain frame.

36. In an apparatus of the character described, a traveling main frame adapted to span a deposit of concrete or the like, a tamping beam carried thereby in transverse relation to the path of travel, actuating means for transmitting to such tamping beam alternatin g downward thrust and retractive movement, said beam being medially jointed and means for adjusting the ointed beam to varying angular relations of the connected sections thereof in unison with the advance travel of the main frame.

3T. In an apparatus of the character described, a traveling main frame adapted to span a deposit of concrete or the like, a tamping beam carried thereby in transverse relation to the path of travel, actuating means forl transmitting to such tamping beam alternating downward thrust and retractive movement, said beam comprising t`wo relatively adjustable sections and means for adjusting said-sections while said main frame is in motion to varyingr inclined relations one with the other to vary the transverse contour of the finished surface of the deposit.

38. In an apparatus of the character described. a traveling main frame adapted to span a deposit of conciete or the like, a gage beam tmnsversely arranged relative to the path of travel. and determining the transverse surface contour of the deposit and vertically disposed vibratory plates at the ends of said beam projecting below the level thereof for acting upon the marginal edges of the deposit and means for transmitting to the plates continuous up and down motion.

39. In an apparatus of the character described, a traveling main frame adapted to span a deposit of concrete or the like, a gage beam transversely arranged relative to the path of travel, and determining the transverse surface contour of the deposit, and vibratory plates vertically disposed at the ends of saidbeam and extending below the level of the deposit operated upon for finishing the side margins of the deposit.

40. In an apparatus of the character described, a traveling main frame adapted to span a deposit of concrete or the like, a gage beam transversely arranged relative to the path of travel, and determining the transverse surface contour of the deposit, and vertically disposed plates at the ends of said beam and adjustable relative thereto, said plates extending below the level of the deposit operated. upon for treating the side margins thereof.

41. In an apparatus of the character described, al traveling main frame adapted to span a deposit of concrete or the like, a gage beam transversely arranged relative to the path of travel, and determining the transverse surface contour of the deposit, and vertically disposed plates at the ends of said beam and adjustable relative thereto, said plates extending below the level of the deposit operated upon for treating the side margins thereof, and means for vibrating the beam and plates simultaneously.

42. In an apparatus of the character described, a traveling main frame adapted to span a deposit of concrete or the like, a gage beam transversely arranged relative to the path of travel, and determining the transverse surface contour of the deposit, and vertically disposed plates at the ends of said beam and adjustable relative thereto, said plates extending below the level of the deposit operated upon for treating the side inargins thereof, said plates and beam being interconnected for unison operation and means for vibrating the beam and plates.

43. In an apparatus of the character described, a traveling main frame adapted to span a deposit of concrete or the like, a vibratory gage beam carried thereby in transverse relation to the path of travel, means for transmitting to the beam an alternating up and downmotion in a direction downwardly and forwardly inclined relative to the plane of 1,

operation, said beam being concave in a direction transversely of the deposit operated upon to afford a transversely convex finished surface, the undersurface of the beam being beveled forwardly and upwardly to afford a camming compression upon an accumulation of surplus material therebeneath.

l '44. In an apparatus of the character described, a traveling main frame adapted to span a deposit of concrete or the like, a vibra-

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Cited By (17)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2430816A (en) * 1944-06-30 1947-11-11 Jackson Corwill Machine for placing concrete and other materials
US2597221A (en) * 1946-02-04 1952-05-20 Barber Greene Co Apparatus for finishing roads
US3051062A (en) * 1959-09-11 1962-08-28 Jaeger Machine Co Screed unit and suspending means
US3113494A (en) * 1958-09-12 1963-12-10 Ralph G Barnes Finishing machine for concrete surfaces
US4818140A (en) * 1988-01-22 1989-04-04 Carlson James O Screed extender with berm-forming screed
US4930935A (en) * 1988-12-29 1990-06-05 David W. Somero Screeding apparatus and method
US5080525A (en) * 1986-12-22 1992-01-14 Tennant Company Floor paving machine and method
US6129481A (en) * 1998-03-31 2000-10-10 Delaware Capital Formation, Inc. Screed assembly and oscillating member kit therefor
US6203244B1 (en) 1998-01-15 2001-03-20 Van-Boh Systems, Inc. Screeding apparatus
US6227761B1 (en) 1998-10-27 2001-05-08 Delaware Capital Formation, Inc. Apparatus and method for three-dimensional contouring
US6386793B1 (en) * 1999-01-29 2002-05-14 Wirtgen Gmbh Device for smoothing a concrete paving surface
US6471442B1 (en) * 1998-03-30 2002-10-29 Wirtgen Gmbh Slip form paver
US20030161684A1 (en) * 2002-02-27 2003-08-28 Quenzi Philip J. Apparatus and method for subgrade preparation
US6860676B2 (en) 2000-02-07 2005-03-01 Conrado Pont Feixes Machine for leveling materials on the ground
US20050265785A1 (en) * 1998-10-27 2005-12-01 Delaware Capital Formation, Inc. Apparatus and method for three-dimensional contouring
US20060008323A1 (en) * 2004-07-06 2006-01-12 Torvinen Jeffrey W Apparatus and method for subgrade preparation
US20150056015A1 (en) * 2013-08-26 2015-02-26 Wirtgen Gmbh Slipform Paver, As Well As Method For Adjusting The Width Of A Mold Device

Cited By (29)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2430816A (en) * 1944-06-30 1947-11-11 Jackson Corwill Machine for placing concrete and other materials
US2597221A (en) * 1946-02-04 1952-05-20 Barber Greene Co Apparatus for finishing roads
US3113494A (en) * 1958-09-12 1963-12-10 Ralph G Barnes Finishing machine for concrete surfaces
US3051062A (en) * 1959-09-11 1962-08-28 Jaeger Machine Co Screed unit and suspending means
US5080525A (en) * 1986-12-22 1992-01-14 Tennant Company Floor paving machine and method
US4818140A (en) * 1988-01-22 1989-04-04 Carlson James O Screed extender with berm-forming screed
US4930935A (en) * 1988-12-29 1990-06-05 David W. Somero Screeding apparatus and method
EP0376692A2 (en) * 1988-12-29 1990-07-04 David W. Somero Improved screeding apparatus and method
EP0376692A3 (en) * 1988-12-29 1991-07-17 David W. Somero Improved screeding apparatus and method
US6203244B1 (en) 1998-01-15 2001-03-20 Van-Boh Systems, Inc. Screeding apparatus
US6471442B1 (en) * 1998-03-30 2002-10-29 Wirtgen Gmbh Slip form paver
US6129481A (en) * 1998-03-31 2000-10-10 Delaware Capital Formation, Inc. Screed assembly and oscillating member kit therefor
US6152647A (en) * 1998-03-31 2000-11-28 Delaware Capital Formation, Inc. Screeding method incorporating oscillating member
US6183160B1 (en) 1998-03-31 2001-02-06 Delaware Capital Formation, Inc. Screeding apparatus and method incorporating oscillating attachment
US7144191B2 (en) 1998-10-27 2006-12-05 Somero Enterprises, Inc. Apparatus and method for three-dimensional contouring
US6227761B1 (en) 1998-10-27 2001-05-08 Delaware Capital Formation, Inc. Apparatus and method for three-dimensional contouring
US7399139B2 (en) 1998-10-27 2008-07-15 Somero Enterprises, Inc. Apparatus and method for three-dimensional contouring
USRE39834E1 (en) 1998-10-27 2007-09-11 Michigan Technological University Apparatus and method for three-dimensional contouring
US20050147467A1 (en) * 1998-10-27 2005-07-07 Delaware Capital Formation, Inc., a corporation of the State of Delaware Apparatus and method for three-dimensional contouring
US6929420B2 (en) 1998-10-27 2005-08-16 Delaware Capital Formation, Inc. Apparatus and method for three-dimensional contouring
US20050265785A1 (en) * 1998-10-27 2005-12-01 Delaware Capital Formation, Inc. Apparatus and method for three-dimensional contouring
US6386793B1 (en) * 1999-01-29 2002-05-14 Wirtgen Gmbh Device for smoothing a concrete paving surface
US6860676B2 (en) 2000-02-07 2005-03-01 Conrado Pont Feixes Machine for leveling materials on the ground
US20030161684A1 (en) * 2002-02-27 2003-08-28 Quenzi Philip J. Apparatus and method for subgrade preparation
US20060008323A1 (en) * 2004-07-06 2006-01-12 Torvinen Jeffrey W Apparatus and method for subgrade preparation
US7311466B2 (en) 2004-07-06 2007-12-25 Somero Enterprises, Inc. Apparatus and method for subgrade preparation
US20150056015A1 (en) * 2013-08-26 2015-02-26 Wirtgen Gmbh Slipform Paver, As Well As Method For Adjusting The Width Of A Mold Device
US8967908B1 (en) 2013-08-26 2015-03-03 Wirtgen Gmbh Slipform paver, as well as method for adjusting the width of a mold device
US9121141B2 (en) * 2013-08-26 2015-09-01 Wirtgen Gmbh Slipform paver, as well as method for adjusting the width of a mold device

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