US1714261A - Paper-converting machinery - Google Patents

Paper-converting machinery Download PDF

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Publication number
US1714261A
US1714261A US23258327A US1714261A US 1714261 A US1714261 A US 1714261A US 23258327 A US23258327 A US 23258327A US 1714261 A US1714261 A US 1714261A
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Prior art keywords
paper
roll
rolls
means
stock
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Expired - Lifetime
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Francis W Egan
John O Ross
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J O ROSS ENGINEERING Corp
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J O ROSS ENGINEERING CORP
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    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D21PAPER-MAKING; PRODUCTION OF CELLULOSE
    • D21GCALENDERS; ACCESSORIES FOR PAPER-MAKING MACHINES
    • D21G1/00Calenders; Smoothing apparatus
    • D21G1/02Rolls; Their bearings
    • D21G1/0253Heating or cooling the rolls; Regulating the temperature
    • D21G1/0266Heating or cooling the rolls; Regulating the temperature using a heat-transfer fluid
    • D21G1/0273Heating or cooling the rolls; Regulating the temperature using a heat-transfer fluid on the exterior surface of the rolls

Description

May 21, 1929. w. EGAN ET AL 1,714,261

PAPER CONVERTING MACHINERY Filed Nov. 11, 1927 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 INVENTO r m -w m BY ATTORNEYS.

May 21, 1929. F. w. EGAN ET AL 1 1,714,261

1 31mm CONVERTING MACHINERY Filed NOV. 11 1927 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 40 IN V EN TOR. M w. 6;, Wm 0m BYAQLLUAQLMMUWW ATTORNEYS.

Patented May 21, 1929.

UNITED STATES FRANCIS W. EGAN, OF \VOODCLIFF-ON-HUDSON, NEW JERSEY, AND JOHN O. ROSS, OF

PATENT OFFICE.

NORTH TZLRRYTOWN, NEVT YORK, ASSIGNORS TO J. ROSS ENGINEERING COR- PORATION, OF NEW YORK, N. Y., A CORPORATION OF NEW YORK.

PAPER-CONVERTING MACHINERY.

Application filed November 11, 1927. Serial No. 232,583.

other is desirably madeof a more yielding material, being commonly made of paper and designated as paper rolls. They may be made by heavily compressing disks of paper and retaining them under heavy pressure, about a shaft, the outer surface being accurately turned to cylindrical form to cooperate with the surface of the metal roller.

in some operations, the paper roll and the steel roll move with dili'erent surface speeds, and a heating effect is produced by the resulting friction. In other cases, the steel roll is hollow and is internally heated. For example, in embossing, the metal roller is constructed of steel with the desired design engraved upon it in reverse so that the stock as it passes between the steel roll and the paper roll is squeezed down into the surface of the paper roll by the projecting design. With many fabrics it is necessary to heat the steel roll in order to cause the design to remain upon the fabric.

In the n'ianufacture of special grades of paper such for example as glassine, the steel rollers are n t engraved. The effect is produced by heat and the pressure between the paper roll and the steel roll alone or accompanied by a slipping between them.

Difliculty has been experienced in main- 1 taining the life of the paper rolls which have been found to disintegrate at the end portions much faster than at the center in spite of the fact that it is the center portion which receives the most wear, as frequently the machine is used'with a stock or web of less width than the length of the paper rolls.

In accordance with this'invention, it .has been discovered that one of the important factors in disintegration is overheating and that this more rapid disintegration at the ends of the paper rolls is due to the still higher temperature at that place. At the points where the stock intervenes between the steel roll and the paper roll, it serves as an insulator to retard the heating of the paper roll by the steel roll but at the ends of the rolls at the sides of the stock where the steel roll and the paper roll are in direct contact, the heating is relatively-intensified.-

This protecting or cooling effect exerted by the strip is still more prominent where the strip is fed to the rolls in damp condition since the evaporation of the contained moisture itself serves to assist the cooling.

It is an object of this invention to utilize this discovery to prolong the life of the paper rolls and to this end, to equalize the temperatures between the' exposed and unexposed portions of the paper roll so that the entire surface is maintained substantially at the same temperature.

Since, moreover, the life of the paper rolls is thus found to be so intimately a function of the temperature at which they are maintained, it is a further object of this invention to increase the life of the rolls by limiting their temperature throughout their entire width.

The invention accordingly comprisw the several steps andthe relation and order of one or more of such steps with respect to each of the others, and the apparatus embodying features of construction, combinations'of elements and arrangement of parts which are adapted to effect such steps, all as exemplified in the following detailed disclosure, and the scope of the application of which will be in-- dicated in the claims.

' For a fuller understanding of the nature and objects of the invention, reference should be had to the following detailed description taken in connection with the accompanying drawings, in which:

Fig. 1 is a perspective view of a fourteen roll calendar stock machine embodying this invention in the manufacture of glassine paper.

Fig. 2 is a diagrammatic section of the device shown in Fig. 1.

Fig. 3 is a front elevation of a somewhat simplified apparatus embodying the invention, certain parts being broken away for clarity. t i i Fig. 4 is a diagrammatic side elevation of the device shown in Fig. 3 with one ofthe supporting side frames removed. I,

Fig. 5 is a plan view of a means for limiting the temperature of the entire roll.

Fig. 6 is a detail showing an alternative method of equalizing the temperature of the roll.

y We have illustrated the invention herein in connection with a machine for the manufacture of glassine paper. From this illustra- ,tion, its application to embossing or similar f work will be obvious. I

, In the drawings, the numeral 1 designates a pair of upright frames in which are journalled a plurality of steel rolls 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, and 7, and a plurality of paper rolls 12, 13, 14:, 15', 16 and 17. The order of these rolls may be varied to suit the nature of the work to'be done. In the form illustrate the steel and paper are alternated save tha the thirdpaper roll is superposed directly upon the second. It will be understood that as the paper stock S is wound back and forth between the rolls, the finishing effect is accomplished chiefly by the steel rolls and where the rolls are alternated, one surface only is treated. The direct superposition of two rolls of like kind as herein illustrated causes the treatment of both sides of the paper. A plurality of follower rolls 8 may be superposed upon the stack of treating rolls. if desired.

As illustrated, in Fig.- 2, the paper stock is carried in between the-rolls 7 and 17, and" back between each pair in succession being carried around the semi-circumference of each rollin turn. The rolls'mayor may not be geared together ,as shown at 18 either for movement with a uniform surface velocity or to afford the slippage desired.

These machines are frequently employed in the manufacture of a stock of .less width than the paper rolls leaving a portion at each end of the paper rolls at each side of the stock in direct contactwith a steel roll. This results in a tendency to overheat this exposed I portion of the paper roll as has already been pointed out. In accordance with this invention, means are provided for equalizing the temperature between this exposed portion and the central portion protected by the paper. p

In the practical embodiment illustrated, specific means are provided for cooling each end of the roll comprising an idlerroll 20 mounted on a shaft 21. This roll 20 is slid-- ably mounted upon the shaft 21 so that it may be positioned to have its inner edge 23 coincide with the outer edge of the glassine strip and it is retained in such position by collars 24 at each end of the idler roll. The idler roll 20 is in engagement with the surface of the paper roll and also with the surface of a moistening roll 27 journalled as at 28 within a trough 29 adapted to contain water. Thus as the paper roll rotates, it picks up water from the surface of the idler roll 20 which has been carried to the roll 20 by the roll 27. In this manner, there is deposited upon the paper roll a degree of moisture, the presence and evaporation of which is sufficient to maintain the temperature of the ends of the paper rolls substantially as low as that of the protected portions. The roll 27 may be coated if-desired-with a water absorbent 30, and

the quantity of water deposited on the paper roll may be determined by the character of the coating as well as by the pressure and the height of'water in the trough.

In Fig. 3 is illustrated a machine of the same general nature'but with fewer rolls, the details being herein more clearly shown. In this view, the steel rolls are made hollow and supplied with steam to their interior through a conduit 35, so that if desired the machine may be operated for certain purposes with hot rolls. This figure illustrates more in detail the manner of supporting the moistening rolls, andthe moistening pans, the shafts 21 being shown is carried by brackets 22 at- .tached to the main frame 1. In this form of .device the stock S is supported byguide rolls 36 as it passes from one side of the machine 'to the otherso that it does not pass around ported from the main frame.

Since it is the high temperature which causes disintegration of thepaper rolls, it is desirable also to employ means for lowering the temperature of the entire roll. A practical form of accomplishing this result is to'providea conduit {10 supplied with air at a temperature materially below that of the rolls, which is connected with a plurality of horizontal branch conduits 41, one such branch conduit being shown parallel and adjacent to each paper roll.

I Where the equalizing rollers 20 and the "branch conduits are both used upon the same roll, they may, if desired, be located upon opposite sides thereof for mechanical'convenience, and this is practical where/the auxiliary guide rolls 36 are employed. Each of the branch conduits is provided with a plurality of nozzles 42 through which air is discharged and distributed throughout the length of the roll. As illustrated the conduit 41 is within the bight of the paper formed between the opposite sides of the paper roll and one of the guide rolls 36,- and this is a satisfactory arrangement where the quantity of airemployed is not great. Under other circumstances it is preferable to provide the air blast upon the side of the pa per which is opposite to the bight in order that the air discharged may have more free egress into the room. i

In the embodiment illustrated in Fig. 6, a different cooling means is employed for equalizing the temperature' In thlS\QInb0dI-. ment, there is provided a conduit 50 adjacent to and parallel to each of the paper rolls provided with jets 51 adapted to project fluid upon the surface of the roll, but means are provided to limit the number of these jets which. operate to limit the area of the roll which is affected thereby. This may pler form has beenchosen for this illustration in which each of the jets is individually controlled by a valve 52. The fluld distributed through'the conduit 50 may be either cold water to be atomized into a spray or cold air, to keep the rolls cool, but 1s preferably cold moist air. I prefer to add moisture to the air as the detrimental effect of the excess temperatures is increased where, the paper rolls become excessively dry. A cooling medium for the ends of the rolls which adds moisture within proper limitations is therefore more effective in its helpfulness than mere cold air alone.

In accordance with the above construction, it will be seen that by depositing upon the ends of the paper roll a degree of moisture such that the cooling effect of itspresence and its evaporation is sufficient to compensate for the protecting effect of the strip in the center portion, no portion of the paper roll will be caused to disin'tegrate before the rest, and since the destruction of any portion of the roll renders; the roll as a whole useless, this means prolongation of the useful life. Moreover, by cooling the roll as a whole the life is still further prolonged.

Since certain changes in carrying out the above. process and in the constructions set forth, which embody the invention may be made without departing from its scope, itis intended that all matter contained in the above description or shown in the accoms panying drawing shall be interpreted as illustrative and not in a limitingsense.

It is also to be understood that the following claims are intended to cover all of the generic and specific features of the invention herein described, and all statements of the scope of the invention which, as a.

matter of language, might'be said' to fall therebetween.

Having described our invention, what we claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent, is:

1. The process of converting 'paper stock which comprises passing it between a finishing roll and a paper roll, wetting that portion of the paper roll not covered by the paper stock in its passage between said rolls and subjecting the whole of the outer surface of the paper roll to artificial cooling.

2. The process of converting paper stock which comprises passing it between a finishing roll and a paper roll and equalizingthe temperature between different portions of the paper roll by moistening the ortions of the paper roll over which the stoc does not pass in its course between the rolls. y

3. The process of converting paper stock which comprises passing it between a finishing roll and a paper roll, subjecting the en-,

tire surface of the paper roll to a cooling effect and subjecting a portion of the paper roll to a moistening effect.

t. The process of converting paper'stoc'k which comprises passing it between a finish-- ing roll and a paper roll, blowing air over the surface of the paper roll to limit itstemperature and applying moisture to certain portions of the roll.

5. The process of converting paper stoclt which comprises passing it between a finishing roll and a paper roll, adding moisture to the paper roll to limit its-temperature and varying the amount of moisture applied to. portions of the paper roll in accordance with'the width of the stock passing between the rolls. V 6. The process of converting paper stock by means of a finishing roll and a paper roll, of greater length than the width of the stock which comprises, passing the stock between the rolls and equalizing the temperature between the rolls by subjecting the whole of the paper roll to moist air and equalizing the temperature between those portions of the paper roll protected by the stockand those portions exposed to the finishing roll by wetting the exposed portions.

7 The. process of converting paper stock by means of ajfiIiiShiIIgTOIl and a paper roll,

stream of cool air over the surface of'the paper roll. 1

9. A device of the character described. comprising, in combination, a plurality of rolls including finishing rolls and paper rolls. means for applying moisture to predetermined portions of the paper roll whereby every part of the surface of the paper roll is maintained at substantially the same temperature. f

-10. A device of the character described, comprising, in combination, a plurality of rolls includin finishing rolls and paper rolls, means for coo g the paper rolls, and means for wetting ortions of the paper rolls,

11. A deviceof the character described, comprising, in combination, a plurality of rolls including finishing rolls and paper rolls,'means for limiting the temperature of the paper rolls and means for cooling dif ferent portions of the paper rolls in varymg de ees. a

12. device of the character described,

comprising, in combination', a plurality of rolls including a finishing roll and a paper roll, means for cooling the entire surface of the "paper roll to a certain degree, and

means for cooling portions of the surface of the paper roll to a different degree.

' adapted for use with apa'per' stock of less width than the length of the rolls and means for cooling portions of the paper rolls between which thestoc k passes to a certain degree and cooling the portions of the paper rolls eXp'osed'to the finishing-rolls to a greater degree. I p

15. A device of the character described comprising, in combination, a plurality of .rolls including finishing rolls and paper rolls adapted for use with a paper stock of less width than the length of'the rolls and a third set of rolls for applying moisture to the exposed ends of -said plurality of rolls.

16. A device of the character described, comprising, in combination, a plurality of rolls including sfinishing rolls and paper rolls adapted for use with a paper stock of less width than the length of the rolls, means for addin moisture to the exposed end portions of t e pa er roll to equalize the tem- -perature with t e remainder ofthe roll and means for maintaining the temperature of the paper roll below a predetermined limit.

17 A device of the-character described comprising,in combination, a plurality of rolls including "finishing rolls and paper rolls adapted for use with a paper stock of less width than the length of the rolls and a roller journalled to contact with the end portion of the surface of the paper roll and means for wetting the surface ofsaid roller to cause the moistening of the end portions of said pa er roll. I

118. A evice of the character described comprising, in combination, a plurality of rolls including finishing rolls and paper rolls adapted for use With a paper stock of less width than the length of the rolls and a roller journalled to contact with the end portion of the surface of the roll, means for moistening the surface of said roller, and means for adjusting the longitudinal positionof said roller to vary the length of its contact with the paper roll.

19. A device of the character described for the converting of paper comprising standards, a plurality of rolls journalled in such standards, certain of said rolls being paper rolls and certain of said rolls being steel rolls,

' means for heating said steel rolls and adj 11st;

able means for cooling the end portions of said paper rolls.

20. A device of the character described for the converting of paper comprising standards, a plurality of rolls journalled in such standards, certain of said rolls being paper rolls and certain of said rolls being steel rolls, means for heating said steelrolls and adjustable means for cooling the end portions of said paper rolls, comprising a shaft supported from said frame adjacent to each paer roll and rollers journalled on said shaft and adjustable longitudinally thereof and means for moistening the surface of said rollers.

21. The method of converting paper stock which comprises passing it between a finishing roll and a paper roll, and cooling one part of the paper roll to a certain degree and cooling the remainder of the paper roll to a greater degree. a

22. In apparatus of the character described a finishing .roll and a paper roll adapted to cooperate, means for passing paper stock of certain width between the rolls, means for cooling the paper'roll over which thestock passes to a certain degree,- and means for cooling the remainder of the paper roll to a greater degree whereby every part of the paper roll is maintained atsubstantially the same temperature. p

In testimony whereof we aflixour signatures. 1

FRANCIS W. EGAN. JOHN o. BOSS.

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Cited By (18)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2565520A (en) * 1945-11-03 1951-08-28 New York And Pennsylvania Co I Calender machine
US2578594A (en) * 1948-12-20 1951-12-11 New York And Pennsylvania Co I Calender machine
US2611312A (en) * 1946-10-17 1952-09-23 Champion Paper & Fibre Co Embossing calender
US2635509A (en) * 1946-10-26 1953-04-21 Glassine Paper Company Method of processing paper
US2663907A (en) * 1949-02-14 1953-12-29 British Celanese Converting fibrous cellulose into an easily powderable form
US2709045A (en) * 1950-06-06 1955-05-24 Onderzoekings Inst Res Process of manufacturing cellulose powder
US2727317A (en) * 1953-04-16 1955-12-20 Offen Bernard Cooling mechanism for web supporting rollers of dryers
US2981175A (en) * 1957-11-06 1961-04-25 Lodding Engineering Corp Sheet caliper control device for paper making
US2993432A (en) * 1958-01-14 1961-07-25 Beloit Iron Works Calender air doctor
US3177799A (en) * 1963-01-10 1965-04-13 Beloit Corp Apparatus for selectively temperature conditioning calenders
US3352232A (en) * 1965-06-21 1967-11-14 John C Leibelt Caliper control in the continuous production of paper
US3451331A (en) * 1967-03-01 1969-06-24 Westvaco Corp Hot roll supercalender
US5033373A (en) * 1988-05-06 1991-07-23 Eduard Kusters Maschinenfabrik Gmbh & Co. Kg Apparatus and process for producing a smooth and glossy surface on a paper web
EP0554698A1 (en) * 1992-02-01 1993-08-11 Voith Sulzer Finishing GmbH Cylinder machine
US5240564A (en) * 1989-06-06 1993-08-31 Valmet Paper Machinery Inc. Method for the control of the nip-pressure profile in a paper making machine
WO1997013592A1 (en) * 1995-10-10 1997-04-17 Circle S Inc. Cleaning of rollers in paper producing machines
US5816146A (en) * 1996-02-28 1998-10-06 Voith Sulzer Finishing Gmbh Calender for satining paper
US6913673B2 (en) 2001-12-19 2005-07-05 Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc. Heated embossing and ply attachment

Cited By (20)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2565520A (en) * 1945-11-03 1951-08-28 New York And Pennsylvania Co I Calender machine
US2611312A (en) * 1946-10-17 1952-09-23 Champion Paper & Fibre Co Embossing calender
US2635509A (en) * 1946-10-26 1953-04-21 Glassine Paper Company Method of processing paper
US2578594A (en) * 1948-12-20 1951-12-11 New York And Pennsylvania Co I Calender machine
US2663907A (en) * 1949-02-14 1953-12-29 British Celanese Converting fibrous cellulose into an easily powderable form
US2709045A (en) * 1950-06-06 1955-05-24 Onderzoekings Inst Res Process of manufacturing cellulose powder
US2727317A (en) * 1953-04-16 1955-12-20 Offen Bernard Cooling mechanism for web supporting rollers of dryers
US2981175A (en) * 1957-11-06 1961-04-25 Lodding Engineering Corp Sheet caliper control device for paper making
US2993432A (en) * 1958-01-14 1961-07-25 Beloit Iron Works Calender air doctor
US3177799A (en) * 1963-01-10 1965-04-13 Beloit Corp Apparatus for selectively temperature conditioning calenders
US3352232A (en) * 1965-06-21 1967-11-14 John C Leibelt Caliper control in the continuous production of paper
US3451331A (en) * 1967-03-01 1969-06-24 Westvaco Corp Hot roll supercalender
US5033373A (en) * 1988-05-06 1991-07-23 Eduard Kusters Maschinenfabrik Gmbh & Co. Kg Apparatus and process for producing a smooth and glossy surface on a paper web
US5240564A (en) * 1989-06-06 1993-08-31 Valmet Paper Machinery Inc. Method for the control of the nip-pressure profile in a paper making machine
EP0554698A1 (en) * 1992-02-01 1993-08-11 Voith Sulzer Finishing GmbH Cylinder machine
US5289766A (en) * 1992-02-01 1994-03-01 Kleinewefers Gmbh Apparatus for cooling calender rolls and the like
WO1997013592A1 (en) * 1995-10-10 1997-04-17 Circle S Inc. Cleaning of rollers in paper producing machines
US5816146A (en) * 1996-02-28 1998-10-06 Voith Sulzer Finishing Gmbh Calender for satining paper
US6913673B2 (en) 2001-12-19 2005-07-05 Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc. Heated embossing and ply attachment
US20050241788A1 (en) * 2001-12-19 2005-11-03 Baggot James L Heated embossing and ply attachment

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