US1632581A - Engine-cooling system - Google Patents

Engine-cooling system Download PDF

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US1632581A
US1632581A US127257A US12725726A US1632581A US 1632581 A US1632581 A US 1632581A US 127257 A US127257 A US 127257A US 12725726 A US12725726 A US 12725726A US 1632581 A US1632581 A US 1632581A
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jacket
liquid
steam
circuit
level
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US127257A
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Lester P Barlow
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    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F01MACHINES OR ENGINES IN GENERAL; ENGINE PLANTS IN GENERAL; STEAM ENGINES
    • F01PCOOLING OF MACHINES OR ENGINES IN GENERAL; COOLING OF INTERNAL-COMBUSTION ENGINES
    • F01P3/00Liquid cooling
    • F01P3/22Liquid cooling characterised by evaporation and condensation of coolant in closed cycles; characterised by the coolant reaching higher temperatures than normal atmospheric boiling-point
    • F01P3/2285Closed cycles with condenser and feed pump

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  • Another objectof invention is to automatically supply cooling liquid to the cylinder jacket. in exact proportions to the amounts of liquid going off as steam from the surface of the liquid body in the jacket from time to time during the steaming operation, and thus automatically maintain a substantially constant liquid level above the cylinders to prevent either flooding the jacket to stop the steaming operation or the boiling away of the liquid body to overheat the cylinders.
  • a further object of my inventon is to sup- .ply the cooling'liquid to the cylinder jacket through 'a standpi e or, chamber having a by-pass at the heig t of'the liquid level for the jacket, so as to regulate said. level in the jacket yet allow fer acontinuous and uninterru ted circulation of liquid-through the chamlier to supply the jacket without any of the .excess liquids passing there through.
  • a further object of my invention is to so position the supply and reserve tank of' the system that it maybe readily reached
  • a 'still further object of myrinvention is to locate this tank under the a ron along the running-board at the side 0 the car and utilize a place notheretofore generally used for this purpose.
  • the invention consists further in the mat 7 mesa i er/0 "ystem constructed in accordance with my invention; y
  • Fig. 2 illustratesthesupply and reserve tankof the system located beneath the apron of the running-board at one side of the car;
  • Fig. 3 is'a vertical sectional view taken on'line 33 of Fig. 2 'and 7
  • Fig.4 illustrates a modified formof constructionto be hereinafter described.
  • Fig. 1 indicates the cylinder block of an internal combustion engine, and 2 the head clamped on top of the block over the upper ends of the enginev cylinders 3 therein,
  • the block 1 is provided with the usual cham bet 4 about the engine cylinders was to re- 'ccive the coolingliquids, as water, as heretofore, said chamber defining the water jacket about the cylinders. as usual.
  • Thehead 2 has a vapor collecting space or steam dome 5 extending above the head and in direct communication at all times at its lower end with the upper end of the chamber 4 so as to receive the steam rising from the body of the liquid in the chamber when brought to the boiling temperature ,from the heat of the explosions in the cylinders during the operation of the engine.
  • the dome 5 is connected with a header or chamber 6 at the upper end of a cooler-0r condenser 7 by a conduit 8.
  • the condenser may take the form of an automobile radiator with water tubes and air passages so as to 'fit in with the present automobile designs.
  • the lower portion of the condenser 7 is prochamber 9, which is connected by a down wardly extendin conduit 10 with a manifold 11 arranged below the condenser, as shown in Fig. 1.
  • the manifold 11 is connected by a conduit 12 with the intake of a ump 13, also located below the condenser and driven from the engine in any desired manner.
  • a standpipe 14 o ening atits lower end into the lower portion of the cylinder 'acket through its liquid intake port 15. T rough this standpipe liquid is supplied to the cylinder jacket 4 and maintained thenein at a level a 1n the lower portion of the dome 5 and above the vided with a condensate collecting header or p cylinders, as shown in Fig. 1.-
  • the standpipe 14 extends upward from the port 15 to the water level a in the dome 5 and is connected at that level by an outlet or overflow pipe or conduit 16 with a supply tank or reservior 17 located below the condenser 7, as shown.
  • a supply conduit 18 connects the standpipe 14 with the discharge outlet of the pump 13, so that said pump when in operation delivers liquid to the standpipe and through the same supplies liquid to the jacket 4 to the level a therein.
  • the tank or reservoir 17 is connected with the manifold 11 on the intake side of the pump by a conduit 19 so as to supply makeup water to the system and permit the liquids to circulate through the standpipe 14 and' its intake and overflow conduits 18 and 16 without passing through the cylinder jacket and the dome.
  • the tank-17 has a capacity to contain all the liquid required for the system and sufficient in addition to constitute a reserve supply and thus compensate for natural losses through leakage and evaporation.
  • Said tank 17 has a filling neck 20, the closure cap of which has a vent opening 21 to the atmos )here. Another vent 22 to the atmosphere is provided for the condenser 7 at its lower-condensate collecting chamber 9, as shown.
  • I To balance the'pressure in the dome 5 and in the regulating chamber 14, I provide a connection between them by a pipe 28, as shown'in Fig. 1.
  • the tubes 23, 23 of the condenser 7 are vertically disposed and connect the upper steam receiving chamber 6 with the lower condensate collecting chamber 9. These tubes are spaced apart so that air flowing through the condenser from front to rear Wlll contact with the tubes to cool them and cause the steam passing downward through the tubes to be condensed and returned to liquid form to the systemthrough the condensate collecting chamber 9.
  • a fan 24 is located at the rear of the condenser 7 and is operated by the engine in the usual manner to draw air through the condenser for steam condensing purposes, as stated.
  • the tank or reservoir 17 On first placing the system in operation, the tank or reservoir 17 is completely filled with cooling liquid through the neck 20 to the level indicated by the dotted line b. As the tank is so located as to extend above the pump 13 and manifold 11, these two elements as well as the conduits 12 and 19 and the portions of the conduits 10 and 18 below the level I) are filled with liquid, thus primin all of the arts and not delaying their fi ling on startlng the engine.
  • the pump 13 draws liquid from the tank 17 and delivers it to the jacket, chamber 4 through the conduit 18 and standpipe 14.
  • the pump fills the jacket chamber 4 to approximately ture conditions.
  • the leveljndicated by a whereu n the flow to the jacket ceases, due to the act that the overflow pipe 16 is connected with the upper end of the standpipe 14 at the height of the level a.
  • the pump continues to operate and by the by-pass 16 circulates-the excess liquid back through the tank without passing through the jacket, and thus making no change in the level a. From the fact that the flow of liquid to the jacket ceases when level a has been reached, the engine is allowed to warm up rapidly and bring the liquid in the jacket tothe boiling point in a relatively short period of time and thusquickly raise the walls of the engine cylinders to the desired economical operating temperature, regardless of load conditions on the engine or the outside atmospheric temperature.
  • Figs. 2 and 3 of the drawings I have shown the tank 17 located in the space between the apron 25 and the running-board 26 at one side of the car and the'adjacent side member 27 of the frame or chassis of the machine.
  • the tank 17 has its filling neck extended upward through an openin g in the apron so that it may be reached for filling the tank from the outside of the car.
  • this overflow pipe 16 so as to connect the upper end of the standpipe at the water level a with the intake side of the pum 13',
  • the level a will naturally lower, it being raised, however, to the height required on the first starting of the engine.
  • the combination with a cy inder jacket having a steam space above the same of means providing a circuit whereby a cooling liquid may be continuously circulated without passing through the jacket, said circuit including a chamber connected with the intake of the jacket for supplying liquid thereto, said chamber having its outlet to the circuit at the height of the liquid level for the jacket in order to maintain such level by supplying liquid to the jacket from the circuit in direct proportion to the amounts going off as steam in the jacket, a condenser connected at its upper end with the steam space and at its lower end with the return side only of said circuit for supplying condensate thereto, and a pressurebalancing connection between the chamber and said steam space.
  • a cooling system for internal combustion engines the combination with a cylinder jacket, of means providing a circuit whereby a cooling liquid is circulated without passing through said jacket, means to maintain the cooling liquid at a predetermined level in the jacket, and a vent for said system, said vent being continuously open to the atmosphere whereby the system operates at all times at atmospheric pressure.

Description

June 14, 1 927 L. P. BARLOW ENGINE COOLING SYSTEM Filed Aug. 5. 1926 7 INVENTOR:
BY FM A TTORNEY.-
new Jae i4; i921.
talisman iii-in s. an. Serial s... 127381.
, This avenues sues to apple cooling systems for internal combustion engines and reaches the boiling point, thereby allowing the engine to be warmed up quickly regardless of the outside atmospheric temperature in which theengine is started. Another objectof invention is to automatically supply cooling liquid to the cylinder jacket. in exact proportions to the amounts of liquid going off as steam from the surface of the liquid body in the jacket from time to time during the steaming operation, and thus automatically maintain a substantially constant liquid level above the cylinders to prevent either flooding the jacket to stop the steaming operation or the boiling away of the liquid body to overheat the cylinders.
- A further object of my inventon is to sup- .ply the cooling'liquid to the cylinder jacket through 'a standpi e or, chamber having a by-pass at the heig t of'the liquid level for the jacket, so as to regulate said. level in the jacket yet allow fer acontinuous and uninterru ted circulation of liquid-through the chamlier to supply the jacket without any of the .excess liquids passing there through. V
A further object of my invention is to so position the supply and reserve tank of' the system that it maybe readily reached A 'still further object of myrinvention is to locate this tank under the a ron along the running-board at the side 0 the car and utilize a place notheretofore generally used for this purpose.
The invention consists further in the mat 7 mesa i er/0 "ystem constructed in accordance with my invention; y
Fig. 2 illustratesthesupply and reserve tankof the system located beneath the apron of the running-board at one side of the car; Fig. 3 is'a vertical sectional view taken on'line 33 of Fig. 2 'and 7 Fig.4 illustrates a modified formof constructionto be hereinafter described.
.In Fig. 1, -1 indicates the cylinder block of an internal combustion engine, and 2 the head clamped on top of the block over the upper ends of the enginev cylinders 3 therein,
as usual in motor vehicle engine designs. The block 1 is provided with the usual cham bet 4 about the engine cylinders was to re- 'ccive the coolingliquids, as water, as heretofore, said chamber defining the water jacket about the cylinders. as usual. Thehead 2 has a vapor collecting space or steam dome 5 extending above the head and in direct communication at all times at its lower end with the upper end of the chamber 4 so as to receive the steam rising from the body of the liquid in the chamber when brought to the boiling temperature ,from the heat of the explosions in the cylinders during the operation of the engine.
The dome 5 is connected with a header or chamber 6 at the upper end of a cooler-0r condenser 7 by a conduit 8. The condenser may take the form of an automobile radiator with water tubes and air passages so as to 'fit in with the present automobile designs.
The lower portion of the condenser 7 is prochamber 9, which is connected by a down wardly extendin conduit 10 with a manifold 11 arranged below the condenser, as shown in Fig. 1. The manifold 11 is connected by a conduit 12 with the intake of a ump 13, also located below the condenser and driven from the engine in any desired manner. i
At one side ofthe block'l is a standpipe 14 o ening atits lower end into the lower portion of the cylinder 'acket through its liquid intake port 15. T rough this standpipe liquid is supplied to the cylinder jacket 4 and maintained thenein at a level a 1n the lower portion of the dome 5 and above the vided with a condensate collecting header or p cylinders, as shown in Fig. 1.- The standpipe 14 extends upward from the port 15 to the water level a in the dome 5 and is connected at that level by an outlet or overflow pipe or conduit 16 with a supply tank or reservior 17 located below the condenser 7, as shown. A supply conduit 18 connects the standpipe 14 with the discharge outlet of the pump 13, so that said pump when in operation delivers liquid to the standpipe and through the same supplies liquid to the jacket 4 to the level a therein.
The tank or reservoir 17 is connected with the manifold 11 on the intake side of the pump by a conduit 19 so as to supply makeup water to the system and permit the liquids to circulate through the standpipe 14 and' its intake and overflow conduits 18 and 16 without passing through the cylinder jacket and the dome. The tank-17 has a capacity to contain all the liquid required for the system and sufficient in addition to constitute a reserve supply and thus compensate for natural losses through leakage and evaporation. Said tank 17 has a filling neck 20, the closure cap of which has a vent opening 21 to the atmos )here. Another vent 22 to the atmosphere is provided for the condenser 7 at its lower-condensate collecting chamber 9, as shown. To balance the'pressure in the dome 5 and in the regulating chamber 14, I provide a connection between them by a pipe 28, as shown'in Fig. 1.
As shown in Fig. 1, the tubes 23, 23 of the condenser 7 are vertically disposed and connect the upper steam receiving chamber 6 with the lower condensate collecting chamber 9. These tubes are spaced apart so that air flowing through the condenser from front to rear Wlll contact with the tubes to cool them and cause the steam passing downward through the tubes to be condensed and returned to liquid form to the systemthrough the condensate collecting chamber 9. A fan 24 is located at the rear of the condenser 7 and is operated by the engine in the usual manner to draw air through the condenser for steam condensing purposes, as stated.
On first placing the system in operation, the tank or reservoir 17 is completely filled with cooling liquid through the neck 20 to the level indicated by the dotted line b. As the tank is so located as to extend above the pump 13 and manifold 11, these two elements as well as the conduits 12 and 19 and the portions of the conduits 10 and 18 below the level I) are filled with liquid, thus primin all of the arts and not delaying their fi ling on startlng the engine.
On first starting the motor or en me, the pump 13 draws liquid from the tank 17 and delivers it to the jacket, chamber 4 through the conduit 18 and standpipe 14. The pump fills the jacket chamber 4 to approximately ture conditions.
theleveljndicated by a, whereu n the flow to the jacket ceases, due to the act that the overflow pipe 16 is connected with the upper end of the standpipe 14 at the height of the level a. The pump continues to operate and by the by-pass 16 circulates-the excess liquid back through the tank without passing through the jacket, and thus making no change in the level a. From the fact that the flow of liquid to the jacket ceases when level a has been reached, the engine is allowed to warm up rapidly and bring the liquid in the jacket tothe boiling point in a relatively short period of time and thusquickly raise the walls of the engine cylinders to the desired economical operating temperature, regardless of load conditions on the engine or the outside atmospheric temperature.
Then the liquid in the acket 4reachcs boiling or steaming temperature, steam rises from the level a of the liquid in the jacket and flows to the condenser 7 through the outlet conduit 8. The level a in the jacket is being constantly lowered to a slight extent by portions of the liquid body in the jackets going off as steam from the heat furnished by the explosions in the cylinders, thereby allowing the ump to constantly supply liquid to the jacket through the standpipe 14. to make up or compensate for the amounts going oil as steam. As the bypass or overflow conduit 16 opens into the standpipe 14 in the plane of the level a in the jacket, it follows that no more make-up liquid will be supplied to the jacket 4 than enough to compensate for the amounts going off as steam in the jacket. Thus the amounts of liquid supplied to the jacket from time to time during the boiling of the liquid in the jacket will be in direct roportion to the amounts of liquid going 0 as steam in the jacket. This an important feature of my invention because not enou h of the cooler liquid is supplied to the jac et at any time during the steaming operation to interfere with or hinder the same, thereby maintaining the cylinder walls of the engine at a substantially constant operating temperature regardless of load and atmospheric temperalVhile considerably more amounts of the liquid about the en ine cylinders will be converted into steam lOHl time to time durin the operation of the engine under heavier l bads than under lighter loads, yet the amounts of cooler, liquid supplied to the jacket under a heavier load from time to time will not be sufiicient to hinder the steaming action in the jacket as to materially reduce the operating temperature of the cylinder walls.
Steam entering the chamber 6' at the top of the condenser 7 will be forced downward through the tubes 23, 23 by the pressure in the dome 5. The tubes being cooled by the ill circulation of air against them, will cause the steam therein to be condensed therein, the condensateflowing by gravity to the lower chamber 9. From there, the condensate liquid will flow downward into the manifold 11 through the conduit 10, and thus be collected to be taken. up by the pump 13 and be returned to the system for resupplying the jacket with liquid in proportion to the amounts going off as steam therein.
I prefer, when my improved system is used with automobiles, to place the supply and reserve tank 17 in a position whereit may be readily reached for filling through the neck 20, from the exterior of the car. In Figs. 2 and 3 of the drawings, I have shown the tank 17 located in the space between the apron 25 and the running-board 26 at one side of the car and the'adjacent side member 27 of the frame or chassis of the machine. The tank 17 has its filling neck extended upward through an openin g in the apron so that it may be reached for filling the tank from the outside of the car. To avoid the use of unduly long conduits 16 and 19 between the tank and the associated parts of the system I prefer to position the tank toward the front. end of the car, as shown in Fig. 2.
While I have shown in Fig. 1 the overflow conduit '16 as connecting the standpipe 14 directly. with the tank 17, I may arrange.
this overflow pipe 16 so as to connect the upper end of the standpipe at the water level a with the intake side of the pum 13',
1 as shown in Fig. 4. This arrangement s ortens the distance of flow from the standpipe 14 to the intake of the pump, which may be desired in some installations. Moreover. by this arrangement the return flow from the standpipe 14 to the pump is not through the supply tank 17 to disturb or heat the same as with the assembly shown in Fig. 1.
While I have shown and described the standpi .e 14 as made separate from the cylinder b ock 1, it could be formed integral with said block, as by making a suitable passage or alcove therein. In either case, it would serve as a chamberto regulate the level of the liquid body about the cylinders and also enable the liquid to be supplied to said body in direct proportion to the amounts going oil as steam therefrom during the steaming operation. After the sys term has been initially filled with liquid through the tank 17 no further filling is required over relatively long periods of I time, as practically all steam generated in the jacket is condensed and returned to the system, On stop. ing the motor steam will :ontinue until the temperature of the cylinler walls drops below the boiling point. of the liquid used. The amp 13 being idle, no liquid will be supplied to the jacket to make-up for the amounts going off as steam.
The level a will naturally lower, it being raised, however, to the height required on the first starting of the engine.
1. In an internal combustion engine vapor coolmg system wh ch is open continuously to the atmosphere and which operates at all times at atmospheric ressure, the combination with a cylinder acket having a steam space abovethesame, of means providinga circuit whereby a cooling liquid may be continuousl circulated without passing through said j ac et, andmeans included in said circuit and connected with said jacket whereby a predetermined liquid level may bemaintained in the jacket by supplying liquid thereto from the circuit in direct proportion to the amounts going ofi as steam in the jacket. V
21 In an internal combustion engine vapor cooling system which is open continuously to the atmosphere and which operates at all times at atmospheric pressure, the combination with a cylinder jacket having a steam space aboye the. same of means providing a clrcuit whereby a cooling liquid may be continuousl. circulated without passing through said- .jac et, said circuit including a liquid level regulating chamber for the jacket and through which the circuit enters the jacket, said chamber having its outlet to the circuit at the height of the liquid level for the jacket in order to maintain such level by supplying liquid to the jacket from the circuit in direct pro ortion to the amounts going oil as steam in t e jacket. 1
3. In an internal combustion engine vapor cooling system which is open continuously to the atmosphere and which operates at all times at atmospheric ressure, the combination with a c linder acket having a steam space above t e same, of means providing a et, said circuit including aliquid chamber for the jacket and the atmosphere and which operates at all times at atmospheric pressure, the combination with a cylinder acket having a steam space above the same, of means providing a circuit whereby a cooling liquid may be continuously circulated without passing throughsaid jacket, a liquid level regulating chamber for the jacket and a forcing pump in said circuit with the latter entering the jacket through said chamber, a reservoir in the circuit, said chamber having its inlet and outlets connected with the discharge of the pump and with the reservoir, respectively, the outlet of said chamber being at the height of the liquid level for the jacket in orderto maintainsaid level by supplying liquid to the jacket from the circuit in direct proportion to the amounts passing off as steam in the jacket.
5. In an internal combustion engine vapor cooling system which is open continuously to the atmosphere and which operates at all times at atmospheric pressure, the combination with a cylinder jacket having a steam space above the same, of means providing a circuit whereby a cooling liquid may be continuously circulated without passing through the jacket, said circuit including a liquid level regulating chamber for the jacket and connected with the intake thereat, said chamber having its outlet to the circuit at the height of the liquid level for the jacket in order to maintain such level by supplying liquid to the jacket from the circuit in directproportion to the amounts going ofif as steam in the jacket, and a condenser connected at its upper end with the steam space and at its lower end with'the return side only of said circuit for supplying condensate thereto.
6. In an internal combustion engine vapor cooling system which is open continuously to the atmosphere and which operates at all times at atmo heric pressure, the combination with a clinder jacket having a steam space above the same, of means providing a circuit whereby a cooling liquid may be continuously circulated without passing through said jacket, said circuit includinga standpipe arranged outside of the jacket and through which standpipe the circuit enters the jacket for supplying liquid thereto, said standpipe havin inlet and outlet openings included in t e circu t with the outlet open ing at the height of the liquid level for the jacket.
7. In an internal combustion engine vapor cooling system which is open continuously to the atmosphere and which operates atall times at atmosphericpressure, the combination with a cylinder jacket having a steam space above the same, of means providing a circuit whereby a cooling liquid may be continuously circulated without" passing through said jacket, said circuit including a standpipe arranged outside of the jacket and connected at its lower end with the intake of the jacket for supplying liquid thereto, said stand ipe having inlet and outlet openings included in the circuit with the outlet openin at the height of the liquid level for the jac (et, and a condenser connected at its upper end with the steam space and at its lower end with the return side only of the circuit for supplying condensate thereto.
8. In an internal combustion engine vapor cooling system which is open continuously to the atmosphere and which operates at all times at atmos heric pressure, the combination with a cy inder jacket having a steam space above the same, of means providing a circuit whereby a cooling liquid may be continuously circulated without passing through the jacket, said circuit including a chamber connected with the intake of the jacket for supplying liquid thereto, said chamber having its outlet to the circuit at the height of the liquid level for the jacket in order to maintain such level by supplying liquid to the jacket from the circuit in direct proportion to the amounts going off as steam in the jacket, a condenser connected at its upper end with the steam space and at its lower end with the return side only of said circuit for supplying condensate thereto, and a pressurebalancing connection between the chamber and said steam space.
9. In a cooling system for internal combustion engines, the combination with a cylinder jacket, of means providing a circuit whereby a cooling liquid is circulated without passing through said jacket, means to maintain the cooling liquid at a predetermined level in the jacket, and a vent for said system, said vent being continuously open to the atmosphere whereby the system operates at all times at atmospheric pressure.
10. In an internal combustion engine vapor cooling system which is open continuously to the atmosphere and which operates at all times at atmos heric pressure, the combination with a cy inder jacket having a steam space above the same, of means providing a circuit whereby cooling liquids may be continuously circulated without passing through said jacket, said circuit including a chamber connected with the intake of the jacket for supplying liquids thereto, and a supply and reserve reservoir connected with said circuit for supplying liquids thereto, said chamber having its outlet for liquids connected with the reservoir and disposed at the height of the liquid level to be maintained in the jacket.
11. In an internal combustion engine vapor cooling system which is open continuously to the atmosphere and which operates at all times at atmos heric pressure, the combination with a cylinder jacket having a steam space above the same, of means providing a circuit whereby cooling liquids may becontinuouslv circulated without passing through said jacket, said circuit including a chamber connected with the intake of the jacket for supplying liquids thereto, a supply and reserve reservoir connected with the circuit for supplying li uids thereto, and a condenser connected wiai said steam space and the return side, respectively, of the circuit for supplying condensate thereto, said chamber having itsoutlet for liquids connected with the reservoir and disposed at'the' height of the liquid level to in the jacket.
12. In an internal combustion engine vapor cooling system which is open continuously to the atmosphere and operating at all he. maintained times at atmospheric pressure, the combi-* liquid without passing through said jacket,
and means for so controlling the admission of liquid from said circuit to the jacket as to maintain the cooling at a predetermined level.
In testimony whereofl afiix my signature this Qndday of Au t, 1926.
' L STER P. BARLOW.
liquid in the jacket
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Cited By (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2586562A (en) * 1950-06-08 1952-02-19 Waukesha Motor Co Evaporative cooling system for internal-combustion engines
EP0207354A2 (en) * 1985-07-05 1987-01-07 Nissan Motor Co., Ltd. Method and system for cooling automotive engines

Cited By (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2586562A (en) * 1950-06-08 1952-02-19 Waukesha Motor Co Evaporative cooling system for internal-combustion engines
EP0207354A2 (en) * 1985-07-05 1987-01-07 Nissan Motor Co., Ltd. Method and system for cooling automotive engines
EP0207354A3 (en) * 1985-07-05 1988-03-16 Nissan Motor Co., Ltd. Cooling system for automotive engine or the like

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