US1323006A - Auxiliary intake fob - Google Patents

Auxiliary intake fob Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US1323006A
US1323006A US1323006DA US1323006A US 1323006 A US1323006 A US 1323006A US 1323006D A US1323006D A US 1323006DA US 1323006 A US1323006 A US 1323006A
Authority
US
United States
Prior art keywords
engine
manifold
fresh air
intake manifold
pipe
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Expired - Lifetime
Application number
Publication date
Application granted granted Critical
Publication of US1323006A publication Critical patent/US1323006A/en
Anticipated expiration legal-status Critical
Expired - Lifetime legal-status Critical Current

Links

Images

Classifications

    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F02COMBUSTION ENGINES; HOT-GAS OR COMBUSTION-PRODUCT ENGINE PLANTS
    • F02MSUPPLYING COMBUSTION ENGINES IN GENERAL WITH COMBUSTIBLE MIXTURES OR CONSTITUENTS THEREOF
    • F02M26/00Engine-pertinent apparatus for adding exhaust gases to combustion-air, main fuel or fuel-air mixture, e.g. by exhaust gas recirculation [EGR] systems
    • F02M26/13Arrangement or layout of EGR passages, e.g. in relation to specific engine parts or for incorporation of accessories
    • F02M26/36Arrangement or layout of EGR passages, e.g. in relation to specific engine parts or for incorporation of accessories with means for adding fluids other than exhaust gas to the recirculation passage; with reformers

Definitions

  • This invention relates to an improved auxiliary intake for internal combustion engines and has as its primary object to provide a device of this character which may be manually controlled for admitting fresh air to the intake manifold of the engine to become mingled with the fuel mixture for increasing the eificiency of such mixture as well as effecting a material saving in the quantity of liquid fuel used, a saving in the consumption of lubricating oil bythe engine and a lesseningg of the heating of the engine.
  • the invention has as a further object to provide a dev-i'ee wherein heated gases will be drawn from the exhaust manifold of the engine in such manner that when the device is manually operated to admitufresh air to the intake manifold, such fresfifair will be previously mixed with the said gases and heated thereby to consequently prevent cooling of the fuel mixture in the intake manifold by'the inrushing fresh air.
  • the invention has as a still further object to provide an arrangement wherein the lubricant laden vapors in the engine crank case will also be drawn therefrom and directed into the intake manifold to'be thence carried into the enginecylinderslfor lubricating the pistons and piston rings.
  • a still further object of the invention is to provide a device of the. above described. character wherein the fiow' of mixed exhaust gases and lubricant laden vapors from the crank case into the intake manifold will be constant so long as theengine is running without regard to the manual control of I the device for also at the same time admitting fresh air to the said manifold.
  • Figure 1 is a fragmentary side elevation showing my improved device applied to a conventional type of motor vehicle engine, a portion of the vehicle body being shown in section to illustrate the disposition of the.
  • Fig. 2 is a fragmentary perspective view showing the device in detail, portions of the engine being also shown to illustrate the con-- nection between the device and the'breather plpe and exhaust manifold of the engine.
  • abody 16 providing a mixing chamber.
  • This body is formed with -a main elongated tubular portion open atits ends and provided upon its upper side with an upstanding inlet 17.
  • alaterally directed outlet or nipple 18 Extending from the rear side ofthe body is alaterally directed outlet or nipple 18 which is tapped into the intake manifold 11 to support the *said connection, in the manner shown in Fig, 1, at the outer side of the manifold.
  • Threaded into the inlet 17 of the body is a pet cock 19 equipped with a valve 20 providing a fresh air inlet valve.
  • This valve at one end is formed with a thumb piece 21 through which is fitted the later-- ally directed terminal of a control rod for the valve.
  • the rod 22 is, as shown in Fig. 1, inclined upwardly from the valve and at its outer extremity is rotatably fitted through the dash 15 and provided with a suitable handle 23. As will be readily understood this handle may be easily operated for rotating the rod to either open or close the valve.
  • a suitable handle 23 Extending from one end of the main tubular portion of the body 16 is a preferably flexible metal pipe 24 secured at its adjacent end to the body by a coupling nut 25. The opposite end of this pipe is carried to the exhaust manifold 12 and is arranged to cooperate with a nipple 25 tapped into the said manifold and receiving a coupling nut 26 connecting the said pipe with the nipple.
  • Extending from the opposite end of the main tubular portion of the body 16 is a preferably flexible metal pipe receiving a coupling nut 30 connecting the pipe 27 with the nipple.
  • the pipe 24 establishes constant communication between the exhaust manifold and the intake manifold through the body 16.
  • the pipe 27 establishes constant communication between the breather pipe 13 and the intake mani-.
  • the air inlet valve 20 may, by proper actuation of the control rod .22 therefor, be readily opened to admit a supply of fresh air into the body 16 to become mixed in the mixing chamber thereof with the flow of exhaust gases and lubricant laden vapors through the saidbody.
  • I have p1 0 vided a very simple and efiicient construction for the purpose set forth and a device wherein either a mixture of exhaust gases and lubricantladen vapors may be introduced into the intake manifold of the engine,
  • a mixture of fresh air, exhaust gases and lubricant laden vapors may be delivered to the said manifold. though it is not desired to admit fresh air to-the manifold, as, for instance, when starting the en ine, or during extremely cold weather, e cient lubrication of the engine pistons may, nevertheless, be had by the introduction of the mixture of exhaust gases and lubricant laden vapors into the intake manifold when the fresh air inlet valve is closed. 7 v
  • an internal combustion engine in combination, an internal combustion engine, a hollow body connected to the intake manifold of the engine intermediate of the ends of'said manifold, a pipe extending from the body and communicating with the engine crank case, and a second pipe extending from the body and communicating with the exhaust manifold of the engine.
  • an internal combustion engine in combination, an internal combustion engine, a hollow body connected to the intake manifold of the engine intermediate the ends of said manifold, a pipe extending from the body and communicating with the engine crank case, a second pipe extending from the body and communicating with the exhaust manifold ofthe engine, and a valve controlled fresh air inlet carried by the body.
  • a device of the character described including a tubular body provided with lateral inlet and outlet nipples, a fresh air valve carried by the inletnipple, the outlet nipple WILLIAM FRANKLIN BRANEN. [11.5.]

Description

W. F. BRANEN.
AUXlLIARY INTAKE FOR INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINES.
APPLICATION FILED wins. 1918.
9 Y Patented Nov. 25, 1919.
WILLIAM FRANKLIN BRANEN, o'F SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH.
' AUXILIARY INTAKE FOB- IN'IERNAL-COM BUSTION ENGINES.
Specification of Letters Patent.
Patented Nov. 25, 1919.
Application filed March 5, 1918. Serial No. 220,561.
To all whom it may concern:
Be it known that I, WILLIAM F. BRANEN, a citizen of the United States, residing at Salt Lake City, in the county of Salt Lake and State of Utah, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in Auxiliary Intakes for Internal-Combustion Engines, of which the following is a specification.
This invention relates to an improved auxiliary intake for internal combustion engines and has as its primary object to provide a device of this character which may be manually controlled for admitting fresh air to the intake manifold of the engine to become mingled with the fuel mixture for increasing the eificiency of such mixture as well as effecting a material saving in the quantity of liquid fuel used, a saving in the consumption of lubricating oil bythe engine and a lesseningg of the heating of the engine. v
The invention has as a further object to provide a dev-i'ee wherein heated gases will be drawn from the exhaust manifold of the engine in such manner that when the device is manually operated to admitufresh air to the intake manifold, such fresfifair will be previously mixed with the said gases and heated thereby to consequently prevent cooling of the fuel mixture in the intake manifold by'the inrushing fresh air.
The invention has as a still further object to provide an arrangement wherein the lubricant laden vapors in the engine crank case will also be drawn therefrom and directed into the intake manifold to'be thence carried into the enginecylinderslfor lubricating the pistons and piston rings.
And a still further object of the invention is to provide a device of the. above described. character wherein the fiow' of mixed exhaust gases and lubricant laden vapors from the crank case into the intake manifold will be constant so long as theengine is running without regard to the manual control of I the device for also at the same time admitting fresh air to the said manifold.
Other and incidental objects will appear as the description proceeds, and in the drawings wherein I have illustrated the preferred embodiment of the invention, and
wherein similar reference characters designate corresponding parts throughout the several views:
Figure 1 is a fragmentary side elevation showing my improved device applied to a conventional type of motor vehicle engine, a portion of the vehicle body being shown in section to illustrate the disposition of the.
control rod of the device, and
Fig. 2 is a fragmentary perspective view showing the device in detail, portions of the engine being also shown to illustrate the con-- nection between the device and the'breather plpe and exhaust manifold of the engine.
In order that the construction, mounting and operation of my improved device may be accurately understood, I have, in the drawings, shown the said device in connection with a conventional type of motor vehicle engine 10. This engine is provided with the usual intake and exhaust manifolds 11 and 12 respectively, as well as a breather pipe 13. A portion of the vehicle body is shown at 14 and this body is provided with a dash 15.
In carrying out the invention my improved deviee is formed with abody 16 providing a mixing chamber. This body is formed with -a main elongated tubular portion open atits ends and provided upon its upper side with an upstanding inlet 17. Extending from the rear side ofthe body is alaterally directed outlet or nipple 18 which is tapped into the intake manifold 11 to support the *said connection, in the manner shown in Fig, 1, at the outer side of the manifold. Threaded into the inlet 17 of the body is a pet cock 19 equipped with a valve 20 providing a fresh air inlet valve. This valve at one end is formed with a thumb piece 21 through which is fitted the later-- ally directed terminal of a control rod for the valve. The rod 22 is, as shown in Fig. 1, inclined upwardly from the valve and at its outer extremity is rotatably fitted through the dash 15 and provided with a suitable handle 23. As will be readily understood this handle may be easily operated for rotating the rod to either open or close the valve. Extending from one end of the main tubular portion of the body 16 is a preferably flexible metal pipe 24 secured at its adjacent end to the body by a coupling nut 25. The opposite end of this pipe is carried to the exhaust manifold 12 and is arranged to cooperate with a nipple 25 tapped into the said manifold and receiving a coupling nut 26 connecting the said pipe with the nipple. Extending from the opposite end of the main tubular portion of the body 16 is a preferably flexible metal pipe receiving a coupling nut 30 connecting the pipe 27 with the nipple.
As will now be seen, the pipe 24 establishes constant communication between the exhaust manifold and the intake manifold through the body 16. In like manner the pipe 27 establishes constant communication between the breather pipe 13 and the intake mani-.
fold through the said body. Consequently, as long as the engine isrunning suction in the intake manifold will actto draw in a steady flow of exhaust gases from the exhaust manifold and a steady flow of lubricant laden vapors from the engine crank case, it being understood, of course, that the breather pipe 13 with which the pipe 27 is connected, is in direct communication with the crank case. The exhaust gases and vapors-so drawn in will meet within the body 16 to become mingled or mixed in the mixing chamber thereof so that the va pors from the crank case will be heated by the said gases before being introduced into the manifold. Consequently, the mixture of exhaust gases and vapors will not act to chill the fuel mixture from the engine carbureter. From the intake manifold, the mixture of exhaust gases and lubricant laden vapors will, of course, be delivered into the engine cylinders to effect the lubrication of the pistons and piston rings. The proper lubrication of these parts will thus always be insured and the efliciency of the engine accordingly increased due to the reduction of possible friction. In this connection it is to be observed that the flow of mixed exhaust gases and lubricant laden vapors into the intake manifold will be'uninterrupted as long as the engine is running and without regard to the manual manipulation of the air inlet valve 20. I
In view of the preceding description, it will now be seen that the air inlet valve 20 may, by proper actuation of the control rod .22 therefor, be readily opened to admit a supply of fresh air into the body 16 to become mixed in the mixing chamber thereof with the flow of exhaust gases and lubricant laden vapors through the saidbody. The 55.
said exhaust gases will thus also act to heat such supply of fresh air before it is introduced into the intake manifold of the engine. Chilling of the fuel mixture within the said manifold by the fresh air supply will thus be obviated. Such fresh air upon becoming mingled, in the intake manifold, with the 1 sumption of liquidfuel will be materially reduced. The volume of the fresh air flow may, of course, be regulated by adjustment of the valve 20. Y
, It will, therefore, be seen that I have p1 0 vided a very simple and efiicient construction for the purpose set forth and a device wherein either a mixture of exhaust gases and lubricantladen vapors may be introduced into the intake manifold of the engine,
.or a mixture of fresh air, exhaust gases and lubricant laden vapors may be delivered to the said manifold. though it is not desired to admit fresh air to-the manifold, as, for instance, when starting the en ine, or during extremely cold weather, e cient lubrication of the engine pistons may, nevertheless, be had by the introduction of the mixture of exhaust gases and lubricant laden vapors into the intake manifold when the fresh air inlet valve is closed. 7 v
Having thus described the invention, what is claimed as new is:
1. In a device of the character described, in combination, an internal combustion engine, a hollow body connected to the intake manifold of the engine intermediate of the ends of'said manifold, a pipe extending from the body and communicating with the engine crank case, and a second pipe extending from the body and communicating with the exhaust manifold of the engine.
2. In a device of the character described, in combination, an internal combustion engine, a hollow body connected to the intake manifold of the engine intermediate the ends of said manifold, a pipe extending from the body and communicating with the engine crank case, a second pipe extending from the body and communicating with the exhaust manifold ofthe engine, and a valve controlled fresh air inlet carried by the body. v
3. A device of the character described including a tubular body provided with lateral inlet and outlet nipples, a fresh air valve carried by the inletnipple, the outlet nipple WILLIAM FRANKLIN BRANEN. [11.5.]
Consequently, even
US1323006D Auxiliary intake fob Expired - Lifetime US1323006A (en)

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US1323006A true US1323006A (en) 1919-11-25

Family

ID=3390463

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US1323006D Expired - Lifetime US1323006A (en) Auxiliary intake fob

Country Status (1)

Country Link
US (1) US1323006A (en)

Cited By (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2786457A (en) * 1954-04-14 1957-03-26 Fairchild Engine & Airplane Engine exhaust disposal system
US3224188A (en) * 1964-04-10 1965-12-21 Joseph S Barlow Combustion control

Cited By (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2786457A (en) * 1954-04-14 1957-03-26 Fairchild Engine & Airplane Engine exhaust disposal system
US3224188A (en) * 1964-04-10 1965-12-21 Joseph S Barlow Combustion control

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US1323006A (en) Auxiliary intake fob
US2700967A (en) Fuel system of internal-combustion engines
US1766900A (en) Internal-combustion engine
US1397780A (en) Fuel-feeding system
US1512954A (en) System for lubricating internal-combustion engines
US1916952A (en) Charge forming and feeding means for internal combustion engines
US1456025A (en) Auxiliary carburetor
US1440689A (en) Oil-cooling system for internal-combustion engines
US1472438A (en) Auxiliary water vapor and air valve for internal-combustion engines
US1792495A (en) Carburetor
US1507950A (en) Auxiliary fuel supplier
US1157189A (en) Air-heater for gasolene-engines.
US1506430A (en) Fuel economizer for internal-combustion engines
US2258902A (en) Exhaust gas return device for internal combustion engines
US1631362A (en) Charge-forming device for internal-combustion engines
US1445194A (en) Charge preheating and vaporizing device
US1384702A (en) Air-moistener
US1257089A (en) Fuel-vaporizing device for internal-combustion engines.
US1887044A (en) Fuel heater and vaporizer
US1316953A (en) Automatic air and vapor device for internal-combustion engines.
US1129723A (en) Starting attachment for internal-combustion engines.
US1377529A (en) Carbureter for internal-combustion engines
US1246903A (en) Manifold.
US1424541A (en) Vaporizer or carburetor for internal-combustion engines and process of vaporizing the motive fluid for such engines
US1626061A (en) Internal-combustion engine