US1359166A - Kerosene and like engine - Google Patents

Kerosene and like engine Download PDF

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US1359166A
US1359166A US227489A US22748918A US1359166A US 1359166 A US1359166 A US 1359166A US 227489 A US227489 A US 227489A US 22748918 A US22748918 A US 22748918A US 1359166 A US1359166 A US 1359166A
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engine
cylinder
air
fuel
kerosene
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US227489A
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Good John
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Good John
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    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F01MACHINES OR ENGINES IN GENERAL; ENGINE PLANTS IN GENERAL; STEAM ENGINES
    • F01PCOOLING OF MACHINES OR ENGINES IN GENERAL; COOLING OF INTERNAL-COMBUSTION ENGINES
    • F01P5/00Pumping cooling-air or liquid coolants
    • F01P5/02Pumping cooling-air; Arrangements of cooling-air pumps, e.g. fans or blowers
    • F01P5/06Guiding or ducting air to, or from, ducted fans
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F01MACHINES OR ENGINES IN GENERAL; ENGINE PLANTS IN GENERAL; STEAM ENGINES
    • F01PCOOLING OF MACHINES OR ENGINES IN GENERAL; COOLING OF INTERNAL-COMBUSTION ENGINES
    • F01P7/00Controlling of coolant flow
    • F01P7/02Controlling of coolant flow the coolant being cooling-air

Description

J. GOOD.
KEROSENE AND LIKE ENGINE.
APPLICATION FILED APR. 9, 1916.
1,359,166, Patented Nov. 16, 1920.
INVE/VTUI? ZEATTOR/VEY PATENT OFFICE.
JOHN GOOD, 0F BROOKLYN, NEW YORK.
KEROSENE AND LIKE ENGINE.-
Specification of Letters Patent.
Patented Nov. 16, 1920.
Application filed April 9, 1918. Serial No. 227,489.
To all whom it may concern.
Be it known that I, JOHN Goon, United States citizen, residing in Brooklyn, New
ork, have invented the following described Improvements in Kerosene and like Engines.
y invention consists in an engine organization adapted for the more efficient combustion of liquid fuels of the heavier grades such as kerosene and more particularly in the temperature control of such engines as hereinafter more fully set forth, whereby the engine is adapted to burn such fuels with maximum efficiency and without the use of exhaust-heated Vaporizers or other contrivances for preliminarily perfecting the charge.
Figure l is a diagrammatic representation of the automobile-type engine equipped with one form of the invention;
Fig. 2 a partial top plan thereof; and
Fig. 3 a diagrammatic side view representation of a modified form.
Referring to Fig. 1 the six cylinder engine shown may be assumed to be constructed for operation in the usual way, drawing its charge mixture of fuel and air from a carbureter l and having usual intake and exhaust valves in any suitable arrangement and such other appurtenances as may be necessary. The engine is air-cooled. that is to say is formed with numerous heatradiating ribs or fins 2 on the walls of each of its cylinders and is contained in a hood or compartment 3 which is longitudinally divided by a horizontal partition 4 midway of the ends of the cylinders, so that air entering the space above the partition can find no outlet save through or past the said tins and thence into the lower compartment thereby abstracting some of the heat from the engine. The flow of air in this direction may be produced in part by the forward motion of the automobile, if the engine is used for that purpose, or by the suction of a fan-type fly-wheel or preferably by both such agencies and all of which is in accordance with the well understood air cooling process. According to the present invention the said air flow is controlled automatically or semi-automatically and with reference to the work the engine is doing and the nature of the fuel employed. In Fig. 1 it is controlled by the adjustable louvers 5 placed in the fan conduit 6 on its delivery or outlet side and under the control of the operator through a linkage system 7 which flow at all times system also controls the engine carbureter in such way that when the engine throttle is closed or partly closed the louvers are similarly and correspondingly closed.
hereby the cooling air flowing past the cyllnders is checked or stopped when the engine 15 throttled or adjusted to an idling or no lpad condition and the temperature of the cylinder walls is kept from falling as the result of the reduced fuel combustion.
In Fig. 3 the air flow past the cylinder fins and out of the lower compartment is discharged upwardly by the fan-type flywheel 8 through a passage 9 containing a balanced cylindrical valve 10, the interior of which is open to an outlet or escape for the air as indicated by the arrows. movable valve member 10 is connected to a thermostat 11 of any suitable type, secured in intimate heat-conducting contact with the engine cylinder casting of one of the cylinders preferably between the ribs thereon as indicated, and adapted to move the valve axially on changes of temperature of the engine. The valve ports in this cylindrical valve are so arranged that a falling engine temperature communicated by con duction to the thermostat, will close them and restrict the outflow from the fan accordingly and thereby tend to restore the engine temperature by the reduced cooling effect. The particular form and mounting of the thermostat is not a matter of importance so long as the valve is operated in themanner described and properly and sensitively responds to the temperature changes of the walls of the combustion space in the engine cylinders. The attachment of the thermostat to one cylinder sufiices for all. since they are presumed to be all operated under the same conditions, but the thermo stat may be located at any other point which varies in temperature with the cylinder walls. In effect the thermostat function is the same as that above described in that when the engine receives a minimum fuel supply, due to a reduction of load or speed, the tendency to cool is restrained resulting in a substantially constant engine temperature and in accordance with this invention that substantially constant cylinder temperature is maintained by the said automatic or semi-automatic control of the air much higher than is possible in water-cooled engines and considerably higher than obtains in air-cooled cmgines under normal conditions. The suitable degree has reference to the character of the fuel and. with kerosene should be about 350 F. at the outside surface of the cylinder walls for best results. When the linkage is properly adjusted to maintain this condition the engine produces results in efiiciency and practical convenience which cannot otherwise be obtained with heavy fuels without relatively great complication, if at all,
and such'an engine constitutes a practicalsolution of the problem of usingkerosene for pro elling automobiles and like purposes. as unsuspended liquid into the combustion spaces of this engine is burned therein with far greater efiiciency than if the same fuel were first vaporized outside of the combustion space and subsequently introduced into it in an expanded condition as a mixture of vapor and air. High working efficiencies are thereby secured. The need for exhaustheatedvaporizers is entirely eliminated and the smell, expense and weight of such appliances are avoided. But especially the objectionable contamination of the lubricating oil in the crank case, by the escape of kerosene past the piston is completely eliminated because the above mentioned operating temperature is above that of the condensation of the liquid fuel and it is found that the liquid is vaporized and burned before it can pass the piston rings. In all types of engines receiving carbureted charge mixtures whether air-cooled or water jacketed, thorough vaporization of the fuel liquid is especially sought and is most desirable to secure prior to its entranceto the cylinder, and various complicated vaporizer means have been devised to that end. In the present engine, on the contrary, the presence of fuel in its liquid form in the carbureted mixture is desired and serves the purpose of the invention by .greatly increasing the volumetric efficiency of the engine and the power developed. On this account it is important, that careful provision be made that the several cylinders of the engine re-* ceive identical quantities of fuel in liquid form, whether suspended as spray or unsuspended in the form of a liquid stream entering the intake port with the air, and this invention therefore further includes the ap-' plication of means for assuring equal distribution of the liquid to multi-cylinder aircooled engines operating at the temperature above described,which as stated is always higher than water-jackettemperatures for all engine loads. In Figs. 1 and 2 such means are shown as consisting of a carbureter structure having a spray nozzle 12 opening into a mixing chamber to which air is admitted under the engine suction through iquid fuel carried as spray or even 1 a spring loaded air check 13 as usual in Each intake valve port of thecarbureters. engine is connected to this chamber by a separate suction spray nozzle 12 is provided with plural spray orifices, one opening toward or into each intake, so that the air inrushing from the air check carries or sweeps equal amounts of liquid successively through each plpe to the corresponding cylinder. This method of distributing liquid-bearing charge mixtures is disclosed in'a companion application filed March 16, 1918, Serial No. 222,828
and is preferred for the case in hand although it will be understood that other means may be used in its place to insure proper and equal admission of l1qu1d to each cylinder..
Claims.
1. An internal combustion engine using kerosene or like heavy fuel, having its cylinder or cylinders provided with heat radiating projections and disposed in an engineinduced cooling air flow, 1n combination with supplemental means for varying said air flow adapted automatically to malntain the same or a higher cylinder temperature during no load as during full load, and means for supplying air and fuel in liquid form to said engine.
2. A multi-cylinder combustion engine using kerosene or like heavy fuel having its cylinders provided with heat-radiating projections disposed in an engine-induced cooling air flow, in combination with supplemental means for varying said air flow adapted automatically to maintain the same or a higher cylinder temperature during no load as during full load, and separate intake pipes for each of said cylind'ers connecting the same to a single carbureter whereby equal proportions of fuel liquid are delivered to each cylinder.
3. An internal combustion engine using kerosene or heavy fuel, having its cylinder or cylinders provided with heat radiating projections and disposed in an engine-induced cooling air flow, a throttle controlling said engine and means for varying said air flow in a predetermined relation to the position of said throttle.
4. An internal combustion engine having its cylinder or cylinders provided with heat radiating projections and disposed in an engine-induced cooling air flow, a throttle controlling said engine, means for varyin said air flow and a connection between said intake pipe 14 and the throttle and means adapted to vary the temi specification.
JOHN GOOD.
US227489A 1918-04-09 1918-04-09 Kerosene and like engine Expired - Lifetime US1359166A (en)

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Cited By (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
DE930049C (en) * 1939-11-08 1955-07-07 Phaenomen Werke Gustav Hiller Air-cooled internal combustion engine
US2810374A (en) * 1955-05-12 1957-10-22 Bendix Aviat Corp Manifold fuel injector
US3109416A (en) * 1960-05-09 1963-11-05 Chrysler Corp Multicylinder inline overhead valve engine
US3175584A (en) * 1963-06-27 1965-03-30 Kosoff Harold Compressor valve for internal combustion engine
US4186695A (en) * 1977-08-12 1980-02-05 Bayerische Motoren Werke Intake-tube arrangement for internal combustion engines

Cited By (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
DE930049C (en) * 1939-11-08 1955-07-07 Phaenomen Werke Gustav Hiller Air-cooled internal combustion engine
US2810374A (en) * 1955-05-12 1957-10-22 Bendix Aviat Corp Manifold fuel injector
US3109416A (en) * 1960-05-09 1963-11-05 Chrysler Corp Multicylinder inline overhead valve engine
US3175584A (en) * 1963-06-27 1965-03-30 Kosoff Harold Compressor valve for internal combustion engine
US4186695A (en) * 1977-08-12 1980-02-05 Bayerische Motoren Werke Intake-tube arrangement for internal combustion engines

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