US1651157A - Cooling system - Google Patents

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US1651157A
US1651157A US746022A US74602224A US1651157A US 1651157 A US1651157 A US 1651157A US 746022 A US746022 A US 746022A US 74602224 A US74602224 A US 74602224A US 1651157 A US1651157 A US 1651157A
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jacket
water
radiator
chamber
cooling
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Samuel W Rushmore
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    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F01MACHINES OR ENGINES IN GENERAL; ENGINE PLANTS IN GENERAL; STEAM ENGINES
    • F01MLUBRICATING OF MACHINES OR ENGINES IN GENERAL; LUBRICATING INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINES; CRANKCASE VENTILATING
    • F01M5/00Heating, cooling, or controlling temperature of lubricant; Lubrication means facilitating engine starting
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F01MACHINES OR ENGINES IN GENERAL; ENGINE PLANTS IN GENERAL; STEAM ENGINES
    • F01PCOOLING OF MACHINES OR ENGINES IN GENERAL; COOLING OF INTERNAL-COMBUSTION ENGINES
    • F01P3/00Liquid cooling
    • F01P3/22Liquid cooling characterised by evaporation and condensation of coolant in closed cycles; characterised by the coolant reaching higher temperatures than normal atmospheric boiling-point

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  • the present invention relates to a cooling system of the general character disclosed in my prior Patent No. 1,37 8,7 24, granted May 17, 1921.
  • cooling systems of this type the water circulation from the cooling jacket of the engine is short circuited through the lower chamber of a radiator below the cooling tubes or honey-comb. thereof, so that the latter operates as an upflow steam con-' denser. Proper and substantially constant boiling temperatures are soon reached be cause there is very little cooling until the boiling point is reached.
  • the cooling is by evolution of steam in the engine jacket and in the lower chamber of the radiator, causing upflow of the steam into the restricted passages of the honey-comb where it is cooled,
  • an important feature of the present invention involves further reduction of the time required to reach boiling point, by short circuiting the water circulation through a short, low resistance path, thus permitting the water to remain in the jacket, substantially unaffected by the continuous circulation in the cooling system.
  • the effect-of the heat generated in theengine is concentrated on the relatively small amount of water in the jacket and brings it quickly to boiling.
  • a furtherfeature of the invention includes a water jacket around the oil pan of the crank case through which the hot jacket water from the engine circulating system is caused to flow, thereby maintaining the crank case oil at relativel high temperature.
  • This oil pan jacket pre erably serves as a reserve supply tank for v the entire system and'it is into this jacket chamber of the upflow steam condenser.
  • Such an arrangement involves the use of a drain pipe for permitting the return to the system of water forced into the upper chamber of. the radiator.
  • This drain pipe pre-.
  • the drain pipe communicates with the drain from the lower tank of the radiator back to the oil pan jacket and if desired, the latter pipe may be provided with a restricted orifice therein which predetermines the rate of gravitational flow from the lower radlator chamber tothe oil pan jacket and prevents the possibility of back pressure blocking up the drain from the top of the radiator.
  • the circulating pump which takes water from the oil pan jacket and delivers it under pressure to the cylinder jacket 1s driven by vertical shaft run through a tube which communicates from the atmosphere to a point above the oil level in the engine crank case, which serves also as an improved breather tube to permit the discharge of gas and vapors from the crank case to a point be'lowwhere they will be swept away under the car instead of being discharged in the usual Way under the engine hood and through the unavoidable openings in the floor into the passenger space of the car;
  • I thus take advantage of conventional engine construction and eliminate the necessity for making extensive alterationsin the crank case casting and avoid the necessity of stufling box to prevent escape of oil.
  • the oil pan jacket may be heat insulated so that when theengine is idle the crank case oil will in large measure be prevented from becoming cold and viscous. Feature-s of minor importance are the provision of means in connection with the engine jacket for preventing a flow of water down the inlet pipe when the engine is stopped and for preventing jacket water from spilling out of ghe outlet pipe when descending a steep gra e.
  • Fig. 1 is aview partly in sectlon and partly in side elevation of an internal combustion engine equipped with the cooling system;
  • Fig. 2 is fragmentary front elevation of the upper end of the cylinder jacket.
  • the circulating system for cooling water includes a jacketed cylinderhead 10 delivering water from its upper forward end through a pipe 11 to a tank or chamber 12 in the bottom ofa radiator'which includes upflow steam condensing pipes 13 of relatively restricted cross section communicating at their upper ends 'With a tank or header 14.
  • I may run the pipe 19 directly into a nipple 27 forming part of casting 23 and communicating with an inlet pipe 28 running through the outlet opening 24.
  • the delivery end of pipe 28 is turned up as at 29 to deliver water near the top of the jacket.
  • the shape of the pipe 29 is intended to prevent jacket water from gravitationally running back-to and through the pump when the engine is stopped.
  • the circulating pump 18 is preferably dis- I posed below the oil pan jacket and is driven by a vertical shaft 30 which extends through a vertical crank case breather tube 31.
  • This tube permits gases from the crank case to escape and be carried ofl under the car without being trapped under the hood from whence they are likely to leak through the floor into the car.
  • Shaft 30 may be driven by a gear 31 operating from horizontal worm shaft 32 or in any other convenient or conventional manner.
  • I encase the oil pan jacket with a sheathing of heat insulating material 36 so that the heat from the water in this jacket may be conserved as long as possible to prevent the temperature of the crank case oil from falling to an undesirably low point.
  • the short circuiting of water from the inlet and outlet of the cylinder jacket is of considerable importance and possesses numerous advantages entirely independently of whether or not the oil pan jacket is used. It is of additional importance, however, where-the oil pan jacket is used since it permits the use of the additional heating jacket without in any way retarding the heating of the. cylinder jacket water.
  • the baffle 10 while assisting materially in providing an eflicient short circuit, is not essential to suclet to andfrom the cylinder jacket be properly arranged in close proximity to each other to provide a low resistance flow path,
  • a cooling system for internal combusabove the container operating as an upflow condenser, interposed between the container and an upper outlet for the escape of air,
  • a relatively high resistance conduit leadingfrom said water container to pumping means fior force feeding water from said conduit into the water jacket, in combination with a relatively low resistance conduit from near the top of the upflow? con denser passages to the intake of the pumping means, thereby affording a normally open, low resistance path for the escaping water to flow to said intake in parallel with water flowing through the higher/ resistance circuit.
  • a cooling system operating by the boiling and condensing method having a circulating system, including a jacketedelement to be cooled, a radiator having a lower water chamber through which the cooling.
  • means including a conduit providing short-circuited water circulation, from a point near the top of the jacket but below the level of overflow to the radiator, to the return part of the circuit leading to the water jacket.
  • a cooling system operating by the boiling and condensing method haivin lating system including a ackete element to be cooled, a radiator havlng a lower water chamber through which the cooling medium is short-circuited and a plurality of upflow condensing passages above said chamber, an inlet in the jacket through which water is delivered from the tank and an outlet in the 'acket from which water flowsto the tank, said inlet and outlet being relatively close together to circuited path for the flow of water through the jacket.
  • a cooling system operating by the boil ing and condensing method including a jacketed element to be cooled, an upfiow steam condenser, means for short-circuitin the cooling medium through the lower end of the condenser and means for short-circuiting the cooling medium through means in communication with the upper end of the jacket.
  • an engine jacket having inlet and outlet ports for cooling fluid, arranged in close proximity to each other, an air cooled radiator having a lower chamber to which said outlet port is directly connected so that the radiator operates as an upflow condenser, and means for conveying the cooling fluid from said lower chamber to said inlet port.
  • a cooling system for internal combustion engines a cylinder jacket having inlet and outlet ports for cooling fluid, arranged in close proximity to each other, and to the topmost level of the water in the jacket, an air cooled radiator having a lower chamber to which said outlet port is directly connected so that the radiator operates as an upfiow condenser, and means for conveying the cooling fluid from said lower cham ber tosaid inlet port.
  • a cylinder jacket having inlet and outlet ports for cooling fluid, 'arranged at approximately the same level, an air cooled radiator having a lower chamber to which said outlet port is directly connected so that the radiator o crates as an upflow condenser, and means or conveying the coolingfiuid from said lower chamber to said inlet port.
  • a cooling'system for internal combustion engines 'an engine jacket having a chamber in its upper end communicating with the body of the jacket only through restricted openings, and inlet and outlet pipes for cooling fluid both opening into the chamber, said chamber offering a low resistance flow path through which cooling -medium is short-circuited while the cooling medium in the body of the jacket is being raised to a temperature suflicient to cause "thermo-circulation through said restricted openings.
  • a cylinder jacket having a chamber in its upper forward end separated by a partition and communicating with the v body of the jacket only through restricted -"openings in said'partition, and inlet and i an outlet pipes for cooling fluid opening into the chamber, said chamber offering a low resistance flow path through which cooling medium may be short-circuited while the cooling medium in'the body of the jacket is being raised to a temperature sufficient to cause inflow of cool fluid into the jacket through some of said restricted openings and outflow of heated fluid through others of said openings.
  • a cooling system for internal combustion engines including a jacketed element to be cooled, a heat radiating element to which cooling medium is passed from the jacket and from which cooling medium is returned to the jacket, the inlet and outlet passages to and from the jacket being disposed one within the other.
  • a cooling system operating by the boiling and condensing method having a circulating system including a jacketed element to be cooled. a radiator having a lower Water chamber through which the liquid portion of the cooling medium is short circuited, and a plurality of condensing passages above said chamber, a jacketed element to be heated, means for passing cooling medium successively through the jacketed element to be cooled, the lower chamber of the radiator and the jacketed element to be heated and means providing a low resistance short-circuited path for the cooling medium through the jacketed element to be cooled.
  • a cooling system operatin by the boiling and condensing method, aving a circulating system including a cylinder jacket, a radiator having a. lower water chamber through which the cooling medium is short-circuited, and a plurality of upfloW condensing passages above said chamber, an oil pan jacket into which Water flows from the chamber and a pump for returning the water from the oil pan jacket to the cylinder jacket.
  • a cooling system operating bythe boiling and condensing method having a circulating system including a cylinder jacket, a radiator having a lower water chamber through. which the cooling medium is short-circuited, and a'plurality of upflow condensing passages above said chamber, an oil container jacket into which water flows from the chamber and a pump for returning the water from the oil container jacket to' the cylinder jacket, and means providing a low resistance short-circuiting'path for the cooling medium through the cylinder jacket.
  • a cooling system operating by the boiling and condensing method having a v is short-circuited and a plurality of upflow condenslng passages above said chamber, said passages communicating with a header at the upper end of the radiator, an oil conboiling and condensing method,
  • jacket a radiator having a lower water chamber through which the cooling medium is short-circuited and a plurality of up'flow condensing passages above said chamber, said passages communicating with a. header at the upper end of the radiator, an oil container jacket into which water from the lower end of the radiator gravitationally flows, means for returning Water from the oil container jacket to the cylinder jacket, and means for draining Water blown up the tubes into the header, including a drain pipe connecting the header With the circulating line from the lower radiator tank to the oil container jacket. 1
  • a device of the class described in claim 16 wherein the circulating line from the lower tank to the oil pan jacket includes a restricted portion limiting the rate of flow therethrough and wherein the drain pipe delivers into said circulating pipe below said restricted portion.
  • a cooling system including in a closed circulating system, a cylinder jacket, a radiator, an oil container jacket and a circulating pump, the inlet and outlet from the cylinder jacket being arranged in close prox imity to eachother.
  • a cooling system including in a closed circuit a cylinder jacket, a radiator, an oil container jacket and a pump, said oil container jacket being adapted to receive water draining from the radiator and being covered with heat insulating material.

Description

Nov. 29, 1927. 1,651,157
s. w. RUSHMORE COOLING SYSTEM Filed Oct. 27. 1924 INVENTOR Ill/r2216! IIZRzu/zmore Mm ATTORNEY Patented Nov. 29, 1927.
, v 1,651,157 PATENT OFFICE.
SAMUEL W. RUSHMORE, OF PLAINFIELD, NEW JERSEY.
COOLING SYSTEM.
Application filed October 27, 1924. Serial No. 746,622.
The present invention relates to a cooling system of the general character disclosed in my prior Patent No. 1,37 8,7 24, granted May 17, 1921. In cooling systems of this type, the water circulation from the cooling jacket of the engine is short circuited through the lower chamber of a radiator below the cooling tubes or honey-comb. thereof, so that the latter operates as an upflow steam con-' denser. Proper and substantially constant boiling temperatures are soon reached be cause there is very little cooling until the boiling point is reached. The cooling is by evolution of steam in the engine jacket and in the lower chamber of the radiator, causing upflow of the steam into the restricted passages of the honey-comb where it is cooled,
and the condensate flows down in close heat exchange relation to the rising steam so that it returns to the circulation at practically the same temperature as the water from which it was boiled oil.
Even so, the time required for the initial heating to boilingtemperature is considerable because in the system of my said patent, asin any other system where a continuous forced circulationof cooling water is maintained through the cylinder jacket, the jacket water cannot reach any steady maximum temperature condition until all the water circulating in the system has been heated to said temperature.
Hence an important feature of the present invention involves further reduction of the time required to reach boiling point, by short circuiting the water circulation through a short, low resistance path, thus permitting the water to remain in the jacket, substantially unaffected by the continuous circulation in the cooling system. Thus the effect-of the heat generated in theengine is concentrated on the relatively small amount of water in the jacket and brings it quickly to boiling. ThusI obviate heating all of the water inthe, system, as has heretofore been K necessary,- in order to raise the jacket water temperatures-"I am thus able to' raise the acket-water toop timum temperature in a water circulation, I prefer to employ baflie members in the upper end of the'cylinder jacket, saidmembers forming a chamber atfording ashort, low resistance path through which the short 'circ'ui'ting of water takes place. The "chamber is in communication with the main body of water in' the jacket through relatively restricted openings so that when steam evolution occurs, the circulation may be automatically extended throughout the entire body of water' in the jacket. A
While this method of rendering temperature of the jacket water substantially independent of the temperature of the water in the cooling system, constitutes an important improvement of the system of my prior patent, it is even more useful for "any system where there is likely to be too much cooling of the circulating Water. A furtherfeature of the invention includes a water jacket around the oil pan of the crank case through which the hot jacket water from the engine circulating system is caused to flow, thereby maintaining the crank case oil at relativel high temperature. This oil pan jacket pre erably serves as a reserve supply tank for v the entire system and'it is into this jacket chamber of the upflow steam condenser. A v
substantial amount of the steam which is first evolved in the cylinder jacket is used to heat this water so that before any substantial steam evolution can occur in the radiator, the water in the cylinder will be boiling and the water in the oil pan jacket will have nearly reached boiling temperature.
When the water in both jackets has become heated *to the desired temperature and steam 7 evolution and condensation takes place in the radiator, I may prevent the loss of water which may be forced up the condensing tubes and into the topofgthe radiator above the honey-comb by an arrangement similar to that shown in my copending application, Ser. No. 746,023, filed on even date herewith.
Such an arrangement involves the use of a drain pipe for permitting the return to the system of water forced into the upper chamber of. the radiator. This drain pipe pre-.
vents back pressure in the condenser and in fact maintains-a substantially uniform con. dlenser pressure andhas the further ad vantage that it permits the use ofthe cheap-' .est and most eflicient types of radia torcore construction with passages too small or too narrow for the free return of the condensate against the upflowmg stream. In accordance I with the preferred embodiment of the invention, the drain pipe communicates with the drain from the lower tank of the radiator back to the oil pan jacket and if desired, the latter pipe may be provided with a restricted orifice therein which predetermines the rate of gravitational flow from the lower radlator chamber tothe oil pan jacket and prevents the possibility of back pressure blocking up the drain from the top of the radiator.
In accordance with another feature of the invention, the circulating pump which takes water from the oil pan jacket and delivers it under pressure to the cylinder jacket 1s driven by vertical shaft run through a tube which communicates from the atmosphere to a point above the oil level in the engine crank case, which serves also as an improved breather tube to permit the discharge of gas and vapors from the crank case to a point be'lowwhere they will be swept away under the car instead of being discharged in the usual Way under the engine hood and through the unavoidable openings in the floor into the passenger space of the car; I thus take advantage of conventional engine construction and eliminate the necessity for making extensive alterationsin the crank case casting and avoid the necessity of stufling box to prevent escape of oil. If desired, the oil pan jacket may be heat insulated so that when theengine is idle the crank case oil will in large measure be prevented from becoming cold and viscous. Feature-s of minor importance are the provision of means in connection with the engine jacket for preventing a flow of water down the inlet pipe when the engine is stopped and for preventing jacket water from spilling out of ghe outlet pipe when descending a steep gra e.
The invention may be better understood from the following description in connection with the accompanying drawings, wherein Fig. 1 is aview partly in sectlon and partly in side elevation of an internal combustion engine equipped with the cooling system;
Fig. 2 is fragmentary front elevation of the upper end of the cylinder jacket.
The circulating system for cooling water, asillustrated in the drawings, includes a jacketed cylinderhead 10 delivering water from its upper forward end through a pipe 11 to a tank or chamber 12 in the bottom ofa radiator'which includes upflow steam condensing pipes 13 of relatively restricted cross section communicating at their upper ends 'With a tank or header 14.
From the tank '12, water passes by gravity through a pipe 15 into an oil pan jacket 16 enclosing preferably the entire oil pan of the crank case. From jacket 16 water is withdrawn through a pipe 17 by a circulating pump 18 and passed upwardly through a' pipe 19 back to the cylinder headjacket 10. The jacket space of cylinder head 10 communicates with the jacket space surrounding the cylinders part of a' casting 23 bolted over an opening 24 in chamber 20 to provide an outlet opening for escaping steam and water. By providing the U-bend in the pipe 22 and raising the intermediate portion of the bend above the top of the waterjacket there is no danger of water gravitationally running from the jacket down to the lower end of the radiartor when the car is descending a steep grade. The lower end of pipe 11 is connected through a flexible pipe section 25 with the inlet pipe 26 which enters the lower radiator tank.
Inasmuch as it is desired to have the inlet and outlet from chamber 20 as close together as possible, I may run the pipe 19 directly into a nipple 27 forming part of casting 23 and communicating with an inlet pipe 28 running through the outlet opening 24. The delivery end of pipe 28 is turned up as at 29 to deliver water near the top of the jacket. The shape of the pipe 29 is intended to prevent jacket water from gravitationally running back-to and through the pump when the engine is stopped.
The circulating pump 18 is preferably dis- I posed below the oil pan jacket and is driven by a vertical shaft 30 which extends through a vertical crank case breather tube 31. This tube permits gases from the crank case to escape and be carried ofl under the car without being trapped under the hood from whence they are likely to leak through the floor into the car.
.Shaft 30 may be driven by a gear 31 operating from horizontal worm shaft 32 or in any other convenient or conventional manner.
By virtue of the construction above described, it will'be seen that when operation of the engine is started and the circulating pump begins to work, there will be .a' short circulation of water from the discharge end 29 of the pipe 19 directly to the pipe 22 and back through pipe 11 to the lower end of the radiator. Water from the tank 12 drains through a restricted orifice 34 down to the oil pan jacket. The water .in the cylinder jacket 10 will remain substantially stagnant until the time when boiling begins. In other cessful operation, since if the inlet and outthrough the outlet pipe 22 will heat the ex-.
cess water circulating through the tank 12 and oil pan jacket. Before the water which isdelivered from pipe 11 into tank 12 is sufliciently hot to efiect any appreciable steam evolution in the tank, the water in the oil pan jacket will have nearly reached boiling point. When the water in' both jackets 'tion engines, comprising a force feed water has reached maximum or desired temperature and steam evolution and condensation is occurring in the regular way in the radiator or condenser, a certain amount of water or condensate may be forced or blown up through the restricted tubes 13 into, the header 14 at the top of. the radiator. This water, however, cannot result in any substantial back pressure within the radiator and will not be blown out through the conventional safety valve because I provide a drain pipe 35 into which it overflows as soon as itreaches the upper header 14. Pipe 35 drains into'the pipe 15 at a point below the orifice 34 and since the amount of water which can pass from tank 12- through this orifice is considerably less than the pipe 15 is capable of taking care of, there will be no substantial back pressure in the pipe 35. In fact, there is more likely to be a subnormal pressure in this pipe which will actually suck water out of the top of the radiator and reduce and equalize pressures throughout the entire radiator condenser.
In order to prevent the crank case oil from becoming chilled and consequently viscous and sluggish when'the engine is temporarily stopped, I encase the oil pan jacket with a sheathing of heat insulating material 36 so that the heat from the water in this jacket may be conserved as long as possible to prevent the temperature of the crank case oil from falling to an undesirably low point.
The short circuiting of water from the inlet and outlet of the cylinder jacket is of considerable importance and possesses numerous advantages entirely independently of whether or not the oil pan jacket is used. It is of additional importance, however, where-the oil pan jacket is used since it permits the use of the additional heating jacket without in any way retarding the heating of the. cylinder jacket water. The baffle 10, while assisting materially in providing an eflicient short circuit, is not essential to suclet to andfrom the cylinder jacket be properly arranged in close proximity to each other to provide a low resistance flow path,
r a short circuit will be established irrespective of whether or not the water is delivered into a baflled chamber. The arrangement for driving the pump is very convenient when the system is installed in cars provided with a crank case breather tube such as the tube 21, but it will be evident that other expedients might be resorted to for driving the pump without affecting the efliciencv of operation of the cooling system. While the oil pan jacket preferably completely encloses and surrounds the oil pan, it may, if desired, merely-be used for surrounding the usual sump inthe bottom of the crank case.
I claim:
1. A cooling system for internal combusabove the container, operating as an upflow condenser, interposed between the container and an upper outlet for the escape of air,
steam or water, a relatively high resistance conduit leadingfrom said water container to pumping means fior force feeding water from said conduit into the water jacket, in combination with a relatively low resistance conduit from near the top of the upflow? con denser passages to the intake of the pumping means, thereby affording a normally open, low resistance path for the escaping water to flow to said intake in parallel with water flowing through the higher/ resistance circuit.
2. A cooling system operating by the boiling and condensing method, having a circulating system, including a jacketedelement to be cooled, a radiator having a lower water chamber through which the cooling.
the chamber and delivering it to the jacket,
in combination with means including a conduit providing short-circuited water circulation, from a point near the top of the jacket but below the level of overflow to the radiator, to the return part of the circuit leading to the water jacket.
3. A cooling system operating by the boiling and condensing method haivin lating system, including a ackete element to be cooled, a radiator havlng a lower water chamber through which the cooling medium is short-circuited and a plurality of upflow condensing passages above said chamber, an inlet in the jacket through which water is delivered from the tank and an outlet in the 'acket from which water flowsto the tank, said inlet and outlet being relatively close together to circuited path for the flow of water through the jacket.
serially including a water jacket, a
a circu- M afford, a low resistance short- 4:- A cooling system operating by the boil ing and condensing method, including a jacketed element to be cooled, an upfiow steam condenser, means for short-circuitin the cooling medium through the lower end of the condenser and means for short-circuiting the cooling medium through means in communication with the upper end of the jacket.
5. In a cooling system for internal com-v bustion engines, an engine jacket having inlet and outlet ports for cooling fluid, arranged in close proximity to each other, an air cooled radiator having a lower chamber to which said outlet port is directly connected so that the radiator operates as an upflow condenser, and means for conveying the cooling fluid from said lower chamber to said inlet port.
6. In. a cooling system for internal combustion engines, a cylinder jacket having inlet and outlet ports for cooling fluid, arranged in close proximity to each other, and to the topmost level of the water in the jacket, an air cooled radiator having a lower chamber to which said outlet port is directly connected so that the radiator operates as an upfiow condenser, and means for conveying the cooling fluid from said lower cham ber tosaid inlet port.
7. In a cooling system for internal combustion engines, a cylinder jacket having inlet and outlet ports for cooling fluid, 'arranged at approximately the same level, an air cooled radiator having a lower chamber to which said outlet port is directly connected so that the radiator o crates as an upflow condenser, and means or conveying the coolingfiuid from said lower chamber to said inlet port.
8. In a cooling'system for internal combustion engines, 'an engine jacket having a chamber in its upper end communicating with the body of the jacket only through restricted openings, and inlet and outlet pipes for cooling fluid both opening into the chamber, said chamber offering a low resistance flow path through which cooling -medium is short-circuited while the cooling medium in the body of the jacket is being raised to a temperature suflicient to cause "thermo-circulation through said restricted openings.
9. Ina cooling system for internal combustion engines, a cylinder jacket having a chamber in its upper forward end separated by a partition and communicating with the v body of the jacket only through restricted -"openings in said'partition, and inlet and i an outlet pipes for cooling fluid opening into the chamber, said chamber offering a low resistance flow path through which cooling medium may be short-circuited while the cooling medium in'the body of the jacket is being raised to a temperature sufficient to cause inflow of cool fluid into the jacket through some of said restricted openings and outflow of heated fluid through others of said openings.
10. A cooling system for internal combustion engines, including a jacketed element to be cooled, a heat radiating element to which cooling medium is passed from the jacket and from which cooling medium is returned to the jacket, the inlet and outlet passages to and from the jacket being disposed one within the other.
11. A cooling system operating by the boiling and condensing method having a circulating system including a jacketed element to be cooled. a radiator having a lower Water chamber through which the liquid portion of the cooling medium is short circuited, and a plurality of condensing passages above said chamber, a jacketed element to be heated, means for passing cooling medium successively through the jacketed element to be cooled, the lower chamber of the radiator and the jacketed element to be heated and means providing a low resistance short-circuited path for the cooling medium through the jacketed element to be cooled.
12. A cooling system operatin by the boiling and condensing method, aving a circulating system including a cylinder jacket, a radiator having a. lower water chamber through which the cooling medium is short-circuited, and a plurality of upfloW condensing passages above said chamber, an oil pan jacket into which Water flows from the chamber and a pump for returning the water from the oil pan jacket to the cylinder jacket.
'13. A cooling system operating bythe boiling and condensing method, having a circulating system including a cylinder jacket, a radiator having a lower water chamber through. which the cooling medium is short-circuited, and a'plurality of upflow condensing passages above said chamber, an oil container jacket into which water flows from the chamber and a pump for returning the water from the oil container jacket to' the cylinder jacket, and means providing a low resistance short-circuiting'path for the cooling medium through the cylinder jacket.
14. A device of the class described in claim 13, wherein a restricted orifice regulates the gravitationalflow. of water from the lower radiatortank-to the oil pan jacket.
1-5. A device of the. class described in claim 13, where'in the oil container is enclosed by a covering of heat insulating ma-, 1
terial'. v
16. A cooling system operating by the boiling and condensing method, having a v is short-circuited and a plurality of upflow condenslng passages above said chamber, said passages communicating with a header at the upper end of the radiator, an oil conboiling and condensing method,
; jacket, a radiator having a lower water chamber through which the cooling medium is short-circuited and a plurality of up'flow condensing passages above said chamber, said passages communicating with a. header at the upper end of the radiator, an oil container jacket into which water from the lower end of the radiator gravitationally flows, means for returning Water from the oil container jacket to the cylinder jacket, and means for draining Water blown up the tubes into the header, including a drain pipe connecting the header With the circulating line from the lower radiator tank to the oil container jacket. 1
18. A device of the class described in claim 16 wherein the circulating line from the lower tank to the oil pan jacket includes a restricted portion limiting the rate of flow therethrough and wherein the drain pipe delivers into said circulating pipe below said restricted portion.
19. A cooling system, including in a closed circulating system, a cylinder jacket, a radiator, an oil container jacket and a circulating pump, the inlet and outlet from the cylinder jacket being arranged in close prox imity to eachother.
20. A cooling system, including in a closed circuit a cylinder jacket, a radiator, an oil container jacket and a pump, said oil container jacket being adapted to receive water draining from the radiator and being covered with heat insulating material.
Signed at Plainfield in the county of Union and State of New Jersey, this th day of October, A. D. 1924.
SAMUEL WV. RUSHMORE.
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Cited By (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2586562A (en) * 1950-06-08 1952-02-19 Waukesha Motor Co Evaporative cooling system for internal-combustion engines
EP0041853A1 (en) * 1980-06-09 1981-12-16 Evc Associates Limited Partnership Boiling liquid cooling system for internal combustion engines
US4367699A (en) * 1981-01-27 1983-01-11 Evc Associates Limited Partnership Boiling liquid engine cooling system
EP0167169A2 (en) * 1984-07-06 1986-01-08 Nissan Motor Co., Ltd. Cooling system for automotive engine or the like

Cited By (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2586562A (en) * 1950-06-08 1952-02-19 Waukesha Motor Co Evaporative cooling system for internal-combustion engines
EP0041853A1 (en) * 1980-06-09 1981-12-16 Evc Associates Limited Partnership Boiling liquid cooling system for internal combustion engines
US4367699A (en) * 1981-01-27 1983-01-11 Evc Associates Limited Partnership Boiling liquid engine cooling system
EP0167169A2 (en) * 1984-07-06 1986-01-08 Nissan Motor Co., Ltd. Cooling system for automotive engine or the like
EP0167169A3 (en) * 1984-07-06 1986-12-03 Nissan Motor Co., Ltd. Cooling system for automotive engine or the like

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