US1537564A - Gyratory cone crusher - Google Patents

Gyratory cone crusher Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US1537564A
US1537564A US4377A US437725A US1537564A US 1537564 A US1537564 A US 1537564A US 4377 A US4377 A US 4377A US 437725 A US437725 A US 437725A US 1537564 A US1537564 A US 1537564A
Authority
US
United States
Prior art keywords
cone
crushing
concave
feed
crusher
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Expired - Lifetime
Application number
US4377A
Inventor
Edgar B Symons
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
SYMONS BROTHERS CO
Original Assignee
SYMONS BROTHERS CO
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Application filed by SYMONS BROTHERS CO filed Critical SYMONS BROTHERS CO
Priority to US4377A priority Critical patent/US1537564A/en
Application granted granted Critical
Publication of US1537564A publication Critical patent/US1537564A/en
Anticipated expiration legal-status Critical
Expired - Lifetime legal-status Critical Current

Links

Images

Classifications

    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B02CRUSHING, PULVERISING, OR DISINTEGRATING; PREPARATORY TREATMENT OF GRAIN FOR MILLING
    • B02CCRUSHING, PULVERISING, OR DISINTEGRATING IN GENERAL; MILLING GRAIN
    • B02C2/00Crushing or disintegrating by gyratory or cone crushers
    • B02C2/02Crushing or disintegrating by gyratory or cone crushers eccentrically moved
    • B02C2/04Crushing or disintegrating by gyratory or cone crushers eccentrically moved with vertical axis
    • B02C2/045Crushing or disintegrating by gyratory or cone crushers eccentrically moved with vertical axis and with bowl adjusting or controlling mechanisms

Description

May 12, 1925.
E. B. sYMoNs GYRATORY GONE CRUSHER original Filed sept. 14, 1923 3 Sheets-Sheet A2 May 12,1925.- v 1,537,564
E. B. SYMONS GYRATORY GONE CRUSHER original Filed sept.: 14, '1925 3 sneefsgsheef 5 I(D O- A y. 4:(5 Q 'lq "i *Si x @el \|O z/ is n w M RQ g R, l kw b m Patented May 12, 1925. f
UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE.
EDGAR B. S'YMONS, 0F LOS ANG-Imm, CALIFORNIA, ASSIGNOR TO S'YMONS BROTHERS COMPANY, OF MILWAUKEE, WISCONSIN, A CORPORATION F SOUTH DAKOTA..
GYRATORY conn cansan-1R.
ContinuationA of applications Serial No. 662,636, and Serial No. 662,638, filed September 14, 1923.'. This application led January To 'all whom it may concern.' Be it known that I, EDGAR B Simons, a citizen of the United States, residing at Los Angeles, in the county of Los Angeles and- State of California, have invented a certain Y new and useful Improvement in Gyratory Cone Crushers,- of which the following is a specification. I My invention relates to improvements 1n 0 gyratory cone crushing machines and has for one object to provide a Crusher through which material may be fed and allowed to flow under the influence of gravity by passing or dropping through the crushing zone l5 in a series of step by step movements and by gradually being reduced as it passes downwardly through the zone and wherein there is a minimum o-f interference with the descent of the material between the crushing stages. y
Another object is to provide a new and improved type of gyratory crusher adapted for fine crushing and .wherein convenient means are provided for adjusting the space between the two conical crushing surfaces.
Another obj ect of my inventionis to minimize the pressure on the bearings. Another object of my invention is to provide a crusher adapted to produce a maximum disintegration and spread of the material being crushed after each crushing impact.
Another objectv of my invention is to provide a simple oiling system and to prevent the entry of dust, water, or'other foreign materials into the bearings and to prevent leakage of the oil.
Another object is to provide a feed limit-` ing means, illustrated for' example in the present application as a feed plate or platform upon which the material to be crushed can be discharged, and whence it is discharged, in la controlled stream, into the crushing zone delimited by cone and con-- cave.
. Another object is to provide Imeans for regulating the flow of material to and from such plate.
Other objects will a pear from time` to time in the course of the specification and claims.
The present application is a continuation of the prior applications 662,636, 4and 662,638 led on September 14, 1923.
24, 1925. Serial No. 4,377.
My invention is illustrated more or less diagrammatically in the accompanying drawings wherein- Figure 1 is a plan view;
Figure 2 is a section along the line 2-2 of Figure l;
Figure 3 is va section on an enlarged scale, along the line 2-2 of lFigure l, showing the upper portion of the crusher;
Figure 4 is a detail part section, similar to Figure 2, showing a modified form; and
Figure 5 is a diagrammatic view of the crushing operation.
Like parts are illustrated by like characters throughout. A is a bed, upon which rests frame A1 outwardly flanged at A2 for stiffness, and provided at its topwith a reinforcing flange A3. A4 A4 are radial arms extending inwardly. from the flange A1 to support a rigid bearing sleeve A5. One side of this bearing sleeve carries a gear case Aa from which projects` laterally the horizontal sleeve A" projecting from the frame. The sleeve A5 terminates .in a gear case A which is formed by a flange A8 projecting outwardly from the body of the sleeve A5, and closed by the bearing cap A9, there being an oil tight packing A1"v between this cap and the top of the sleeve A5. The sleeve A5 is provided with a. tightly fitted lining A11.
B is an eccentric sleeve mounted for rotation in the bearing and having an outer babbitted bearin A12. It is flanged at B2 and has an annu ar ball bea-ring B1 resting on the flanged upper end of the lining A11 to support the downward thrust caused by the weight of the eccentric and its associated parts. B3 is a ring gear bolted or riveted to the underside of the flange B2 surrounding-the upper end of the bearing A and lo# cated within the gear case A16. Bi is a bevel pinion in mesh with the gear B3, mounted on the drive shaft B5 which shaft rotates in a bearing B6 carried by the two art split adjustable bearing support B7, w ich support is outwardly tapered and feathered in the sleeve A7. The two parts of the bearing support are adapted to be forced inwardly toadjust the bearing by means of feed vscrews B8 in the cap B9 which cap is bolted in place to close the open end of the sleeve A?. B1o is a belt pulley, keyed to the shaft B5. i
The bearing cap A has at its upper side a spherical bearing surface which supports a segmental ball member C1 having a Babbitt facing C2 to engage thespherical bearing surface. C3 is the crushing head or cone mounted on and integral with the segmental ball above referred to. It has a skirt C* extending downwardly below the ball bearing and is provided immediately below the bearing covered by the skirt with a lia-nge C5, having a spherical surface concentric with the ball bearing engaging an oil packing ring C6 in a spherical surface on the cap A2 which surface is also concentric with the ball bearing. C7 is a shaft mounted in the cone, tapered and locked by the compression ring C2 and the nuts C2.4
This shaft extends down through the cap A9 making a close fit with the Babbitt surface C1 on the inside of the eccentric sleeve B, so that when the sleeve is rotated the shaft will be gyrated and cause the cone to gyrate on its spherical bearing.
D is an inclined mantle, of manganese steel or other suitable material, carried on the cone, and supported for example by the packing D1 of zinc or other suitable mate-- rial. D2 is a conic plug adapted to engage the upper portion of thev mantle D to hold it 1n place, the abutting surfaces being substantially perpendicular to the surface of the cone. The plug is held in position for example by the nut D3. I have shown it as slightly conical, though the character and angle of its surface will depend on the material to be fed and the f laterally rate of gyration of the cone, and its rela tion to the center of gyration of the cone. Under some circumstances it may be flat or even concave, and under others it may be more inclined than herein shown. The plate is mounted on a supporting cap D5 which in turn may be bolted to a lug or stub D2 projecting upwardly from the. top of the shaft C7, and having an apron D8 adapted to enclose and protect the top of thenut D3 and prevent the exposure of the threads on the upper end of the shaft.
E is a conical spider having a cylindrical flange E1 adapted to penetrate and be vertically adjustable in the frame A1. It is provided with reinforcing ribs E2 and three extending lugs E2. bolts E4 are screw threaded in bosses E5 on the ring A1, and pass through the lugs E3. The lugs E3 are counter sunk at E6 and supporting nuts E7 and locking nuts E2 have conical surfaces ,to engage these countersinks so that when the nuts E2 have been slacked olfl the nuts E7 may be rotated to raise or lower the spider and adjust it to- Ward and from the crushing head or cone. E2 is a concave mantle carried by the spider E provided with a zinc or other suitable D4 is a feed plate.`
Adjusting lower edge of the concave are engaged Vby holding bolts E12 which pass upwardly through the flange E1 and are held 1n place to support the mantle by the nuts E11. The spider is outwardly flared above the cone to -provide a funnel or hopper to guide the materounding and slidably engaging the apron,
E25 to provide a substantially tight closure about the upper end of the Crusher. E27 is a feed chute mounted on the frame E21 by means of the brackets E28. It has a cylindrical outward extension E29 extending into.
the space surrounded by the apron E25, and an upper lateral extension E20 adapted to communicate with a supply pipe, hopper, oichute E31, whereby material may be fed to the machine.
F is a pump housing closing the lower end of the sleeve A5. F1 is a gear pump carried thereby and mounted on a shaft F2. F3 is a crank disk rigidly attached to the gear pump and having an aperture adapted to be engaged by a crank pin F4 which is thrust downwardly toward the disk by means of a spring F15. In arranging this part of the apparatus the plug F16 is screw threaded into a hole in the end of the eccentric and a collar on the crank pin F4 rests against this plug to prevent the spring F15 from throwing the plug out too far. The relative position of plug and collar is such that the crank pin can go down far enough to engage the hole in the crank disk. Taking the `position shown in Figure 2, when the cra-nk disk is put in place, the crank pin rides on the disk compressingthe spring. As soon as the apparatus starts up the eccentric rotates until the crank pin is in line with the hole in the disk, when the spring forces the pin into the hole and from then on the crank pin is in the hole in the crank disk. F5 is an oil pipe extending from a point above the bottom of the chamber F6 socket bearingl whence it drains intothe j conduit F18 into the gear chamber, and thus packing E10. Lugs E11 projecting from theback to the oil well. Some of this oil will be passed through the conduit l?n to lubricate the bearing B. g I"zo is an oil ductextending, as shown injFi re 2, from the oil conduit F8 to the cham er beneath the eccentric and the main crusher shaft in which is located the crank disk F3. Oil passes through this duct F2 to fill this chamber and in response to the action of the pump F1. Since the cross sectional area of passage F is very materiallysmaller than the cross sectional area of t e conduit F8, this receives a relatively small proportion of the delivery of the pump, but suiiicient to maintain the feed chamber full of oil and to force oil upwardly between the main crusher shaft and the eccentric B and between 'fm ^#centric B and the sleeveor bearing A11. The oil which thus passes upwardl about the crusher shaft and eccentric finds its way either over the top of the eccentric or out through the ball earings B1 and finally fiows back to the oil chamber F".
- There is thus a complete circulation of oil and associated with lock nuts through all of the bearin s and the Aoil chamber being completely c osed andthere being no rotating packing employed lubrication troubles will be reduced to a minimum.
While the flange E1 carries the spider E it makes a close fit in theframe Aa and is more or less held against rotation by the adjust- Still the crushing action is likely to cause creeping with respect tothe frame as the radius along the lcrushing pressure is applied sweeps round and round-duringthe gyration of the cone. In order to.
prevent this creeping and resultant locking, jamming or breaking of the adjusting screws the upper portion of the frame is split at G and rovided with horizontally disposed lugs 1, G2, G", G4, are al tightening or locking bolt and nut passing throu h these lu G4., by whic once the concave has been properly adjusted for height, the frame may be clamped snugly on the spider to hold the parts against the creeping or displacement. The key I is also inserted in key ways cut in the frame and spider to assist in holding against creeping. H is a bearing bed carrying abracket H1 and bearing H2. H3 is a stop collar on the shaft BIs to hold the shaft against lateral displacement so as to maintain the pinion B* with respect tothe gear B3 in proper meshing relation. The eccentric B carries, secured to its upper flange B2, a removable counterweight L, which in Figure 4 is shown 'as B3 bolted tothe gear and adapted to rotate within the gear liousin A16. It is necessary to provide this remova le gear and counterweight because the same gear is used for eccentrics having varying throws and whena customer orders a machine having'any4 particular throw eccentric, it is necessary to cast the eccentric the with'the special throw and to bolt with it the standardear with a counterweight of vsuitable size, t us making it unnecessary to carry in stock various ty es of gears in order to permit the use of dierent eccentricities. 1 The operation of my invention is -as folows:
Whereas I have illustrated and described a practical and operative Crusher, it will be realized that I may make many changes in size, number, shape, disposition and location of parts without departing from the spirit of myrinvention and that I wish-my disclosure to be taken as in a broad sense illustrative, rather than as limiting me to my specific' device herein shown.
When the machine is -set up as shown in the drawings and the drive shaft is rotated, it rotates the eccentric' sleeve and thereby causes the eccentric shaft tol gyrate or wabble. The eccentric .sha-ft in turn gyrates the conic crushing head which rocks or gyrates on its large spherical bearing. The head, in response to the movement of the eccentric lsleeve and the eccentric shaft, gyrates about a point adjacent the apex ofd the cone, this central point being determined by the curvaation due to gravity, the rate and length of gyration of the cone, the angle of the cone, and the size of the particle.
lSince the concave overhangs the cone, this dropping action of the material away from the surface of the concave is obtained, by
withdrawing the cone with sufcient rapidity from' the concave. After each crushing impact I move the head through an excursion of such length and gyrate it at such a rate that the cone recedes from the concave faster than the material can drop. Since the cone is withdrawn fromvbeneath the material which has just been crushed, thegparti'- cles will fall vertically downwardly from the concave until `they again strike the cone, and
they will then be deflected by the inclination of thel cone and will slide downwardly and outwardly along the cone. Meanwhile, the cone returns again toward the concave, carrying with it the particles which have dropped upon the cone and which lare sliding down its surface. When the cone reaches a p'oint at which the distance between its surface andthe concave is equal to the diameter of the particles sliding down the con- Cil particles ceases and they are again crushed. This alternate lateral' conveying, crushing, vertical drop and lateral conveyingy continues until the particles being crushed have escaped from the crushing zone and pass downwardly across the 'lower edge of thecone.
This action is diagrammatically shown in Figure 5 wherein s-h is the fixed surface of the concave, ze-j indicates the line of closest approach of cone to concave and e-Z the line of farthest recession of cone from concave. The line r-s represents the cross section of the material crushed at the first crushing impact., being the minimum distance between cone and concave at the point adjacent theito-p of the cone where the particle being crushed was caught between cone and concave and crushed. In other words, r-s is the first reduc-tion. and represents the size to which the material is reduced by the first crushing impact. As the cone is withdrawn from r-y' to a-l the material of the size /-s drops vertically away from the concave and is finally received by the cone,
striking it, for example at the point f and extending outwardly from the face of the cone to the point g. The motion of the particle until it strikes the cone is simply a vertical drop. When it is again in contact with the cone its mot-ion is a compound one, since it slides downwardly and outwardly along the inclined surface of the cone and is at the same time laterally1 conveyed by the cone towards the concave. It continues this motion until .it is carried so far laterally by the cone as again to contact the concave. Its position at this point is indicated in Figure 5 by the line /v-p which. is equal to /-'.s', since the particle has not been'reduced since its reduction at fn-8. But since the distance between the cone and concave at their nearest approach decreases from top to bottom of the cone, the distance o-p is greater than the minimum distance between cone and concave at that point, and the cone continues its lateral excursion, reducing the particle to the size o-p. It is again withdrawn and the particle, sized to o-p, drops vertically away from the concave, only to be caught again by the cone, slides therealong and is carried again laterally toward the concave for further reduction. The crushing sequence through which e-ach particle passes is therefore as follows:
An initial drop under the influence of gravity into the space between cone and conall cave; contact with the cone; a sliding downwardly along the cone during the lateral lmovement of the cone; a crushing impact terminating this lateral and sliding movement upon the cone; a vertical drop directly downwardly from the concave at the termination of `the crushing impact; a further slide along and lateral excursion with the cone; a further crushing impact terminating it, and so on until the reduction is,comF In order to obtain a positive sizingforyl the particles so crushed, I provide afzo'ne of.,
pleted.
parallelism about the bottom ofthe cone and concave, in which the opposed walls of the crushing element are parallel. The length of the zone of parallelism is governed bytwo main factors; first, the speed imparted to the material 'by gravity. gravity being a constant force, and second. the interval of time between the crushing impacts, during which the material is permitted to drop as it is released by the increasing distance between the opposed cone and concave, and during which it slides along the cone prior to the crushing nip. The interval of time is governed by the speed of operation of the machine. The length of the zone of parallelism must be such that all the material passing therethrough will remain in thev zone so long as to be caught at least once by the cone and the concave at the moment of their closest approach. v The maximum distance between concave and cone is Jfiar greater than the ultimate size of the material crushed. This must be so, since in fine reduction crushing I may reduce ma-` This last crushing impact reduces' since as thc particles drop from the concave and are received; upon the cone, they spread out upon the surface of the cone and slide or roll freely downwardly thereupon. Thus when thev material is crushed the particles arenot superposed upon each other or compacted, but are freely spread, and the larger particles project farther from the surface of the cone than the smaller and are crushed first. Particles which have, ,for any reason, been crushed at the preceding crushing impact to a size less than the minimum distance between cone andconcave at the next impact, are not crushed at all thereby.
The total throw of the head is divided into a lateral v.conveying excursion and a crushing excursion. The actual crushing excursion is substantially smaller than the lateral conveying excursion. Furthermore, its length in relationto the conveying excursion decreases progressively from top cessively reduced, and, as-in the form of crusher herein shown, the 'movement of the crushing surface increases. Thus in fine crushing, relatively large fragments of material are progressively reduced, and, as they pass downwardly between cone and concave, at each conveying excursion the point at which .they come in contact with theconcave is nearer and nearer the termination of the throw of the hea-d. The throw of the head at the bottom of the cone may exceed two and one-half inches, whereas when the Crusher is set to crush one-quarterof an inch or less, the actual final crushing excursion may itself be Inot over one-quarter of an inch in length. lSince the headitself gyrates about a point adjacent the .top of the cone, and since the cone gyrates upon a spherical bearing surface, the total throw of the head itself increases progressively l from top to bottom of the cone.v
ln the use of my Crusher it is necessary that the space between cone and concave be sparsely filled with material undergoing crushing` in order that there may be space for the material freely to drop. and in order that compacting of the material and filling of the crushing space may be avoided, l therefore find it advantageous to control and limit the feed of material to the crushing zone. As an example of means for controlling the feed for a crusher of the type l have herein illustrated, l have illustrated a feed spout and a feedcplate, the feed plate being positioned above the cone and gyrating with it, the feed spout being centrally aligned with the plate and cone, and being vertically adjustable in relation thereto.
ln operation the feed spout is constantly filled with material and delivers a column of material which rests upon the plate D4. The progress of the column is arrested by the plate, which thus positively governs the feed to the crusher. The material will be drawn from the bottom of the column and fed through the space below the feed plate and into the crushing zone, at a rate depending upon the inclination of the surface of the feed plate, and the rat-e of gyration of the crushing head, both of which are normally fixed, and the distance between the feed platev and the spout or chute, which can be adjusted by the operator. The inclination of the plate is preferably but not necessarily such that the high side of the plate is horizontal.
As the feed plate4 is gyrated and laterally displaced about its center, it will retain its general perpendicularity to the axis of the crushing shaft, and it therefore will be progressively tilted. This will result ,in feeding from about the periphery of the feeding plate a relatively thin stream Vof material which will be fed or dropped down through the open'space beneath the plate to ing zone, and will flow downwardly and in wardly therefrom until it strikes the crushing head. It will then be carried by the head against the concave for the first crushing impact.
`Whereas the feeding means shown herein is perfectly practical, nevertheless T might control my feed by other mechanical means. Whatever the means be used, however, it is important that the feed be adjustable, and that it be constant when adjusted. While underfeeding will not normally affect the operation of my process,save asv it reduces the volume crush, overfeeding must be prevented. l may adjust my feed to allow for variations in size of the crushed product, and variations in the material crushed.
In its broad outline the operation of the herein disclosed apparatus is asfollows: It feeds a controlled stream of material of restricted volume between two opposed crushing elements, vone of which is preferably but not necessarily vfixed and the other of which is preferably moved periodically toward and away from the first mentioned element. The crushing surface of one element, preferably the fixed element overhangs the surface of the moving element, the crushing surface being preferably inclinled above to each other and to the vertica y Material is fed by gravity into the crushing zonebetween the opposed crushingelements, the stream being controlled to pre, vent the filling of the crushing zone vand the packing of material therein, since it is essential for the proper operation of my crusher that the material may drop freely by gravity into and through the crushing zone, except so far as the course of the material being crushed is impeded or interrupted by the successive conveying excursions and crushing impacts of the moving element. The opposed crushing members are preferably, through not necessarily, provided with a zone of parallelism, through which the particles must pass before they can escape from the crushing zone.
Thus each particle as it passes through the crushing zone of my Crusher moves or is operated upon in three differentwa'ys. Part of of the time it slides freely along an inclined surface, and part of the time it'is undergo` ing a reduction during actual crushing con.-
tact, ,Substantally all particles are at all los the time it drops by gravity, part times undisturbed, and relatively unaffected by the association-with other particles, in that they are either dropping freely under the inuence of gravity, or are able to sort themselves freely as they drop upon and are scattered upon the surface of the moving crushing element, and finally are crushed only so far, in the main, as each individual particle is itself in contact with both of the opposed crushing surfaces.
I claim:
l. In a gyratory crusher, a crushing cone of a higher angle than the angle of repose of the material delivered thereto, a downwardly .and outwardly inclined concave overhanging said cone, the crushing space .between said cone and concave having a cross section materially greater than that ofv the stream of material -passing therethrough, and meansl for withdrawing the cone from the concave, after each crushing impact, at such high speed as' to leave the material unsupported, so that it may drop freelyA by gravity away from the concave upon a lower portion of the cone.
2. In a gyratory crusher, a crushing cone having a higher angle than the angle of repose of the material delivered thereto, a downwardly and outwardly inclined concave overhanging said cone, the crushing space between said'cone and concave having `clined concave overhanging the cone, the
;e'crushing space between said cone and concave having a cross section materially greater than that of the stream ofmaterial passing therethrough, and means for withdrawing the cone from the concave, after each crushing impact, along a path substan- -tially at right angle to the crushing facey of the cone, ,at such high speed as to leave the material unsupported, after the termination of the crushing impact, and to cause it to i drop freely by gravity away from the concave upon a lower portion of the cone.
4. In a gyratory crusher, a crushlngcone .of higher anglethan the angle of repose, a downwardly and outwardly inclined concave overhanging said cone, the crushing space between said cone and concave having a cross section materiallyr greater than that of the stream of material passing therethrough, and means for moving said cone zone defined by opposed cone and concave a stream of material of substantially less thickness than the maximum distance between the cone and concave.
6. In a gyratory crusher, a crushing cone, a downwardly and outwardly inclined concave overhanging the cone, material feeding means `adapted to deliver to the crushing zone defined by opposed cone and concave a stream of material of substantially less thickness than the maximum distance between the cone and concave, and means for retracting the cone from the through a stroke more than twice as'lo'ng as concavel the diameter of the maximum size of piece discharged.
7. In a gyratory crusher, a crushing cone, a downwardly and outwardly inclined concave overhanging said cne, means for delivering material to the upper opening of the crushing cavity delimited by the opposed cone and concave, and means for maintaining the material so fed, as it passes through said crushing cavity, in a layer of substantially less thickness, throughout the crushing cavity, than the maximum separation between the opposed crushing elements at any point therein.
8. In a gyratory crusher, a'crushing cone, a downwardly and outwardly inclined concave overhanging said cone, means for gyrating said cone, mea-ns for delivering material to the crushing cavity delimited'by the opposed cone and concave, means for maintaining the material so fed,'as it passes through said crushing cavity, in a stream substantially less in cross section than the cross section of the crushing cavity at any point therealong, and for successively freely scattering the material on the cone as it passes from top to bottom of the crushing cavity.
' 9. In a gyratory crusher, a crushing cone, a downwardly and outwardly inclined concave overhanging the cone, means for delivering material to the crushing cavity delimited by the opposed cone and 'concaye progressively about the periphery of said concave, and means for maintaining the material so fed, as .it passes through said crushing cavity, in a stream substantially less 1n cross `section'than the'cross section of the crushing cavity at any point therealong.4
10. A crushing machine consisting of two crushing members one fixed and the other moving, in which the total stroke of the moving member substantially exceeds its actual crushingexcursion, adjustable means Ior limiting the delivery of material between said crushing members, and means ,for varying the amount of reduction made at anyone stroke of the mcving member in relation to the total length ofth'estrokc.
1l. A crushing machine having a pair of relatively movable' crushing elements, and
means for feeding into the crushing zone defined thereby, a stream of material of a cross section materially less than that of the crushing zone the maximum distance between the elements at their greatest recession being substantially greater than the maximum diameter of the particles of the product discharged therethrough. j
12. In a crushing machine, affram'e having a cylindrical bearing surface, a crushing spider engaging such bearing surface, a concave carried thereby and means for raising and lowering the spider along such bearing surface in the frame, comprising a plurality of fixed screws upwardly projecting from the frame, lugs on the spider loosely engaging the screws, and adjusting and supporting nuts for said lugs screw threaded on the screw and located above and below said lugs to lock the parts in position.
13. In a gyratory crusher, a crushing. member, a shaft therefor. an eccentric apertured to receive the shaft, and adapted to tilt and gyrate it, a driving gear removably mounted on the ececntric and means for driving it, and a counterweight removably mounted on the driving gear. y
14. A feed control for crushing machines and the like, comprising a horizontally disposed gyratory feed plate adapted to feed material from its periphery to the crushing zone of the machine, and a chute adjustable toward and from the center of the upper surface thereof.
15. The combination with a Crusher having a gyratory crushing member of a horizontally disposed feed plate .mounted thereon and thereabove for movement therewith and a feed chute adjustable toward and from the `central portion of the upper surface thereof.
16. The combination with a crusher having a gyratory crushing member of a horizontally disposed feed plate mounted thereon and thereabove for movement therewith and a feed chuteadjustabletoward and from the central portion of, the 'upper surface` thereof, the` center .of gyration ofthe plate being located below the'working surface thereof.
` 17. The combination with la'chrusheru'lii'avingla gyratory crushing member supported on Afor movement therewith above' thev crush- VAing'zmne anda feed chute adjustable-'toward :and'from the central surface of the plate.
portion of the upper 18. In la gyratory .crusher,'a main frame, a crushing head carried thereby, a concave vertically adjustable' thereon, and fixed against rotation in relation thereto, a feed plate carried by the head, and a feed chute vertically adjustable with respect to the plate independently ofthe adjustment of the concave.
19. In a gjyratory crusher, a main frame, a spider vertically adjustable therein, studs projecting upwardly therefrom, nuts associated therewith to support and position the spider therein, a feed chute adjustably mounted on said studs above the frame and independent of the adjustment of the spider.
20. In a gyratory cone, a crusher, a hopper, a frame, adjustable above the hopper comprising an open topped annular housing element and outwardly and downwardly eX- tending arms, a chute carried by the frame, and means associated with the crushing hopper for adjustably supporting the frame.
21. In a crushing machine, a concave and head, a. feed plate above them, a chute discharging against the central portion of the feed plate, an adjustable supportl for the chute, a closure interposed between ,the support and vthe concave adapted sto close the space between them, and independent of any change in the -position of the support.
22. In a crushing machine having a crushing concave open at the top, a feed chute discharging vinto the concave, means interposed between the chute and the concave for limiting the flow of material and/a housing, surrounding the discharge end of the cinte and the limiting means and positioned above the crushing concave, the discharge end' of l jecting `from theconcave adjacent the apron.
24. ,The `combination, with a gyratory Crusher. havin an annular intake openin of means for eeding material to be crushe in a thin c lindrical stream into said intake opening-1; roughout its entire periphery, said means comprising a feed plate supported above theintake opening, a chute adjustable'toward and from the plate, and means for supplying material, through the chute against'the surface of thefplate and for directing the material thus sup lied outwardly away from the center o `the plate and discharging it downwardly from the plate.
25. In a gyratory Crusher having a cone and means for gyrating it, and a concave, the combination with thel cone of a gyrating feed plate positioned substantially above the crushing surface of the cone, and substantially co-axiaI with the cone, and adapted to gyrate in unison therewith.
26. The combination with a crushing machine comprising a fixed crushing concave and a gyrator crushing cone and means for gyrating it, o feeding n eans adapted to 'deliver material tothe cavity delimited by the cone and concave and a feed limiting element interposed between the feeding means and the cone and adapted to move in unison with said cone.
27. In a crushing machine having an open topped crushing concave and a gyratory cone, and means for gyrating it, a feed spout, a gyratory feed controlling plate interposed between the spout and the cone, the diameter of the plate approximating the diameter of the bottom of the cone of material defined by the angle of repose of the material discharged from the spout, and means for imparting to the plate horizontal movement in relation to said spout.
28. In a ,gyratory Crusher, a'crushing cone,
a downwardly and outwardly inclined con` cave overhanging the cone, material feeding means adapted to deliver to the crushing zone defined by opposedicone and concave a stream ofy material of substantially less thickness than the maximum distance between the cone and concave, the distance between cone an'd concave diminishing progressively from top to bottom, the opposed surfaces being equi-distant about their lower edgesfor a substantial distance upwardly therefrom.
29. A crushing machine having a pair of relatively movable crushing elements, and means for feeding into the crushing zone defined thereby a stream of material of a cross section materially less than that of the crushing zone, the maximum distance between the crushing elements at their greatest recession being substantially greater than the maximum diameter of the particles of the product discharged therethrough, thedistance between the opposed members diminishing from top to bottom thereof, the
opposed members being equi-distant along their lower edges for a substantial distance upwardly therefrom.
Signed at Los Angeles, county of Los An'- geles and State of California, this 15 day -of January, 1925.
f EDGAR B. SYMONS.
US4377A 1925-01-24 1925-01-24 Gyratory cone crusher Expired - Lifetime US1537564A (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US4377A US1537564A (en) 1925-01-24 1925-01-24 Gyratory cone crusher

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US4377A US1537564A (en) 1925-01-24 1925-01-24 Gyratory cone crusher

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US1537564A true US1537564A (en) 1925-05-12

Family

ID=21710500

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US4377A Expired - Lifetime US1537564A (en) 1925-01-24 1925-01-24 Gyratory cone crusher

Country Status (1)

Country Link
US (1) US1537564A (en)

Cited By (6)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2509920A (en) * 1947-08-04 1950-05-30 Nordberg Manufacturing Co Feeding device for gyratory crushers
US2590795A (en) * 1947-06-17 1952-03-25 Smith Engineering Works Gyratory crusher
US2670142A (en) * 1947-08-04 1954-02-23 Nordberg Manufacturing Co Attrition mill
US2770423A (en) * 1952-10-28 1956-11-13 Nordberg Manufacturing Co Bowl liner for gyratory crushers
WO2011044313A1 (en) 2009-10-09 2011-04-14 Flsmidth A/S Crusher device
RU186303U1 (en) * 2018-02-27 2019-01-15 Александр Ревазович Меребашвили Cone Eccentric Crusher

Cited By (8)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2590795A (en) * 1947-06-17 1952-03-25 Smith Engineering Works Gyratory crusher
US2509920A (en) * 1947-08-04 1950-05-30 Nordberg Manufacturing Co Feeding device for gyratory crushers
US2670142A (en) * 1947-08-04 1954-02-23 Nordberg Manufacturing Co Attrition mill
US2770423A (en) * 1952-10-28 1956-11-13 Nordberg Manufacturing Co Bowl liner for gyratory crushers
WO2011044313A1 (en) 2009-10-09 2011-04-14 Flsmidth A/S Crusher device
US20110084156A1 (en) * 2009-10-09 2011-04-14 Flsmidth Excel Llc Crusher device
US8215576B2 (en) 2009-10-09 2012-07-10 Flsmidth A/S Crusher device
RU186303U1 (en) * 2018-02-27 2019-01-15 Александр Ревазович Меребашвили Cone Eccentric Crusher

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US2509920A (en) Feeding device for gyratory crushers
US1537564A (en) Gyratory cone crusher
US3212720A (en) Centrifugal feed unit for crusher and method
US3446444A (en) Rotary crusher feeding aid
US1553202A (en) Crushing head
US2635818A (en) Gyratory crusher and liner and mantle therefor
US2540358A (en) Gyratory ball mill having a gyrated chamber with a peripheral discharge
US3358939A (en) Feeder for cone crushers and the like
US2206145A (en) Air flow choke for bowl mills
US3614023A (en) Gyratory crusher
US2148682A (en) Crusher
US2621860A (en) Feed plate for gyratory crushers
US5799885A (en) High reduction ratio crushing in conical/gyratory crushers
US2310737A (en) Shaftless cone crusher and tilting member therefor
US1592313A (en) Gyratory cone crusher
US2500908A (en) Gyratory impact ball mill and grinding method
US2296280A (en) Means of feeding gyratory crushers
US3506203A (en) Feed distributor for crusher
US1761240A (en) Feeding device for crushers and the like
US3533568A (en) Gyratory crusher
US2020464A (en) Feed device for a cone crusher
US1145629A (en) Stone crusher and pulverizer.
US2296281A (en) Method for feeding gyratory crushers
USRE19154E (en) Process of crushing hard materials
US2433872A (en) Gyratory impact ball mill