US1369269A - Disk talking-machine - Google Patents

Disk talking-machine Download PDF

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US1369269A
US1369269A US227960A US22796018A US1369269A US 1369269 A US1369269 A US 1369269A US 227960 A US227960 A US 227960A US 22796018 A US22796018 A US 22796018A US 1369269 A US1369269 A US 1369269A
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record
arm
spindle
reproducer
machine
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US227960A
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Haas Percy De
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    • GPHYSICS
    • G11INFORMATION STORAGE
    • G11BINFORMATION STORAGE BASED ON RELATIVE MOVEMENT BETWEEN RECORD CARRIER AND TRANSDUCER
    • G11B17/00Guiding record carriers not specifically of filamentary or web form, or of supports therefor

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  • warren srATEs- PATENT orrlacs warren srATEs- PATENT orrlacs.
  • This invention relates to disk talking machines, and has for its object to provide a machine (or a fitting to be applied to an existin machine) which will give a substantia ly continuous phonographic reproduction of sounds, so enabling lengthy .movements, such as overtures, and symphonics to be played without undesirable breaks.
  • This object is effected, according to my invention, by providing a plurality of turntables or mandrels for the records over which the stylus wit-h its sound box successively travels, and means for automatically moving the reproducer from one record to another.
  • the other record (or records) or record-carrier may be running idle, and a record may, if de sired, be changed without stopping the machine, this bemg an advantage as the reproducer may be brought into contact with a number of records in succession with very short intervals of silence between each; thus the attention required by the operator is reduced.
  • 1 provide a secondary spindle driven by belt
  • a single tone arm with sound box or boxes articulated thereto is provided, and is adapted to move freely about its pivot, so that a stylus may be brought into contact with either the record disk on the turntable of the main spindle or the record disk on the turntable of the secondary spindle.
  • the record disk on the first turntable may be removed and replaced by a new record while the record on the second turntable is bein reproduced, so as to be ready for playing the moment the production of the second record is completed. Then the tone arm may be turned back to its initial position to start the reproduction of the new record on the first turntable, and so the sound reproduction goes on almost continuously, if desired by the operator, or with on liy very short intervals of silence.
  • he rising of the reproducer is, of course, readily arranged for, as, for instance, by providing the socket piece that carries the reproducer and the tone arm with elbows at their adjacent ends which pivot into one another.
  • the arrangement for automatically moving the reproducer from one record to the next, and causing it to assume the starting position on the second record is characterized in that thetone arm, or part moving therewith or operated thereby of the machine carries a hinged or pivotal arm or bar located in such a position and disposed atsuch an angle that at the end of theirsproduction of one record the'turning of the tone arm or other part about its pivot will have brought said pivotal arm into contact with the spindle (whereby the second record is actuated) to produce a two fold action.
  • Means may be provided for throwing either turntable out of gear when the other is working.
  • Ball bearings may be fitted, if, desired.
  • I may also provide means for adapting the apparatus to play records of varlable sizes.
  • Fig. 2- an elevation, of a disk talking machine adaptedfor the successive playing of two records.
  • Fig. 3 represents in side elevation and end view! an adapter sleeve for use in the playing of larger or longer records than usual.
  • the talking machine illustrated 1s of well known type, the mechanlsm for automatlcally causing the playing of a. second record being added.
  • FIGs. 1 and .2 of said drawings 1 represents the box or cabinet of the machine, 2 a turntable, and 3 a record disposed on said turntable 2; 4 indicates the tone. arm revoluble about the spindle 5, 6 the sound box mounted on the U connecting tube or goose-neck 7 which is pivotally socketed in the tone arm 4, and 8 1s a stylus secured to the sound box 6: all as common in disk talking machines.
  • I, J
  • a spring motor disposed within the cabinet 1 of the machine, is a grooved driving pulley 10, and secured on a second revoluble spindle 11 which carries a second.
  • turntable 12 is a grooved driving pulley 13: operatively connecting said pulleys 10 and 13 is a driving belt 14,
  • said arm 20 is provided with a pin or lug 21 whereon is secured a screw threaded spindle 22 which extends through a slot 23 formed in the bracket 18 and a passage in a plate 24, and is provided with a nut 25.
  • Ad ustment of said arm 20 relatively to bracket 18 may be effected by a ioffd 26, the engaging end whereof is secured to said spindle 22,,said rod 25 being secured by a set screw 26".
  • said pivotal arm 20 Secured to said pivotal arm 20 is one end of a chain or like flexible connection 27, which is led over a pulley 28 mounted on a support 29 carried by bracket18, the other end of said chain being attached to a disk 30 secured to a winged screw 31 which passes through an arm 32 mounted on the U tube 7 and is secured by a nut 33. B slack ing-back said nut 33 the screw 31 with disk 30 may be turned and adjustment of chain 27 effected.
  • the inner face of said pivotal arm 20 is covered with a strip of rubber or othersuitable frictional material 34 and the upper end of said spindle 11 is provided with a rubber sleeve 35.
  • the parts are positioned for the playing of the primary record 3, and in the consequent circular movement of the tone arm 4, bracket 18, and pivotal arm 20,'the latter moves into contact with the sleeved spindle 11 just as the pla in of this record is completed; and, throug t e frictional engagement of the inner face of pivotal arm 20 with the rotating spindlell, themotion of said arm bracket 18-tone arm '4 with U piece 7, and the reproducer 20 (comprising the sound box 6 and stylus 8) is continuous: at the" piece 7, the latter is turned about its pivotal support on the tone arm'4 and the reproducer is raised clear of record 3 and moves over to'the record 15.
  • the arm 4 is shifted until the stylus 8 lies in the inner or last sound groove of the record, and then the attachment is secured to the arm 4 with the arm engaging the spindle 11.
  • the flexible connection 27 is also adjusted so that the reproducer will be-raised and lowered in proper timed relation to an actuation of the arm 20 by contact with the spindle 11.
  • the tone arm 4 is gradually swung as the stylus-8 travels inwardly toward the center of the record 3.
  • the bracket 18 in swinging toward the spindle 11 carries the pivoted arm 20 into engagement with said spindle which has a rolling action against the arm 20.
  • the motion of the spindle causes the arm to move on the s indle and since the arm is pivoted relative to the bracket, it is obvious that the outer end of "the arm 20 will be swung relative to the bracket 18.
  • the initial contact of the arm 20 with the spindle 11 is such that the arm 20 receives an actuation pulling on the flexible connection 27 and this takes place'as the stylus 8 reaches the inner or last sound groove of the In consequence of the flexible connection 27 being pulled upon the reproducer is elevated, and further travel of the arm 20 against the spindle 11 causes the tone arm 4 and the bracket 18 to be swung whereby the reproducer is placed over the outer or first sound groove of the record 15.
  • the motion of the spindle 11 is depended upon for the transfer (if the tone arm from one record to the other, and after thetone arm is in position relative to the record 15, the angularity of the arm 20 is changed, and the flexible connection 27 slackened to permit of the stylus 8 being lowered into the outer or first sound groove of the record 15, when there is a rendition of this record until the reproducer reaches the inner or last sound groove of said record. It is during the playing of the second record 15 that the first or primary record 3 may be changed so that other records may be placed in position and rendered with very little interruption in the playing.
  • the primary record 3 may be changed if desired so, that three records may be reproduced with very little break in playing.
  • an adapter or extension sleeve 36 may be used which is designed to cause the reproend of the sleeve 36 is pushed on to the end of same, so that said pin 37 may be locked into the customary bayonet slot provided in said tube.
  • the reproducer is then fitted on the reduced end of said adapter, the customary pin provided on the reproducer being locked in the bayonet slot 38 of the adapter.
  • record carriers means adapted to operate said carriers in unison, a sound reproducer, and means carried by the sound reproducer and actuated by one of said carriers adapted to transfer said sound reproducer from one carrier to the other.
  • said means includes any arm which causes the tone arm to move in a lateral plane and the reproducer thereof to be raised and lowered.
  • driven records disposed in superposed planes with one record overlapping the other and driven therefrom, a spindle axially of the overlap ping driven record,a tone arm common to said records, a reproducer carried by said bracket, and adapted for con act with the I spindle of the overlapping record to cause said tone arm to swing from one record to the other, and means attached to said pivoted arm and to said reproducer adapted to raise and lower said reproducer in timed relation to the movement ofsaid tone arm.

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  • Holding Or Fastening Of Disk On Rotational Shaft (AREA)

Description

' P. DE HAAS,
DISK TALKING MACHINE APPLICATION FILED APR: 11, 1918.
1,369,2683 Patented Feb. 22, 1921.
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warren srATEs- PATENT orrlacs.
PERCY DE HAAS, OF ROCK FERRY, ENGLAND.
DISK TALKING-MACHINE.
To all whom it may cancer/m Be it known that I PERCY on HAAS, a subect of the King of liln land,'residing at 63 ighfield road, Rock erry, in the county of Chester, England, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in or Relating to Disk Talking-Machines, of which the following is a specification.
This invention relates to disk talking machines, and has for its object to provide a machine (or a fitting to be applied to an existin machine) which will give a substantia ly continuous phonographic reproduction of sounds, so enabling lengthy .movements, such as overtures, and symphonics to be played without undesirable breaks.
This object is effected, according to my invention, by providing a plurality of turntables or mandrels for the records over which the stylus wit-h its sound box successively travels, and means for automatically moving the reproducer from one record to another.
While the sounds are being reproduced phonographically from one record, the other record (or records) or record-carrier, may be running idle, and a record may, if de sired, be changed without stopping the machine, this bemg an advantage as the reproducer may be brought into contact with a number of records in succession with very short intervals of silence between each; thus the attention required by the operator is reduced.
in carrying my invention into practical efiect, according to one arrangement, 1 provide a secondary spindle driven by belt,
chain, toothed wheels, friction wheels, wormgear, or otherwise, from the main driving spindle (or it may be driven by a separate and independent. motor); which secondary spindle carries a turntable or support for a separate record. A single tone arm with sound box or boxes articulated thereto is provided, and is adapted to move freely about its pivot, so that a stylus may be brought into contact with either the record disk on the turntable of the main spindle or the record disk on the turntable of the secondary spindle.
To start the apparatus in a construction wherein a single motor actuates both main and secondary spindles, the main spindle is set in motion by the driving motor, thus rotating the two records, andon the stylus Specification of Letters Patent. Patented Feb, 22, 1921 Application med April 11, 1918. Serial no. 227,960.
being brought into contact with one of them the sound is reproduced phono aphically. {it the end of the reproduction t e tone arm is turned on its pivot and. the stylus is raised and brought into contact with the record on the other turntable, thus starting the sound reproduction from said latter record.
The record disk on the first turntable may be removed and replaced by a new record while the record on the second turntable is bein reproduced, so as to be ready for playing the moment the production of the second record is completed. Then the tone arm may be turned back to its initial position to start the reproduction of the new record on the first turntable, and so the sound reproduction goes on almost continuously, if desired by the operator, or with on liy very short intervals of silence.
he rising of the reproducer is, of course, readily arranged for, as, for instance, by providing the socket piece that carries the reproducer and the tone arm with elbows at their adjacent ends which pivot into one another.
The arrangement for automatically moving the reproducer from one record to the next, and causing it to assume the starting position on the second record, is characterized in that thetone arm, or part moving therewith or operated thereby of the machine carries a hinged or pivotal arm or bar located in such a position and disposed atsuch an angle that at the end of theirsproduction of one record the'turning of the tone arm or other part about its pivot will have brought said pivotal arm into contact with the spindle (whereby the second record is actuated) to produce a two fold action. namely (1) the displacement of said arm about its pivot, wherebythrough a connecting cord or chain, levers, or the likethe reproducer is lifted ed the first record; and (2) the adhesion or pressure of-said pivotal arm against said seconda spindle, whereby a traveling movement like that imparted by a pinion to a toothed rack) is imparted to the former which carries the tone arm and reproducer into the starting position and said pivotal arm to make certain of the latter partaking of the motion imparted to -it by the former, I prefer to provide the surfaces of said arm andsaid secondary spindle with coverings of vulcanized fiber,
india rubber, or other suitable material, so
as to insure their becoming .frictionally herentby contact.
overhangs the turntable of the main spindle,
one record, therefore, being at a higher level than the other.
' Means may be provided for throwing either turntable out of gear when the other is working. Ball bearings may be fitted, if, desired.
I may also provide means for adapting the apparatus to play records of varlable sizes.
I will further describe my invention with the aid of the accompanying sheets of explanatory drawings which illustrate, by way I of examples only, one mode of embodying same. v
In said drawings I Figure 1 is a'plan view, and
Fig. 2- an elevation, of a disk talking machine adaptedfor the successive playing of two records.
Fig. 3 represents in side elevation and end view! an adapter sleeve for use in the playing of larger or longer records than usual.
The talking machine illustrated 1s of well known type, the mechanlsm for automatlcally causing the playing of a. second record being added. r
Referring first to Figs. 1 and .2 of said drawings 1 represents the box or cabinet of the machine, 2 a turntable, and 3 a record disposed on said turntable 2; 4 indicates the tone. arm revoluble about the spindle 5, 6 the sound box mounted on the U connecting tube or goose-neck 7 which is pivotally socketed in the tone arm 4, and 8 1s a stylus secured to the sound box 6: all as common in disk talking machines. I, J
Mounted on the vertical spindle 9which drives the turn-table 2 and is operated by. a spring motor disposed within the cabinet 1 of the machine, is a grooved driving pulley 10, and secured on a second revoluble spindle 11 which carries a second. turntable 12 is a grooved driving pulley 13: operatively connecting said pulleys 10 and 13 is a driving belt 14, Thus, when spindle 9- and with it turntable 1 and record 3-is rotated by the motor of the machine, motion is transmitted through said pulley 10, belt 14, pulley 13 and spindle 11, to second turntable 12, and the record 15 disposed on same.
Firmly cli ped on said tone arm 4 is a bifurcated piece 16 whereto is hinged, by means of a connecting spindle 17, a bracket 18 which is normally prevented from upmesses ward displacement by means. of. a spring19,
below the plane of the bracket 18, as shown -in"Fi 2. For the purpose of connection with racket 18, said arm 20 is provided with a pin or lug 21 whereon is secured a screw threaded spindle 22 which extends through a slot 23 formed in the bracket 18 and a passage in a plate 24, and is provided with a nut 25. Ad ustment of said arm 20 relatively to bracket 18 may be effected by a ioffd 26, the engaging end whereof is secured to said spindle 22,,said rod 25 being secured by a set screw 26". a
Secured to said pivotal arm 20 is one end of a chain or like flexible connection 27, which is led over a pulley 28 mounted on a support 29 carried by bracket18, the other end of said chain being attached to a disk 30 secured to a winged screw 31 which passes through an arm 32 mounted on the U tube 7 and is secured by a nut 33. B slack ing-back said nut 33 the screw 31 with disk 30 may be turned and adjustment of chain 27 effected. The inner face of said pivotal arm 20 is covered with a strip of rubber or othersuitable frictional material 34 and the upper end of said spindle 11 is provided with a rubber sleeve 35.
As illustrated in the drawings, the parts are positioned for the playing of the primary record 3, and in the consequent circular movement of the tone arm 4, bracket 18, and pivotal arm 20,'the latter moves into contact with the sleeved spindle 11 just as the pla in of this record is completed; and, throug t e frictional engagement of the inner face of pivotal arm 20 with the rotating spindlell, themotion of said arm bracket 18-tone arm '4 with U piece 7, and the reproducer 20 (comprising the sound box 6 and stylus 8) is continuous: at the" piece 7, the latter is turned about its pivotal support on the tone arm'4 and the reproducer is raised clear of record 3 and moves over to'the record 15. This is brought about by'the outer end of the arm 20 being swung outwardly or away from the bracket 18, due to said arm engaging the spindle and it is or rotating of the spindle the 'turnin 5 arm which causes it to swing against sai on its pivot even afterthe stylus 8 has been raised from the record.
When th pivotal arm 20 movesclear of the spindle 11, the stylus 8 is deposited on the second record 15 in position to commence the reproduction of same, being lowered gradually through the shape or configuration ofthe inner face or rear end of the pivotal arm as shown in the drawings.
To install the attachment,'the arm 4 is shifted until the stylus 8 lies in the inner or last sound groove of the record, and then the attachment is secured to the arm 4 with the arm engaging the spindle 11. The flexible connection 27 is also adjusted so that the reproducer will be-raised and lowered in proper timed relation to an actuation of the arm 20 by contact with the spindle 11.
Assuming that the stylus 8 is in the outer or first groove of the record 3 and the machine is placed in operation, the tone arm 4 is gradually swung as the stylus-8 travels inwardly toward the center of the record 3.
Since the bracket 18 is attached to the tone record 3.
arm 4 and the arm 20 pivotally attached to the outer end of the bracket 18, the bracket 18 in swinging toward the spindle 11 carries the pivoted arm 20 into engagement with said spindle which has a rolling action against the arm 20. As the arm 20 encounters the spindle 11 the motion of the spindle causes the arm to move on the s indle and since the arm is pivoted relative to the bracket, it is obvious that the outer end of "the arm 20 will be swung relative to the bracket 18.
The initial contact of the arm 20 with the spindle 11 is such that the arm 20 receives an actuation pulling on the flexible connection 27 and this takes place'as the stylus 8 reaches the inner or last sound groove of the In consequence of the flexible connection 27 being pulled upon the reproducer is elevated, and further travel of the arm 20 against the spindle 11 causes the tone arm 4 and the bracket 18 to be swung whereby the reproducer is placed over the outer or first sound groove of the record 15. Since both of the records are driven in unison, the motion of the spindle 11 is depended upon for the transfer (if the tone arm from one record to the other, and after thetone arm is in position relative to the record 15, the angularity of the arm 20 is changed, and the flexible connection 27 slackened to permit of the stylus 8 being lowered into the outer or first sound groove of the record 15, when there is a rendition of this record until the reproducer reaches the inner or last sound groove of said record. It is during the playing of the second record 15 that the first or primary record 3 may be changed so that other records may be placed in position and rendered with very little interruption in the playing.
During the playing of the second record 15, the primary record 3 may be changed if desired so, that three records may be reproduced with very little break in playing.
Referring now to Fig. 3 of the drawings,
if, for instance, the machine as illustrated is arranged to reproduce records of ten inches in diameter, and it be desired to play larger records of, say, twelve inches in diameter, an adapter or extension sleeve 36 may be used which is designed to cause the reproend of the sleeve 36 is pushed on to the end of same, so that said pin 37 may be locked into the customary bayonet slot provided in said tube. The reproducer is then fitted on the reduced end of said adapter, the customary pin provided on the reproducer being locked in the bayonet slot 38 of the adapter.
Having now described my invention what I claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent is 1. A disk taking machine-embodying a plurality of turntables mounted on driven spindles, means adapted for operating the spindle, a pivotal tone arm and sound reproducer articulated therewith; a bracket secured to said tone arm, an arm pivotally mounted on said bracket; means adapted to operatively connect said pivotal arm and said reproducer, the arrangement being'such that on the termination of the reproduction of one record said pivotal arm contacts with the turntable spindle of the second record whereupon said arm is moved so that ,it causes the reproducer, to be raised from the first record and carried toand deposited in position for playin on the second record.
2. In a disk talking machine, record carelevated and lowered during its transfer from one carrier to the other.
4. In a disk talking machine, record carriers, means adapted to operate said carriers in unison, a sound reproducer, and means carried by the sound reproducer and actuated by one of said carriers adapted to transfer said sound reproducer from one carrier to the other.
5. In a disk talking machine, driven records, a tone arm and a reproducer common to said records, and means actuated from one of said records to transfer said tone arm and reproducer from one record to the other.
6. In a disk talking machine, driven'recorda, disposed in superposed planes with one record overlapping the other and driven in claim 6, wherein said means includes any arm which causes the tone arm to move in a lateral plane and the reproducer thereof to be raised and lowered.
8. In a disk talking machine, driven records, spindles centrally of said records, a tone arm, a reproducer carried thereby, a bracket on said tone arm, an arm carried by said bracket and adapted to be swung by contact with one of said spindles, and means connecting said arm to saidreproducer adapted for raising and lowering said reproducer.
9. In a disk talking machine, driven records disposed in superposed planes with one record overlapping the other and driven therefrom, a spindle axially of the overlap ping driven record,a tone arm common to said records, a reproducer carried by said bracket, and adapted for con act with the I spindle of the overlapping record to cause said tone arm to swing from one record to the other, and means attached to said pivoted arm and to said reproducer adapted to raise and lower said reproducer in timed relation to the movement ofsaid tone arm. In testimony whereof I afiix my signature in the presence of two witnesses.
PERCY on I-IAAS. Witnesses: v
I. F. V. Wamnm, E. Bvmmrr.
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Cited By (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3386744A (en) * 1966-01-03 1968-06-04 Gen Electric Phonograph adaptor

Cited By (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3386744A (en) * 1966-01-03 1968-06-04 Gen Electric Phonograph adaptor

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