US1505850A - Valve mechanism for wells - Google Patents

Valve mechanism for wells Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US1505850A
US1505850A US620110A US62011023A US1505850A US 1505850 A US1505850 A US 1505850A US 620110 A US620110 A US 620110A US 62011023 A US62011023 A US 62011023A US 1505850 A US1505850 A US 1505850A
Authority
US
United States
Prior art keywords
valve
pressure
nozzle
wash pipe
wells
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Expired - Lifetime
Application number
US620110A
Inventor
Charles H Benckenstein
Original Assignee
Charles H Benckenstein
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Application filed by Charles H Benckenstein filed Critical Charles H Benckenstein
Priority to US620110A priority Critical patent/US1505850A/en
Application granted granted Critical
Publication of US1505850A publication Critical patent/US1505850A/en
Anticipated expiration legal-status Critical
Expired - Lifetime legal-status Critical Current

Links

Images

Classifications

    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E21EARTH DRILLING; MINING
    • E21BEARTH DRILLING, e.g. DEEP DRILLING; OBTAINING OIL, GAS, WATER, SOLUBLE OR MELTABLE MATERIALS OR A SLURRY OF MINERALS FROM WELLS
    • E21B34/00Valve arrangements for boreholes or wells
    • E21B34/06Valve arrangements for boreholes or wells in wells

Description

Patented Aug. 19, 1924.
UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE.
VALVE MECHANISM FOR WELLS.
Application led February 19, 1923. Serial No. 620,110.
To all whom it may concem:
Be it known that I, CHARLES H. BENCK- ENs'rEIN, a citizen of the United States, and a resident of Vinton, in the parish of Calcasieu and State of Louisiana, have invented certain new and useful improvements in Valve Mechanisms for Wells, of which the following is a full, clear, and exact description.
The invention relates to valve mechanisms for wells, and one of the objects of the invention is to provide a valve ,mechanism which will greatly facilitate the setting and washing of wells.
Another object of the invention is to provide a valve mechanism of this character which will eliminate the necessity for equalizing the pressure above and below the back pressure valve, as is necessary in the use of back pressure valves previously known.
A further advantage of the invention resides in the provision of a valve so constructed that it is impossible for it to be rendered inoperative by reason of encountering mud, sand, rocks, dbris, etc., as commonly happens in the previous practice.
Another advantage ofthe invention resides in the provision of a valve so constructed that it is impossible for sand or other matter to become lodged between the .valve and its seat, thereby preventing the proper seating of the valve.
Still another object of the invention is to provide a valve mechanism whichv may be employed to aid in pulling the screen.
v ln order that the advantages of the present invention may be more clearly understood, I will first briefly describe a few of the diiiculties that are often encountered inI the setting and washing of wells with the back pressure valves now in common use.
ln setting a well, with the old standard back pressure valve in use, it is necessary as the screen and liner are lowered intothe well a few hundred feet, to ll the screen and liner with heavy mud, in order that the pressure exerted by the mud in the hole will not force out the back pressure valve. In other words, the pressure against the back pressure valve must be equalized, in order that it will not be forced .out by coming into contact with or passing through the mud in the hole. This must be done not only after the screen and liner have been lowered into the hole a few hundred feet, but also at about every hundred feet, in order to keep the pressure substantially equalized at all times.
Another disadvantage resulting from the use of the old standard back pressure valve is that when the screen and liner have been lowered to within a few feet of the bottom of the well trouble is often encountered by reason of the mud, rocks, sand, and other residue that'may lay in the bottom of the hole, and force their way up through the nipple and against the back pressure valve, preventing its voperation entirely.
Another diiiiculty often encountered in the use of the old standard back pressure valveis that sand or other gritty substance lodges between the valve and the valve seat, thereby preventing the proper seating of the valve.
Furthermore, it is often necessary to pull the screen that has been set in the well; and this frequently becomes impossible, due to the packing of the mud, sand, etc., about the screen. Obviously, if it were possible to pump water or oil around the outside of the screen, the pressure on the screen would be relieved and it could be pulled; but it is impossible to do this with 'the old standard back pressure valve rendered inoperative from any one of numerous causes, a few of which have been outlined above.
The purpose of the present invention is to provide a valve mechanism which will overcome all of the above mentioned diiiiculties, and others well known to those skilled in the art to which this invention appertains.
The invention will now be described in detail, reference being had to the accompanying drawings, in which: f
Figure 1 is a vertical sectional view of the Vlower portion of a well.
Figure 2 is a vertical sectional view of my improved valve mechanism, the back pressure valve being in open position; and
Figure 3 is a similar view through the apparatus, showing the back pressure valve in closed position, the wash pipe and nozzle being shown in elevation.
Referring to the drawings more in detail, numeral l indicates the lower end of the usual well casing. Numeral 2 indicates the valve casing, whlch is equivalent of the ordinary mud nipple, and which is attached at its upper end to the lower end of the screen 3; the screen being connected to the liner 4 which extends up into the casing in the usual manner.
The valve is referred to by numeral 5, and it is provided with a valve stem 6 slidably mounted in the valve stem guide 7. A member 8 is also mounted in the valve casing, and the upper side of this member is provided with a valve seat'9, while the lower side thereof is provided with a second valve seat 10. rllhe valve 5 is normally pressed upward against its seat 10 by means of a coil spring l1 mounted on the valve stem 6.
The usual wash pipe is indicated by numeral 12, and mounted on the lower end thereof is a nozzle 13 having apertures 14 for the passage of water or oil; and also provided with a tapering shoulder .15 which is adapted to engage the upper valve seat 9. The member 8 is provided with a centrally arranged passage 16 to permit the nozzle 13 to pass therethrough and engage the valve 5, for a purpose to appear heremafter.
In the operation of setting a well, with the apparatus disclosed herein, the liner, screen and wash pipe are run into the well in the usual manner, but the wash' pipe which carries the nozzle 13 is so positioned that the nozzle extends through the central bore of the member 8, engages the valve 5 and forces it'to open position, as clearly shown in Figure 2. It is thus apparent that as the parts are lowered into the well the baclepressure valve is open and the mud is free to pass through the opening 14 into the wash pipe, thus equalizing the pressure on the valve, and eliminating the necessity of filling the screen and liner with mud, as in the prior practice. In my construction the back pressure valve is maintained in open position by the nozzle of the wash pipe as the parts are lowered into the hole, thus permitting a thorough washing of the well. When the nozzle is in its operative position, as shownfin Fi ure 2, the inclined shoulder 15 of the nozz e engages the up er valve seat 9, thereby avoiding any loss o vpressure in washin the well due to water from the wash pipe acking up into the liner.
After the well has been washed the wash pipe is raised, as shown in Figure 3, whereupon the valve 5 automatically closes itself by means of the spring 11.
It is to be noted that my valve mechanism cannot be rendered inoperative by reason of encounterin mud, sand, stone, etc., at the bottom of t e well. For the valve is positively held open when the parts are lowered into the hole, and when the wash pipe is withdrawn the valve will merel move upwardly into the space previousy occupied by the nozzle of the wash pipe, and thus there is nothing to prevent the proper functioning of the valve.
It is also to be noted that the present mechanism presents a ready means for assisting in the pulling of screens. If with the present device the operator makes an unsuccessful test and wishes to pull his screen, he can lowerl the wash pipe and nozzle into the well, allowing the nozzle to set down on the valve and force it open, thus allowin water or oil to be forced down the well an out around the screen, thereby relieving it of 'pressure and permitting its withdrawal.
In accordance with the patent statutes, I have described what I now believe to be the best embodiment of the invention, but I do not wish to be understood thereby as limiting myself or the scope of the invention, as many chan es and modifications may be made without departing from the spirit of the invention; all such I aim to include in the scope of the appended claims.
What I claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent is:
1. In an apparatus for wells, a wash pipe, a back pressure valve, and means attached to said wash pipe for engaging and opening the back pressure valve.
2. In an apparatus for wells, a wash pi e, a back pressure valve, a nozzle carried by t e lower end of the wash pipe, said nozzle being -constructed and arranged to engage and open the back pressure valve.
3. In an apparatus for wells, a member provided with a bore, a wash pipe, a back pressure valve, a nozzle carried by thel wash pipe, said nozzle adapted to pass through saidv bore and engage the back pressure valve.
4. In an apparatus for wells, a member provided with a bore and a valvelseat, a. wash pipe, a back pressure' valve, a nozzle carried y the wash pipe, a shoulder on said nozzle for engaging the valve seat when the nozzle is in operative position, said nozzle adapted to engage and open the back pressure valve.
5. In an apparatus forwe1ls,a back pressure valve, a wash pipe, means attached to said wash pipe for engaging'and openin the back pressure valve, and means for gui in 'said opening means to the back pressure v ve.
6. In an apparatus for wells, a member provided with `a bore, and a valve seat on its ower side, a back pressure valve adapted to engage the valve seat, a wash ipe, said wash pipe adapted to pass throng the bore and o n the back pressure valve.
7.4 an apparatus for wells, a member having a bore, and a valve seat on its upper side, a back pressure valve, a wash pipe, and means carried by the wash pipe for engaging the l.valve seat and opening the' back pressure valve.
8. In an apparatus for wells, a member having a valve seat in the upper and lower sides thereof, a back pressure valve for en- News@ gaging the lower vaive sea, end means for engaging the upper valve sem and opening the Valve.
9. iin an apparatus for Weis, e member having e bore therein, e *Juive seat in the upper and lower sides of the member, a, back pressure valve adapted to engage the ower Veve seat, a Wash pipe, a, nozzle carrie by the wesh pipe, said nozzle aapaed to project hrough the bore and open the beck pressure M Valve, and a, shoulder carried by the Wash pipe for engaging the upper Valve seat.
CHARLES H. BENCKENSTEN.
US620110A 1923-02-19 1923-02-19 Valve mechanism for wells Expired - Lifetime US1505850A (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US620110A US1505850A (en) 1923-02-19 1923-02-19 Valve mechanism for wells

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US620110A US1505850A (en) 1923-02-19 1923-02-19 Valve mechanism for wells

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US1505850A true US1505850A (en) 1924-08-19

Family

ID=24484617

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US620110A Expired - Lifetime US1505850A (en) 1923-02-19 1923-02-19 Valve mechanism for wells

Country Status (1)

Country Link
US (1) US1505850A (en)

Cited By (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2761514A (en) * 1950-06-12 1956-09-04 Kobe Inc Apparatus for removing drilling mud from a well having a prepacked liner
US2768840A (en) * 1946-07-01 1956-10-30 Kobe Inc Tubing system for fluid operated pumps
US2804281A (en) * 1954-02-02 1957-08-27 Henry G Osburn Float valve
US3015227A (en) * 1957-12-06 1962-01-02 Standard Oil Co Union and gas chromatography column port

Cited By (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2768840A (en) * 1946-07-01 1956-10-30 Kobe Inc Tubing system for fluid operated pumps
US2761514A (en) * 1950-06-12 1956-09-04 Kobe Inc Apparatus for removing drilling mud from a well having a prepacked liner
US2804281A (en) * 1954-02-02 1957-08-27 Henry G Osburn Float valve
US3015227A (en) * 1957-12-06 1962-01-02 Standard Oil Co Union and gas chromatography column port

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US1871536A (en) Well drilling appliance
US2211846A (en) Valve
US3409078A (en) Self-fill and flow control safety valve
US1505850A (en) Valve mechanism for wells
US1612168A (en) Valve mechanism for wells
US2274093A (en) Apparatus for completing submarine wells
US1911323A (en) Apparatus for controlling oil wells
US2095899A (en) Bottom hole choke
US2647582A (en) Apparatus for cementing wells
US2214550A (en) Testing device for wells
US1512066A (en) Set shoe
US2213372A (en) Apparatus for producing oil from subsurface deposits
US2144842A (en) Bypass assembly for packers
US2211845A (en) Means for equipping wells under pressure
US2386593A (en) Activator for wells
US1867720A (en) Vent for core drills
US1790424A (en) Tool fob testing well formations
US1853474A (en) Device for controlling the flow of wells
US1899121A (en) Back pressure valve mechanism for well pipe
US2143196A (en) Perforation cleaner
US2629335A (en) Gas lift apparatus
US1956157A (en) Flow line
US1305914A (en) Washer fob well-scbreebts
US1546527A (en) Valve
US2237612A (en) Apparatus for washing perforations