US1414987A - And morris j - Google Patents

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US1414987A
US1414987A US1414987DA US1414987A US 1414987 A US1414987 A US 1414987A US 1414987D A US1414987D A US 1414987DA US 1414987 A US1414987 A US 1414987A
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intake
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    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F01MACHINES OR ENGINES IN GENERAL; ENGINE PLANTS IN GENERAL; STEAM ENGINES
    • F01LCYCLICALLY OPERATING VALVES FOR MACHINES OR ENGINES
    • F01L1/00Valve-gear or valve arrangements, e.g. lift-valve gear
    • F01L1/28Valve-gear or valve arrangements, e.g. lift-valve gear characterised by the provision of coaxial valves; characterised by the provision of valves co-operating with both intake and exhaust ports

Description

G. LOEFFLER AND M. J. COHEN.

HYDROCARBON ENGINE.

APPUCATION FILED JULY 21,1919.

1 ,414,987 Patented May 2, 1922. 7 z {4 1 swans-sum AT RNEY G. LOEFFLER AND M. J. COHEN.

HYDROCARBON ENGINE APPLICATION HLED JULY 21.1919.

1,414,987. Patented May 2, 1922.

5 SHEETS-SHEET 2. H; 5

INVENTOR I ATTORNEY.

G. LOEFFLER AND M. J. COHEN. HYDROCARBON ENGINE. APPLlCATlON men JULY 21.1919.

1,41 4,987. a nted May 2, 1922.

5 SHEETS-SHEET 3.

INVENTORS.

j w m .61....

(5. LOEFFLER AND M. J. COHEN.

Patented May 2, 1922.

HYDROCARBON ENGINE.

APPLICAHON HL-ED JULY 21.1919.

5 SHEETS-SHEET 4.

\ /ENTORS:

7:20 I I f r s /"fi G. LOEFFLER AND M. 1.. COHEN. HYDROCARBQN ENGINE.

APPLICATION FILED JULY 21.1919.

1,414,987. Patented y 2,1922.

5 SHEETS-SHEET 5.

I A5 iORNEY.

UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE.

GEORGE LOEFFLER, OF NEW YORK, AND MORRIS J COHEN, OF BROOKLYN, NEW YORK.

HYDROCARBON ENGINE.

Application filed July 21,

To all whom it may concern 1 Be itknown that we, Gnouon LOEFFLER and Morris J. COHEN, both citizens of the United States, residing, respectively, in the borough of Manhattan, city, county, and State of New York, and borough of Brooklyn, county of Kings, and State of New York, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in Hydrocarbon Engines, of which the following is a specification.

This invention has reference to internal combustion engines, and, particularly, relates to the type thereof adapted to road vehicles, aircraft and similar apparatus.

Among the objects of our invention may be noted the following: to reduce the size and weight of the engine as a whole, enabling it to occupy less space in the hood of an automobile, for instance, and impose less weight upon the vehicle, and giving more room in the latter for other mechanisms,- or auxiliary apparatus usually associated with the hydrocarbon engine for practical and commercial purposes; to provide a structure such that the units of the engine may be associated but kept apart or separated, so that all the units may be air cooled by the circulation of air around the cylinders or units within the casing; to enable the work cylinders to be arranged vertically on the chassis or support of the vehicle, thus giving to the units and the engine as a whole the advantage of vertically reciprocating pistons and connecting mechanisms, wherein the stroke of the pistons can be given without unnecessary loss of power and with a minimum of friction, thus obtaining a maximum of power with a minimum of fuel and friction; to provide a structure of hydrocarbon engine such that, with a plurality of work cylin-' ders, a single, horizontally arranged, offset crank-shaft can be used and a maximum of power transmitted thereto through the several piston-rods: to provide a construction such that extensive bearings for the crankshaft and connecting rods are provided between cylinder-units so as to give steadiness in operation of the shaft, eliminate vibration, secure quietude and give durability; to provide a valve mechanism for internal combustion engines, in combination with the intake and exhaust ports. which is simple, compact. economical and durable by reason of its peculiar location in the work cylinder and its cooperative relation to the intake and exhaust ports; to provide a single valve Specification of Letters Patent.

Patented May 2, 1922.

1919. Serial No. 312,303.

mechanism in the work cylinder of a hydrocarbon engine which takes care of the intake and exhaust of the fuel charge and forms a part of the head of the work cylinder; to provlde a valve for the work cylinders of a hydrocarbon engine which will not become pitted and, consequently, will have long life: to provide a valve mechanism wherein the ntake of the charge will clean the valve and its seat, cool the valve casing after every exhaust, and, in turn, absorb the heat of the valve casing so as to preliminarily heat the charge; to provide an intake and exhaust valve for hydrocarbon engines which is practically noiseless in operation and has fewer movements compared with the valves now commonly found in engines of this type;

to provide a valve mechanism wherein the seat and valve-head cannot readily become worn, thus reducing the possibilities of leak age of the charge under all conditions of operation of the engine; to provide a structure of hydrocarbon engine wherein the number of valves is reduced to a minimum and wherein a single valve, forming part of the work cylinder, takes care of all the various cycles of operation; to provide a single cam mechanism for hydrocarbon engines actuating a single valve which takes care of both the intake and exhaust in the operation of the engine; to provide a cam mechanism for a plurality of work cylinders in hydrocarbon engines wherein a single shaft operates all the cams directly and positively; to provide a combination rotary and reciprocatin 'valve for taking care of inlet of charge, ex must of products of combustion, and which helps to resist the explosive action of the fuel charge; to provide a valve mechanism wherein a plurality of telescoping parts are relatively rotated and in which the valve is mounted, and in which all the ports are provided; and to provide a combination of mechanism mounted on a single shaft for giving all the movements to the valve and valve-sleeve.

lVith the above objects in View and others which will be detailed during the course of this description, our invention consists in the parts, features, elements and combinations thereof hereinafter described a and. claimed.

In order that our invention may be clearly understood, we have provided drawings wherein:

Figure 1 is a vertical section of a workllO cylinder, its piston-actuating mechanism, and its valve mechanism, taken on the line, for example, 11 of Figure 12;

Figure 2 is a sectional detail of the telescoping members of the valve mechanism substantially at the point indicated by the line 22, Figure 1;

Figure 3 is a section of the valve mecha nism substantially on the line 33 of Figure 12;

Figure 4 is a section of the valve sub stantially on the line 4.4i of Figure 3;

Figure 5 is a detail showing the crankshaft and piston-rod, the latter being broken off, the position of the parts corresponding to Figures 3 and 4;

Figure 6 is an elevation of the valve mechanism shown in Figure 3;

Figure 7 is a section of the valve substan tially n the line 7-7 of Figure 6;

Figure 8 is a view similar to Figure corresponding to the position of the parts shown in Figures 6 and 7;

Figure 9 is a view similar to Figure 6 showing a different position of the parts;

Figure 10 is a section of the valve on the line 10-10 of Figure 9;

Figure 11 is a view similar to Figures 5 and 8showing the position of the parts corresponding to Figures 9 and 10; and

Figure 12 is a horizontal section on the extended line 12-42, Figure 1, showing the duplex arrangement and assuming the units of the work cylinder to be extended in rear of Figure 1.

Referring to the drawings, the numeral 1 indicates the piston or work cylinder which, by its flanged or extended base 2, is connected in any usual manner to the crank casing not shown in any of the figures, in order to simplify the drawings and because the mounting of the work cylinders is no part of our present invention. The work cylinders 1 have the usual cooling or water circulating jacket 3, the chamber 4 of which extends upwardly to a point closely adjacent the intake and exhaust manifold 5 and downwardly to a point near the base 2. The piston 6 reciprocates vertically in the work chamber 7, and, in its upward or outward stroke, reaches a point slightly above the bottom of the combustion chamber 8, into which a small boring 9 extends adapted to receive the spark-plug which may be extended from practically any point and in any direction into the combustion chamber, the position of the boring being simply suggestive of a mode by which to lead the sparking device to the combustion chamber.

Viewing Figure 1, it will be seen that the combustion chamber, at its top. has a vertical passage or port in which the valve casing 10 is secured by means of a shouldered portion 11 at the bottom thereof resting upon the interior flange or seat 12 at the top of the combustion chamber, and, at its top, by means of a screw-threaded plu or spanner-nut 13 screwed into the top 0 the manifold 5 and engaging the beveled portion 14 of the valve casing 10, whereby to force and securely hold the valve casing down upon the flange or seat 12 and prevent the same from rotating in the passage or port of the manifold and work cylinder. The valve casing 10, see Figure 3, and the sectional views of Figures 2, 4, 7 and 10, is provided with intake port 15 and exhaust port 16 corresponding, respectively, to the intake passage 17 and exhaust passage 18 of the manifold 5. For the purposes of our invention, the longitudinal axis of the work cylinder and piston, which axes are coincident, are indicated by the line 19, and, viewing Figures 1 and 12, it will be seen that the said axes are eccentric to the longitudinal axis of the valve chamber. Viewing Figure 1, it will also be seen that the crankshaft 20 is eccentric to, or offset from, the longitudinal axis of the work cylinder, and that the crank-arm 21. is connected to the piston-rod 22 by means of the crankin 23, the PlStOHd'Od being curved outwardl y and pivotally connected at its upper end in usual manner to the wristpin 24 mounted in the piston.

From the foregoing description, two factors are to be noted, viz., the exhaust passage 18 is quite short and the intake passage 17 is comparatively long; and the coupling or connection of the piston rods 22 to the crank arms of the shaft 20 is offset from the piston rods so that the thrust from the pistons to the cranks is in the longitudinal axis of the work-cylinders and parallel with a vertical plane cutting the longitudinal axis of the (-ra11l-tshaft lengthwise. These are iniportaut factors, since a short exhaust passage means avoidance of overheating the engine, which directly aids the cooling system. The long intake passage gives time for the incoming, cold gas to be heated to a considerable extent before reaching the work-cylinder, this aiding combustion and also meaning the absorption of cylinder or engine heat, which is a cooling process for the top of the engine or intake manifold. thus, again, aiding the cooling system. As to the coupling of the piston rods to the crankshaft. the arrangement overcomes any possibility of dead centers, or impediment to speed, or transmission of power, since the thrust is in the longitudinal axis of the cylinders and pistons and along the length of the piston rods, and, hence, eccentric to the longitudinal axis of the shaft, the offset coupling being always located so as to transmit the thrust without binding, impediment or loss of power. In addition to the foregoing, the engine is so constructed and the elements and mechanisms are so arranged as to enable a single cam-shaft to be used for the purpose of actuating the several valve mechanisms; that is to say, the work-cylinders are, for example, arranged in pair-units and set upright or vertically, the units being disposed as previously noted so as to place the workcylinders alternately on opposite sides of the longitudinal center line of the crankshaft, see Figure 12. The single cam-shaft 18 is extended across the top or heads of the several work-cylinders with its longitudinal axis lying in the same plane or in the same vertical plane, which cuts the longitudinal axis of the crank-shaft, see Figure 1. This arrangement places the cam-shaft in a convenient position for inspection and repairs and also enables easy and rapid installation and removal. This arrangement of crank and cam-shafts and work-cylinders in unit castings also brings about simplicity of construction, compactness, and economy in construction and maintenance, since the cams 49 are interchangeable, as are also the bellcrank levers actuated by said cams, and the gearing driven by said shaft; and reduction in weight of frames or castings results, together with total weight of engine, wear and friction of moving parts. The driving power of the engine is increased as the direct result of the foregoing.

The valve casing, see Figure 3, is composed of the outer member heretofore inclicated by 10 and the inner member 25, which latter has the shoulder 11 and rests upon the seat 12 at the top of the combustion chamber. The inner member 25 is provided with a port 15 corresponding with the port 15 in the outer member, and also has a port 16 corresponding with the port 16 in the outer member. The inner member is also provided with a reduced, cylindrical bearing member, the upper portion 26 of which is more extensive than the lower portion 27. The two cylindrical portions 26 and 27 afford a long bearing for the valve-stem 29. the lower end of which is provided with a head or valve 29 beveled on one side as at 30, and cooperating with a similarly beveled por tion or valve-seat 31 of the inner valve casing 25. The valve-stem, at its opposite end, terminates in an impact or contact head 32, and has applied thereto just below said head a spring seat or washer 33 against which one end of the coiled, encircling spring 3 1 rests, and the opposite end of which engages a collar 35 screwed upon the adjacent end of the cylindrical member 26 of the inner valve casing. The collar 35 retains the members of a ball-bearing 36 within the shell 37 of the gear 38, said shell being secured to the valvesleeve 39 by one or more screws 40. The valve-sleeve 39 has its smaller cylindrical portion surrounding the upper cylindrical member 26 and its larger cylindrical portion *1 operating between the inner member 25 of the valve casing and the outer member 10. Between the two members 26 and 27 an enlargement or flange 42 is provided affording a seat for an anti-frictional washer 43 arranged between said flange and the smaller member 39 of the valve-sleeve. The said flange 4:2 and the washer 13 preventthe free end of the valve-sleeve member 41 from engaging the inner casing member 25, thus leaving clearance as at 44, which reduces friction and provides for lubrication. The valvesleeve member 11 is provided with a port 15 adapted to register and cooperate alternately with the ports 15 and 15 and 16 and 16. The chamber 46, formed between the cylindrical member 27 of the inner casing and the member 25 of the inner casing, afl'ords communication to the combustion chamber 8 through the intake and exhaust passages 17 and 18, respectively, and their cooperating ports.

The gear 38 which drives the valve-sleeve 3941 is driven by a gear 47, shown in dotted lines only in order to avoid confusion in the drawings. The gears 38 and 47 are spiral gears; but, may be of any other suitable type found effective for the purpose of properly driving the valve-sleeve. The spiral gear 4-7 is mounted on the cam-shaft 48, shown in section in Figures 1, 3, 6, and 9, and the center line of which is shown in Figure 12. The shaft 48 also carries a cam 49, which is substantially in the form of a quadrant, said cam operating upon the antifrictional roll 50 carried by pin 51 mounted in the end of the arm 52 of a bell-crank lever journaled to rock upon, or with, a countershaft 53, said bell-cank having its other arm 5% provided at its outer end with an adjustable screw 55 held in set position by a nut 56 and having its lower end projecting beyond the bell-crank arm 54, so as to engage the head 32 of the valve-stem. The direction of rotation of the cam 49 and gear 4:7 is indicated by arrows in Figures 1, 3, 6 and 9. as is also the direction of rotation of the crank-shaft, and arm carried thereby, in Figures 1, 5, 8 and 11. The relation of the cam 49 and gear 48 is such that the valve-sleeve will be given one rotation to one reciprocation of the valve-stem and valve -arried thereby, while the crank-shaft has two rotations to the single reciprocation of the valve and single rotation of the valvesleeve.

(lur invention is of such character, as shown in Figure 12. that a unit casting may comprehend two work cylinders and two intake manifolds arranged in staggered relation and. when a plurality of unit castings are grouped, they will be arranged as shown in Figure 12. which arrangement may be carried out for six and eight-cylinder engines, as will be readily understood.- By providing duplex units, as justdescribed,

will be common to all the valve mechanisms of the duplex units, as shown by the center line 4:8 of said shaft in Figure 12. The centers ofthe work cylinders are also indicated by lines which are marked, so that the relation between the work cylinders and valve casings can readily be seen and understood.

Having thus described our invent-ion in its details, the following mode of operation will be readily understood upon reference to the first four sheets of drawings:

In Figure 1, the piston 6 is shown at the beginning of its compression stroke with the valve 29 seated, and, referring to Figure 2, with the valve-sleeve 41 in position to close the exhaust port and open the intake port.

In Figure 3, the cam 49 has made a 90 turn, the valve 29 is still seated, the crankshaft has made a 180 turn, compression has been completed, and the valve-sleeve 11, see Figure 4, has been rotated so that the intake port is closed and the exhaust port is about to be uncovered, explosion taking place at approximately this time. In Figure 6, the cam 19 has made a further 90 turn, the crank-shaft a further 180 turn, being driven to that position by the action of the explosive charge upon the piston with the valve still seated. The cam 19 in this position is beginning to operate upon the bellcrank 52-54, so that the valve-stem is moved longitudinally, and the valve 29 slightly unseated. As seen in Figure 7, the valvesleeve has further rotated so that the exhaust port is completely uncovered, and, with the valve 29 continuing to move away from its seat under the influence of the cam -19 and bell-crank lever, exhaust takes place carrying off the products of combustion and completely scavenging the work cylinder. In Figure 9, the cam 49 has made an additional 90 turn, causing the bellcrank 5254 to completely unseat the valve, and the crankshaft has made an additional 180 turn to the position of Figure 5, aiding the exhaust and scavenging of the cylinder. In this position of the parts, the valve-sleeve 4:1 has made a further turn to completely close the exhaust port and to be about ready to uncover the intake port. Complete scavenging and exhaust of the products of combustion have now occurred, and a further 90 turn of the cam 49 will bring the latter to the position of the parts shown in Figures 1 and 2 with the exhaust port closed, the intake port completely uncovered, the valve 29 seated, or about to be seated, and the crankshaft will have made another 180 turn and will begin its compression stroke, as in Figure 1, with the valve completely seated. Thus, the four cycles of the engine have been completed and are about to be repeated, and it will be seen that intake, compression, explosion and exhaust have all occurred during the operation of a single valve in the top of the combustion chamber and in a single chamber common to both intake and exhaust, and a single valve-sleeve which alternately cooperates with the intake and exhaust ports of the single chamber.

It will thus be seen that, with our engine, all the objects of our invention have been accomplished with resultant advantages which will be readily understood by those skilled in the art.

Having thus described our invention, what we claim and desire to secure by Letters Patent is:

1. In a hydrocarbon engine, a plurality of independent castings arranged'in alignment, each of said castings having a plurality of work-cylinders constituting a unit; a crank-shaft below the work-cylinders and common to all of them and extending in the direction of alignment of the cylinders, and the latter being arranged so that the cylinders of each unit will be alternately on opposite sides of the longitudinal axis of the shaft, and a vertical plane passing through said longitudinal axis will out each cylin- (ler of the aligned units eccentrically to its vertical axis, said shaft having a plurality of cranks; and piston rods connecting the cranks and pistons of the work-cylinders respectively, said rods having their ends coupled to the cranks by ofi'set members, so that the thrust from the pistons to the cranks is in the longitudinal axis of the work-cylinders and eccentric to the longitudinal axis of the crank-shaft.

2. A hydrocarbon engine having two parallel rows of vertically arranged work-cylinders, each of the work-cylinders having a port at one end thereof, a valve mechanism i open at its bottom for controlling each of said ports and also having oppositely disposed ports for controlling the intake and exhaust ports of the engine. and means for actuating said valve mechanisms comprising a single cam-shaft extending horizontally across said cylinders at the heads thereof and between the parallel rows.

3. A. hydrocarbon engine having a plurality of parallel rows of work-cylinders, each cylinder having a port at one end thereof; a valve mechanism open at its bottom for controlling each of said ports and also having oppositely disposed ports for controlling the intake and exhaust ports of the engine; pistons operating in each of the work-cylinders; and mechanisms actuating the pistons and valve mechanism including a crank-shaft and a cam-shaft extended parallel with the rows of work-cylinders and arranged in a vertical plane cutting the longitudinal axes of said shafts.

4. A hydrocarbon engine having a plurality of parallel rows of work-cylinders each cylinder having a port at one end thereof and an intake and exhaust port; a valve mechanism open at its bottom for controlling each of said ports and also having oppositely disposed ports for controlling the intake and exhaust ports of the engine; three shafts extending parallel with the rows of work-cylinders and arranged in a vertical plane cutting the longitudinal axes of said shafts; and mechanisms extending respectively from said shafts to operate the pistons of the work-cylinder and the valve mechanisms to control the said ports.

5. A hydrocarbon engine having an explosion chamber with a port therein, a valve casing having an open bottom cooperating with said port and also having intake and exhaust ports at diametrically opposite points, and a single valve mechanism for controlling all said ports, said mechanism comprising an inner member and outer stationary member, a reciprocating valve operating in the inner member, a valve-sleeve operating between said inner and outer members, and means for actuating the valve and valve-sleeve with a ratio of one reciprocation of the valve to one rotation of the sleeve.

6. In a hydrocarbon engine having intake and exhaust ports and an explosion chamber, means for connecting the explosion chamber with the intake and exhaust ports comprising a valve casing set between the two ports and having its bottom open into the explosion chamber, said casing comprisinginner and outer members, a rotary valve for controlling said two ports operating between said inner and outer members and a valve for closing the said open bottom.

7. A hydrocarbon engine having intake and exhaust ports and an explosion chamher, a valve casing set between the two ports and affording chamber into which the ports open said casing comprising inner and outer members, aport from the explosion chamber to the chamber in the valve casing, a valve for controlling communication between the explosion chamber and chamber in the casing, and a rotary sleeve operating between the inner and outer members of the valve casing for controlling the ports into the chamber of said casing.

8. A portable valve mechanism, for controlling the intake and exhaust ports of a hydrocarbon engine, consisting of an inner casing, an outer stationary easing independcut of the engine casing having oppositely disposed intake and exhaust ports, a valvesleeve adapted to turn between the two cars ings and having a single cooperative port, a valve having its stem adapted to reciprocate in the inner casing. and a seat for said. valve at one end of the inner casing.

5). A hydrocarbon engine having a long intake passage and a comparatively short exhaust passage in its casing above the work chamber, the two said passages being oppositely disposed and separated from each other by a valve chamber opening into the work chamber, in combination with a valve mechanism comprising a cylindrical casing set in the valve chamber and having a port opening into the work chamber, and ports respectively communicating with the intake and exhaust passages, a rotary valve sleeve having a single port operating within said casing and controlling the intake and exhaust ports. and a reciprocating valve operating within said casing controlling the other of said ports and having a seat on the end of said casing at the entrance to the work chamber.

10. A valve mechanism for hydrocarbon engines comprising a cylindrical casing con1- posed of an inner member and a stationary outer member and having oppositely arranged ports, a rotary valve-sleeve operating between said members and controlling said ports, a third port in said casing surrounded by a valve-seat, a reciprocating valve controlling the latter port, and means for rotating the valve-sleeve and reciprocating the valve with a ratio of one reciprocation of the latter to one rotation of the former.

11. An engine construction substantially as set forth in claim 6, wherein the casing has an elongated cylindrical bearing carried by the inner casing member centrally of and within the same, and wherein the reciprocating valve controlling the said. open bottom has its stem guided in the said hearingmember.

12. A. valve mechanism for hydrocarbon engines comprising a cylindrical casing having a plurality of ports, a rotary valvesleeve controlling two of said ports. a reciprocating valve controlling the other of said ports, and means for actuating the valve-sleeve and valve comprising interacting gearing and a cam carried by a single shaft and a bell-crank lever actuated by the cam.

13. A hydrocarbon engine having a port in the topof its combustion chamber eccentric to its longitudinal axis, and above the same in the casing an intake passage and a comparatively short exhaust passage; and a valve mechanism having a cylindrical casing with a chamber therein communicating with the combustion chamber through the port thereof, intake and exhaust ports cooperat ing with the respective passages, a valve for controlling the communication between the valve chamber and combustion chamber, and another valve for controlling the in take and exhaust ports and passages.

14. In combination with the work cylinder of a hydrocarbon engine having a port in one end and a valve chamber adjacent thereto and communicating therewith, intake and vexhaust ports communicating with said valve chamber, and a valve mechanism set within said chamber comprising a casing having an opening in one end communicating with the work cylinder and comprising two concentric members having ports registering with the intake and exhaust ports, respectively, and a central, elongatec, cylindrical member extending substantially from end to end of said casing members, a valve sleeve member operating between the two casing members and having a port adapted to cooperate alternately with the re istering intake and exhaust ports, and a vadve-stem extending through said central member and having a valve-head adapted to cooperate with the casing for closing the passage between the work cylinder and the valve chamber.

15. In combination with the work cylinder of a hydrocarbon engine having a port in one end and a valve chamber adjacent thereto and communicating therewith, intake and exhaust ports communicating with said valve chamber, and a valve mechanism set within said chamber comprising a casing having an opening in one end communicating with the work cylinder and comprising two concentric members having ports registering with the intake and exhaust ports, respectively, and a central, elongated, cylindrical member extending substantially from end to end of said casing members, a valve sleeve member operating between the two casing members and having a port adapted to cooperate alternately with the registering intake and exhaust ports, a valve-stem extending through said central member and having a valvehead adapted to cooperate with the casing for closing the passage between the work cylinder and the valve chamber, and gearing,

for rotating said valve sleeve, and means for actuating the valve-stem.

16. In combination with the work cylinder of a hydrocarbon engine having a port in one end and a valve chamber ad'acent thereto and communicating therewit intake and exhaust ports communicating with said valve chamber, and a valve mechanism set within said chamber comprising a casmg having an opening in one end coinmuni eating with the work cylinder and compris mg two concentric members having ports registering with the intake and exhaust ports, respectively, and a central, elongated,

cylindrical. member extending substantially from end to end 01"" said casing members, a valve sleeve member operating between the two casing members and having a port adapted to cooperate alternately with the registering intake and exhaust ports, a valve-stem extending through said central member and having a valve-head adapted to cooperate with the casing for closing the passage between the work cylinder and the valve chamber, means for rotating said valve sleeve, and a cam mechanism for actuating the valve stem.

'17. In combination with the work cylinder of a hydrocarbon engine having a port in one end and a valve chamber adjacent thereto and communicating therewith, intake and exhaust ports communicating with said valve chamber, and a valve mechanism set within said chamber comprising a casing having an opening in one end communicating with the work cylinder and comprising two concentric members having port's'registering with the intake and exhaust ports, respectively, and a central, elongated, cylindrical member extending substantially from end to end of said casing members, a valve sleeve member operating between the two casing members and having a port adapted to cooperate alternately with the registering intake and exhaust ports, a valve-stem extending through said central member and having a valvehead adapted to cooperate with the casing for closing the passage between the work cylinder and the valve chamber, a shaft carrying a gear-wheel and a cam, a gear co operating with the gear-wheel for rotating the valve sleeve, and a lever cooperating with the cam for reciprocating the valvestem.

18. In combination with the work cylinder of a hydrocarbon engine having a port in one end and a valve chamber adjacent thereto and communicating therewith, intake and exhaust ports communicating with said valve chamber, and a valve mechanism set within said chamber comprising a casing having an opening'in one end communicating. with the work cylinder and comprising two concentric members having ports registering with the intake and exhaum ports, respectively, and a central, elongated, cy-

lindrical member extending substantially from end to end of said casing members, a valve sleeve member operating between the two casing members and having a port adapted to cooperate alternately with the registering intake and exhaust ports, a valve-stem extending through said central. member and having a valve-head adapted to cooperate with the casing for closing the passage between the work cylinder and the valvechamber, means for normally holding the valve-head seated, a cam and lever for overcoming the action of the spring, and means for rotating the valve sleeve.

19. A hydrocarbon engine having a work cylinder with a combustion chamber at one end thereof, a valve mechanism set in the top of the combustion chamber with its longitudinal axis parallel with and eccentric to the longitudinal axis of the work cylinder; a short exhaust passage and a comparatively long intake passage leading to the valve mechanism, said passages being arranged oppositely to each other; and means for actuating said valve mechanism.

20. A hydrocarbon engine having a work cylinder with a combustion chamber at one end thereof and, above the same in the easing, a valve-chamber with a port into said combustion chamber; said casing also having oppositely arranged intake and exhaust passages above said combustion chamber and on opposite sides of said port and communicating with said valve chamber; a removable valve mechanism set in said valve chamber comprising stationary inner and outer members, a reciprocating valve, and a rotary valve between said members; and means for actuating the several valves.

21. A hydrocarbon engine having an explosion chamber with a port set eccentrically in one end thereof; a removable valve casing mounted .in the engine casing above said chamber and open at its bottom for cooperation xvith said port and having inner and outer members and oppositely disposed intake and exhaust ports; a valve mechanism "for controlling all said ports, including a rotary member and a reciprocating member, the rotary member having a single port and operating between the members of the valve casing, so as to be without wear upon the engine casing, and the valve casing and valve mechanlsm being removable as a whole from the engine; and means for actuating said valve members with a ratio of one reciprocation of the one member to one rotation of the other member.

GEORGE LOEFFLER. MORRIS J. COHEN.

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Cited By (10)

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US2791992A (en) * 1950-09-01 1957-05-14 H H Robinson Single poppet valve internal combustion engine
US3071123A (en) * 1960-09-15 1963-01-01 Carl F Gromme Internal combustion engine
US3424139A (en) * 1966-01-06 1969-01-28 Donald G Brooks Internal combustion engine valve means
US4945866A (en) * 1987-03-26 1990-08-07 Chabot Jr Bertin R Altered piston timing engine
DE4309040A1 (en) * 1993-03-20 1994-09-22 Michael Spierer Internal combustion engine
DE4318401A1 (en) * 1993-06-03 1994-12-08 Klaus Volk Internal combustion engine
US5544627A (en) * 1995-03-21 1996-08-13 Terziev; Nicola Engine design for gasoline/diesel engines
US6460505B1 (en) * 2000-12-13 2002-10-08 Angelo V. Quaglino, Jr. Offset connecting rod for internal combustion engines
DE10135179A1 (en) * 2001-07-19 2003-02-13 Klaus Grigoleit Production and use of kinked connecting rods in internal combustion engines are new
FR2986261A1 (en) * 2012-01-30 2013-08-02 Peugeot Citroen Automobiles Sa Gas intake and exhaust system for combustion chamber of e.g. direct injection type diesel internal combustion engine of car, has opening/closing unit of orifice of chamber placed in downstream of distribution unit and including valve

Cited By (10)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2791992A (en) * 1950-09-01 1957-05-14 H H Robinson Single poppet valve internal combustion engine
US3071123A (en) * 1960-09-15 1963-01-01 Carl F Gromme Internal combustion engine
US3424139A (en) * 1966-01-06 1969-01-28 Donald G Brooks Internal combustion engine valve means
US4945866A (en) * 1987-03-26 1990-08-07 Chabot Jr Bertin R Altered piston timing engine
DE4309040A1 (en) * 1993-03-20 1994-09-22 Michael Spierer Internal combustion engine
DE4318401A1 (en) * 1993-06-03 1994-12-08 Klaus Volk Internal combustion engine
US5544627A (en) * 1995-03-21 1996-08-13 Terziev; Nicola Engine design for gasoline/diesel engines
US6460505B1 (en) * 2000-12-13 2002-10-08 Angelo V. Quaglino, Jr. Offset connecting rod for internal combustion engines
DE10135179A1 (en) * 2001-07-19 2003-02-13 Klaus Grigoleit Production and use of kinked connecting rods in internal combustion engines are new
FR2986261A1 (en) * 2012-01-30 2013-08-02 Peugeot Citroen Automobiles Sa Gas intake and exhaust system for combustion chamber of e.g. direct injection type diesel internal combustion engine of car, has opening/closing unit of orifice of chamber placed in downstream of distribution unit and including valve

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