US1753358A - Method of manufacturing meat cure - Google Patents

Method of manufacturing meat cure Download PDF

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US1753358A
US1753358A US23502227A US1753358A US 1753358 A US1753358 A US 1753358A US 23502227 A US23502227 A US 23502227A US 1753358 A US1753358 A US 1753358A
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salt
condensate
method
wood
cure
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Ernest H Wright
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Ernest H Wright
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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A23FOODS OR FOODSTUFFS; THEIR TREATMENT, NOT COVERED BY OTHER CLASSES
    • A23LFOODS, FOODSTUFFS, OR NON-ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES, NOT COVERED BY SUBCLASSES A23B - A23J; THEIR PREPARATION OR TREATMENT, e.g. COOKING, MODIFICATION OF NUTRITIVE QUALITIES, PHYSICAL TREATMENT; PRESERVATION OF FOODS OR FOODSTUFFS, IN GENERAL
    • A23L27/00Spices; Flavouring agents or condiments; Artificial sweetening agents; Table salts; Dietetic salt substitutes; Preparation or treatment thereof
    • A23L27/20Synthetic spices, flavouring agents or condiments
    • A23L27/27Smoke flavours

Description

April 8, 1930. E. H. WRIGHT 1,753,358

METHOD oF MANUFACTURING MEAT CURE FiledNov. 22, 1927 ERA/55r- H h/R/G H T,

Ma/5MM A TTORNEYj .Patented Apr. 8, 1930 l Maaate lMyraNr ermee ERNEST n. WRIGHT, or KANSAS CITY, MISSOURI METHOD Fv MANUFAGEURING MEAT CUBE Application mea november 22, 1927. Iserial N. 235,022.

This invention relates to a method of manufacturing meat curing materials, and to the product resulting therefrom.` For many years, it has been recognized that meats cured E by the smoke of certain'of the hard woods,

such as hickory for example, have a. very delightful flavor, and meats cured by smoking in the manner indicated, havel become a delicacy, and command a very high price. I-Iow- .10 ever, the method of curing meats by hanging them up in ,a smoke house and exposing them to wood smoke over a considerable period of time., is ySo slow and, consequently, so expensive that ways have been eagerly sought for l accomplishing substantially the same result in a more economical way. Having, upon one occasion, observed a drip from a stove.` pipe, burning hard wood, I conceived they i eaof condensing the gases driven od from hard wood and of utilizing. the resultant the salt is caused to carry a great deal moreI of the condensate in proportion'to the bulk of the salt than is the ease with known productsrof this character. ABy my -improved method I am able to cause the salt to take up a very great deal more of the condensate than o it has been possible to cause the Salt totake up by methods heretofore employed.

Furthermore, by myimprov'ed method I free the condensate of certain objectionable and even injurious substances, particularly g5 wood alcohol,.and I so treat the condensate as l to dehydrate it before bringing it into union with the salt. v. v

' The .ligure shown ,in the accompanying drawing diagrammatically illustrates my method'.

\ In carrying out the method of the present invention I proceed as follows:

A suitable hard wood, such as hickory for example, is charged into the revolving-retort f 5 of a still, such Aas those commonly employed 55 for the destructive distillation of wood. At the beginning of the run, which is'usually in the morning, the. temperature is maintained at from 100 to 160 F. At these tempera` tures a very substantial part of the gases 6o which contain wood alcohol, are driven 0E. These gases are permitted to escape from the system through a pipe 6, leading to a barrel f 7, this pipe being known as theretort drip. During the time that these lighter vapors are being driven ofi', a valve 8, which controls the communication ofthe interior of the retort with the condenser 9 ofthe still, is kept closed, and thereaftersaid valve is opened and the vapors driven oi from the wood are per- 70 mitted to pass into the coils of the condenser, which are kept cooled in any suitable. and v conventional way, such as by running water over them. The temperature ofthe retort is raised as the run progresses, being gradually. increased through the day yto a maximum of about 900 F. 1 This slow increase `in temperature results in driving 0E successively heavi- -er fractions and all 4the fractions which pass through the condenser, and which are con-Y .80 densed therein are delivered to a suitable container 10; A'. vent 11,'atl the top of the condenser permits the escape of certain uncondensible and undesirable vapors, such as 'carbon dioxide and carbon monoxide.- It has 85 been found that the .material discharge through the retort drip 6, at the beginning4 of the` run, consists of wood alcohol, light oils, A and some pyroligneous acid, and that of this material substantially 18% is xwood alcohol. 90 Thus it will be seen that a very sub# stantial proportion of this objectionable agent is gotten rid of by the. simple expedi- .ent of discharging those fractionsirst released at relatively low temperatures completely from the system, before permitting any of the vapors to pass into the condenser -and before permitting any of the condensatel t'o pass to the container 10.

While, for purposes of explanation, have 1.9@

illustrated all of the apparatus as being so connected as to carry out the process in a continuous manner, it is to be understood that this is not essential, but that the material delivered to the container 10 may be led ditainer 10 to a conventional type of vacuum still 12, for the purpose of dehydrating the same. The result of dehydrating is to very considerably increase the degree of concentration of the condensate. While the degree of concentration may be varied within wide ranges, I have, by dehydration, converted a quantity of the material having a specific gravity of-1.013 to a very much heavier con- "centrate of anhydrous residue comprising 47 .75% ofthe original quantity. The linal heavy concentrate is brought into intimate admixture with the crystals of common salt, of a degree of fineness approximating that of table salt, by spraying this material while in a heated condition upon the salt crystals at a time when theyare in astate of suspension and agitation. This is accomplished by conductingjthe heated condensate from the vacuum still 12, through a suitable tube 13, to the container 14 of a conventional'type of spray gun, such as those commonly employed in the arts for the application of paint, varnishes and the like. Compressed air delivered from a compressed air container 15, through a tube 16, is delivered to the spray gun after being passed through a heater 17, which preheats the air. It is, of course, apparent that a condensate of the character described would become more or less thick and viscous when cold. By preheating the air and by using the condensate in a heated condition, and by delivering thewhole forcibly through a spray gun, the condensate is delivered in an atomized, relatively thin, and heated state, to the salt. The salt, in turn, is heated, being delivered directly from the vacuum pans, in

which it is dried, to the hopper18 and revolving drum 19 of amixer. This may be a common type of mixer, such as is used for mixing concrete, and comprising a revolving drum having internal baiiles, by which the material charged therein is continually lifted. and turned over and dropped, the result being to maintain a continuous. shower of salt in the path of discharge of the spray gun.

The ,discharge of the condensate bythe spray gun is with suiiicient force to bring a out an impact of the condensate upon the salt crystals. Salt crystals are relatively hard and dense, and do` not readily take up liquid smoke, particularly when thehydr'ous content has been removed therefrom. By the method hereindescribed, of discharging the condensate upon the crystals, under pressure, the salt is caused to take `up a very great deal more of the liquid than they would take up if they were merely exposed to contact with the liquid.

I iind a pressure of 25 pounds, at the gun, to operate satisfactorily, but this may be varied and still give satisfactory results.

Further, the application of the condensate to the salt is not restricted to a single passage of the salt in front of the spray gun, but, upon the contrary, the showering down of the salt vand the discharge of the condensate thereon is continued until all of the salt crystals are heavily coated with the condensate.

By this method I am able to produce a proda uct of very great strength, as far as the smoke flavor is concerned, and this, of course, is what is primarily desired.

I find it of advantage to add 5% of brown sugar, preferably of the grade known in the trade as C or No. 7. and saltpeter and black and red pepper to the final product' as marketed. This produces a complete smoke and sugar cure which renders it possible to give to meats the desired smoke flavor, while, at the same time, all of the labor incident to o rdinary smoke house practice is avoided.

The present application is directed to the processA hereindescribed, including the impact of the condensate upon the salt, and to the resulting product, whlch includes the salt as a carrier.

In my co-pending application No. 238 995 led on the 9th day of December 1927, I aniV susf article of commerce to be applied to the meats in its liquid form, as with a brush. l

While I find the salt to be a convenient carrier I contemplate the application of thecondensate to saltpeter, or any other granular or crystalline carrier which may be found suitable for the pur: ose.

Having describe my invention, what I claim is:

1. The herein described method of manufacturing a meat cure which consists of impacting the concentrateV resulting from the distillation of wood upon salt crystals.

2. The herein described method of manufacturing a meat cure product, which yconsists of atomizing the condensate resulting from the distillation of wood and forcibly discharging the same upon salt crystals.

3. The'herein described method of manufacturing a meat cure product, which consists Vof atomizing the condensate resultin the distillation of -wood and forcib y disfrom' charging the same upon salt crystals, and in facturinga meat cure product, which consists of atomizing the condensate resulting from the distillation of' wood and forcibly discharging the same upon salt crystals, at ele- Vated temperature. i

5. The herein described method of manuacturing a meat cure product, which consists of atomizing the condensate resulting from the distillation of wood and forcibly discharging the same upon salt crystals, while agitating the salt.

6. The herein described method of manufacturing a meat cure product, which consists of atomizing the condensate resulting from the distillation of wood and lforcibly discharging the same upon salt crystals, While agitating the salt in suspension.

7. The herein described method of coating salt crystals with the concentrate resulting from the distillation of hard wood, which consists of maintaining the salt in a substantially continuous shower and discharging the concentrate ina heated condition and under the influence of heated air forcibly into contact with the salt crystals.

In'testimony whereof l ax my signature.

ERNEST H. WRIGHT.

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Cited By (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3806609A (en) * 1970-05-11 1974-04-23 V Goblik Method of producing liquid smoke
US4154866A (en) * 1976-08-24 1979-05-15 Stange Co. Method of producing from wood tar a liquid smoke product for use in food processing, and product of said method
US5637339A (en) * 1995-04-27 1997-06-10 Hickory Specialties, Inc. Method of making a tar-depleted liquid smoke

Cited By (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3806609A (en) * 1970-05-11 1974-04-23 V Goblik Method of producing liquid smoke
US4154866A (en) * 1976-08-24 1979-05-15 Stange Co. Method of producing from wood tar a liquid smoke product for use in food processing, and product of said method
US5637339A (en) * 1995-04-27 1997-06-10 Hickory Specialties, Inc. Method of making a tar-depleted liquid smoke

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