US1256509A - Addressing-machine. - Google Patents

Addressing-machine. Download PDF

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US1256509A
US1256509A US15104417A US15104417A US1256509A US 1256509 A US1256509 A US 1256509A US 15104417 A US15104417 A US 15104417A US 15104417 A US15104417 A US 15104417A US 1256509 A US1256509 A US 1256509A
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card
printing
cam
magazine
tray
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US15104417A
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Edwin D Belknap
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Robert Bosch GmbH
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    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B41PRINTING; LINING MACHINES; TYPEWRITERS; STAMPS
    • B41LAPPARATUS OR DEVICES FOR MANIFOLDING, DUPLICATING OR PRINTING FOR OFFICE OR OTHER COMMERCIAL PURPOSES; ADDRESSING MACHINES OR LIKE SERIES-PRINTING MACHINES
    • B41L47/00Details of addressographs or like series-printing machines
    • B41L47/42Printing mechanisms
    • B41L47/46Printing mechanisms using line-contact members, e.g. rollers, cylinders

Description

E. D. BELKNAP. ADDRESSING MACHINE.
APPLICATION FILED FEB-26.1917.
Patentedv Feb. 19, 1918.
E. D. BELKNAP. ADDRESSING MACHINE. APPLICATION FILED ria'fzs, 1912.
Patented Feb. 19, 1918.
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ADDRESSING MACHINE.
APPLICATION FILED FEB-26. I917.
1,256,509. Patented Feb. 19,1918.
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ADDRESSING MACHINE.
APPLICATION FILED FEB-26,1917- Patented Feb. 19,191&
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ADDRESSING MACHINE. APPLICATION FILED FEB. 26. 1911.
Patented Feb. 19, 1918.
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ADDRESSING MACHINE.
APPLICATION FILED FEB. 26. I917.
Patented Feb. 19, 1918.
I SHEETS-SHEET 6- v g E an m NAN v x a WIIIIIII A N w i i l1 I E. mm n. m g o V QQ H HM 3N a Mm I RM & v mm 0 9% M wwmm 9W mm mm Hm w. h. www Q 3% ms w mm & Q ww ww E. n. BELKNAP ADDRESSING MACHINE.
APPLICATION FILED FEB. 26. I917- Patented F615. 19, 1918 I SHEETS- SHEQI' 7- I A i-1W1] I.
EDWIN n. IBELKNAP, or n-As'r omen, NEW JERSEY.
ADDRESSING-MACHINE.
To all whom it may concern:
Be it known that I, EDWIN D. BELKNAP, a citizen of the United States of America, residing at East Orange, county of Essex, State of N ewJersey, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in Addressing-Machines, of which the following is a specification.
My invention relates to printing mechanism generally but more specifically consists of certain improvements in that type of printing apparatus which employs stencil cards as an element in the printing mechanism and which is'more especially designed for addressing mail matter by means of such stencil cards. My invention finds its most ready application to machines of this type in which a series of stencil cards are pulled out. one by one from the bottom of a pile in a magazine, fed by a reciproeating claw apparatus to an'inking device in which the article to be addressed is pressed down on the card so fed out while an inking roller passes along the under side of the card, and
on the next repetition of this cycle of operations the used card is forced out into a collecting box. A good example of such general type of machine is shown in my U. S.
Patent No. 976,142, dated Nov. 22, 1910. The more important hereinafter described improvements on such basic construction may be grouped as follows:
First. Improvements in general operating mechanism by which themachine may either be automatically thrown out of gear after each cycle of operations, or may be run continuously and by which the printing mechanism may be temporarily disabled while any number of cards, from which no printing is desired, may be fed through the machlne, This last I call the skip mechanism.
Second. Improvemens by which the card feeding mechanism may be automatically varied in action so that (a) one card will be fed out for each printing cycle, (6) each card may be held in printing position during two, three or more cycles of operation, or (c) any particular card may beheld in printing position indefinitely so that the apparatus becomes in effect an ordinary receiving or collecting appara-tus,.-the re- 7 Specification of Letters Patent. Patented Feb. 19, 1918.
' Application filed February 26, 1917. Serial No. 151,044.
ceiving capacity of which is increased by just the proper amount as each additional card is deposited in it, and which has automatically operating gates which allow the card box to be removed therefrom only when the apparatus is in proper position for discharging.
Fourth. A coiiperating device by which the extra weight resulting from the use of the third above mentioned feature is lifted from the cards in the magazine during each feeding operation.
Fifth. An auxiliary printing device by whicha character indicating the article to be mailed in the wrapper or envelop being addressed may be marked on a portion of the stencil card frame designed for such records, and
Sixth. An improved inking mechanism.
There are in addition minor points of improvements which will be hereinafter pointed out.
The best form of apparatus at present known to me embodying my invention is illustrated in the accompanying seven sheets of drawings in which,
Figure 1 is a side elevation of the complete machine, parts being broken away and others omitted.
Fig. 2, is an enlarged detail side view of the upper part of the machine, parts being shown in cross section.
Fig. 2*, is a detail plan view of the card compressing platen in the card magazine.
Fig. 3 is a general plan view of the machine, parts being broken away, others shown in section and still others removed.
Fig. 4 is an enlarged perspective view of the front of the machine, parts being broken away, and others removed.
Fig. 5 is a detail side elevation of the lower end of the card receiving box, and support therefor.
Fig. 6 is a detail receiving tray.
Fig. 7 is a detail edge view of the driving cranks and main clutch parts being broken away. 2'
Fig. 8 is an end view of the clutch and face view 0 the crank.
Fig. 9 is a detail perspective view of the operating treadles and connections.
Fig. 10 is a detail side elevation and partial section on different planes of the inking mechanism, parts being broken away.
ig. 11, isa front view of the same, parts plan view of the card h eing broken awav and others shown in section.
Fig. 12 is a plan view of the same with parts broken away.
Fig. 13 is a detail side elevation of-the card feed mechanism, parts being broken away and others shown in section.
gig. 14 is a similar'front view of the same, an
Fig. 15 is a partial plan view and horizontal section of the same parts.
Fig. .16 is a detail side view of the duplicating cam.
Fig. 17 is a detail view of the handle and sector controlling the duplicating attachment.
. F ig. 18 shows the u per side of the preferred form of stem i1 card when in the position assumed in the herein described machine, and v i Fig. 19 shows the under side of such card.
Throughout the drawings like reference characters indicate like parts.
Main clutch and Mining mechanism.
The. main frame of the machine is composed of the four uprights, 1, 1, supporting table 2, and braced by cross bars 3, 3. A, represents generally the magazine of stencil cards, B, the printing mechanism and C, the card receiving or collecting apparatus. 4, is an electric motor driving the machine through belt 5, and grooved pulley 6, mounted on stud shaft 7 carried by one of the cross bars 3. Pulley 6, has one or more drivstuds 8, 8, on the inner face of its hub adapted to engage the spring: controlled, endwise sliding stud 9, mounted in clutch member 10. which is loosely mounted on stud shaft 7. (See Fig. 7). The clutch member is grooved circumferentially at 11. and the full portion of sliding stud 9, projects into said groove. though the cutaway portion 12, does not 13,' s a spring normally forcing stud 9, toward pulley 6, so as to engage one of the fixed driving studs 8. 8, thereon. 14, is a cam shaped hook which has a bevel d side face and is pivoted to the main frame at 15 (see Fig. 1) and connected by l nk 16, to main treadle 17, which is pivoted to the main frame at 18, and normally held up by spring 19, against stop 20, (see Fig.
. 9). When motor 4, is revolving pulley 6,
and main treadle 17,is held up in the norr al posi ion shown in Figs. 1 and 9, the cam hook 14, lies in groove 11, as shown in Fi 7, and enters the cut away space 12. in sl ding stud 9. as clutch member 10. revolves, thereby wedging or pulling the stud 9. away from en a ement with the driving studs 8, and tripping the clutch. so that thereafter pulley 6, revolves idly. These cooperating parts also act in a measure as a brake to prevent any further rotation of the clutch and connected mechanism after the clutch mecha- 1 adjustable crank 25.
nism is tripped. When, however, the operator depresses main treadle 17, cam hook 14, is pulled away from groove 11, spring 13, forces sliding stud out into the path of driving studs 8, 8, one of these engages stud 9, and the clutch is thrown into action, member 10, being then locked to and revolving with pulley 6. If the treadle 17, is released at any time after the clutch parts have thus engaged the cam hook, 14, returns to groove 11, and after the clutch member 10, has completed the revolution then in progress the sliding stud 9, is again withdrawn and the clutch again tripped.
21, is acrank pin on clutch member 10, to which connecting rod 22, operating printing mechanism B, is pivoted. 23, is a false crank on the end of pin 21, and on this is pivoted at 24, in line with the axis of pulley 6, the adjustable crank 25, which may be swung angularly in adjustment by operating screws 26, 26,-mounted in threaded lugs 27 27. on false crank 23, and engaging either side of lug 28,'which projects laterally from This adjustable crank carries crank pin 29. to which is .pivoted a second connecting rod 30, which operates the card feed mechanism. "When the clutch member 10 revolves. connecting rods 22, and 30, are thereby reciprocated with the following results.
0am? feeding mechanism.
Connecting rod 30, reciprocates bell crank 31, fast on shaft 32. iournaled in housing 34, d pending from table 2. Aconnecting rod 33. pivoted at one end to the other arm of hell crank 31, is pivoted at its other end to c rriage 35. sliding on'horizontal ways 36, 36, (see F g. 3). Carriage 35, thus reciprocated carr es claws 37, 37 pivoted to it at 38, (see F g. 13). The rear ends of these pivoted claws are jo ned by cross pi ce 39 (Figs. 13 a d 15) carrying anti-friction roller 40, wh ch runs on the outer rib 41. of vertically adiustable frame 42, when the latter is raised. When frame 42, is dropped, however, (as is the case during normal operation of the machine) the small spiral springs 37, 37 shown in dotted lines in Fig. 3. force up the. outer ends of claws 37. 37, so that as the ends of its outward travel on the first en-' ga eme t of it by claws 37. it runs onto the u wardly sloped. y eld ng card stop 44 (see Fig. 10) which by friction prevents the card being carried by its momentum beyond the point where the claws leave it. The card will stop withits advancing edge over the Printing mechanism.
Connecting rod 22, is pivoted at its upper end at 45, to T-cam 46, which is pivoted by shaft 47 to housing 48, depending from table 2. The T-cam 46, has an external cam face 49, on which runs roller 50, carried by lever 51, pivoted at 52, on the depending arm of bell crank 53, which is pivoted on the main frame at 54, and the upper arm of which carries the platen 55. This platen bell crank is normally held in the raised position shown in Figs. 1 and 2, by spring 56. hen lever 51, is held in normal position shown in these figures of drawing by spring 57, so that cam roller 50, is lowered as shown in full lines, each downward movement of T-cam 46, causes its externalface 49. to shove roller 50, and lever 51, to the left, rotating platen bell crank 53, clockwise and lowering platen 55, onto the stencil card 43, which has been fed beneath it by two cycles of operation of the previously described card feed mechanism. Prior to this the operator has placed under the platen and over the card the envelop, wrappersheet, billhead or other article to be printed, and the descending platen has clamped this down on top of the stencil card 43. By the same operation ink is forced through the permeable portions of the stencil card onto the article thus clamped down on the card.
This inking mechanism comprises reciprocating ink roller 58, mounted on shaft 59 (see Fig. 3) journaled in reciprocating yoke 60. The ends of-the shaft 59, run in guides 61, 61, cored out in the inner faces,
of the shirts of the casting forming table 2. Yoke 60, is pivoted to crank arm 62, on shaft 63, journaled in housing 67. On the end of shaft 63, is cam crank 64, carrying anti-friction cam roller 65, which runs in the internal cam groove 66, formed on the inner face of the T-head of T-cam 46. The lower half of this cam groove 66, as shown in dotted lines in Fig. 2, is concentric to the center 47, so that no motion is given roller 65, during the first half of the downward swing of T-cam 46, under pull of connecting; rod 22, but during the last half of each downward swing of the cam, the straight upper part of cam groove 66, comes into action, oscillates the bell crank 62-6364,
I and drives ink roller 58, out along guide slots 61, which lift the roller up against the under face of card 43, so that it forces ink through the card onto the en elop or other article held on top of the card by platen 55, and stencils the address or other markings on said envelop. On the upward swing of the cam, the above described action is of course reversed.
Referring to Figs. 10, 11 and 12, 68 is a doctor roll mounted on a shaft 69, journaled in yoke 70, which swings loosely on shaft 47. This shaft also serves as pivot for T-head cam 46, as before described. Yoke 70, has a depending lug 73, which carries adjusting screw 74, which rests against swinging tongue 75, pivoted at 76, to housing 72. Tongue 75, carries anti-friction roller 75, which runs on cam 77, fixed on shaft 47. On the outer end of shaft 69, of doctor roll 68, is pinion 78, meshing with quadrant gear .7 9, also mounted on shaft 47. Both T-cam 46, and quadrant gear 79, are fast on shaft. 47, but to make the connection between these two more rigid still a pin 80, projecting from quadrant 79, extends under T-cam 46. Accordingly when 46,.is pulled down by connecting rod 22, quadrant gear 7 9, moves with it and rotates doctor roll 68, through the agency of pinion 78. While at rest in the position shown in Fig. 10, and during the initial portion of its rotation doctor roll 68 is in contact with wick 81, mounted in ink fountain 82. The ink pulled up through wick 81, by capillary attraction is thus transferred to the surface and soaked into the body of doctor roll 68. When cam 77. comes into play it swings tongue 7 5, to the left (looking at Fig. 10) and that tips yoke 70, upward through the agency of screw contact 74, so that doctor roll 68, (still rotating), is lifted up into contact with ink roller 58, and rotated against the same, transferring ink thereto. 83, (see Fig. 12) is a spring plunger which tends to force yoke 70, downward against swinging tongue 75. Screw 74, adjusts the position of yoke 70, so that doctor roll 68, will rest on wick 81, with just the right pressure. 84, is a screw capped opening through which ink may be introduced into fountain or reservoir 82, which rests on bracket 85, and into which wick 81, extends.
It is evident that if lever 51, be lifted on pivot 52, so that anti-friction roller 50, is out of contact with cam face 49, of T-cam 46, as shown in dotted lines in Fig. 2, the platen bell-crank 53, will not be oscillated and platen 55, will remain stationary in the lifted position shown in Figs. 1 and 2, during all periods of operation of the rest of the mechanism. This disabling of the printing mechanism can be efi'ected by the skip attachment comprising second treadle 104, pivoted at 105, to main treadle 17, resting on lug 106, projecting laterally from main one end of hook-lever 108, pivoted on shaft 47. When second treadle 104, is depressed it not only depresses the main treadle 17, through the agency of lug 106, and throws in the main clutch, but it also lifts the hooked end of lever 108,- which engages the shaft extension 109,- of anti-friction roller 50, and lifts said roller out of operative relation with cam face 49, as shown in dotted lines in Fig. 2. While second treadle 104, is held down the cards will be fed through without any action of the main printing mechanism, z. e. the cards not to be used skip by without being used until a card to be used appears. Then release of second treadle 104, brings the printing mechanism into action on the card so appearing.
Reverting to the operation of the printing mechanism, it should be said that the doctor roll 68, is a roll of solid felt such as is described in my U. S. Patent No. 1208270, and absorbs ink from wick 81, by capillary action whenever in contact therewith. Gn ac- .count of the concentric outline of the lower half of cam 66, the inking roller 58, remains at rest with its shaft resting in the lower end of cam guides 61, during the first and last quarter of each cycle of operations. Soon after the beginning of each cycle the cam 77, comes into action and forces doctor roll 68, away from wick 81, up against inking roll 58, and as 68, is continuously ro-' tated by gearing 7 87 9, inking roller 58, is rotated by frictional contact with 68, and ink is evenly transferred to all its surface. At the begining of the second quarter of the cycle the straight part of cam 66, comes into action and 58 is shot out along guides 61,
under the stencil card and rotated by frictional contact therewith. During the third quarter of the cycle 58 is retracted and during the fourth quarter it is again being rotated by contact latter drops down on wick 81. While the clutch 10, is out of engagement, 68 rests continuously on 81, and has ample oppo tunityto absorb ink therefrom.
The mechanism so far described inks the stencil card and effects the main printing.
'There is, however, a second or auxiliary printing mechanism for printing a record on the stencil card itself. This comprises an endless ink ribbon 86, running over inking roller 87, around guide rolls 99, 99, and over one or more types 88, set in slide 89, mounted in table 2, under auxiliary platen 90. This slide has a row of holes. 91 (see Fig. 3) in any one of which a type 88, (see Fig. 10) may be set. These holes correspond to the eight columns headed S or F on the under side of the stencil. card 43. as shown. in Fig. 19. If a card with a different number of such columns were to be with 68, until at the end the eashes of a movement in guides 92, in table 2. (see Fig. 11) along the line of card travel under control of hand lever 93, pivoted to the table at 94, and connected to slide 89, by link 95. Sockets 96, 96, are formed in one guide, into which a round nosed plunger 97, carried by the slide may be forced by spring 98, (see Fig. 3) to hold the slide in different positions to bring the type 88, in line with one or another of the cross lines of spaces marked Catalogue, Booklet, etc., on the under face of each card 43, as indicated in Fig. 19. By grasping the lever 93, the o erator can move slide 89, so that plunger 9%, drops into the right socket 96, to bring type 88, over which ribbon 86, has been placed, on the line of spaces on card 43, opposite the word Catalogue, when the wrappers or envelops for a shipment of catalogues are being addressed on the machine. rollers 99, 99, can be shifted so as to bring the ribbon 86 under the proper column marked S or F (which stand for the spring or fall) on the under face of the card, the ribbon being properly located between tip; corresponding guides 86 86 (see Fig. 1 is a lot of wrappers for catalogue No. 5, to be distributed in the fall of 1917, a type 88, would be set in fourth type socket 91, the ribbon 86, would be placed over the type and slide 89, would be moved so that the type 5 would hold the" ribbon up against the card on the line opposite Catalogue, whenever the card had stopped in position for cooperation with the main printing mechanism. Then when the platen 55, drops to print with the card, auxiliary platen 90,
will press the card border or frame down on the ink ribbon and the character 5 will be printed thereon as shownv in Fig. 19.@ A feeding action for the ink ribbon 86, is suplied by ratchet wheel 100, on the shaft of ink roller .87, operated by gravity pawl 101, pivoted at 102, to quadrant gear 79. Pin 103, acts as a stop for pawl 101, when it is lifted'away from ratchet wheel 100, by Loscillation of the quadrant gear 79.
Inking roller 87, is preferably made o? a highly absorbent material such as a so id bodyof felt, in accordance with the description' of U. S. PatentNo. 1,208,270, previously referred to, and thoroughly saturated with ink. Such a roller will hold a sufficient amount of ink to keep the endlessv ink ribbon saturated during a long period of use. Thus any necessity for changing ink ribbons with the ordinary frequency, is
avoided.
4 Uard handling devices. I
The guide such as are described in U. S. Patent No.
775,696, granted to F. D. Belknap, Nov. 22,
1904. Such a tray containing cards designed to be used in the machlne is-set in magazine A, and its clips 111, then swung outwardly as indicated in dotted lines in Fig. 6, so that they no longer engage the ends of the column of cards in the tray.
A toggle lock for holding the swinging back I' in either of its two positions is supplied by links 116, 117, pivoted or hinged together at;
121. Short link 116, is pivoted to the front} section 113, at 118. Long link 117, has at right angled bend and is connected to swing-' ing rear section 114, by pin 119, working in slot 120, in the longer arm of link 117. When the magazine is to be opened the operator swings long link 117 out into the dotted line position and swinging section 114, can then be tipped back until pin 119, reaches the outer endof slot 120. The empty tray is then removed, a full one substituted and section 114, swung up to'the vertical full-line position shown in Figs. 1 and 2. Slotted link 117 then drops by gravity into the vertical position shown in full lines in Fig. 1, and locks the parts in. vertical position. "When a tray 110, with cards in it is being. handled,
horizontal groove or slot in lug 131. The
as during insertion in magazineA, the clips 111, are swung into position shown in full lines in Fig. 6, to prevent thecards slippingout of the open ends of the tray.
The card receiving or collecting apparatus C, is composedof an upper section 122, located at the front of the machine at the end of card guides 44, and a sliding base 123, supported on bracket 124, at a distance below 122, equal to the length of a tray 110,
This base 123, is supported by slide rods 1 125, 125, running in guide thimbles or perforated bosses 126, on bracket 124. The base 123, has slots 127 127, into which the lower end of a card tray 110, fits. The upper section has slots 122, into which the upper end of such card tray fits. The cards discharged from printing mechanism B, collect in the tray 110, untilit is filled, clips 111, being swung out to permit the cards to drop into the tray. They are prevented from falling out of the open front of the tray by locking clip 128, which is composed of a bent rod the upper vertically extending end of wh ch is journaled in the telescopebearing 129,
lug 131, projecting laterally from sliding base 123. The lower vertically extending end of 128, has a boss or rounded shoulder 132, which can drop into a socket in lug 131, as indicated in Fig. 5, while its horizontal section normally. rests in a slot in the upper face of lug 131. The clip-is of such length that when base 123, is slid in-ward as shown in Fig. 4, so that tray 110 stands vertical, the upward movement in telescope bearing 129, is limited so that the horizontal portion at the lower end of the clip 128, cannot be freed from the slot in lug'131, and the clip is held in the position shown in Figs. '3, 4, and 5, in front of tray 110, so that the cards cannot fall out. When the sliding base 123, is pulled out, (rods 125 sliding in guide thimbles 126) the distance from hinge 130,. to lug 131, is increased so that" by sliding clip 128, up as far as it will go into telescope bearing 129, its lower end is free from the slot in lug 131. This is indicated in dotted lines in Fig. 4, though of course, the clip could not be lifted into the dotted line position without sliding out the base 123. When lifted as indicated in" dotted lines in vFig. 4, the clip may be swung outward on boss bearing 132, and telescope bearing 129. The tray 110, can then be removed by hand, and as its upper end has then been tipped backward by the sliding outward of base 123, there will be no danger of the stack of cards falling out of its unguarded front. When an empty tray is put back into the apparatus its lower end sits in grooves 127, and its upper end comes under slots 122, the clip 128, is swung in front of it and the horizontal portion of its lower end falls into the and when clips 111, are swung out'to permit cards to enter at the top there would be nothing to prevent them falling all the way through and out at the bottom. The
card support or foot 133, carried on bracket 134, guided by anti-friction wheels 135, 135, running on vertical rods 136, 136 (-see Fig. 1) and movable up and down'thereon, suports the stack of used cards accumulatmg in the card receptacle C. This foot extends around the side of and into tray 110, as shown in Fig. 4. When the full tray'is to be taken out lugs 111, are swung into position shown in full lines in Fig. 6', so as to be under the bottom of the column of cards,
' the ma and foot 133, is dropped below the end of the card tray, the goose neck 124*, in bracket 124, permitting bracket 134, to drop that far. Bracket .134, in its turn is supported by vertical rod 137, which extends up through anti-friction guide 138, and terminates in a platen 139, adapted to rest on top of the stack of cards in magazine A. 'When magazine A, is full, card receptacle C, is empty and vice versa. As one card is pulled from the bottom of the stack in the magazine by the claw feed the platen 139, rod 137, bracket 134, and card supporting foot 133, fall as a unit a distance equal to the thickness of one card so that automatically space is created in the receiving system C, for that card which the same feeding action is expelling from the printing mechanism B, and depositing in the collecting apparatus.
140, is a spring pawl on bracket 134, and pin 141, is a stop therefor. 142, is a cooperating toe on shaft 32. When the machine is at rest, 71. c. with the parts in position shown in Fig. 1, and bracket 134, is lifted up by hand, pawl 140, will slip over toe 142, and when the bracket is released the pawl will rest on the toe, being held in horizontal position by stop 141. Platen 139, and foot 133, will then be held in their highest ositions. The first operation of in'e will, however, withdraw toe 142, from under pawl 140, and the parts will then drop until platen 139, comes to a bearing on top of the stack of cards in magazine'A.
It is evident that with the construction above described there will be a considerable weight pressing down on the bottom card in magazine A. There is always the weight of whatever cards are stacked above it in the magazine and there is also the weight of platen 139, bracket 134, rod 137, and connected parts. The resulting pressure if unrelieved would produce great frictional resistance to the forcing out of the bottom card by claws 37 To avoid this by relieving the pressure, 1 provide means for automaticall'y lifting rod 137, and its attached parts during each card feeding action. This comprises a friction clutch shown in Fig. 13, composed of collar 143, slidin on rod 137, having a pin 144, journale passing through it horizontally and cut away to form a flat surface on the side adjacent to the rod 137. When pin 144, is in the position shown in Fig. 13, the rod can slide through collar 143, which rests on support or rest 147, projecting from housing 34. A. lever or crank arm 145, is fast on pin 144, and has its outer end resting on a cam fast on shaft 32, in which is a cam socket 146. The parts are so proportioned that when the card feed mechanism is at rest lever 145, rests in cam socket 146, and collar in and naeaeoe 143, on support 147, with the cutaway face of pin 144, parallel to rod 137, and so leaving said rod free to fall until its further movement is arrested by platen 139, resting on top of the stack of cards in magazine A. As soon, however, as shaft 32, begins to oscillate in operating the card feeding apparatus the end of lever 145 (preferably equipped with a cam roller 148) begins to ride up out of cam socket 146, and to twist pin 144, so that the lower edge of its flat, cutaway face grasps rod 137, with a friction grip. Further upward'movement of roller 148, then lifts lever 145, collar 143, and rod 137, as a unit, and thereby lifts their weight off of the stack of cards in magazine A, holding it off until completion of that feeding operation. This reduces the pressure on the bottom card to the more weight of the superposed cards in the stack and that of platen 139.
The platen 139, may be rigidly fastened to rod 137, but I prefer to make it adjustable thereon so as to facilitate the running of the machine on short stacks of cards amounting to less than a trayful, as well as on full trays. An adjustable connection is shown in Figs. 2 and 2*, where laten 139 is carried on a U-shaped rod 1 v5, to the outer end of which it is fastened by set screw 173. The other end of rod 175, passes through collar 174, arranged to normally slide on rod 137, and is journaled in said collar. The portion of the rod 175 in the collar and opposite rod 137, has a flat face held against rod 137. When this rod 175 is slightly rotated, the edge of this flattened face bites into vertical rod 137 and forms a friction clutch similar to that described with reference to parts 143, 144, 145. So long as rod 137, tends to fall this friction clutch binds it to platen 139. If, however, the operator lifts rod 137, a certain. distance, the clutch is released and collar 174, and platen 139, can he slid up or down on rod 137, to any desired position. if rod 137, is so lifted'slowly while the platen 139, is resting on the stack of cards the platen will remain in that position, the friction clutch slipping, and when rod 137, is later released the clutch will immediately come into action holding the parts in the position of adjustment then assumed. Of course this clutch must be so designed as not to be released by the slight lift, given rod 137, when the cam socket 146 is rotated out from under the cam roller 148, as above described, and thereby produce a readjustment of the position of platen 139, on rod 137, at every cycle of operation.
The attachment for disabling the card feed mechanism during different periods of time so that two or more printing operations can be performed with the same card in printing position consists essentially of ing and lowering said frame so that said throw the feed out of action at rib will either raise the rear cross piece 39, of claws 37, by contact with antifriction roller 40, and so tip said claws far enough downward to clear card 43, or will remain in a lower position and clear the roller 40, and leave the claws to do their normal work of feeding out successive cards one at each cycle of the printing operation. As shown, frame 42, is pivoted loosely on horizontal shafts 149, which terminates at the front of the machine in a crank handle l50, having a spring index finger or pointer 152, cooperating with a series of depressions in rigid sector 151, to hold the shaft in different positions ofangular adjustment, unless overcome by superior force applied to handle 150. Frame 42, being loosely mounted or hinged on shaft 149, is supported in various positions by cam roller 168, carried by inner-rib 169, which cotiperates with cam 155, which revolves with stub shaft 160, but is capable of sliding endwise thereof, through operation of spline 170 (see Figs. 13 and 15). The cross profile of the cam can be understood by inspection of Fig. 14. At the left is a cutaway portion 156, which is of such diameter that when cam roller 168 rests on its frame 42 will be held low enough for outer rib 41, to just clear roller 40, on the rear cross piece 39, of claws 37. This I call the continuous face because while in action it allows the feeding apparatus to continuously feed out stencil cards, one for each printing operation. Next on the cam to the right (looking at Fig. 14) is a full faced section 157, which is of diameter sufficient to lift frame 42, through agency of roller 168, so that outer rib 41, acts on roller 40, to lift the rear of claws 37 37 far enough to throw them out of action. Whenever cam 155, is slid to the left far enough to bring thisface 157, under cam roller-168, the feedin apparatus is disabled and the stencil car in print- .ing position under platen 55, remains there and operation of the machine will merely produce repeated impressions from the same card. Consequently I call this the repeat face of the cam. Next to the right is a face 158, having three'equallyspaced depressions leaving three equally spaced full faced portions each a sixth of the cam circumference. In Fig. 16, two of the depressions are shown in dotted lines and one in full lines. They all drop to the same radial depth as that of face 156. As the cam is given a sixth of a revolution for each operation of the machine this face 158, will every other operation. Consequently, as each card fed outwill remain under platen 55, during two operations and duplicate impressions can be obtained therefrom, I call this the duplicate face of the cam. Finally, at the extreme right of the cam (looking at Fig. 14) is a face 159, having two equally spaced depressions each covering a sixth of the cam' circumference. This leaves two oppositely spaced full faced sections each a third of the cam circumference in length.
This is shown in full lines in Fig. 16. When this cam face comes under cam roller 168, the claws 37, 37, will be held out of action during two consecutive operations of the machine and permitted to' feed the cards forward only on every third operation. Consequently, three impressions can be taken from eachcard, and I call this face 159, the triplicate face of the'cam. The means shown for producing the endwise sliding of cam 155, on shaft 160, comprise sliding yoke 154, pivoted to crank 153, of
shaft 149, by pin and elliptical slot connection 171. When handle 150, is in the position shown in Fig. 17, with index finger at point marked C on sector 151, the continuous face 156 of the cam is under roller 1'68, and in operation. When the handle is swung far enough to the left to bring the index finger opposite point B, the re peat face 157, of the cam is under roller 168. When the index points at D, the duplicate cam face 158, is under roller 168, and when it points at T, the triplicate face 159, is in operative position.
The mechanism for producing the step by step rotation of cam 155, as shown, comprises a pawl carrying crank 161, on shaft 32, having crank pin 162, on which is pivoted pawl 163, normally held against stop 164, by spiral spring 165. This pawl cooperates with the six-toothed ratchet wheel 166, fast on shaft 160. At each operation of the machine the ratchet crank 161, is swung to the left (looking at Fig. 13) by shaft 32, and as pawl 163 sweeps over ratchet wheel 166, it turns the same one tooth, or one sixth of a revolution. On the return stroke pawl-163, slips over the teeth of ratchet wheel 166, as spring 165 yields. The ratchet wheel is held against any tendency to backward rotation by stop pawl 167, pivoted on housing'34. I
Metltod of use.
which a catalogue or other document is to be mailed. Theserecords are kept posted up. to date on this face of each card by proper clerical work.
Assuming that the Operator is addressing "envelops to be used in sending out catalogue No. 5, for the spring distribution of 1917, a type 88, having the printing face 5 is set in the third socket 91, in slide 89,-
(counting from the'left as one faces the machine) and the slide is moved by lever 93,
into theproper position to have such type register with the line of spaces opposite the word Catalogue on the under face of the card shown in Fig. 19. Ink ribbon 86, is ad- -.justed so as to run over the type placed in this position. A full tray of stencil cards is placed in magazine A, and an empty tray in -shoves an envelop under platen 55, and at the next operation, it is addressed to the customer whose name and address is on that card. If the record on the next card also comes within the catalogue No. 5 class, treadle 17, is held down and the addressing of envelops goes on. Ifthe record on the next, or any succeedin card is not such as to warrant sending a o. 5 catalogue to the customer thereby represented the operator depresses second treadle 104, which disables the platen operating mechanism by throwing cam roller 50, out of operative position i and that card is fed through without print skip.
ing the address, z. e. the machine skips that card and as long as second treadle 104 is held down "the machine pontinues to At each printing of the address on one envelop by cooperation of platen 55, and inking roller 58, with the stenciled section 172, of the card,'the auxiliary platen 90, also presses the frame'extension of the card down on the ink ribbon 86, and type 88, beneath said ink ribbon. Consequently the character 5 is printed in column ,S un-, .der 1917 opposite Catalogue on each card: used, thus making a record on the card of the fact that a No. '5 catalogue was, in the spring of 1917, mailed to the customer whose name and address are shown by the stenciling part ofthe card. No suchrecord is, however, made on the cards which are skipped. The next operation in each case kicks the used, or the skipped, card out intothe card receiving devlce C, where the column of previously collected cards automatically drops the thickness of one card to receive 1t. When the cards have all been transferred from the tray in the magazine A, to the tray in the recelving apparatus C, the sliding base 123 is pulled out, locking clip 128, swung out, and'the full tray lifted out and filed away. An empty tray is then inserted in the receiving mechanism C, an-
-other full one placed in magazine A, and
operations are resumed. After the full tray has been removed, and an empty one put in place, bracket 134 and rod 137, are lifted so that pawl 140, engages ,toe 142, and holds the card supporting foot 133, raised in proper position for such resumption of operations. If cards bearing certain records are to be used in printing envelops in which a catalogue is to be sent, and others are to be used in printin envelops in which a booklet is to be mai ed, theslide 89, can be accordingly shifted by lever 93, while the machine is in operation when the proper cards appear.
After all the cards have been run through the machine and envelops have been addressed to all those entitled to receive catalogue No. 5, another type, say 6 may be inserted and adjusted so as to print on the line opposite the word Booklet and on running the cards through the machine again envelops will be printed from all cards on which the records show that prior U purchases entitle the customer to receive that, booklet, while the machine will be caused to skip all other cards, as previously explained. Since during above described operation the machine has been set at continuous, i. 6. with index 152, pointing at C, a card is fed forward at each printing operation.
.If an imitation typewritten letter or other document is to be sent with each catalogue or booklet, shaft 149, is turned so that index 152, points at D, and then the card feed mechanism is disabled at every other print"- ing operation,-so that when a card showing the proper record of prior purchases comes out to the printing mechanism it stays there during two reciprocations of the platen 55. During "the first the operator inserts the envelop to be printed on from that card and. during the second he inserts the letter head.
11' a third document is to have the name and address on each card printed on it, or if the machine is working on a document requiring the name and address to be printed on it in three places, such as a gas or electric light bill, the index is moved to T, and then.
masses in printing position indefinitely, and as long as the machine is operated copies of the legend it bears may then be struck oil as in an ordinary printing press.
In handling jobs where skipping is necessary the operator usually presses treadles 17, and lOl, intermittently, allowing the automatic throw-out for the main clutch to come into action and stop the machine after each operation so that there is plenty of time to decide Whether the next operation is to be a printing one or a skip. That is to say, if the card visible between magazine and printing mechanism is one of those to be used. the operator presses down treadle 17 until the clutch engages and then takes his foot off. The pulley 6, and clutch member 10, then make one complete revolution before cam hook 14-, trips the clutch. During that revolution the particular card observed is fed into the printing mechanism and an envelop printed from it. After the clutch is then automatically thrown out the machine stops with the next card exposed midway between magazine and printing mechanism. The operator therefore may take as much time as is required to read the record on the card and decide Whether it is to be used or skipped. If the'latter decision is reached he presses down treadle 104, and the card goes through without printing. Treadle 104, also can be released as soon as the clutch engages and the parts begin to move because if cam roller 50, is raised when T- cam 46 begins to move down it cannot get back into operative position until the cycle is completed, even if hook lever 108, is dropped away from shaft extension 109. Again the clutch throws out, after that card has been fed through without printing, and the operator can take as much time as he likes to look at the succeeding card and decide again whether to print or skip and then I produce the desired operation by pressing down the proper treadle as before.
It is evident. of course, that when the machine skips the auxiliary platen 90, also fails of operation and no record is printed on the under face of the card by type 88, and ink ribbon 86.
The advantages of my invention comprise its flexibility of adjustment to a plurality of uses as above described, its automatic recording, on each card used, of the article mailed the customer represented by that card, the convenient and automatic action of the card magazine and card collecting mechanisms, the relieving of each card from all unnecessary friction during the feeding operation. the hermetic sealing of the ink fountain and the even action of the inking mechanism.
Transfer of the ink from the fountain to the doctor roll 68, by capillary attraction acting in such doctor roll made of solid felt and in the wick 31, secures an even and ample supply of ink at all times. Furthermore, the withdrawing of the doctor roll from contact with the inking roller 58, during the period in which the inking mechanism is at rest insures a perfectly even distribution of the ink around the entire circumference of the inking roller by avoiding the deposition of an extra heavy line of such ink on the inking roller along the points of contact between doctor roll and inking roller such as is produced if these rollers are allowed to stand in contact for any considerable period of time while the machine is at rest.
I wish it understood that various changes can be made in the details of construction shown and described without departing from thesubstance of my invention so long as the general principles of operation and c0- action of parts herein set forth are preserved. Thus other forms of address bearing strip or strips bearinglegends to be printed, could be substituted for the stencil cards here shown and described. The line forms on the under face of the frame of each card may be varied, if articles other than catalogues and booklets are to be mailed.
Having described my invention, I claim:
1. The combination with a printing mechanism adapted to operate on a series of stencil cards, of apparatus for feeding a series of such cards through said printing mechanism, continuously operating driving mechanism for both printing and feeding apparatus and means controllable by the operator for temporarily disconnecting said printing mechanism from the driving mechanism without interrupting the action of the card feeding apparatus.
2. The combination with a printing mechanism adapted to cooperate consecutively with each one of a series of address bearing strips, of a series of such strips, an apparatus for feeding them consecutively through the printing mechanism, continuously operating driving mechanism for both printing and feeding apparatus, and
means for temporarily disconnecting the printing mechanism from the driving mechanism without interrupting the continuous operation of the feeding apparatus.
3. The combination with a printing mech anism adapted to cooperate consecutively with each one of a series of address bearing strips comprising a reciprocating member, of a series of such strips, an apparatus for feeding them consecutively through the printing mechanism, and means for temporarily disabling the printing mechanism without interrupting the continued operation of the feeding apparatus, said means comprising a cam, a cooperating cam roller, a swinging support for said roller pivoted on the reciprocating member of the printing mechanism, and a device for so moving said swinging support that the roller carried the magazine through the printing mechathereby is removed from operative relation with the cam.
4;. The combination with a printing mechanism adapted to cooperate consecutively with each one of a series of address bearing strips comprising a reciprocating member, of a series of such strips, an apparatus for feeding them consecutively through the printing mechanism, and means for tempo:
rarily disabling the printing, mechan1sm without interrupting the continued operation of the feeding apparatus, said means comprising a cam, a cooperating cam roller, a swinging support for said roller pivoted on the reciprocating member of the printing mechanism, and a treadle and connections cooperating with the cam roller which when the treadle is depressed throw the roller and its swinging support out of normal position and away from the cam.
5. The combination of a magazine, a series of address bearing strips stacked in said magazine provided on their upper faces with classification marks, a printing mechanism, guides extending from the bottom of the magazine through the printing mechanism, and an apparatus for feeding the strips one by one from the bottom of the magazine into the guides together with mechanism under control of the operator for disabling the printing mechanism but continuing the feeding mechanism in operation, the parts being so proportioned that when one strip has been pushed into printing position, the classification marks on thesucceeding strip will be exposed to view in a position between the magazine and the printing mechanism, so that the operator may then decide whether to print from said strip or to skip it.
6. The combination of a magazine, a series of address bearing strips stacked in said magazine each provided with classification' 'marks on its upper face, a prlntlng mecha-' nism, guides extending from the'bottom of nism, an apparatus for feeding the strips one by one from the bottom of the magazine into the guides, the parts'being so proportioned that when one strip has been pushed into printing position, the succeeding strip will be exposedto view in a position between the magazme and the printing mechanism, and continuously operating driving apparatus for both feeding and printing mechanlsm, together with means under control of the operator for disconnecting the printing mechanism from the driving apparatus during oneor more cycles of operation of the feeding apparatus, whereby the op- .erator, after determining the classification of each strip exposed. can cause the printing mechanism to operate with itor to skip 1t, as the system of classlfication may require.
adapted to cooperate with any one of said strips when it reaches a given point along said guides, and an apparatus for feeding said strips along said guides to said point, of an auxiliary printing mechanism comprising a reciprocating platen adapted to cooperate with any one of said strips while it is in the position for cooperation with the first platen.
9. The combination with a series of address bearing strips, guides along which said strips may pass, a-maln printing mechanism comprising a reciprocating platen adapted to cooperate with any one of said strips when it reaches a given point along said guides and an apparatus for feeding said strips along said guides to said point, of an auxiliary printing mechanism adapted to make a proper record on each strip with which the main printing mechanism cooperates, said auxiliary mechanism comprising an auxiliary platen carried by the main platen.
10. In a stencil printing machine the combination with guides, apparatus forfeeding a series of stencil cards along the guides, an inking device below the guides, and a vertically reciprocating platen above the guides, cooperating with the inking device, of an adjustable type below the guides, an inkribbon above the type, but below the guides, and means actuated by the platen for. forcing each card operated on by it against the ink ribbon and type beneath.
11. In a stencil printing machine thecombination with guides, apparatus for feeding a series of stencil cards along the guides, an inking device below the guides, and a vertically reciprocating platen above the guides, cooperating with the inking device, of an adjustable type below the guides, an ink ribbon above the type but below'the guides, and means actuated by the platen for forcing each card operated on by it against the ink ribbon and type beneath, together withme'clianism for feeding said ink ribbon forward after each impression.
vertically reciprocating platen above the guides, cooperating with the inking device, of an adjustable type below the guides, anink ribbon above the type but below the guides, and means actuated by the platen for forcing each card operated on by it against the inlt ribbon and type beneath, together with a hand operated lever and connections for shifting the position of the type.
13. In an addressing machine adapted to" operate with a series of stencil cards the combination, with a reciprocating pivoted claw feeding apparatus for forcing said cards consecutively through the machine, of a disabling cam roller on said claws, a vertically adjustable track for said cam roller to run on and automatically operated means for raising and lowering said track during a predetermined number of cycles of operation of the machine.
14. In an addressing machine adapted to operate with series of stencil cards the combination, with a reciprocating pivoted claw feeding apparatus for forcing said cards consecutively through the machine, of a disabling cam roller on said claws, a vertically adjustable track for said cam roller to run on and automatically operated means for raising and lowering said track during a predetermined number of cycles of operation of the machine, said means comprising a cam having several dilferent sections adapted to coiiperate separately with a mem ber carried by the track structure, means for giving said cam a definite amount of rotation for each cycle of operations of the feeding apparatus, and means controllable by the operator for shifting the position of the cam with reference to the track-carried member.
15. Thecombination with a. printing mechanism adapted to cooperate with a series of card-like members bearing legends to be printed thereby, a magazine for holding a stack of such members ready for use, a receptacle for collecting such members after use, and an apparatus for feeding said members consecutively from the magazine, through the printing mechanism to the re-' ceptacle, of a movable bottom piece for such receptacle supported by the stack in the magazine.
16. The combination with a printing mechanism adapted to cooperate with a series of card-like members bearing legends to be printed thereby, a magazine for holding a stack of such members ready for use, a receptacle for collecting such members after use. and an apparatus for feeding said members consecutively from the magazine, through the printing mechanism to the receptacle, of a movable bottom piece for such receptacle supported by the stack in the magazine, and a device for holding said bottom piece in its highest position when the printing mechanism is at rest but which is disabled when the feeding apparatus is put in motion.
17 The combination with a printing mechanism adapted to cooperate with a series of card-like members bearing legends to be printed thereby, a magazine for holding a stack of such members ready for use, a receptacle for collecting such members after use, and an apparatus for feeding said members consecutively from the magazine, through the printing mechanism to the receptacle, of a movable bottom piece for such receptacle provided with connections through which it is supported by the stack in the magazine, and means for automatically lifting the weight of said bottom piece and connections off the stack whenever one of the card-like members is being fed out of the magazine.
18. The combination with a printing mechanism adapted to cooperate with a series of card-like members bearing legends to be printed thereby, a magazine for holding a stack of such members, ready for use, a receptacle for collecting such members after use, and an apparatus for feeding said members consecutively from the magazine, through the printing mechanism to the receptacle, of a movable bottom piece for such receptacle provided with connections comprising a vertical rod through which it is supported by the stack in the magazine, and means for automatically lifting the weight of said bottom piece and connections off the stack whenever one of the card-like members is being fed out of the magazine, said means comprising a friction clutch engaging the rod and alternately thrown into, and out of, action in unison with the operations of the feeding apparatus.
19. The combination with a. printing mechanism adapted to cooperate with a series of card-like members bearing legends to be printed thereby, a magazine for holding a stack of such members ready for use, a receptacle for collecting such members after use, and an apparatus for feeding said members consecutively from the magazine, through the printing mechanism to the reoeptacle. of a movable bottom piece for such receptacle, .a. vertical rod supporting the bottom-piece, a platen resting on the stack in the magazine and a device connecting the rod and platen adapted to grip the rod when it tends to fall but to release said grip when the rod is lifted.
20. A stencil magazine for addressing machines and the like having in combination a rigid vertical main frame open at one side, a section hinged to the bottom of the main frame on the open side so as to swing on a horizontal axis, and means for holding I sertion of the stack of cards provided with a locking toggle, one link of which toggle is straight and pivoted to a rigid part of the magazine While the other is composed of two arms bent at right angles one to the other, one of said rms being slotted and engaging a pin on the hinged section of the magazine, while the other is pivoted to .the first mentioned togglelink.
22. A device forsupporting a tray adapted to hold a stack of card-like articles in vertical position which comprises in combination a main frame having means for holding the upper end of the tray and a horizontally sliding base provided with means for holding the lower end of the tray.
23. A device for supporting a tray adapted to hold a stack of card-like articles in a vertical position which comprises, in combination, a, main frame having downwardly opening slots for receiving the upper end of the tray and a horizontally sliding base provided with upwardly opening slots for receiving the lower end of the tray, the parts being so proportioned that when the base is slid outward the distance from the bottom of one set of slots to the mouth of the other is greater than the length of the tray,
but when the base is slid back to bring the tray into vertical position the above stated distance is reduced to less than the length of the tray.
24. A device for supporting an open faced tray in a vertical position and retaining therein a vertical stack of card-like articles which comprises, in combination, a main frame provided with means for holding the upper and lower ends of the tray, a locking clip pivoted in said ,frame and adapted to be swungin front of the open face of the tray or away therefrom and means for holding the clip in the first mentioned position.
25. A device for supporting n open faced tray in a vertical position and retaining therein a vertical stack of card-like articles which comprises, in combination, a main frame provided with means for holding the upper and'lower ends of the tray, 'a locking clip pivoted in said frame and adapted to be swung in front of the open face of the tray or away therefrom and means for holding the clip in the first mentioned position, comprisinga horizontally extending section of the clip and an upwardly opening slot in the frame into which said section may drop.
26. A device for supporting an open faced tray in a vertical position and retaining therein a vertical stack of card-like articles which comprises, in combination, a main frame provided with means for holding the upper end of the tray, a horizontally movable basefor holding the lower end of the tray, and a clip pivoted to the frame and base in bearings which allow limited vertiarts being so proporthe tray backward but will not permit it to be so llfted out when the base 1s slid back to bring the tray into a vertical position.
27 A device for supporting a tray adapted to hold a stack of card-like articles in vertical position which comprises in combination a main frame having means for holding the upper end of the tray and a horizontally sliding base provided With means for holding the lower end of the tray, together with a vertically movable bottompiece adapted to travel up and down in said tray when the latter is in a vertical position, or to drop beneath it and allow its lower end to swlng outward with the movement of the sliding base.
28. In a card handling apparatus for addressing machines the combination with a vertical magazine for the cards, a horizontally extending guideway from the bottom of the magazine and a reciprocating claw for forcing the bottom card from the ma azine out along the guideway, of a frictlon stop under said guideway adapted to engage each card as it is fed from the magazine and to bring it to a stopas soon as the propelling movement of the claw ceases, said stop comprising an adjustable upwardly C. F. PAYSON, S. WEmBERc.
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