US1698619A - Liquid-lifting apparatus - Google Patents

Liquid-lifting apparatus Download PDF

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Publication number
US1698619A
US1698619A US36512A US3651225A US1698619A US 1698619 A US1698619 A US 1698619A US 36512 A US36512 A US 36512A US 3651225 A US3651225 A US 3651225A US 1698619 A US1698619 A US 1698619A
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liquid
pipe
column
nozzle
valve
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US36512A
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Blow George
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Blow George
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    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F04POSITIVE - DISPLACEMENT MACHINES FOR LIQUIDS; PUMPS FOR LIQUIDS OR ELASTIC FLUIDS
    • F04FPUMPING OF FLUID BY DIRECT CONTACT OF ANOTHER FLUID OR BY USING INERTIA OF FLUID TO BE PUMPED; SIPHONS
    • F04F1/00Pumps using positively or negatively pressurised fluid medium acting directly on the liquid to be pumped
    • F04F1/18Pumps using positively or negatively pressurised fluid medium acting directly on the liquid to be pumped the fluid medium being mixed with, or generated from the liquid to be pumped

Description

Jan. 8, 1929.

G. BLOW LIQUID LIFTING APPARATUS Filed June 11, 1925 3 Sheets-Sheet v gwuefato'o I 851 M Gum-m Jan. 8, 1929. 1,698,619

G. BLOW LIQUID LIFTING APPARATUS Filed June 11, 1925 3 Sheets-Sheet if a9, cam x9199 4119.

G. BLOW LIQUID LIFTIN G APPARATUS Jan. 8, 1929.

Filed June 11, 1925 s Sheets-Sheet Patented Jan. 8, 1929.

UNITED STATES GEORGE BLOW, F KNOXVILLE, TENNESSEE.

LIQUID-LISTING APPARATUS.

Application filed June 11, 1925. Serial No. 36,512.

This invention relates to apparatus for lifting liquids and while capable of general use, 1s articularly adapted for liftlng water, 01 or other liquids from wells,

5 shafts, reservoirs, bilges or the like.

- The common method of lifting liquids, particularly from deep wells or shafts, 1s by a pump located in the well and operated by a rod or wire line from the surface. The cylinder, piston, and valve are necessarily placed at the bottom of the well, wh1le the driving mechanism, of various types, is located at the well head. The disadvantage of this method and apparatus is the necessity for frequent repairs to or re lacement of the working parts because 0 friction therebetween or clogging of the same by sand and the like. Since most of the parts are inaccessible by reason of their location, repairs to or. replacement of the same requires the expenditure of considerable time, with the consequent increased cost of maintenance and decreased efliciency of paratus. The principal objects of the resent 1nvention are to provide liquid ifting aparatus which overcomes the defects and disadvantages inherent inknown apparatus such as above referred to; which carries out so a method utilizing the principles of the air lift and the hydraulic jet; which produces a differential of pressure on the nozzle tip for the hydraulic jet by decreasing the density or weight of one of two normally balanced 5 columns of liquid by means of suitable medium such as air injected therein; which maintains a constant pressure on the nozzle by a driving column of liquid supplied at the head thereof through the medium of a ressure tank; which discharges the li uid reely into the pressure tank' and ena les lifted liquid to be conducted therefrom by overflowing of the tank; which maintains a constant pressure on the driving column of liquid by discharging the lifted liquid into the pressure tank; which secures the required differential of pressure by injection of the air at the desired depth in the column of liquid lifted; and which insures control of the differential of pressure by the volume of air injected or by the depth of submergence of t e airpipe.

Broadly stated, his invention consists in overcoming the static balance of two columns of liquid, hereinafter designated 1 as air injected into said column or a portion the ap-' the driving column and the discharging column by decreasing the weight or density of the discharging column, preferabl through the medium of a suitable gas suc thereof; producing a hydraulic jet directed upwardly through the discharging column,

by the differentlal of pressure obtained on the jet nozzle tip when the columns of liquid are unbalanced; causing liquid to circulate in the system by maintaining-constant pressure on the head of the driving column, preferably through the medium of a bulk of liquid into which the dischar ing column overflows; and lifting liquid rom a well or the like with the hydraulic jet and the discharging column.

This invention may be embodied in a variety of mechanical expressions, one. of which is shown in the accompanying drawings, but it is to be ex ressly understood that the drawings are or purposes of illustrati'on only and do not define the limits of the invention, reference being had to the appended claims for this purpose.

In said drawings, v

Fig. 1 is a longitudinal section through apparatus embodying the invention and shown installed in a well or other reservoir of liquid to be lifted;

Fig. 2 is a side elevation of a foot nozzle or ejector adapted to be submerged within the well;

Fi 3 is a vertical section on the line 3, 3 of ig. 2;

Figs. 4, 5, 6 and [are horizontal sections a .on the lines 4-4, 5-5, 66, and 7-7, of

Fig. 2;

ig. 8 is an enlarged detail ection of the pipe coupling shown in Fig. 1, illustrating" 1n detail a supplemental nozzle; 7

Fig. 9 is a orizontal section on the line 99 of Fig. 8; 1

Fig. 10 is a longitudinal central section through a pipe coupling provided with me another form of supplemental nozzle;

Fig. 11 is a horizontal section on the line 11-11 of Fig. 10; and

Fig. 12 is a vertical section on the line 12-12 of Fig. 11. I

Referring to the drawings, wherein like characters designate like parts throughout the'several views, 5 and 6 indicate two concentrically arranged liquid containers in the form of pipes which reach to or near the 110 10 of the liquid in said tank.

bottom of a well 7 and terminate in a foot nozzle or ejector 8 submerged in the liquid of the well. The upper end of pipe is secured in any suitable manner within an 5 opening 9 formed in the bottom of a pressure tank 10 which constitutes in effect, an enlarged head for the pipe 5. Pipe 6 projects into tank 10 th ough Opening 9 and has its upper open encl disposed above the surface J An air pipe or boss 11 projects through the upper open end of pipe 6 and extends downwardly within the latter a distance less than the full length of pipe 6 and determinedby the depth of the well and the amount of liquid in the hole. Said air hose or pipe is connected with any suitable air pump or .motor (not shown). When the apparatus is installed, the system is filled with any suitable driving fluid such 2 as water or oil. The nozzle 8 provides communication between pipes 5 and 6 and the two columns of liquid in said pipes are thus normally maintained in static balance. Foot nozzle or ejector 8 preferably com- 2 prises a-single casting having one movable part therein. As here shown, the casting provides concentrically arranged liquid containers in the form of an outer pipe 12, and an inner pipe 13 joined to said outer pipe 3 by hollow legs 14 which define ports 15 .extending through the walls of the pipes adj acent the lower ends thereof. Pipes 12 and 13 are threaded or otherwise suitably secured on the lower ends offlpipes 5 and 6 and legs ll 14 serve to conduct liquid from pipes 5 and 12 into the nozzle. The nozzle proper comprises the inturned upwardly directed end' 16 of pipe 13 and the bottom closure 17 of pipe 12, the pipe end 16 and bottom closure.

17 having 0 posed surfaces suitably curved to direct liquid descending downwardly through legs 14 upwardly through the nozzle and pipe 13. The inturned pipe end 16is provided adjacent its base with a plurality of pressure ports 18, and a seat 19 of rubber or other suitable material for a sleeve valve- 20'which is slidablymounted in pipe 13 and Iformall rests on seat 19 as indicated b dottedlmes in Figs. 1 and 3. When seate I said valve closes port 15- and prevents liquid in well 7 from entering ipe 13.

Sleeve valve 20 is provided with a converging diverging bore 19, which serves as a throat for the hydraulic jet producedby the foot nozzle. The valve has a comparatively loose fit within pipe 13 so that it'may fall by its own weight to close ports 15. Pipe 13 is provided intermediate its ends with flanges 21 and 22 and valve 20 is provided 60 intermediate its ends with an annular flange 23 which during movement of the valve has slidin contact with theannular space .defined y flanges 21 and 22. The upper and lower surfaces of flanges21 and 22 are pref: erably provided with seats .24 and 25 for of column B, C, at the nozzle, is la "the system as long as air is discharged flange 23 and said seats may be of rubber or any other .suitable cushioning material.

Above flange 22, the pipe 13 is provided with a plurality of ports 26 through which liquid of the driving column in pipes 5 and 12 may be directed upwardly within pipe. 13. against the lower surface of a comparatively 'wide annular flange 27 at the top of the sleeve valve, the driving fluid admitted between flanges 22 and 2 together with fluid admitted or directed through pressure ports 18, serving to lift valve 20. Flange 27 is preferably provided'with a piston ring 28 but the provision of packing between said flange and pipe 13 is not essential since any leakage at this point would not interfere with t e operation of the apparatus. Supplemental nozzles are preferablyprovided by a plurality of inclined ports 29 formed in pipe couplings 30 for the sections of pipe 6 and said nozzles serve to direct small streams of liquid from pipe '5 upwardly into ipe 6 (Figs. 1, 8 and 9). The supplemental jets may also be produced by the construction shown in Figs. 10, 11 and 12 wherein the coupling 31 for adjacent sec- 1 tions of pipe 6' is provided with a substantially flat nozzle having a wide hollow base 32 extending across pipe 6' and terminating in ports, 33, 33, through which the, liquid is admitted from pipe 5'. The liquid after being admitted within the hollow base 32 is directed in a relatively small stream or jetnpwardly into pipe 6 by the side and end walls 34 and 35 which for this purpose converge upwardly to provide a port 36 located axially with respect to pipe 6' and through which the liquid is ejected therein. During operation of the apparatus, a suitable gas such as air is forced through pipe 11 and discharges from: the lower end there-. of into the liquid contained in pipe 6. This decreases the density or weight of column C which is now composed of air and liquid. Column B is composed of liquid alone. Column A is also composed of liquid alone and is under a constant head of pressure from tank 10. Therefore the unit PXGSSIIIIIG t an driving column A. A jet of wat r will 115 therefore flow from' the nozzle upwardly through thefthroat 19' of valve 20 and inteo There will thus be a constant circulation in from pipe 11. It will be noted that the operation 1s in part an air lift, with the difference that the high percentage of submergence required by that'method is not necessary with the present method. The difference in pressure at the nozzle may be regulated by the amount of air injected into discharging column B, C or by the depth of submersion of the air pipeor hose 11.. It

is to be particularly .noted that the action carrying suction.

of the air injected in discharging column B,

C is not that of forcing water out of the discharge pipe. The air simpl changes the density or Weight of the discharging column or a portion thereof and consequently produces the aforesaid differential of pressure on the nozzle tip by the unbalancing of driving column A and discharging column 13,0. When the hydraulic jet has been produced in the manner stated, the higher pressure of column A acts to direct liquid through ports 26 against the annular flange 27 of sleeve valve 20. The high pressure driving column A also acts to direct liquid through pressure ports 18 against the base of the sleeve valve, and the combined effect of these pressures on the sleeve valve, assisted by friction of the jet through throat 19' of valve 20 lifts the valve to its upper position as shown in Figs. 1, 2 and 3. Ports 15 are thus opened and oil or other liquid in the well 7 is admitted into pipe 13 adjacent the nozzle. The hydraulic jet produced by the nozzle and throat 19 has the property of creating a suction behind it and along any fluid entrained by this Liquid from the well therefore flows to the hydraulic jet and is lifted with the discharging column B, C. Column B, C- overflows at the upper end of pipe 6 into tank 10. A certain proportion of liquid overflows from tank 10 into an inclined trough 37 which leads to a storage tank 38 preferably disposed at a level lower than that of the pressure tank 10. The liquid flowing from pipe 6 into tank 10 serves to maintain the head of pressure on column A constant. The liquid overflowing from tank 10 constitutes the liquidlifted from the well, while the balance of the liquid lifted is retained within the system as circulating liquid. When columns A and B are unbalanced in the manner stated, the driving column will produce supplemental jets through the supplemental nozzles and these supplemental jets assist the lifting of column B, C and constitute what might be termed booster jets. Any desired number of supplemental nozzles may be employed and they may be placed at suitable mtervals in the length of the pipe for column B, C. The total pressure on the booster nozzles will vary with de th but the differential of pressure under w ich they act will be'the -rame for every point below the air discharge.

When it is desired to stop the lifting operation, the supply of air to the discharging column B, C 15 cut off. The jet will then flow until a static balance between columns A and B, C is obtained, at which time there is no differential of pressure to hold up the sliding sleeve valve 20. The valve therefore falls by its own weight onto seat19, thereby closing ports 15. and preventing oil or liquid in the well from entering pipe 13. Closing well from entering pipe 13 but also serves to retain driving1 liquid within the system and prevent disc arge of the same into the well when the apparatus is not in operation.

It will thus appear that I have provided liquid lifting apparatus simple in its construction and operation, entirely automatic, and producing a continuous non-pulsating flow which caneasily be regulated by varying the amount of air supplied or the depth of submergence-of the air pipe. The present "apparatus is capable of handling sand, slimes and other solids which are destructive to known equipment for pumping or lifting liquid. If a number of wells are to be lifted as on an oil lease, a central power plant may supply air through lines to a paratus installed in each of the wells. oreover, lifting of liquid from all of the wells may be controlled from the same point by suitable valves on the line to each well. In this way, superintendenceand maintenance may be concentrated and reduced to a minimum. It is to be expressly understood that the driving liquid may be oil, or Water, or both, and that the apparatus is ca able of -lifting liquids other than oil an Moreover, the air or other suitable density reducing medium may be injected into the discharging column through various'types of orifices, and nozzles other than the one particularly disclosed herein may be employed for roducing the hydraulic jet. It is to be furt or understood that other methods and devices may be used to decrease the density of one of the two normally balanced columns of liquid without departing from the spirit of this invention. These and other changes in the procedure and the form and construction of the apparatus are therefore intended within the limits of the appended claims.

What is claimed is 1. In a liquid lifting apparatus, the combination of communicating containers for two normally balanced columns of liquid, a device for aerating one liquid column to reduce its density, a'nozzle for roducing a hydraulic jet in the aerated co umn bythedrivin effect of the other column, and a valve in the path of said jet and actuated thereby to automatically establish communication between the container for the aerated column and a well or the like, whereby l iquid in the latter flows to the hydraulic et and is lifted with the aerated column.

2. In a liquid lifting apparatus, the combination of communicating containers having two normally balanced columns of li uid therein, means for unbalancing said cdlumns and causing the liquid in one eontainer to discharge into the other container, said means comprising a device for aerating one column and a nozzle producing a hlyt; draulic jet in the aerated column by t of the valve not only prevents liquid in the water.

driving effect of the other column, and

means acted upon by said jet and controlling communication between the container for the aerated column and a Well or the'like, whereby liquid in the latter flows to the hydraulic jet and is lifted with the discharging aerated column.

3. In combination, two containers disposed one within the other adapted to be placed in a well or the like and terminating in a nozzle directed upwardly within the inner container, a valve in the inner container controlling communication between the latter and the well, and means for direct-- ing fluidunder pressure against said valve to lift, the same and admit liquid from the well into the inner pipe adjacent said nozzle.

in the inner container, and a valve slidably' mounted within the inner container and having a converging-diverging bore provid 'ing a throat for receiving the jet of said nozzle, said valve controlling the passage of fluid from the well into the-lnner pipe.

6. In combination aninner and an outer conduit having an inlet port and terminating in a nozzle directed upwardly within the inner conduit, a-valve for admitting fluid.

through said port between the inner conduit and the nozzle, and means for directing fluid under pressure from the outer conduit said ort.

7 n combination an inner and an outer liquid container having an inlet port in the walls thereof, said containers terminating in a nozzle directed upwardly within the in ner container, a valve in the inner container normally closing said port and normally seated over said nozzle, and means for directing liquid under pressure against said valve -to liftthe same and open the port.

8. In combination an outer and an inner conduit terminating in a nozzle directed upwardly within the inner conduit, said conduits having one or more ports in the walls thereof, a valve in said member normally closing the port or orts and having a throat against said valve to lift the same and open for the jet from t e nozzle, and means for directing liquid under pressure from the outer conduit against said valve to lift the same and open the port or ports.

9. In com ination an outer and an inner conduit terminating in a nozzle directed upwardly within the inner conduit, said member having one or more ports in thewalls thereof for admitting liquid between the inner conduit and the nozzle, a valve normally seated over the nozzle. to close the .ports and having a throat for the jet of the nozzle, and means for lifting the valve .by fluid pressure from the outer, conduit. j 10. In combination, two containers disposed one within the other' and adapted to be placed in a well or the like, a nozzle di-. rected upwardly from the outer into the innor of said containers, an opening from said well to said'inner container, and a pressure actuated valve normally closing said opening, and operable by a jet from said nozzle impinging thereon.

In testimony whereof I have signed this specification. A

GEORGE BLOW.

US36512A 1925-06-11 1925-06-11 Liquid-lifting apparatus Expired - Lifetime US1698619A (en)

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Cited By (9)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2978985A (en) * 1955-08-01 1961-04-11 Rca Corp Electromagnetic pumps
US2988998A (en) * 1959-06-01 1961-06-20 Wilkinson Rudolph Purifoy Method and means for producing high viscosity oils and loosely consolidated sands from low pressure reservoirs
US3028817A (en) * 1958-05-05 1962-04-10 Cunetta Joseph Adjustable airlift pump
US5407010A (en) * 1994-08-19 1995-04-18 Herschberger; Michael D. Artificial lift system
US5488993A (en) * 1994-08-19 1996-02-06 Hershberger; Michael D. Artificial lift system
US6123511A (en) * 1996-09-26 2000-09-26 Marwal Systems Fuel supplying apparatus for drawing off fuel for a motor vehicle tank having a jet pump deflector for priming
US20050286103A1 (en) * 2004-06-24 2005-12-29 Visteon Global Technologies, Inc. In-tank fuel supply unit with attachable jet pump assembly and filter
WO2010128336A1 (en) * 2009-05-08 2010-11-11 Coldharbour Marine Limited Liquid pump apparatus and method
US9902630B2 (en) 2011-12-22 2018-02-27 Coldharbour Marine Limited Apparatus and method for liquid pumping

Cited By (13)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2978985A (en) * 1955-08-01 1961-04-11 Rca Corp Electromagnetic pumps
US3028817A (en) * 1958-05-05 1962-04-10 Cunetta Joseph Adjustable airlift pump
US2988998A (en) * 1959-06-01 1961-06-20 Wilkinson Rudolph Purifoy Method and means for producing high viscosity oils and loosely consolidated sands from low pressure reservoirs
US5407010A (en) * 1994-08-19 1995-04-18 Herschberger; Michael D. Artificial lift system
US5488993A (en) * 1994-08-19 1996-02-06 Hershberger; Michael D. Artificial lift system
US6123511A (en) * 1996-09-26 2000-09-26 Marwal Systems Fuel supplying apparatus for drawing off fuel for a motor vehicle tank having a jet pump deflector for priming
US7387111B2 (en) 2004-06-24 2008-06-17 Ford Motor Company In-tank fuel supply unit with attachable jet pump assembly and filter
US20050286103A1 (en) * 2004-06-24 2005-12-29 Visteon Global Technologies, Inc. In-tank fuel supply unit with attachable jet pump assembly and filter
WO2010128336A1 (en) * 2009-05-08 2010-11-11 Coldharbour Marine Limited Liquid pump apparatus and method
GB2470070B (en) * 2009-05-08 2012-05-16 Coldharbour Marine Ltd Liquid pump apparatus and method
AU2010244230B2 (en) * 2009-05-08 2014-09-18 Coldharbour Marine Limited Liquid pump apparatus and method
US8998585B2 (en) 2009-05-08 2015-04-07 Coldharbour Marine Limited Liquid pump apparatus and method
US9902630B2 (en) 2011-12-22 2018-02-27 Coldharbour Marine Limited Apparatus and method for liquid pumping

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