US1672434A - Shed-forming machine with paper pattern cards - Google Patents

Shed-forming machine with paper pattern cards Download PDF

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US1672434A
US1672434A US176174A US17617427A US1672434A US 1672434 A US1672434 A US 1672434A US 176174 A US176174 A US 176174A US 17617427 A US17617427 A US 17617427A US 1672434 A US1672434 A US 1672434A
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knife
pick
lifting
card
needles
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US176174A
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Staubli Hugo
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Gebr Staubli & Co
Staubli Geb & Co
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Staubli Geb & Co
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    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D03WEAVING
    • D03CSHEDDING MECHANISMS; PATTERN CARDS OR CHAINS; PUNCHING OF CARDS; DESIGNING PATTERNS
    • D03C1/00Dobbies
    • D03C1/14Features common to dobbies of different types
    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D03WEAVING
    • D03CSHEDDING MECHANISMS; PATTERN CARDS OR CHAINS; PUNCHING OF CARDS; DESIGNING PATTERNS
    • D03C2700/00Shedding mechanisms
    • D03C2700/01Shedding mechanisms using heald frames
    • D03C2700/0127Programme-controlled heald frame movement
    • D03C2700/0177Devices for levelling the heald frames; Coupling and uncoupling the drive for the heald frames; Devices for holding the shed open

Description

Juhe 5, 1928. v 1,672,434

' H. STAUBLI SHED FORMING MACHINE WITH PAPER PATTERN CARDS Filed March 17, 1927 v '7 Sheets-Sheet 1 ff jiaa f June 5, 1928. 1,672,434

4' H. STAUBLIV SHED FORMING MACHINE WITH PAPER PATTERN CARDS Filed March 17, 1927 S eets-Sheet 2 June 5, 1925. 1,672,434

H. STAUBLI SHED FORMING MACHINE WITH PAPER PATTERN CARDS Fil ed March 17, 1927 '7 Sheets-Sheet a In Van/5 y June 5, 1928. 1,672,434

H. STAUBLI SHED FORMING MACHINE WITH PAPER PATTERN CARDS Filed March 1'7, 1927 7 Sheets-Sheet 4 June '5, 192$. 1,672,434

H. STAUBLI SHED FORMING MACHINE WITHPAPER PATTERN CARDS Filed March 17, 1927 v Sheets-Shet 5 mven/zv June 5, 1928.

H. STAUBLI SHED FORMING MACHINE WITH PAPER PATTERN CARDS Filed March 17, 1927 eet -$1 6 1E" r i 5 2 WW& rfz

June 5, 1928.

H. STAUBLI SHED FORMING MACHINE WITH PAPER PATTERN CARDS Filed March 17, 1927 '7 h tsh '7 I/////// VI/ Patented June 5, 1928. v v

unmen-STATES A ENT forms j HUGO sTAUBLI, or ZURICH, SWITZERLAND, Assienon To GEBR; STKUIBLI & 00., F nonenn, SWITZERLAND. I

' snap-romaine MACHIN WITH PAPER PATTERN CARDS:

Application filed mini 17, 1927, Serial 11017 .174, and in Switzerland May 28, 1926.

machine for the manuwards without any manipulation of the dobby mechanism. A paper patterndobby has the advantage over a dobby working with wooden lags and pegs of allowing the up to 10000 picks per repeat. To weave such a fabric with wooden lags and pegs practically impossible. The paper pattern which I use for mydobbies may 'contain for instance 333 picks per meter and even a long pattern can easilybe "placed. in

such a manner that it will not be in'convenient either for the good working of the machine or for the space required. The great advance of the new type dobby working with paper pattern over the old tyoe is the positive motion of the pattern cylinder in both directions. the loom backwar ds for a pickout without any manipulation of, the (lobby mechanism; the right shedin relation 'tothe pattern/will always be opened. The shed-forming machinefor dobby or acquard-mechanism constituting the subject-matter of the present invention, furnishes both during its forward movement and also during tl' e return movement a weaving-in and releasing respectively of the wefts in the correct sequence. This is based upon thefact that ii; during one stroke of the lifting knife or knives two successive picks of the- 'Jatterncard for the same knife are read can the same-time and the hooks arcpplaced and kept in readiness for the liftingknife, by Mr suitable members in such a way that during the lost motion of the knife, when the vmar-hne is rotating forwardsftlie coming pick the determining factor, and-during the backward rotation the precedmg pick the weaver only had to turn the loom backv weaving of fabrics with very long repeats,

This enables theweaver to turn determining factor, for the position ofthe hook in relation to the knife.

The accompanying drawings illustratetwo constructional examples of the invention constructed as dobbies. Figures 1 to '3 being diagrammatical views of the first example, which relates to a single-lift (lobby.

Fig.4 is a graphic chart showing the movements of the elements of the machine disclosed in Figs. 1 to 3.

-. Fig. 5 is a similar graphic chart showing the elements ofthe machine shown in Figs.

example vmachine, showing the driving elements of the cylinder motion whichgare also shown in front elevation in Fig; 6.

In the constructional example according to Figs. 1 to 4,1 isthe cylinder over which the paper pattern-card 2 runs,- and whichis fedforward one pick from the'shaft'5 after each pick oft-hev loom by transmission elements which are more fully indicatedfor the second example in Figs. 6 to 9., Upon the shaft5 is mounted, in avmanner known from v existing dobbies, at each end of the machine, a cam disc 6, which through themedium of a roller 8, actuatesan oscillating arm 10, which carries the lifting knife12. Within reach .of the latter are located the hooks 14, each connected with one end to a balance 40 whilst the other end lies free. The balance engages with a swing 41, which is movably mounted upon a rod 42 and to the arm 43.of which a shaft is connected. in a known manner. In

the ositionsaccording to Figs. 2 and 3, the

balance 40 bears against stationary ledges 44.

Under each hook 14 is mounted loose upon 4 pattern-card. The needles 22 Qand 22 are located at the weft distance one behind the other, in order that two successive picks may always be simultaneously read off by them. They are guided-in iron strips or ledges 23, and the driver needles 21. and 21 are guided in the vertical limb of an angle iron 24, a horizontal limb of which serves as a stop for the levers 16 if the latter are only subject to the action of the springs 18.

For lifting the reading needles 22 and 22 off the paper card 2 before the feeding of the reading needles, and for the subsequent supporting of those driver needles 21 and 21 of which the needles 22 and 22 have dropped into holes in the paper card, there serve bars 25 and 26 respectively, which are carried by the upper arm of a bell-crank lever 28, the other arm of which is pressed by gravity against the periphery .of a cam 29. The latter revolves at the same speed as the cam shaft 5. Upon a shaft 4, which likewise revolves with the velocity of the shaft 5, and which therefore in practice will preferably be the shaft of the cam 29, are mounted two cams 3,0 and 31 with their tops angularly displaced in relation to one another. Of these, the cam 30 acts upon a bellcrank lever 32, and the cam 31 upon a si1nilar bell-crank lever 33. The other upwardly directed arms of these bell-crank levers 32 and 33 each carry a driving bar, 34 and 35 respectively, which act in a manner to be described below upon the driver needles 21 and 21.

The diagram given in Fig. 4; illustrates the movements of the elements described, in their relative time relationships during the revolution of the cam shaft 5. Figures 1 to 3 illustrate the relative positions of these elements in relation to the points I, II and III on the diagram. In the latter, the vertical lilies provided at the top with degree indications denote the various positions of the cam disc 6 beginning in the position according to Fig. 1. The numbers applied to the transverse lines correspond to those which are used in Figures 1 to 3 for the members, the movements of which are represented by those lines.

From this diagram will be seen, starting from the left. before the position of the cam disc 6 marked 0, the following While the roller 8 bears upon the beginning of the longer left-hand concentric pe ripheral part of the cam disc 6 in Fig. 1, the

knife 12 is stationary, and before the cylinder 1 is fed forward, the needles 22 and 22 are lifted out of the paper card 2, the eccentrio part of the cam disc 29 rotating the lever 28 insuch a way that the small rods 25 and 26, and the driver needles 21 and 21 bearing upon them, are raised. The needles 22 and 22 are thus located during the feeding movement of the cylinder 1, which im mediately succeeds their upward movement,

out of contact with the naper card, as shown in Fig. 1. After the feeding of the cylinder is completed, the top of the cam 29 slips off thelever 28, and thus the small rods 25 and 26, the driver needles 21 and 21-and the needles 22 and 22 descend, so that the latter can now read two successive picks.

In the following constructions it is first assumed that under each needle there is a hole in the paper card 2. Hence the needles 22* and 22 drop into the latter, the depth of penetration being regulated by the bearing of the driver needles 21. and 21 upon the small rods 25 and 26 which are held stationary by the lever 28 as long as the concentric part of the cam 29 lies on the lever 28.

With their downward movement the driver needles 21 and 21 pass within reach of the driving bars'34l and 35. As a result,

the top of the cam 30 first comes into action 1 against the action of the spring 18, so that it does not touch the hook 14, which at. the same time (Fig. 4) swings backwards and downwards out of the position indicated in Fig. 1. This hook therefore remains lying upon the lifting knife 12. The position of the parts is now that indicated in Fig. 2. Here begins the so-called lost motion of the knife 12, that is to say, the latter continues its previous movement, backwards a little further, while the roller 8jbears upon a part of a cam disc 6, the distance of which from the axis of rotation decreases somewhat further in the direction of rota-- tion. The hook 14 on the contrary no longer follows this movement of the knife 12, as the balance 10 bears on both ledgees 4 1. The position of the parts 16, 32, 3a and 21" at first still remains the same. As soon-however. as the top of the cam 39 begins to run off the lever 32 the driving bar 32 moves back again and therefore the lever 16 can rotate forwards under the action of the spring 18 not however into its initial position, but only into an intermediate position in which it somewhat raises the hook 1 1 (Fig. 3), for if the end of the lever 32 that bears upon the cam 30 has moved back as far as half the height of the cam, the end of the lever 33 bearing upon the cam 31, has in its ascent reached half the height of the cam in question. \Vhilc therefore from this position onwards (Fig. 3) the driving bar 34 goes back, the driving bar 35 swings further forward, and, by

means'of the driver needle 21, rotates the lever 16 back again. The hook 1 1 thus places itself again upon the knife 12 and is driven by the latter, which has meanwhile Hill turns to its initial position again, releasing the driver needle 21, andthe cam 29 again of the paper card 2.- Thecylinder 1 is then fed forward one pick, and the cam disc 5 begins its second revolution, whereupon the operations described are" repeated, but the pick previously read by the needle 22 is read by the needle 22",.and the needle 22 reads a new pick. Hence, each pick is read twice.

' It was assumed above that each of the me M dles 22 and 22 had dropped into a hole in the pattern-card, Should, however, only the needle 22" for example have dropped and not the needle 22, because the paper card 2contained no hole at the point in question, the

following modification Would take place The driver needle 21, during the transition of the lever 28 out of the position according to Fig. 1 into that according to Fig. 2 in consequence of the needle 22 standing upon the paper card 2,c'ould not follow the descending rod 26 into its lowestlever 33 it would not be touched bythe driving bar 35. Hence the lever 16 could follow the driver needle 21' returning to its initial position as far as the stop on the angle iron 2 1-, and would liftthe hook 1a completely off the knife 12, so that the latter would execute the second halfof its trax' el idly. that is to say the corresponding shaft would not be lifted; a

From Fig. 3 and positionHl in Fig. 1 it will be seen that if the machine is rotated backwards out of this; position the driving bar 34 moves back again (towards the right in Fig. 3) and pushes the lever 16 away from-the hook 14;,so that .the latter is driven forwardby the knife 12 in its movement, and thus the immediately preceding pick is released again. At the moment when the knife 12 located in its basic position (Fig! 3) there are always two picks available for the hanging of the hook 1 1 on the knife, a'nd a's Li consequence one pick is woven in, orthe other pick released again according to the direction of rotat1on.- VV1th a constantdirection-of rotation of the machine the said same is trans ferred to the lever 16 the first time by the firstneedle (22 for example) during the second half, and the second time, after the Under these circumstances, however, onlv the transmission 'occurring in the second 1 of the lost motion is-on each occasi a determining factorfor the hanging of the hook onthe knif l levers 10 and 11.

As will be seen from Fig. 4 themoveinent of the driving bars-34 and 35 occupy a some- -what greater interval than the lost motion of the lifting knife One driving bar has already reached its outermost working position before the lost motion commences and only after the termination of the latter does the other driving; bar return back out of its workingposition. A guarantee is thereby given that the hook l l at the beginning and at the end of the lostmotion, lies upon I the'knife, far as the corresponding needle 22 or 22 is located in ahole in the patterncard, or is lifted off the knife, not hung, in so far as this needle has notufonnd a hole.

In the case of the constructional form (double-lift machine) according to F igs, 5 to 9, the operations described forv one knife in reference to Figs. 1 to 4: take place in a similar manner for each of the two knives. l l hila however, in the case of the singlelift machine the cylinder'of the paper pattern-card is'fed forward onepick after each pick, in the case of the double-lift machine the feeding oft-he cylinder takes'place after every second pick through two picks, the holes in the paper card corresponding to these two picks'anjd therefore also the associated needles,*being displaced a few millimeters from one another in the longitudinal and transverse directions of the paper: card."

The shafts 4t and 5 revolve in the case of the double-lift machine only half as fast as in the case of the singlelift machine and at the same speed as one another. 6 and 7 (Fig; '9) are the cam discs mounted on the shaft 5, and 8 and 9' the" rollers bearing against the discs and carried by th'eknife 12 is the lower lifting knife; and 13 the upper lifting knife. and 15 are the hooks, one upper and one lower of each of which engage wit-lithe same balance 40. Upon the lower hooks 1 1 there acts thelever 16', and upon the upper hook 15 a lever 20. mounted loose on the same pivot 17 as the lever 16?, through the medium of a thin rod or. wire 19, the lower end of which bears upon anoblique surface on the upper end of the lever. Like the lev r 16, the lever 20'is alsos ubject to the action of a tension spring 18, which might likewise be replaced by a counter-weight. Asin-the case of the first example, the lever 21" and 21 located one above the other in a vertical plane, L the needles v22 and 22 being suspended from the said drivers 21 and 21;. The needles 22 and 22 are located in a plane which is parallel to theplane passing through thencedles 22 and 22 and are set back afew n'iillimeters'in the peripheral. direction of the cylinder 1 relatively to the said needles. It is assumed that the let needles 22 and 22 read the odd picks (indicated at the bottom of Fig. 6 by way of example by the holes marked a and 0 in the paper card 2), while theneedles 22 and 22 read the even picks (for example Z) and d in Fig. 6). For the supporting of the driver needles 21, 21 21 and 21 there serve, as in the case of Figs. 1 to 3, small rods 25 and 26 carried arms 27 of a bell-crank lever 28, the rod 25 serving for the driver needles 21 and 21" and the rod 26for the driver needles 21 and 21. The lever 28 in its turn is subject to the influence of the cam 29 mounted fast upon the shaft 1. The cams 30 and 31 likewise secured to the shaft 4; each comprise two diametrically opposite rises. The relationship between the positions of one rise on one cam disc and the adjacent rise on the ther cam disc, and that of one of these pairs of rises and the rise on the cam disc 29, is similar to what has been described in reference to Figs. 1 to 3. The arrangement of the bell-crank levers 32 and and of the driving bars 341 and 35 carried the latter in the case ofthis constructional form of the machine is similar to their arrangement in the previous case. Each of the driving bars acts upon two levers 16 and 20, namely the bar 3d by the driver needles 21 and 21 and the bar 35 by the driver needles 21 and 21 The method of working of the machine illustrated in Figs. 6 to 9 is in part evident from what has been said in reference to Figs.

1 to 1;, and the remainder will be explained in reference to the diagram contained in Fig. 5. In Fig. 5 the degree indications arranged in a row at the top again relate to the cam shaft 5, while the numbers applied to the transverse lines indicate that these lines represent the movements of the similarly designated members. The positions marked in Fig. 5 as I, II and HI correspond to the similarly designated positions according to Fig. 4-, with the differences conditioned by the other number of knives. Thus for example in position I in Fig. 5 the knives are in motion and cross one another. From this position onwards, which is also illustrated in Fig. 8, the movements of the various parts proceed essentially in the following manner The knife 12 moves backwards, the knife 13 forwards, (see arrows in Fig. 8). The cam 29 by its projecting part has rotated the lever 28 in such a way that the upper arm 2'? thereof has raised the small rods 25 and '26, and thereby the driver needles 21, 21, 21 and 21, and the needles 22, 22", 22 and complete revolution of the cam plates 6 and 7, once by two picks (one pick for each knife) by means of a tooth- (Fig.9), which is mounted fast upon the shaft 1 and which engages with a toothed wheel 3 mounted fast upon the shaft of the cylinder 1. When this feeding is completed, the cam on the cam disc 29 slides off the lever 28, the upper arm 27 of the latter descends, and the needles 22", 22 22 and 22 are now released'for the reading of the pattern-"card 2. In the following remarks it is assumed by way of example that the pattern-card contains holes in its present position underneath the needles and 22, but not underneath the needles 22 and 22 the position thus being as .indieated below in Fig. 6 by the letters a, b, If, for a later position. Thus the needles and 22 can drop into the pattern-card 2, and the driver needles 21 and 21 follow the descending small rods '25 and 26 and pass within reach of the driving bars 3 1 and 5:35, as shown in dot-and-dash lines in Fig. 8. Immediately after the projecting part on the cam disc 29 has run off the lever 28','the adjacent cam on the cam. disc 30 comes into action upon the lever 32, so that the driving her 34L pushes back the driver needle 21. and the latter pushes back the lever 16 into the position according to- Fig. 7. The lever therefore comes out of reach of the hook 1 1 swinging back, so that the latter remains lying upon the knife 12, when it begins its lost motion (F ig. 7). WVhile in the course of this lost motion. the cam on the disc 30 runs off the lever 32, the adjacent cam on the cam disc.31 begins to act upon the lever 33, as has been described abovewith reference to F igs 1 to 4. The lever 16, when the movement of the knife 12 reverses is therefore held in the disengaged position (Fig. 7) by the driving bar 35 and the driver needle 21. The hook end therefor remains hanging on the knife 12 and is carried forwards by the latter in its movement.

' The above-described actuation of the levers 32 and 33, the driving bars 34 and 85, the'driver needles 21 and 21, and the lever 16 is repeated after half a revolution of the shaft 1 under the action of the second cam" on the cam discs 30, 31, without however having here any significance, as the knife 12 is now located in its front end position. On the other hand the upper knife 18 has mean while reached its rear position. As, how- 1 ever, the needles 22 and 22 could not enter holes in the pattern-card, the parts 21 and 21 20 and 19 maintain the positions inclicated in Fig. 7, so that the hook 15 remains in its raised position and cannot hang on the knife 1.3. If, however, the needles 22 and 22 had been able to drop into holes in the pattern card, operations would have taken place under the action of the second cam on the cam discs 30 and 31 at the rear ill) end of the'path of the knife 13, similar to those described above for the lower knife 12. The driver needles 21 and 21 would have been located in the same position as regards depth asis indicated in Fig.7 for.

the needles 21 and 21.. They would therefore have-come into contact during the swinging of the levers 32 and 33 with'the driving bars 34 and 35 and would thereby disengage the lever 20, so that the rod 19' the hole inthe pattern-card 2 previously 10- cated below the needle 22 has come to lie Hence if during the preceding strokeof the knives the first and below the needle 22.

' third picks were read off by the needles 22 and 22 and the second and fourth picks'b y the needles 22 and 22 it Would now be the third and fifth and the fourth and sixth. Here again, as in the case of the single-lift machine, each pick is read off twice, and in the case of one knife it is always the even picks, and in the case of the other knife the odd picks. 16, 20, comes into action for the even picks. and the other for the odd picks. According to the direction in which the loom or the shed-forining machine is fed forward'one or other of the picks standing ready for the same knife comes into operation. Hence, with this machine forward or backward rotating can be efiected from any desired point and the correct pick will always work.

if a dobby shall work with positive'motion, it is essential that, in relation to one knife, the respective hooks of difierent shafts change duringthat short interval during which the knife remains at its dead position,

I as shown for instance in Fig. 3. If for instance a shed is formed by lifting the 1st,

ond pick the odd shafts remain low while the even shafts arelifted, the respective hooks have to be pulled forward by the knife. For the first pick the odd hooks will fall down upon the knife while the even hooks will be retained out of reach of the odd hooks must be brought out of reach of the knifeby their supporting levers 16, while the even hooks must fall down upon the knife to be pulled for-ward, thus opening the second shed for. the second pick. This One of the supporting levers would have to be'done.

changing of the hooksmust be done while the knife is in its dead posit-ion, therefore, if the direction of the running of thelooin ischanged, the ho'oksll: for the first shed, will be released and fall down a ain upon the knife, while the hooks "for t e second shed. will be brought youtQof reach of the knife. 1 Now then, to enable this manipu lation of the hooks, the respective supporting levers 16, Fig. 3, for instance, must be kept ready in this moment, to either release or lift the, hooks out of reach of. the knife. At the same moment, there must two picks be readofi' by the needles 22 and 22 respectively; that is to say, thefirst' pick" and the second pick; let usjsay" that' the first pick has already been woven, and that the second one is going to be woven. Nowthen, if the loom runs forwards th' e second'pick being read off by the needle 22, 3,

the driving needle 21 is pushed forwards, 1

because of the cam 31 anddriving b1ar 3 5,

against. the spring of the lever l6 and, so

releases the hook. The same processes have been done for the first" pick before an'd by the.

will turn in the opposite direction as indicated by the arrow, thus the cam 30 will act upon the) le'v'er32 and therefore u sh forwards the driving needle 21%, w ich this time releases the book 14 by turning the lever 16 backwardsagainst thepower .of the spring, For this reason there are arranged twoneedles,

If in the contrary, there would be used one feeler needle 22 only, the following processes Supposing the first pick has, been woven and the knife has'come back to its dead point position as shown in 3, the feeler needle,.a t this moment,

would be fallen down upon the paper card inorder to read off these-cond pick. now the direction of the .running of the loom and dobby were ychan ed in. order to open again thefirs't' shed or picking out the first pick, the feeler needle would have to be lifted out of. the paper, the cylinder would have to beturned backwards to bring the first pick underneath the feelerneedle, which thenwould haveto be let drop on the paper card in order to readgoff the first: pick. But for all these processes, the lapse of time, during which the knife remains in the position, shown in F ig. 3 is too short; a fact fully'proven by theexistinglmachines.

Asthe feeding of the, pattern c linde r only takes placeafter every 'secon 7 pick, but takes place by two picks each time, the 1113 chine works smoothly. l VVhatj-I .claimis: i

1. A shed forming machine, comprising movable. hooks for liftingthe threads of the warp a lifting knife-adapted to engage with suchhooks and to perform a reciprocating movement together with the hooks engaged with it and a short movement relatively to these hooks just before reaching and after having reached one of its dead points, a movable pattern card, movable pick reading members adapted to come in engagement with this card for reading a pick, movable members adapted to adjust the position of the lifting hooks to the pattern as represented on the pattern card during said period of relative movement of the lifting knife in such a way that on the subsequent stroke of this knife an engagement of hooks by the knife in accordance with the pattern will take place at either direction of working of the machine.

2. A shed forming machine, comprising movable Warp lifting hooks, a lifting knife adapted to perform a reciprocating movement together with such hooks and a short movement relatively to these hooks at the end of the shaft lowering stroke and the beginning of the shaft lifting stroke, a movable pattern-card, pick-reading members adapted to be brought in contact with this pattern card while it is at rest, movable members adapted to support the lifting hooks during the period of idle movement of the lifting knife so as to hold said hooks out of reach'of this knife, driving and releasing members dependent as to their relative position and operation upon the position of the pick-reading members relatively to the pattern-card and adapted to release said supporting members from their lifting hooks during said idle motion of the lifting knife at a definite position ofthe corresponding pick reading members to permit the released hooks to be carried along with this knife on its subsequent stroke. 1

3. A shed forming machine, comprising a movable-pattem-card, pick representing marks thereon, pick-reading members adapted to read off two successive picks from this pattern-card, movable lifting hooks for lifting the warp threads, a lifting knife adapted to perform a reciprocating movement, a moiable member for each lifting hook adapted to support this hook at a definite period of the reciprocating movement of the lifting knife to hold it out of reach of said knife, driving means adapted to act upon said supporting member for releasing it in said definite period but dependent as to their operation upon the position of the pick read.- ing members relatively to the pattern-card in such manner that in either direction of working of the machine the hook is permitted to be carried along with the knife at its subsequent stroke if the corresponding pick reading member is in its reading position.

'4. A shed forming machine comprising movable w'arp thread lifting hooks, a lifting knife adapted to temporarily engage with such hooks and to perform a reciprocating movement with they hooks engaged and a short idle movement relatively to these hooks just before reaching and after having reached one of its dead points, a cylinder, a pat-- tern-card 011 this cylinder, pick-representing marks on this card disposed in planes at right angle to the axis of the cylinder, pick reading members disposed at a distance one from another equal to the weft distance as given on the pattern-card in the same of'said planes and to coact with said marks, means for displacing the pattern-card intermittently each time for a length equal to the weft distance in such a way that, according as to the direction of displacement, one or the other of said pick-marks is in position to be read by the other one of said pickreading members than it was read, before said displacement took place, driving members adapted to coact with the pick reading members in such a way that in said dead point of the hook liftingknife the driving members of both pick reading members are in position of readiness to permit the hook to come in reach of the lifting knife at the subsequent stroke thereof.

5. A shed formingmachine, comprising warp lifting hooks, a lifting knife, driving means for imparting to this knife a reciprocating movement, a movable supporting member for each of said hooks adapted to control the position of such hook at definite periods of the reciprocating movement of the lifting knife, a movable pattern-card, pick-reading means adapted to coact with this pattern-card, driving means adapted to move in a determined speed ratio with regard to the lifting knifemotion transmitting members disposed between these driving means and the hook supporting member and controlled by the pick-reading members in such a manner that in said definite periods of the reciprocating movement of the lifting knife said lifting hooks are either released by their supporting member to be engaged by the knife in its forward stroke or held out of the path of said knife according as the pick reading member corresponding to the actual direction of movement of the machine is in or out of engagement with the pattern-card.

6. A shed forming machine, comprising movable warp lifting hooks, a lifting knife adapted to perform a reciprocating movement and to impart to said hooks a lifting motion, a movable supporting member for each lifting hook adapted to hold this lat ter out of engagement with the lifting knife during a definite period of its movement, a movable pattern-card, pick presenting marks thereon, movable pick-reading members adapted to coact with two successive ones of loo said marks, driving members adapted to be operated during said periods 'of'the move:

' ment of the lifting knife, movable releasing members dependent'as to their releasing op eration upon the position of the pick read-- ing members and interposed between said driving means and the hook supporting member in such a manner that when one of the pick reading members is in its pick reading position the corresponding 1 releasing member is operated upon by" said driving means to release said hook supporting'memher from the hook during a definite part of said period to allow the hook to be engaged by the knife to perform its warp-thread lifting motion; I i

7. A shed movable hooks for lifting the warp threads, a lifting knife adapted to engagewith such hooks in a definite position thereof and to perform a reciprocating movement together hook controlled by the two pick reading membersand adapted to act upon the lifting hooks during the idle motion ofthe lifting knife.

8. A shed forming machine, comprising movable warp lifting hooks, lifting knife adapted to engagewith such hooksand to perform a reciprocating movement together with the hooks engaged with it and a short idle movement relatively to'these hooks just before reaching and after having reached its dead point at the beginning of the hook engaging stroke, movable patte'rmcard,

means for intermittently displacing this patj tern-card for the weft distance, movable pick reading members hanging above the pattern-card at a distance on behind another equal to the weft distance as represented on the pattern-card and adapted to come in contact with this card while it is atfrest, means for lifting these pick reading mem. bers and holding them removed from the pattern-card during the displacement of the latter, rocking levers for supporting thelift- \ng hooks during the idle movement of the lifting knife, releasing members controlled by the pick-reading members to release said rocking levers from the hooks if the corresponding pick reading memberis in its operative position.

'9. In a shed forming machine, a rotatable formin machine com risin' cylinder, a perforated" paper pattern-card support'edby this cylinder and adapted to run with it, means for intermittently displacing this pattern card each time fora length having a definite relation to the. weft distance, two series of pick reading members located one behind another at a dis tance having a definite relation to the weft distance, always a member'of the first and one of the second series being located in the same radial plane of thecylinder, a lifting knife, means for imparting to this knife a reciprocating movement, a series of warp lifting hooks adaptedto be brought into reach of this knife, means for stopping the movement of the hooks on the rear end of its backward stroke before the knife is reaching its dead point, a movable support ing member for each of said hooks adapted to hold the hook outof reach of the lifting knife during the lost motion of'the lifting knife, two actuating members for each of these supporting members adapted to be brought in working or;non'-workingflposi- 'tion in accordance with the position of'the' corresponding pickreading members in such a manner that a hook, dur-ingone-half of the lost motion of the knife, is dependent upon one pick, and during theother half of the said lost motion, with constant direction of the machine, is dependent upon the otherof the picksread, but in the event of a change in the direction, again becomes dependentupon the first pick. i

10. A shed forming machine as claimed Hill in claim 9, comprising a shaft for actuating the lifting knife, another'shaft adapted to v i to one another,a motion transmitting member in the reach of each of these cams and adapted to transmit-the motion/received therefrom to a member acting upon, a hook supportingmember in such a manner as to release it from the hook and giving this latter free to hang on the lifting'kni-fe.

11.. A shed forming machine comprising a pattern-card, a revolving shaft, a lifting knife connected with'this shaft so as to re ceive from it a reciprocating movement,

lifting hooks adapted to come in reach of this knife, two series of pick reading mem bers adapted to coact with the pattern-card, a transmission gear actuatedby said shaft, two other shafts in this gear'one thereof having the same speed as the first shaft, the other receiving an intermittent motion to displace the pattern-card each time by an amount which is in a definite relation to the distance of two series of pick reading members, wherein a rocking lever below each of said lifting hooks normally held in a posi-.

tion to raise the corresponding hook out of reach with the lifting kni'feduring. the dead rotate in definite speed ratio to the first shaft, two cams on this second shaft with their tops. angularly displaced in relation lit) reach of the corresponding bell-crank-lever if the corresponding pick reading member is in engagement with the pattern-card but are retained. out of said reach when no such engagement takes place.

12. In a shed forming machine, a lifting knife adapted to perform a reciprocating ill movement, hooks pivotally connected with one end to a movable shed supporting member and extending in the direction. towards and over the lifting knife, a movable supporting member for each of said hooks adapted to normally hold the hoolrout of engagement with the lifting knife during a definite period of the reciprocating movement of this knife, releasing members adapted to release the hook supp'ortin member from the hook so as to allow this to fall in reach of the lifting knife and to be carried along therewith, means for. stopping the backward movement of the hook before the lifting knife reaches its rear dead point, movable pick reading needles each controlling the position of one of said releasing members, a bell crank lever for each of these releasing members adapted to impart toeach a releasing motion when the eorr ,ponding pick reading needle is in its pick reading position, a cam adapted to revolve in a definite velocity ratio to the lifting knife and to act upon said bell crank lever at a definite part of the idle motion of the lifting knife, the two cams which act upon the same hook supporting member being dis placed relinivel to one another in the peripheral direction in such a way that accord-v ing to the direction of motion of the machine one comes into action upon the supporting member during the first and the other during the second half of the lost motion of the knife or conversely, and in the basic position of the knife, in the case of either direction of motion of the machine, both cams stand ready to release the supporting member.

13. In a shed forming machine according to claim 12, a movable pattern-card, a hook supporting lever rotatable about a horiz-nontal axis, two driver needles opposite to this lever on the same side thereof, a pick reading needle hanging down from each of the-1e driver needles, these two needles being d1 posed to read two successive picks in the direction of feed of the pattern-card, and, according as they can drop into holes in the the hook during the first and the other during the second half of the lost motion of the knife, and thereby releasing the said hook for hanging on the knife, whereas in the second case the driver needles remain unactuated.

fit. in a. shed forming machine, a perforated movable pattern-card,a shaft, a lifting knife adapted to receive a reciprocating movement from this shaft, thread warp supporting hooks adapted to be brought in engagement and to be carried along with the lifting knife 011 its forward stroke,means for arresting the hooks at a certain distance in front of the rear dead centre of thejknife in order to permit this latter to perform a short idle motion in each direction near its rear dead centre, a. supporting rockinglever mounted below each of said hooks, andholding the corresponding hook normally out of engagement with the lifting knife during the idle motion of the latter, two driver needles opposite said supporting lever on thesame side thereof, pick reading members controlling the position of the driver needles in accordance with the pick holes in the pattern-card, a lever opposite each of said dr'iverneedles, a cam for each of these levers adapted to revolve in a definite velocity ratio to the shaft actuating the lifting knife and to act upon said lever in Such a manner that this lever, by means of the corresponding driver needle, releases the hook supporting lever, as far as the driver needle is within the reach of said pushing lever, in order to permit the hook to be en- ,d by the knife on its forward stroke, said cams being so arranged that they actuate their pushing levers successively and that in the rear dead centre of the lifting knife both pushing levers, one on itsrearward and the other on its forward movement are 10- cated at half travel in a position ready to act upon their driver needle, the interval within the two cams act being as a whole somewhat greater than the interval within below each of said lifting hooks and adapted. to normally hold the corresponding hook re-' moved from the path of the lifting knife,

two. series of pick reading-needles hanging above the pattern-card supporting cylinder in a distance one from another equal to av weft distance as represented on the pattern.- card, a cam adapted to revolve in. a definite relation with the lifting knife, a. rocking lever in contact with this cam,.two series of driving needles supported by this rocking lever and supporting. the pick-reading needles, a driving needle of one series. and a needle. of the other series being-disposed on the same side of the same hook supporting rocking lever, two other cams adapted to rotate with the said. speed as the first mentioned cam, arocking lever. in reach of each of these two other cams adapted to act upon the driving needles of one series at a definite position of the pick reading needleshanging thereon, these cams being so displaced relatively to one another in the peripheral direction that in the rear dead centre of the knife the two rocking levers, one on its rearward and the other on its forward movement, are located at half travel in a position of readiness to push the driving needles towards the hook supporting lever to allow I the hookto fall in reach of the lifting knife at its subsequent forward stroke if the corresponding pick reading needle is in its .pick reading position, the peripheral extent of said pair of cams as a whole belng such I last mentioned cams, the driving needles supporting the pick reading needles being supportedby the same of said bell crank levers and adapted to come into reach of and to be pushed by one of the other bell crank levers when the corresponding pick reading needle is in its lowermost or pick reading position, the cani acting upon the first of said bell. crank levers being located with relation to the other two cams in such a Way that it lifts the pickreading needles out of contact with the pattern-card and allows their lowering into the pick reading position before the other two cams come in working position, these two cams being disposed in such relation one to anotherand to the cam for actuating the lifting knife, that during the idle motion of the knife at the forward motion of the machine, the subsequent pick and at the backward motion the preceding pick is determinative for the position of the lift ing hook relatively to the lifting knife.

17. A shed forming machine, comprising two series of warp-thread lifting'hooks a lifting knife for each of these series adapted to perform arecipr'ocating movement and to carry along with it such'hooks, means for stopping the movement .of thesehooks before the knife is reaching its rear dead point, a rotatable cylinder, a paper pattern-card loosely mounted on this cylinder, parallel rows of holes in this pattern-card,'the holes in each row being displaced relatively. to that on the adjacent rows in the direction of displacement of the pattern-card one row of holes representing the odd picks and the other the even picks, a supporting rocking lever. for each of said lifting hooks adapted to hold the hook out of'reach of the knife duringthe idle motion thereof, two driving needles opposite each supporting lever, fa pick-reading needle hanging down from each driving needle, these two reading needles being displaced relatively to thoseof the adjacent pairs in the longitudinal and peripheral directions of the cylinder by the very short distance between two adjacent holes in the pattern-card, two rocking levers opposite the rear end of the driving needles, a rocking lever for supporting these needles and 'to bring. them into and out of reach of the first mentioned rocking levers in dependence. on the position of the corresponding pick-reading needle in such a way that each I of these two rocking levers is adapted toact' upon. two driving needles one of which bears upon the one and the other bears upon the other of the hook supporting levers.

18. shed forming machine as claimed in claim 17 two cams on the same shaft adapted to impart to the two series of lifting knives a reciprocating movement in opposite direction one series relatively to the other, another shaft adapted to revolve at the same speed as the first mentioned shaft, means driven by this shaft to impart to the cylinder supporting the pattern card at each revolution of said shaft an angular movement corresponding to two picks viz, equal to the distance of the two reading needles of the same pair, two pairs of diametrically opposite cams on said second shaft, each pair adapted to act upon one of the rocking levers for actuating the driver needles, the cams of one pair being displaced in peripheral direction relatively to those of the other pair in such a way that at the rear dead center of either of the lifting knives the bell crank levers operated upon by these cams are in positionof readiness to act upon the opposite driver needles in accordance with the position of the corresponding pickreading needle at either direction of movement of the machine.

F19. A shed forming machine, comprising thread warpsupportingbalances adapted to rocking each on a 'horizontalaxis,'a'hook on each end of ithis "balance 7 pivotally connected therewith, a lifting 'knife below each of theseh'o'dks, a shaft for imparting to these -knives a reciprocating movement in opposite direction one relatively to the other, a supporting rocking meniber for each hook adapted to normally hold the hook out of reach ol the knife just before and after this latter is reaching its rear dead center, a perforated paper pattern-card, a cylinder supporting this pattern-card, the holes in "the pattern-card "being disposed in series 'arranged'in planes'at right angles'tothe axis of the cjlinder, two adjacent series 'of hol'es being displaced relatively "one to another in the direction of the seriesfa't a distance equal to thelhalf of the very short distance 0f two 'ho'les of the same series (weft-disvtance), one series correspondingto'the odd picks, the other to "the even picks, two pairs of pick reading needles for each pair of lifting hooks, these needle pairs Jloeing in the same vertical planes as the series of 7 holes in the pattern-card, the distance bethe "other end "opposite to different of tfvvo :ro'ckingilevers, means for imparting to the "pattern-card "by means "of the cylinder and aftereach second pick an intermittent movement by an extent equal to the distance be tween the pick-reading needles of the same pair :(double weft distance), a rocking lever for supporting the driver-needles and to hold the pick-reading needles out of contact with the pattern-card during the displacement thereof, said "rocking lever allowing after such displacement the needles to drop into pick-tea ing position and to bring thereby the corresponding driver needles into "the path of "the opposite rocking lever earns "disposed 'in the 'r'ea'ch'of *these rocking levers and adapted "to revolve with the same velocity as the "cams for 'aetuating the lifting knives and disposed in such position relatively to one another and to these last mentioned cams thatea'h of the above 'mentioned hook supporting rocking members of one pair of hooks is, as to its position, 'contrdlled hy-one 'ofsa i'd rocking levers at the end of the rearward stroke and by the other "rocking lever at the beginning of the subsequent for-ward or lifting "stroke to permit the hook to "come into reah or the knife at the subsequent stroke and tobe carriedalong with it at either -direction movement of the machine if the pick-reading needle corresponding tto this stroke has entered into one of the holes-of the pattern-card. I

"In "testimony "whereof I have altered my signature.

*HUGrO STAUBLI,

iek-reading

US176174A 1926-05-28 1927-03-17 Shed-forming machine with paper pattern cards Expired - Lifetime US1672434A (en)

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Cited By (8)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2712832A (en) * 1954-02-16 1955-07-12 Crompton & Knowles Loom Works Paper pattern indicated dobby
US2751938A (en) * 1952-09-02 1956-06-26 Staubli Geb & Co Dougle lift shedding motion
US3156266A (en) * 1964-11-10 Schwarz
US3171445A (en) * 1962-09-12 1965-03-02 Rueti Ag Maschf Feeler needle mechanism for exploring pattern cards of looms
US3277928A (en) * 1963-05-24 1966-10-11 Johann Kaiser K G Maschinenfab Pre-needle apparatus for double lift dobby mechanism
US3390705A (en) * 1965-02-19 1968-07-02 Rueti Ag Maschf Dobby
US4172475A (en) * 1976-07-21 1979-10-30 Staeubli Ltd. Weaving machine simultaneously controlled by a Jacquard machine and a dobby
US4497346A (en) * 1980-09-12 1985-02-05 Sulzer Brothers Limited Clutch arrangement for controlling a heddle of a weaving machine

Cited By (8)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3156266A (en) * 1964-11-10 Schwarz
US2751938A (en) * 1952-09-02 1956-06-26 Staubli Geb & Co Dougle lift shedding motion
US2712832A (en) * 1954-02-16 1955-07-12 Crompton & Knowles Loom Works Paper pattern indicated dobby
US3171445A (en) * 1962-09-12 1965-03-02 Rueti Ag Maschf Feeler needle mechanism for exploring pattern cards of looms
US3277928A (en) * 1963-05-24 1966-10-11 Johann Kaiser K G Maschinenfab Pre-needle apparatus for double lift dobby mechanism
US3390705A (en) * 1965-02-19 1968-07-02 Rueti Ag Maschf Dobby
US4172475A (en) * 1976-07-21 1979-10-30 Staeubli Ltd. Weaving machine simultaneously controlled by a Jacquard machine and a dobby
US4497346A (en) * 1980-09-12 1985-02-05 Sulzer Brothers Limited Clutch arrangement for controlling a heddle of a weaving machine

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