US1239708A - Indicating, registering, recording, and check-printing mechanism. - Google Patents

Indicating, registering, recording, and check-printing mechanism. Download PDF

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US1239708A
US1239708A US57892810A US1910578928A US1239708A US 1239708 A US1239708 A US 1239708A US 57892810 A US57892810 A US 57892810A US 1910578928 A US1910578928 A US 1910578928A US 1239708 A US1239708 A US 1239708A
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arm
printing
pawl
check
dial
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US57892810A
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William D Mccoy
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    • GPHYSICS
    • G06COMPUTING; CALCULATING OR COUNTING
    • G06CDIGITAL COMPUTERS IN WHICH ALL THE COMPUTATION IS EFFECTED MECHANICALLY
    • G06C7/00Input mechanisms
    • G06C7/10Transfer mechanisms, e.g. transfer of a figure from a ten-key keyboard into the pin carriage

Definitions

  • g s M a I na HHQI g I I n fi H g m n H N2 ⁇ QN I 3 be A SN M U .fi a H x g ⁇ N m 1 w AQ H n z ⁇ w 3 m g r a Qt QR w R n 7 A I E nn 4 1 MIMI m I 3w & 1 m a ha 0 vi .I I N 7 New I Rs INs w u 1 E a n s 2 E i I 1 3* km E w g k INVENTOR WITNESSES W. D. McCOY.
  • PatentedSeptfll 1917.
  • the main object of the invention isto 81mpl if the construction and operation of a ma ine of this-character, enable it to be made offbut few, parts and to accomplish certain operations asjmore'fully hereinafter set forth.
  • the mechanism as a whole is constituted so as to facilitate the carrying out of a system foridentifying and tracing each separate transaction, 1'. at'is, the record or detail strip and 'thei as printed in the machine can always be located and compared with absolute certainty by reason of the simultaneously printed identification marks as 'lieneinaftrl pointed out. Improvements will be found to relate particularly to:
  • 3rd Mechanism for indicating the values setup and the character of various transactions and the symbol of the operator.
  • the setting arm carries a push key which is movable longitudinally for afl'ectingfthe indicator shutter, the registering mechanism, the drawer release and the printing operation.
  • the indication is eflected by means of a series of dials which are arranged on a common axis and are rotated when the setting arm and knob are set.
  • the shutter is operated to display the proper indications when the push key is operated and conceals the indication as soon as the operating arm is again moved.
  • the indicating dials are operated by a series of frames which are pivoted on the same vertical axis with the setting'arm. The rear ends of these frames are connected to the indicating dials and the front ends of the frames carry the type for printing items on the record strip and the checks.
  • the registering mechanism is carried by the setting arm.
  • cents registering parts are set when the arm is swung horizontally to Set up the cents item set when the operating knob is rotated to set up a dollar item and is operated when the knob is set back to zero.
  • the drawer is released when the push key is operated.
  • the operation of a spring connected with a handle at the right of the machine throws the drawer open and raises the handle and the depression of the handle to normal position effects the printing of the record strip and the check and the closing of the drawer.
  • the record strip is fed automatically from left to right above the printing frames and the checks are fed automatically from the rear to the front beneath the printing frames.
  • wo series of.automatic counting and printing wheels print consecutive numbers on the face of the record strip and on the top face of each check.
  • Classification mechanism is arranged at the right of the machine and consists of a series of counters adapted to be operated by a key so that the operators can keep track of the total number of the different kinds of transactions which the machine is designed to record. The character of the transaction is indicated at the same time. Aliment devices are provided throughout for necessitating the proper operation of the setting arm and knoband other parts prior to actual indication, registration or printing. Safety interlocking devices are also provided to make it necessary to complete each operation before it is possible to set up the mechanism for another item. It will be obvious hereinafter that many of the details of construction may be varied in form and arran ement and substitution may be made wit iin a wide range of equivalents without a departure from the spirit and scope of the invention claimed herein.
  • Figure 1 is a front view of a machine embodying the improvements of my invention, part of the casing and the cash drawer being omitted, the setting arm and key being in its mid position and the indicators set for the amount of $10.45 and symbol X being paid out.
  • Fig. 2 is a plan view of the same, operating and setting arm being in its extreme 1e t hand position set for an amount of 95 cents.
  • Fig. 3 is a partial vertical section and elevation taken from the left of Fig. 1 and showing also a part of the cash drawer.
  • Fig. 4 is a vertical sectional view showing the connections between the indicating dials.
  • Fig. 5 is an enlarged vertical sectional
  • Fig. 6 is a vertical sectional view of parts of the registering mechanism taken longitudinally of the operating arm.
  • Fig. 7 is a rear view of a fragment of the operating knob showing the interlocking device.
  • Fig. 8 is a rear view of parts of the shutter or curtain and mechanism for operating the same together with apart of the mechanism for operating the indicating dials.
  • Fig. 9 is a detail view of the gears for transmitting motion from the units of cents dial to the tens or tens of cents dial, parts being broken away.
  • Fig. 10 is a rear view and partial section of the record strip feeding and operating mechanism.
  • Fig. 11 is a plan view of the check printing platen.
  • Fig. 12 is a left hand side view and elevation of part of the check printing and feeding mechanism in the position which the parts occupy when the mechanism has been operated and corresponds to the open position of the drawer.
  • Fig. 12 is a perspective view of an inking roller and its supporting frame.
  • Fig. 13 is a front view and partial section on the plane of the line A A of Fig. 6 showing details of the registering mechanism.
  • Fig. 14 is a similar section of the registering mechanism on the plane of the line B B of Fig. 6.
  • Fig. 15 is a detail side view of part of the mechanism for the carrying forward of dollars from the cents registering drum to the dollar registering devices.
  • Fig. 16 is a right hand side View and partial section of parts of the mechanism for releasing the drawer from the classifying mechanism and showing the time clock and part of the printing mechanism.
  • Fig. 17 is a plan view and partial section of parts of the check and record strip printing mechanism.
  • Fig. 18 is a horizontal sectional view of parts of the check printing mechanism showing its connection with the time clock.
  • Fig. 19 is a detail perspective view of the cam for raising the platen for printing the record strip.
  • Fig. 20 is a bottom view of a check as printed and delivered from the machine.
  • Fig. 20 is an edge view of a plate for printing special matter.
  • Fig. 21 is a left hand side view and artial section on the plane of the line C, of F1g. 2 showing the parts of the classifying and counting mechanism and showing part of the mechanism for operating the printing device and closing the drawer.
  • Fig. 22 is a perspective view and section of the classifying arm on the plane of the line 1)., D of Fig. 21.
  • Fig. 23 is a detail perspective view of a check for retaining the reversing pawl and it is similar to the check employed in connection with the feeding of the inking tape or ribbon.
  • Fi 24 is a plan view showing the double pawl and adjacent parts for compelling operation of the push key in the main. setting arm.
  • Fig. 25, is a perspective view of the double pawl of Fig. 24;
  • Fig. 26 is a perspective view of the feeding pawl of the inking ribbon mechanism.
  • Fig. 27 is a perspective view of the reverse device for the ribbon feed.
  • F ig. 2 8 is a vertical front sectional view and the projection of the check supply-feeding mechanism.
  • Fig. 29, is a view of the under side of the check feeding device.
  • Fig. 3.0 is an upright sectional view of the same on the plane of the line E, E of F ig. 29.
  • Fig. 31 is a perspective view of the check discharging arm orkicker.
  • Fig. 32 is a perspective view of a fragment of the supply check or magazine for containing the unprinted checks.
  • the parts 1, 2 and 3 together with the vertical shaft 1 constitute the principal supporting members of the frame of the machine.
  • the segmental section 5 of the front of the case is mounted on the bed-plate 6 which latter may serve as aportion of the case for the usual cash drawer 7,
  • the main setting arm 8 is pivoted near the rear on the vertical shaft 4 and has a flanged sleeve 9 at the front end.
  • This sleeve 9 surrounds tube 10 which is mounted upon a hollow shaft 11 which carries the knob 12 at its front end.
  • the segmental section 5 has a slot or opening 13 which .guides the sleeve 9 and thus permits the main setting arm to be swung in a horizontal plane.
  • a guard 13 carried by the sleeve 9 covers the rear of the opening 13.
  • the machine as herein illustrated is adapted to indicate, register and print for amounts varyin by five cents from 45 to 95 and dollars roin zero to 19. i
  • the mechanism I For the purpose of setting the mechanism I have arranged numerals zero, 5, 10,15, etc, to 95 along the upper beveled edge 14 of the segmental section 5 and numerals zero, 1, 2, 3, etc, to 19 around the beveled edge of the knob 12;.
  • the former may be called the cents. setting scale and. the latter the dollar setting dial.
  • the mechanism might be adapted to other systems of money counting and that the cents setting scale might be arranged by unitsv from zero, 1, 2,3, etc, and that the dollar setting dial might be arranged for a larger or smaller amount.
  • the knob 12 is held from rotation by means of the projection 15 at the rear which engages in a notch 16 in the flanged sleeve 9 which is not rotatable.
  • the knob however 18 adapted to be pushed inward, that is, to the left as viewed in Fig. 5, a distance suflicient to disengage the projection 15 from the notch 16 and allow the knob 12 to be rotated. It will be noted that when the knob is rotated it cannot be pulled outward until it is rotated back to; its normal position at .which position the zero on the dollar setting indicating mechanism as will be later described.
  • the collar 20 also pivotally mounted on shaft 4 carries printing frame 20 at the front end for printing dollar items and at the rear is connected to operate the dollar indicating dial.
  • the collar 21 also 'pivotally mounted on the shaft 4 carries the operators printing frame 21. and is connected at the rear to the operators indicator. Connected to the collar 20.
  • a segmental beveled gear 22 also pivoted on shaft 4 with which the bevel pinion 23 carried by the hollow shaft 11 is adapted to engage when the shaft and knob 12 are pushed to the rear, that is, to the left as viewed in Fig. 5.
  • pawl 24 engages notches25 in the upper fiace of gear 22 so as to assist in stopping the movement of? the gear 22 at definite angular positions.
  • a notched segment 26 beneaththe setting arm 8 is adapted to assist in definitelypositioning the setting arm when the reciprocating frame 27 is pushed inwardly as will be later described, it being necessary that a part of the frame 27 should mesh with one of the notches in the segment 26 which notches correspond with the different cents amounts on the cents setting scale.
  • the amount indicated by the dials in Fig. 1 is $10.45 and the operators symbol X.
  • the usual windows will of course be provided in the case for displaying the amounts and symbols, but it is unnecessary to illustrate them herein,
  • the shutter 28 is adapted to coverup, the indicating portion of the dials except when the machine is operated properly to indicate the definite amounts.
  • the operation 05;- the shutter will be described later.
  • the dial 30 has printed around its periphery the alternating The spring 'dial.
  • the dial 31 has numerals zero, 1 to 9 inclusive and may be called the tens indicating
  • the dial 32 has the numerals zero, 1, 2, to 19 inclusive and may be termed the dollar indicating dial.
  • the dial 30 is carried by the rotatable shaft 33 which has on its rear end pinion 34.
  • An oscillating member 35 pivoted on a horizontal axis has a segmental gear 36 meshing with pinion 34 at its upper end and a segmental bevel gear 37 at its lower end meshing with the segmental bevel gear 38 at the rear 0 the collar 19.
  • Fig. 4 shows details of connection between the indicating dials.
  • the shaft 33 is a gear 40 meshing with gear 41 (see Fig. 9) which is carried by bracket 42.
  • gear 41 has gear 43 rotating with it and the latter meshes with gear 44 on a hollow shaft 45 which carries the indicating dial 31.
  • the gears 40, 41 are so cut that the gear 41 has one rotation for every two rotations of gear 40 and its action is thus intermittent.
  • the gear connection between the setting arm 8 and the shaft 33 and dial 30 is such that as the setting arm is moved from zero to 5 on the cents setting scale, the indicating dial 30 rotates so as to bring the numeral 5 in the indicating position, that is, one-tenth of a. revolution. ⁇ Vhen the setting arm is moved from 5 to 10 on the cents setting scale the units indicating dial 30 moves to the next zero position one-tenth more of a revolution.
  • the connection between the gears 40 and 41 is such therefore that at this time the gear 41 will make one-tenth of a turn and thus rotates the dial 31 one-tenth of a turn and brings numeral 1 on the tens dial into the indicating position.
  • the movement of the indicating dials 30 and 31 is progressive as the setting arm is swung from right to left.
  • the dollar indicating dial 32 is carried by a sleeve 46 which has a bevel pinion 47 meshing with a segmental bevel gear 48 which is carried by an upward extension 49 from the collar 20 before referred to.
  • the pinion 23 rotates the gear 22, collar 20 and arm 49 which thus rotates the pinion 47 and dollar indicating dial 32 progressively.
  • the symbol dial 50 1s semi-circular and carried by sleeve 51 which has bevel pinion 52 meshing with segmental gear 53 on the arm 54extending upwardly from collar 21.
  • the frame 21 has a forward extension 55 with an operating knob or handle 56 so that the frame 21 may be swung from right to left to set the operators symbol for indicating and. printing.
  • a scale may be provided'for setting the handle 56 in a manner similar to the setting of the arm 8 at the diiferentcents positions.
  • the rear dial 50' is also semi-circular and connected to dial 50 by means of a web 57 so that the two rotate together. The dials are arranged in pairs so as to display corresponding indications at the front and rear simultaneously.
  • Dial 30 is mounted on shaft33 with dial 30.
  • Dial 31 is on hollow shaft 45 with dial 31 and dial 32' is on sleeve 46 with dial 32. I p
  • the shutter 28 is carried by two up-right rods 60, 60 connected at their lower ends by a horizontal rod 61, these parts constituting the shutter frame.
  • a pivoted pawl 62 constitutes a catch for holding the shutter in its raised position at which time figures on the indicating dial are visible.
  • This pawl has a rearwardly and upwardly extending arm which by means of a spring 63 (see Fig. 8) is pressed upwardly against the notched lower surface 64 at the rear end of the collar 19 just beneath the segmental gear 38.
  • the lower end of the pawl 62 has a notch or recess 65 in which the rod 61 of the shutter frame is supported when in the position shown in Figs. 3 and 8.
  • a swinging frame 66 is loosely pivoted to the rod 61 with the shutter frame and has a shoulder 67 at the lower end which when the shutter is down rests upon the projection 68.
  • This projection is a part of a vertically movable frame having the rear upright bolt 69 and the front up-right 70 connected by the crosspiece 71 (see Fig. 16).
  • This vertically movable frame is guided by ball hearings or other suitable means of connection on the square post pillow block 72.
  • the lower end of the rear up-right 69 is beveled and when the parts are in the position shown in Fig. 16 engages the catch 3 projecting from the rear of the drawer 7. Th1s is also shown in Fig. 3.
  • the rod 76 has a push key or thumb-piece and is reciprocable in the hollow shaft 11 preyiously referred to as constituting a part of the main setting arm construction.
  • the spring 79 has its rear 'end secured to the reciprocating frame 27 and its front end connected to "a screw 80 or other projection carried by the main setting arm 8, so that the spring places a tension upon the reciprocating frame 27 to hold it in and to return it to its forward position, that is, at the right as viewed in Fig. 5'.
  • the rear lower portion of the reciprocating frame .27 has aninclined 'or cam surface 81 adapted when the reciprocating frame is pushed inward to engage the corresponding inverted incline 82 on theyerticallymoving frame on the pillow block 72 before referred to.
  • the push key 75 is pushed inward the action of the incline 81 is to lift the vertically moving frame and its projection 68 and thus by means of the engagement of the latter with the shoulder 07 lift the indicator shutter 28 from the dotted line position of Fig. 3 to the full line position previously referred to.
  • the up righ bolt portion 09 of the vertically moving frame is disengaged from the latch 73 (see Figs. 3 and 16), the drawer is released.
  • the arm 83 carried by the "shaft 84 has a normally forward pressure exer'oed upon it by the spring 85. Near the lower end of this arm 83 is a roller 86 carried by the drawer 7-. When the drawer has been released as just mentioned, the power of the spring thus throws the drawer forward; The completion of closing the drawer will be described in connection with the printing operation hereinafter.
  • cam member 93 On the main setting arm 8 in the path of movement of the rojection 92 is e cam member 93 having its opposite ends beveled as shown in Fig; 24.
  • the opposite feces of the setting arm 8 "adjacent this cam 93 have oppositely faced teeth 94 end 95 adapted to be engaged respectively by the teeth '90 and- 01 of the pawl device.
  • the rpawl device will yield sufficiently to allow the continued inward or backward movement of the operating key or pawl device but will not allow forward or return movement until the projection -92 is disengaged from the rear of the cam 93-.
  • the spring 89 will return the pawl device to its central position so that the projection 92 will stand in the rear of the cam 93-. If the push key is then released the action of the spring 79 will move the reciproeating frame 27 "and the pawl tooth forwardly (to the right as viewed in Fig.
  • the registering mechanism is'sho'wn particularly in Figs. 2, 5, 6, 13-, 14 and 15-.
  • This latter has a hub 102 which is re tatably mounted upon the sleeve 103 on the-hollow shaft 11.
  • a star-wheel 104 carried by hub 102 is engaged by a roller 105 carried by a pair of arms 106 which are normally pressed by a spring 107 'so as to hold the roller 105 in one of the spaces between the teeth of the star-wheel 104:.
  • This roller 105 and its arms 106 are adapted to yield as the star-wheel is rotated by reason of the lateral swingin of the main setting arm 8 and hollow sha t 11 but the tendency of the pressure of the roller 105 is to'stop the rotation of the star wheel104 and comb-- quently to stop the swinging of the shaftll at one ofthe positions corresponding to one of the setting points on the cents setting scale.
  • the sleeve 103 has a cam groove 108 in which a pin 109 on the reciprocating frame 27 projects.
  • the sleeve 103 is rotatable on the hollow shaft 11 but is prevented from rearward motion by the sleeve 110.
  • the cents registering drum 111 is carried by a ratchet 112 which is rotatable on the hollow shaft 11 (see Fig. 6)-.
  • Mounted on the sleeve 103 is a plate 113 which is connected to the well of the bevel ear 101 by means of a spring 114.
  • sleeve 103 has a flange 118 which has a shoulder 119 which rotates with the sleeve 103 as the key is pushed in and out.
  • the spring114 normally tends to rotate the plate so thata part of it for instance, the hub of the pawl 115 presses against the stop 119.
  • the sleeve 103 is rotated to the right as viewed from the front, or clockwise, by reason of the pin 109 in the cam groove 108 and the tension of the spring 114 will cause the plate 113 and pawl 115 to follow around to the right until the projection 116 on the plate 113 engages the stop 117 carried by the gear 101.
  • the amount of the rotation of the plate and its pawl 115 will therefore depend upon the angular position of the gear 101 and main setting arm 8. As the pawl 115 rotates to the right it slips over the teeth of the ratchet 112 and when the key is released the pawl returns and rotates the ratchet 112 and the cents setting drum 111 through exactly tlie angle that the displacement of the step 117 permitted the plate 113 and the pawl 115 to rotate when the key was pushed inwardly. This then brings the proper number on the cents registering drum to the reading position which in this particular arrangement is selected to be at the upper surface of the drum.
  • the spring pawl 120 engaging with the notch or ratchet-like periphery of the registering drum 111 prevents the drum from being turned backwardly (see Figs. 14 and 15).
  • any suitable form of counting mechanism such as 121 may be employed for keeping track of the total number of dollars registered; This is driven by the plate 122 by the'operation of the knob 12 and intermediatemechanism.
  • the plate 122 is held stationary by a projection or finger 123 carried by the reciprocating frame 27 engaging in a notch in plate 122 (see Fig. 13).
  • the plate 122 carries a spring pressed pawl 124 engaging with the teeth of the ratchet 125.
  • the latter is pinned or otherwise suitably secured to a gear 126 which meshes with a pinion 127 on the shaft of the counting mechanism.
  • On the rear end of the tube 10 previously referred to is a plate 128 which is connected by means of a spring 129 to the hub of the plate 122. The'tension of this spring holds the nose 1300f the plate 128 against the projection 131 carried by the plate 122.
  • the tube 10 the knob has the zero on its dial uppermost.
  • the finger 123 rides over the back of the teeth of the ratchet 134 cut in the rear of plate 122 until it comes opposite the notch in the edge of the plate 122 whereupon it engages and locks the plate.
  • the knob 12 and plate 122 are rotated backwardly as just mentioned,'the pawl 124 being in engagement with the ratchet 125 rotates the ratchet and its attached gear 126 and the pinion 127 of the counting mechanism through an les correspondin to the dollar item which as been set up.
  • FIGs. 5, 6, 13, 14 and 15 show the details of this device.
  • Beneath the drum 111 and plate 122 is located the short shaft 135 suitably pivoted on the main settin arm 8. At the rear end this shaft carr1es an upwardly projecting arm 136 which stands in the path of movement of the pin 137 which rejects rearwardly from the drum 111.
  • he front end of the shaft 135 carries a awl arm formed in two parts 138 and 139 w 1011 are pivotally connected together.
  • a spring 140 exerts a pressure upon the two parts of the arm in connection with the shaft 135 so as to hold the upper end of the part 139 which is hooked as shown in Fig. 13 in engagement with the teeth of the pinion 126 previously referred to.
  • the pin 137 strikes the arm 136 and moves it to the right, as viewed from the front of the machine; so as to rock the shaft 135 and arm 138 and carry the pawl part 139 to the right.
  • cents registration occurs while the reciprocating frame 27 is being thrown forward by the spring 79 after release of the push key 75 and the dollar registration occurs while the knob 12 is being turned back to the zero position of the dollar setting dial.
  • the record or detail strip 145 is of any ordinary or suitable character and in the form shown is provided in a roll on the spool 14:6 and is wound on to the hub 147 traveling from left to right as viewed from the front of the machine (see Fig. 1).
  • the hub 117 is hollow and mounted upon the stationary spindle 148 (see Fig. 10).
  • Secured to the hub is the ratchet 149 engaged by the spring pressed pawl 150.
  • a vertically reciprocable member 151 (which also constitutes the printing platen for pressing the recond strip against the type) carries a. spring finger 152 which is adapted to en gage the teeth of the ratchet 149.
  • a plate 153 has a portion cut away to provide guiding and bearing surface for the end of the spring finger 152 so that the member 151 rotates the ratchet 149 at about the middle of its downward stroke and the finger 152 is disengaged from the ratchet at the lower end of the stroke. ()n the upward motion of'the member 151 and finger 152 the ratchet is held from backward rotation by the pawl 150 and the finger 152 is retracted by the sliding engagement with the curved edge of the plate 153.
  • the member 151 has a. shoulder 154 at the lower end engaged by the cam 155 whereby the member 151 is raised as will he pointed out, and is pressed downward by the spring 151 (see Fig. 1).
  • the cam 155 is mounted upon the sleeve 156 which is rotatable in suitable hearings in the part 3 of the frame of the machine (see Figs. 17 and 18).
  • the cam is secured to the case 157 of the time clock.
  • the gear 158 rotatable with the cam and clock is in mesh with the segmental gear 159 which is secured on shaft 160 (see Fig. 16).
  • This shaft 160 has an arm 161 connected by means of link 162 to the arm 163 on shaft 84 previously referred to (see Fig. 3).
  • the cran'k 164 on the right of the machine is secured to this shaft 84 and is normally nearly horizontal. as shown in Figs. 1. 3 and 21, being inclined slightly downward toward the rear.
  • crank 16st and the shaft 3-1- may be operated by any suitable driving means either manual or power but for convenience l have illustrated the crank 164- with a handle for the purpose of operating the shaft 84.
  • FIG. 2 and 21 An arm 165 sccured to shaft 84 carries the pivoted twopronged pawl 166 which has a central tooth 167 engaging in one of the two notches 168 of the catch 169. This catch is carried by the arm 165 and it is under pressure of the spring 170 tending to hold the catch in engagement with the tooth 167 of the pawl.
  • Two series of notches or ratchet teeth 171 and 172 are adapted to he engaged respectively with the upper and iowcr prongs of the pawl 166.
  • the teeth are faced in opposite directions as shown in Fig. 21 and the intermediate shoulder 173 is provided. ⁇ Vhen the crank 164 is moved upward from the position shown in Fig. 21 the pawl 166 is carried downward and allowed to slide overthe backs of the teeth of the ratchet portion 171 but the shape of the teeth pre vents the pawl and arm from being returned to the original position until the pawl 166 is disengaged by the contact of its upper prong with the shoulder 173. This contact tilts the pawl 166 clock-wise sufficiently to force the tooth 167 of the pawl out of the upper notch of the catch 169, the catch yielding sufficiently to permit this. The tooth 167 then snaps into the lower notch of catch 169 where it is yieldingly held.
  • crank 164 may then be pushed downward and the arm 165 moved upward accordingly, the lower prong of the pawl 166 then sliding over the backs of the teeth of the ratchet portion 172.
  • the crank 164 cannot be moved upward again until the lower spring of the pawl 166 engages the shoulder 173 and is forced backward into the position shown in Fig. 21, the tooth 167 snapping from the lower notch to the upper notch 168 in the catch 169.
  • a bolt 180 On the left of the pillow block 72 previously referred to is located a bolt 180 which has a limited forward and backward movement in or on suitable guides and is normally pressed forwardly by a spring 181 (see Fig. 3).
  • the upright of the vertically movable frame 1 on the plllow block is provided with a shoulder 182 ada ted to engage the forward beveled end of t e bolt 180 when the frame is raised b the action of the reciprocating frame 27. s the shoulder 182 passes above the bolt 180 the bolt snaps forward beneath the shoulder and thus prevents the frame from being moved down under the impulse of the spring 183 (see Fig. 16).
  • the rear of the bolt 180 has a shoulder 184 or lip which projects to the left and is adapted to be engaged by the arm 83 when that is moved rearwardly by the downward action of the crank 164.
  • the lip 184 is engaged by the arm and the bolt is retracted from beneath the shoulder 182 thus allowing the spring 183 and gravity to move the frame 71 downward.
  • the bolt 69 engages the catch .73 on the drawer and holds the drawer in its closed position.
  • the crank 164 is released the tension of the spring 85 rotates the shaft 84 until the arm 83 strikes the roller 86. It will thus be seen that the drawer 7 acts as a movable abutment for the arm 83.
  • the bolt 69 serves to lock this movable abutment until the push key is operated.
  • the platenmember 151 rests with its shoulder 154 upon the tip of the cam 155 as shown in Fig. 16.
  • the spring'85 turns the shaft 84 and the cam 155 through the medium of the mechanism above described.
  • the cam thus rotates right-handed or clock-wise and the shoulder 154 of the platen member 151 is disengaged from the point of the cam, then drops to cause the printing, and is then gradually raised as the cam continues to rotate.
  • the cam has its greatest radius at about the point 190 (see Figs. 16 and 19), which is somewhat greater than the radius of the cam at its tip directly beneath the shoulder 154 as shown in Fig. 16.
  • a spring pressed catch 191 is adapted to snap beneath the shoulder 192 on the platen member 151 when the point 190 of the cam 155 raises the platen member to its highest position.
  • the lower end of thecatch 191 has a projection 193 at its rear whose upper and lower faces are inclined as shown in Fig. 16.
  • An arm 194 carried by the vertically moving frame 71 has its front end beveled to co-act with the faces of the projection 193.
  • the printing wheels 235 are mounted on the shaft 236 which has a spring pressed arm 237 (Figs. 16 and 17) which is oscillated by the projection 238 on the shaft 160 attached near the left-hand end thereof.
  • a bevel gear 239 meshing with the lower face of the double faced miter gear 240 whose upper face meshes with the gear 241 on the shaft of the printing wheels 242.
  • the wheels 235 print on the upper face of the checks and the wheels 242 print upon the lower face of the record strip.
  • the two sets of wheels being geared to gether, rotate together and exactly the same numbers are prmted upon the checks and upon the record strip.
  • the part 243 of the platen 151 forces the record strip against the ribbon on the type segments 200, 201 and 202 and the numbering wheels 242 for printing.
  • Figs. 5, 12, 16, 17 and 18 show the construction and arrangement of the dating and time printing mechanism while Fig. 20 shows the card or check 250 as it is printed on the bottom, the item being printed upon the upper surface.
  • a series of printing wheels and segments are arranged on a com mon axis as shown in Figs. 17 and 18.
  • YVheel 251 carries the type face for printing the numbers of the days of the months as shown at 251' in Fig. 20.
  • the segment 252 prints the words Day of month with a pointer as shown at 252'.
  • the segment 253 prints an index or pointer 253 for months.
  • the wheel 254 prints a scale of minutes and names of the months as shown at 254'.
  • the segment 255 prints the pointer 255' to indion the hollow shaft 261 is driven b cate the minute on the minutes scale.
  • the segment 256. prints the pointer 256' for indicating the hour on the hour scale.
  • the wheel 257 prints a scale of hours a. m. and p. m. as at 257 in Fig. 20.
  • the pinion 260 the oscillating segment,221.previously re erred to which is in turn operated through the instrumentality of the movement of the arm 83 and shaft 84 and the link eonnection162.
  • the printing wheel 254 is secured to shaft 261 and rotates Withdt.”
  • the printing segment 252 is securely clamped in any suitable manner upon the shaft 261 and prints the words Da of month and the pointer shown at 252 always in the same angular positionso that it will come in the center of the check.
  • the day printing wheel 251 is secured upon the sleeve 262 which is rotatably mounted in a part of the frame 3 and has a dial 263. at the left-hand side, which dial carries numbers corresponding to the numbers of the days of the months on the type wheel as shown in Fig. 12.- A spider-like.
  • a stationary pointer 265 corresponds to the location of the pointer on the segment 252 when in its printing position, in order to set the dial 263 which is rotated in any suitable manner so that the number on the dial corresponding to the day of the month comes opposite the pointer 265.
  • the corresponding number on the printing wheel 251 will be adjacent the pointer on the segment 252. This adjustment is effected when the drawer is closed and the parts of the mechanism are in their normal osition.
  • any suitable orm of clock or time-piece is suitably mounted in the case 157.
  • this clock is of the so called 24 hour type in which the hour shaft rotates once in each 24 hours.
  • the minute shaft 267 of the clock serves as a centering and alining device for the time printing wheels and also carries the minute pointer rinting segment 255.
  • the hour shaft 268 IS a hollow shaft as is customary in clock mechanism and carries the hour pointer printin segment 256.
  • the hour number printing w eel 257 is car ried by the sleeve 156 which is secured to the case of the clock.
  • the type wheels and segments just described are inked in suitable manner, for instance, by means of an inking roller 270 '(see Fig. 5) carried by a pivoted spring arm or frame 271.
  • a suitable yielding roller 272 is 'rotatably mounted in the frame of the machine made for instance, of a yielding material so. as to press yieldingly against the face of the printing wheels and segments and tocoustitute in conjunction therewith means for moving the check forwardly into a position to receive the imprint of the item and other characters as will be understood hereinafter.
  • the platen 275 for forcing the check up against the printing ribbon to receive the imprint of the item and other type is carried by two posts or plungers such as 276 secured to the platen in any suitable manner as for instance, in the recesses 277, 277 (see Fig.
  • plungers 276 are pressed downwardl'y by suitable means as for instance, springs such as 278 (see Fig. 5) and held away frdln the printing ribbon.
  • suitable printing plate 214 (Fig. 5) may be secured to the under side of the web 273 (Fig. 17)
  • the narrow end279 of the platen extends immediately beneath the item printing segments 203, 204, 205 previously described.
  • the broad part of the platen 275 extends rearwardly beneath the web 273 for pressing the check against the bottom of the advertisement printing plate and the consecutive numbering printing wheels previouslydescribed and the classification printing wheels hereinafter described.
  • the plate 280 is beneath the platen 275 when'the'mechanism is in its normalposition. Thccam 281 on the shaft 160 is "adapted topress against the plate-280 and 'the latter in turn lifts the platen 275 and forces it upward so as to print the upper face of the check.
  • This cam'281 is secured 'in such an angular position upon the shaft 160 tliat it presses against the plate 280 and raises platen 275 at the very last'part' of the oscillation of the shaft 84 and after the feeding forward of the check has been completed so that the check is in its proper position on top of the platen 275.
  • the checks such as 250 are suppliedin a magazine or chute 285 (see Figs. 28, 29, 30).
  • the body consists of the plate 295 supported on the guides 296, 296 by means of a suitable anti-friction device which preferably consists of -'a series of balls such as 297held in spaced relation by means of a perforated plate 298 through which the lower surfaces of the balls project.
  • the engaging edge of the feed member is formed by the hp 299 which is a art of a spring device 300 secured to the lower part of the plate 295.
  • a slot opening 301 In the rear end of this engaging member is a slot opening 301 in which a conical part 302 of a screw engages.
  • ⁇ Vhen'the'arm83 is moved to'the rear again byrneans of the operation of the crank 164 the feeddevice'moves forward'and carries the check 250 between the wheels.
  • the continued rearward motion 0 the arm 83'rotating thetimeprinting wheels moves thech'ck forwardly on to the'platen 275.
  • This 'kicker hasits upper end slotted as shown in l ig. '31'so as to'have a limited up and down movement on the screw or pivot bearing 308 and is under tension to be moved 'forwardby means of the spring 223 previously referredto.
  • the lower end ofthe kicker is providedwith one or more teeth or other suitably formed engaging means'such as 309.
  • This kicker has aproJeCtion 31-0 at the left which is in the path of movement of the two'pronged'dog 311 pivotally carried by the oscillating segment 221.
  • the dog is nnder the impulse of the spring 312 which presses it against stop 313 on the oscillating

Description

W. D. MCCOY.
INDICATING. REGISIERING, RECORDING, AND CHECK PRINTING MECHANISW,
APPLICATION men 6.25. 1910.
1,239,708. PatentedSept. 11, 1917.
9 SHEETS-SHEET I.
WITNESSES mvsuron JQMM'I W. D. McCOY.
INDICATING, REGISTERING, RECORDING, AND CHECK PRINTING MECHANISM.
I. Gk 1 m Nb fix Q I a. a. 3 2w 8 R mm a a g. E) Km m. w \Nw o I IN M m 41.. n IT I- I 1.1.11.1. f v hml wm IIH HwII I I: m .fi g um 0 03w FWQQ n m aQ m4 mg 4, 11% E Q. g s M a I na HHQI g I I n fi H g m n H N2 \QN I 3 be A SN M U .fi a H x g \N m 1 w AQ H n z \w 3 m g r a Qt QR w R n 7 A I E nn 4 1 MIMI m I 3w & 1 m a ha 0 vi .I I N 7 New I Rs INs w u 1 E a n s 2 E i I 1 3* km E w g k INVENTOR WITNESSES W. D. McCOY.
INOICATING, REGISTERING, RECORDING, AND CHECK PRlNTING vMEGHANISM.
APPLICATION FILED AUG.25. 1910. 1,239,708. Patented Sept, 11,1917.
9 SHEETS-SHE 3.
W. D. McCOY.
INDICATING, REGISTERING, RECORDING, AND CHECK PRINTING MECHANISM.
W. D. McCOY.
INDICAIING, REGISTERING, RECORDING, AND CHECK PRINTING MECHANISM.
Patl antedSept. 11, 1917.
9 SHEETS-SNEE I 5.
APPLICATION FILED AUGJS. IQIII.
Q? i n INVENTOR WITNESSES 421mm fiWM W. D. McCOY.
INDICATING, REGISTERING, RECORDING. AND CHECK PRINTING MECHANlSM.
APPLICATION man we. mo. 1,239,708.
PatentedSeptfll, 1917.
9 SHEETSSHEET 5.
F12 g/E.
W/TNfSSES INVENTOR W., I]. McCOY.
INDICATING, REGISTERING, RECORDING, AND CHECK PRINTING MECHANISM.
APPLICATION FILED AUG/"5' 19H). 11
9 SHEEIS-SHIEI I.
MN ITII. MAR. APR MAY JUNE JULY AUGSfI? OCI 740i DIG] @ammpfl 6 42M I 30 w. o. mcov. INDICATING, REGISTERING, RECORDING, AND CHECK PRINTING MECHANISM.
APPLICATION FILED IQ-25' 1910.
p a SNEETS--SHEEI a.
PatentedSept. 11, 1917.
W. D. McCOY.
INDICATTNG, REGISTERING, RECORDING, AND CHECK PRINTING MECHANISM,
APPLICATION FILED AUG.25. 19H).
Patented Sept. 11, 1917.
9 SHEETS-SHEET 9.
WITNESSES W. 4 aw WILLIAM D. MoCOY, OF NEW YORK, N. Y.
INDIGA'DDTG, REGISTERING, RECORDINGJAND CHECK-PRINTING MECHANISM.
Specification of Letters Patent. Patented Sept. 11, 1917.
Application filed August 25, 1910. Serial No. 578,328.
To all whom it mjrjconc em:
.Be it known that 1, WILLIAM D. McCoy,
' a'citizen of the United States, residing at 239 ox Ave, New Yorlg in the county of New" 'ork and State of New York, have m- Ivented certain new and useful Improvements in Indicatin Registering, Recording, and Check-Printmg Mechanism, of which the ifoIlowingfis a specification. I
'My invention relates-to improvements in what are commonly termed cash registers.
The main object of the invention isto 81mpl if the construction and operation of a ma ine of this-character, enable it to be made offbut few, parts and to accomplish certain operations asjmore'fully hereinafter set forth. p
The mechanism as a whole is constituted so as to facilitate the carrying out of a system foridentifying and tracing each separate transaction, 1'. at'is, the record or detail strip and 'thei as printed in the machine can always be located and compared with absolute certainty by reason of the simultaneously printed identification marks as 'lieneinaftrl pointed out. Improvements will be found to relate particularly to:
1st. Mechanism for controlling and settin" the indicating and other mechanism an "displaying the amount and nature of each transaction together with the symbol of the o orator. I
and. implified operating mechanism whereby a great variety of variations in values may be lndicated, registered, printed and recorded.
3rd. Mechanism for indicating the values setup and the character of various transactions and the symbol of the operator.
4th. Mechanism for registering and totalizin the items.
5th. Mechanism for printin the record of transactions upon a record s rip and upon checks in which the consecutive numbering of the items on the record slip and on the checks is efi'ected for each transaction.
(3th. Mechanism for printing the time and date of each transaction upon the cheeks.
7th. Mechanism for feeding individual checks automatically to the printing position and delivering the same after the completion of the rinting.
8th. Mechanism for classifying and registering the various transactions and indicating the nature thereof;
It will be noted that the different mecli-a nisms as herein constituted and assembled are designed to cooperate and do so coact' as to constitute with each other improved combinations for the purposes hereinafter 'set forth. It will be obvious hereinafter that certain of these different mechanismsin themselves constitute improvements inthe art adapted to uses inde endently or'in conjunction with other mcrihanism. Other im- Brovements will be found to reside in the" etails of construction, the
preferred form of which is herein illustrated; I
In the particular form" of mechanism shown and described in detail hereinafter there is a graduated scale for' setting up cents itemszero, 5, 10, etc, to"95'a"rrangeci on a horizontal are at the front of the mac h1ne. Beneath this are is arranged a setting arm pivoted near the rearof the ma chine and adapted to swing in a horizontal plane. This arm carries at its front endfan operating knob having upon. it a scalefor dial graduated from zero to 19 for setting up dollar items. To set up an item for a transaction the arm is swung horizontally till 'it comes directly beneath the proper number on the cents setting scale andthelmob' is rotated until the proper dollar number' is brolught directly beneath the centssetting sca e.
The setting arm carries a push key which is movable longitudinally for afl'ectingfthe indicator shutter, the registering mechanism, the drawer release and the printing operation. The indication is eflected by means of a series of dials which are arranged on a common axis and are rotated when the setting arm and knob are set. The shutter is operated to display the proper indications when the push key is operated and conceals the indication as soon as the operating arm is again moved. The indicating dials are operated by a series of frames which are pivoted on the same vertical axis with the setting'arm. The rear ends of these frames are connected to the indicating dials and the front ends of the frames carry the type for printing items on the record strip and the checks. The registering mechanism is carried by the setting arm. The cents registering parts are set when the arm is swung horizontally to Set up the cents item set when the operating knob is rotated to set up a dollar item and is operated when the knob is set back to zero. When the total of cents items registered equals or exceeds a dollar the dollar is carried forward or transferred to the dollar registering mechanism. The drawer is released when the push key is operated. The operation of a spring connected with a handle at the right of the machine throws the drawer open and raises the handle and the depression of the handle to normal position effects the printing of the record strip and the check and the closing of the drawer. The record strip is fed automatically from left to right above the printing frames and the checks are fed automatically from the rear to the front beneath the printing frames. A series of rinting wheels arranged below the path 0 motion of the checks rint the date and time of each transaction. wo series of.automatic counting and printing wheels print consecutive numbers on the face of the record strip and on the top face of each check. Classification mechanism is arranged at the right of the machine and consists of a series of counters adapted to be operated by a key so that the operators can keep track of the total number of the different kinds of transactions which the machine is designed to record. The character of the transaction is indicated at the same time. Alinement devices are provided throughout for necessitating the proper operation of the setting arm and knoband other parts prior to actual indication, registration or printing. Safety interlocking devices are also provided to make it necessary to complete each operation before it is possible to set up the mechanism for another item. It will be obvious hereinafter that many of the details of construction may be varied in form and arran ement and substitution may be made wit iin a wide range of equivalents without a departure from the spirit and scope of the invention claimed herein.
Figure 1, is a front view of a machine embodying the improvements of my invention, part of the casing and the cash drawer being omitted, the setting arm and key being in its mid position and the indicators set for the amount of $10.45 and symbol X being paid out.
the
and the classification Fig. 2, is a plan view of the same, operating and setting arm being in its extreme 1e t hand position set for an amount of 95 cents.
Fig. 3, is a partial vertical section and elevation taken from the left of Fig. 1 and showing also a part of the cash drawer.
Fig. 4, is a vertical sectional view showing the connections between the indicating dials.
Fig. 5, is an enlarged vertical sectional,
view and side elevation parts being broken away and showing on an enlarged scale parts of the operating, registering and printing mechanism.
Fig. 6, is a vertical sectional view of parts of the registering mechanism taken longitudinally of the operating arm.
Fig. 7, is a rear view of a fragment of the operating knob showing the interlocking device.
Fig. 8, is a rear view of parts of the shutter or curtain and mechanism for operating the same together with apart of the mechanism for operating the indicating dials.
Fig. 9, is a detail view of the gears for transmitting motion from the units of cents dial to the tens or tens of cents dial, parts being broken away.
Fig. 10, is a rear view and partial section of the record strip feeding and operating mechanism.
Fig. 11, is a plan view of the check printing platen.
Fig. 12, is a left hand side view and elevation of part of the check printing and feeding mechanism in the position which the parts occupy when the mechanism has been operated and corresponds to the open position of the drawer.
Fig. 12 is a perspective view of an inking roller and its supporting frame.
Fig. 13, is a front view and partial section on the plane of the line A A of Fig. 6 showing details of the registering mechanism.
Fig. 14, is a similar section of the registering mechanism on the plane of the line B B of Fig. 6.
Fig. 15, is a detail side view of part of the mechanism for the carrying forward of dollars from the cents registering drum to the dollar registering devices.
Fig. 16, is a right hand side View and partial section of parts of the mechanism for releasing the drawer from the classifying mechanism and showing the time clock and part of the printing mechanism.
Fig. 17, is a plan view and partial section of parts of the check and record strip printing mechanism.
Fig. 18, is a horizontal sectional view of parts of the check printing mechanism showing its connection with the time clock.
Fig. 19, is a detail perspective view of the cam for raising the platen for printing the record strip.
Fig. 20, is a bottom view of a check as printed and delivered from the machine.
Fig. 20 is an edge view of a plate for printing special matter.
Fig. 21, is a left hand side view and artial section on the plane of the line C, of F1g. 2 showing the parts of the classifying and counting mechanism and showing part of the mechanism for operating the printing device and closing the drawer.
Fig. 22, is a perspective view and section of the classifying arm on the plane of the line 1)., D of Fig. 21.
Fig. 23, is a detail perspective view of a check for retaining the reversing pawl and it is similar to the check employed in connection with the feeding of the inking tape or ribbon.
Fi 24, is a plan view showing the double pawl and adjacent parts for compelling operation of the push key in the main. setting arm.
Fig. 25, is a perspective view of the double pawl of Fig. 24;,
Fig. 26, is a perspective view of the feeding pawl of the inking ribbon mechanism.
Fig. 27, is a perspective view of the reverse device for the ribbon feed.
F ig. 2 8, is a vertical front sectional view and the projection of the check supply-feeding mechanism.
Fig. 29, is a view of the under side of the check feeding device.
Fig. 3.0, is an upright sectional view of the same on the plane of the line E, E of F ig. 29.
Fig. 31, is a perspective view of the check discharging arm orkicker.
Fig. 32, is a perspective view of a fragment of the supply check or magazine for containing the unprinted checks.
The parts 1, 2 and 3 together with the vertical shaft 1 constitute the principal supporting members of the frame of the machine. The segmental section 5 of the front of the case is mounted on the bed-plate 6 which latter may serve as aportion of the case for the usual cash drawer 7,
The main setting arm 8 is pivoted near the rear on the vertical shaft 4 and has a flanged sleeve 9 at the front end. This sleeve 9 surrounds tube 10 which is mounted upon a hollow shaft 11 which carries the knob 12 at its front end. The segmental section 5 has a slot or opening 13 which .guides the sleeve 9 and thus permits the main setting arm to be swung in a horizontal plane. A guard 13 carried by the sleeve 9 covers the rear of the opening 13. The machine as herein illustrated is adapted to indicate, register and print for amounts varyin by five cents from 45 to 95 and dollars roin zero to 19. i
For the purpose of setting the mechanism I have arranged numerals zero, 5, 10,15, etc, to 95 along the upper beveled edge 14 of the segmental section 5 and numerals zero, 1, 2, 3, etc, to 19 around the beveled edge of the knob 12;. The former may be called the cents. setting scale and. the latter the dollar setting dial. It will be obvious however that the mechanism might be adapted to other systems of money counting and that the cents setting scale might be arranged by unitsv from zero, 1, 2,3, etc, and that the dollar setting dial might be arranged for a larger or smaller amount. Normally the knob 12 is held from rotation by means of the projection 15 at the rear which engages in a notch 16 in the flanged sleeve 9 which is not rotatable. The knob however 18 adapted to be pushed inward, that is, to the left as viewed in Fig. 5, a distance suflicient to disengage the projection 15 from the notch 16 and allow the knob 12 to be rotated. It will be noted that when the knob is rotated it cannot be pulled outward until it is rotated back to; its normal position at .which position the zero on the dollar setting indicating mechanism as will be later described. The collar 20 also pivotally mounted on shaft 4 carries printing frame 20 at the front end for printing dollar items and at the rear is connected to operate the dollar indicating dial. The collar 21 also 'pivotally mounted on the shaft 4 carries the operators printing frame 21. and is connected at the rear to the operators indicator. Connected to the collar 20. is a segmental beveled gear 22 also pivoted on shaft 4 with which the bevel pinion 23 carried by the hollow shaft 11 is adapted to engage when the shaft and knob 12 are pushed to the rear, that is, to the left as viewed in Fig. 5. pawl 24 engages notches25 in the upper fiace of gear 22 so as to assist in stopping the movement of? the gear 22 at definite angular positions. A notched segment 26 beneaththe setting arm 8 is adapted to assist in definitelypositioning the setting arm when the reciprocating frame 27 is pushed inwardly as will be later described, it being necessary that a part of the frame 27 should mesh with one of the notches in the segment 26 which notches correspond with the different cents amounts on the cents setting scale.
The amount indicated by the dials in Fig. 1 is $10.45 and the operators symbol X. The usual windows will of course be provided in the case for displaying the amounts and symbols, but it is unnecessary to illustrate them herein, The shutter 28 is adapted to coverup, the indicating portion of the dials except when the machine is operated properly to indicate the definite amounts. The operation 05;- the shutter will be described later. The dial 30 has printed around its periphery the alternating The spring 'dial.
amounts zero5, zero, etc. This dial may be termed the units indicating dial. The dial 31 has numerals zero, 1 to 9 inclusive and may be called the tens indicating The dial 32 has the numerals zero, 1, 2, to 19 inclusive and may be termed the dollar indicating dial. The dial 30 is carried by the rotatable shaft 33 which has on its rear end pinion 34. An oscillating member 35 pivoted on a horizontal axis has a segmental gear 36 meshing with pinion 34 at its upper end and a segmental bevel gear 37 at its lower end meshing with the segmental bevel gear 38 at the rear 0 the collar 19. When the setting arm 8 is swung horizontally the collar 19 is swung correspondingly and by reason of the connection between the gears 38, 37 and 36, 34 the dial 30 is rotated correspondingly. Fig. 4 shows details of connection between the indicating dials. ()n the shaft 33 is a gear 40 meshing with gear 41 (see Fig. 9) which is carried by bracket 42. These two gears are similar to what is commonly known as Geneva gears for intermittent transmission. The gear 41 has gear 43 rotating with it and the latter meshes with gear 44 on a hollow shaft 45 which carries the indicating dial 31. The gears 40, 41 are so cut that the gear 41 has one rotation for every two rotations of gear 40 and its action is thus intermittent. The gear connection between the setting arm 8 and the shaft 33 and dial 30 is such that as the setting arm is moved from zero to 5 on the cents setting scale, the indicating dial 30 rotates so as to bring the numeral 5 in the indicating position, that is, one-tenth of a. revolution. \Vhen the setting arm is moved from 5 to 10 on the cents setting scale the units indicating dial 30 moves to the next zero position one-tenth more of a revolution. The connection between the gears 40 and 41 is such therefore that at this time the gear 41 will make one-tenth of a turn and thus rotates the dial 31 one-tenth of a turn and brings numeral 1 on the tens dial into the indicating position. The movement of the indicating dials 30 and 31 is progressive as the setting arm is swung from right to left. The dollar indicating dial 32 is carried by a sleeve 46 which has a bevel pinion 47 meshing with a segmental bevel gear 48 which is carried by an upward extension 49 from the collar 20 before referred to. When the setting knob 12 and dollar setting dial are rotated, the pinion 23 rotates the gear 22, collar 20 and arm 49 which thus rotates the pinion 47 and dollar indicating dial 32 progressively. The symbol dial 50 1s semi-circular and carried by sleeve 51 which has bevel pinion 52 meshing with segmental gear 53 on the arm 54extending upwardly from collar 21. The frame 21 has a forward extension 55 with an operating knob or handle 56 so that the frame 21 may be swung from right to left to set the operators symbol for indicating and. printing. A scale may be provided'for setting the handle 56 in a manner similar to the setting of the arm 8 at the diiferentcents positions. The rear dial 50' is also semi-circular and connected to dial 50 by means of a web 57 so that the two rotate together. The dials are arranged in pairs so as to display corresponding indications at the front and rear simultaneously. Dial 30 is mounted on shaft33 with dial 30. Dial 31 is on hollow shaft 45 with dial 31 and dial 32' is on sleeve 46 with dial 32. I p
The shutter 28 is carried by two up- right rods 60, 60 connected at their lower ends by a horizontal rod 61, these parts constituting the shutter frame. A pivoted pawl 62 constitutes a catch for holding the shutter in its raised position at which time figures on the indicating dial are visible. This pawl has a rearwardly and upwardly extending arm which by means of a spring 63 (see Fig. 8) is pressed upwardly against the notched lower surface 64 at the rear end of the collar 19 just beneath the segmental gear 38. The lower end of the pawl 62 has a notch or recess 65 in which the rod 61 of the shutter frame is supported when in the position shown in Figs. 3 and 8. A swinging frame 66 is loosely pivoted to the rod 61 with the shutter frame and has a shoulder 67 at the lower end which when the shutter is down rests upon the projection 68. This projection is a part of a vertically movable frame having the rear upright bolt 69 and the front up-right 70 connected by the crosspiece 71 (see Fig. 16). This vertically movable frame is guided by ball hearings or other suitable means of connection on the square post pillow block 72. The lower end of the rear up-right 69 is beveled and when the parts are in the position shown in Fig. 16 engages the catch 3 projecting from the rear of the drawer 7. Th1s is also shown in Fig. 3. When the main setting arm 8 and collar 19 are moved to the right or left from the position shown in Figs. 3 and 8 the horizontal arm of the pawl 62 is forced downward by the action of the notched portion 64 of the collar 19 and the catch 65 is thus disengaged from the rod 61 and the shutter frame allowed to drop by gravity until the bracket 66 falls into the position in dotted lines in Fig. 3 at which time its shoulder 67 rests upon the projection 68 just above mentioned. The shutter is raised by the inward thrust of push key 75.
The rod 76 has a push key or thumb-piece and is reciprocable in the hollow shaft 11 preyiously referred to as constituting a part of the main setting arm construction. A collar 77 securely fixed upon the rod 7 5 near its rear end engages an upright por-' tion 78 of the main reciprocating frame 27 which is carried by the main setting arm 8. The spring 79 has its rear 'end secured to the reciprocating frame 27 and its front end connected to "a screw 80 or other projection carried by the main setting arm 8, so that the spring places a tension upon the reciprocating frame 27 to hold it in and to return it to its forward position, that is, at the right as viewed in Fig. 5'. The rear lower portion of the reciprocating frame .27 has aninclined 'or cam surface 81 adapted when the reciprocating frame is pushed inward to engage the corresponding inverted incline 82 on theyerticallymoving frame on the pillow block 72 before referred to. When the push key 75 is pushed inward the action of the incline 81 is to lift the vertically moving frame and its projection 68 and thus by means of the engagement of the latter with the shoulder 07 lift the indicator shutter 28 from the dotted line position of Fig. 3 to the full line position previously referred to. When the up righ bolt portion 09 of the vertically moving frame is disengaged from the latch 73 (see Figs. 3 and 16), the drawer is released.
The arm 83 carried by the "shaft 84 has a normally forward pressure exer'oed upon it by the spring 85. Near the lower end of this arm 83 is a roller 86 carried by the drawer 7-. When the drawer has been released as just mentioned, the power of the spring thus throws the drawer forward; The completion of closing the drawer will be described in connection with the printing operation hereinafter.
In order to prevent improper operation I have provided it double acting pawl device which necessitates the push key 75 being pushed completely inward and then thrown completely forward by the action of the spring 79 and fiame27 when the key has been released (see Figs. 3, 5, 24 and 25). The body of the pawl device 87 is pivotedon a stud 88 carried by the reciprocating fralne 27. This has an elastic or spring per tion 89 tending to hold the pawl device in the position shown in Fig; 24-. The rear end of the pawl device has oppositely faced teeth 90, 91, Between them is arranged a yielding or elastic projection 92-. On the main setting arm 8 in the path of movement of the rojection 92 is e cam member 93 having its opposite ends beveled as shown in Fig; 24. The opposite feces of the setting arm 8 "adjacent this cam 93 have oppositely faced teeth 94 end 95 adapted to be engaged respectively by the teeth '90 and- 01 of the pawl device. When the pawl device moves to the rear by reason of the pushing in of the push key 75 and reciprocating frame 27 the elastic projection 9-2 engages the froift hand end of the cam 93 and is forced to the left (as viewed in a plan view of the me chine).
This brings the teeth of the pawl device into engagement with one of the teeth 95 in the main setting arm. The rpawl device will yield sufficiently to allow the continued inward or backward movement of the operating key or pawl device but will not allow forward or return movement until the projection -92 is disengaged from the rear of the cam 93-. As soon as the projec tion is thus disengaged from the rear of the cam 93 the spring 89 will return the pawl device to its central position so that the projection 92 will stand in the rear of the cam 93-. If the push key is then released the action of the spring 79 will move the reciproeating frame 27 "and the pawl tooth forwardly (to the right as viewed in Fig. 24); The rear end of the cam 93 will'th'en be dis engaged by the projection 92 and force the projection to the right (as viewed in plan view), thus tilting the pawl device so that thetooth 90 engages onebf the teeth 94: on the main setting arm. It will thus be seen that the pawl device and operating key are free to continue their forward motion but cannot be pushed inward llntil the forward motion is completed because of the inter-em gagement of the tooth 90 with the teeth 94.
The registering mechanism is'sho'wn particularly in Figs. 2, 5, 6, 13-, 14 and 15-. A segmental bevel gear which is station= an is engaged by the teeth of a bevel gear 10- This latter has a hub 102 which is re tatably mounted upon the sleeve 103 on the-hollow shaft 11. A star-wheel 104 carried by hub 102 is engaged by a roller 105 carried by a pair of arms 106 which are normally pressed by a spring 107 'so as to hold the roller 105 in one of the spaces between the teeth of the star-wheel 104:. This roller 105 and its arms 106 are adapted to yield as the star-wheel is rotated by reason of the lateral swingin of the main setting arm 8 and hollow sha t 11 but the tendency of the pressure of the roller 105 is to'stop the rotation of the star wheel104 and comb-- quently to stop the swinging of the shaftll at one ofthe positions corresponding to one of the setting points on the cents setting scale.
The sleeve 103 has a cam groove 108 in which a pin 109 on the reciprocating frame 27 projects. The sleeve 103 is rotatable on the hollow shaft 11 but is prevented from rearward motion by the sleeve 110. When the key 75 is pressed inward andcarries' with itthe reciprocating frame 27 as above mentioned; the pin 109 by reason of its en= gageznent in the cam groove 108 "causes rotationof the sleeve 103 through nearly a complete revolution; The cents registering drum 111 is carried by a ratchet 112 which is rotatable on the hollow shaft 11 (see Fig. 6)-. Mounted on the sleeve 103 is a plate 113 which is connected to the well of the bevel ear 101 by means of a spring 114. A
spring pressed pawl 115 carried by the plate 113 engages the teeth of the ratchet 112. Normally the spring 114 tends to rotate the plate 113 relative to the gear 101 until the projection 116 on the plate 113 engages the stop 117 on the gear 101. The gear 101 as above mentioned rotates as the arm is moved from left to right and vice versa and the position of the stop 117 is therefore dependent upon the position of the arm 8. The
sleeve 103 has a flange 118 which has a shoulder 119 which rotates with the sleeve 103 as the key is pushed in and out. The spring114 normally tends to rotate the plate so thata part of it for instance, the hub of the pawl 115 presses against the stop 119. As the key 75 is pushed inward the sleeve 103 is rotated to the right as viewed from the front, or clockwise, by reason of the pin 109 in the cam groove 108 and the tension of the spring 114 will cause the plate 113 and pawl 115 to follow around to the right until the projection 116 on the plate 113 engages the stop 117 carried by the gear 101. The amount of the rotation of the plate and its pawl 115 will therefore depend upon the angular position of the gear 101 and main setting arm 8. As the pawl 115 rotates to the right it slips over the teeth of the ratchet 112 and when the key is released the pawl returns and rotates the ratchet 112 and the cents setting drum 111 through exactly tlie angle that the displacement of the step 117 permitted the plate 113 and the pawl 115 to rotate when the key was pushed inwardly. This then brings the proper number on the cents registering drum to the reading position which in this particular arrangement is selected to be at the upper surface of the drum. The spring pawl 120 engaging with the notch or ratchet-like periphery of the registering drum 111 prevents the drum from being turned backwardly (see Figs. 14 and 15).
Any suitable form of counting mechanism such as 121 may be employed for keeping track of the total number of dollars registered; This is driven by the plate 122 by the'operation of the knob 12 and intermediatemechanism. Normally the plate 122 is held stationary by a projection or finger 123 carried by the reciprocating frame 27 engaging in a notch in plate 122 (see Fig. 13). The plate 122 carries a spring pressed pawl 124 engaging with the teeth of the ratchet 125. The latter is pinned or otherwise suitably secured to a gear 126 which meshes with a pinion 127 on the shaft of the counting mechanism. On the rear end of the tube 10 previously referred to is a plate 128 which is connected by means of a spring 129 to the hub of the plate 122. The'tension of this spring holds the nose 1300f the plate 128 against the projection 131 carried by the plate 122. The tube 10 the knob has the zero on its dial uppermost.
W'henthe knob 12 is pushed in (see Fi 5) the pin 132 engages'the recess 133 and t ere.-
upon the rotation of the dial 12 will be com municated to the tube 10 and the plate 128 on its rear end. The platewillthereiapon be rotated through an angle correspon ing to the number of dollars of the item to which the dollar setting dial is set. The pinion 23 at this time is in mesh with gear 22 which is yieldingly held in position-by means of the spring pressed pawl 24 operating in conjunction with the notches 25heretofore referred to. When the push key 7 5 is pushed inward and carries with it the reciprocating frame 27, the finger'123 is disengaged from the notch in the edge of the plate 122 and passes to the rear leaving the plate 122 free to be rotated in a right hand direction as viewed from the front of the machine. In this right hand rotation caused by thetension of the spring 129 the pawl 124 rides over the backs of the ratchet teeth 125 until the rotation of the' plate 122 is stopped by the engagement of the stop 131 with the nose 130 on the plate 128 which is the angular distance corresponding to the number of dollars of the item set up. Whenthe push key 75 is released the reciprocating frame 27 moves forward again and the finger 123 engages the teeth of the ratchet 134 on the rear of the plate 122, thus preventing the plate 122' from being rotated to a higher registration. When the knob 12 is rotated left handed back to the zero position the finger 123 rides over the back of the teeth of the ratchet 134 cut in the rear of plate 122 until it comes opposite the notch in the edge of the plate 122 whereupon it engages and locks the plate. When the knob 12 and plate 122 are rotated backwardly as just mentioned,'the pawl 124 being in engagement with the ratchet 125 rotates the ratchet and its attached gear 126 and the pinion 127 of the counting mechanism through an les correspondin to the dollar item which as been set up. t will be noted in this particular that by reason of the interaction of the finger 123 on the reciprocating frame 27 with the teeth 134: on the back of the plate 122 that the operation of the machine is completely locked until the knob 12 is turned backward to its zero position and the registration set up has been completed. Until this takes place the machine cannot be further operated, sincewhen the frame 27 is in this rearward position it is interlocked with the stationary notched segment 26 previously referred to.
VVheil the cents registering drum 111 has been advanced to 95 the next registration a will carry forward or transfer the next item to the counting mechanism. Figs. 5, 6, 13, 14 and 15 show the details of this device. Beneath the drum 111 and plate 122 is located the short shaft 135 suitably pivoted on the main settin arm 8. At the rear end this shaft carr1es an upwardly projecting arm 136 which stands in the path of movement of the pin 137 which rejects rearwardly from the drum 111. he front end of the shaft 135 carries a awl arm formed in two parts 138 and 139 w 1011 are pivotally connected together. A spring 140 exerts a pressure upon the two parts of the arm in connection with the shaft 135 so as to hold the upper end of the part 139 which is hooked as shown in Fig. 13 in engagement with the teeth of the pinion 126 previously referred to. When the registering drumlll moves forward from the 95- registerin position to the 'zero position making a tota. of $1.00 on the cents registering mechanism, the pin 137 strikes the arm 136 and moves it to the right, as viewed from the front of the machine; so as to rock the shaft 135 and arm 138 and carry the pawl part 139 to the right. This rotates the ratchet 125 and the gear 126 secured thereto and the latter being in engagement with the pinion 127 moves thedol'lar counting dial forward one point. As soon as the pin 137 is past the arm 136the latter .under the pull of spring 140 snaps ibackinto its proper position ready for the carrying forward of the next dollar from the cents registering drum.
It will be noted that the cents registration occurs while the reciprocating frame 27 is being thrown forward by the spring 79 after release of the push key 75 and the dollar registration occurs while the knob 12 is being turned back to the zero position of the dollar setting dial. As the carrying forward of the total of one dollar from the cents registration drum to the dollar registration device occurs when the cents registration takes place there is no possibility of interference between the carrying forward operation and the regular operation of dollar registration from the operating knob.
The record or detail strip 145 is of any ordinary or suitable character and in the form shown is provided in a roll on the spool 14:6 and is wound on to the hub 147 traveling from left to right as viewed from the front of the machine (see Fig. 1). The hub 117 is hollow and mounted upon the stationary spindle 148 (see Fig. 10). Secured to the hub is the ratchet 149 engaged by the spring pressed pawl 150. A vertically reciprocable member 151 (which also constitutes the printing platen for pressing the recond strip against the type) carries a. spring finger 152 which is adapted to en gage the teeth of the ratchet 149. A plate 153 has a portion cut away to provide guiding and bearing surface for the end of the spring finger 152 so that the member 151 rotates the ratchet 149 at about the middle of its downward stroke and the finger 152 is disengaged from the ratchet at the lower end of the stroke. ()n the upward motion of'the member 151 and finger 152 the ratchet is held from backward rotation by the pawl 150 and the finger 152 is retracted by the sliding engagement with the curved edge of the plate 153. The member 151 has a. shoulder 154 at the lower end engaged by the cam 155 whereby the member 151 is raised as will he pointed out, and is pressed downward by the spring 151 (see Fig. 1).
The cam 155 is mounted upon the sleeve 156 which is rotatable in suitable hearings in the part 3 of the frame of the machine (see Figs. 17 and 18). In the particular form shown the cam is secured to the case 157 of the time clock. The gear 158 rotatable with the cam and clock is in mesh with the segmental gear 159 which is secured on shaft 160 (see Fig. 16). This shaft 160 has an arm 161 connected by means of link 162 to the arm 163 on shaft 84 previously referred to (see Fig. 3). The cran'k 164 on the right of the machine is secured to this shaft 84 and is normally nearly horizontal. as shown in Figs. 1. 3 and 21, being inclined slightly downward toward the rear. It should be noted however that the particular position or angle of inclination of the crank is immaterial and the position is referred to simply for the sake of convenience of description. This crank 16st and the shaft 3-1- may be operated by any suitable driving means either manual or power but for convenience l have illustrated the crank 164- with a handle for the purpose of operating the shaft 84.
In order to prevent errors and tampering with the machine I have provided means for necessitating the completion of the oscillation of the shaft 81 when once it has been started in either direction. This is illustrated in Figs. 2 and 21. An arm 165 sccured to shaft 84 carries the pivoted twopronged pawl 166 which has a central tooth 167 engaging in one of the two notches 168 of the catch 169. This catch is carried by the arm 165 and it is under pressure of the spring 170 tending to hold the catch in engagement with the tooth 167 of the pawl. Two series of notches or ratchet teeth 171 and 172 are adapted to he engaged respectively with the upper and iowcr prongs of the pawl 166. The teeth are faced in opposite directions as shown in Fig. 21 and the intermediate shoulder 173 is provided. \Vhen the crank 164 is moved upward from the position shown in Fig. 21 the pawl 166 is carried downward and allowed to slide overthe backs of the teeth of the ratchet portion 171 but the shape of the teeth pre vents the pawl and arm from being returned to the original position until the pawl 166 is disengaged by the contact of its upper prong with the shoulder 173. This contact tilts the pawl 166 clock-wise sufficiently to force the tooth 167 of the pawl out of the upper notch of the catch 169, the catch yielding sufficiently to permit this. The tooth 167 then snaps into the lower notch of catch 169 where it is yieldingly held. The crank 164 may then be pushed downward and the arm 165 moved upward accordingly, the lower prong of the pawl 166 then sliding over the backs of the teeth of the ratchet portion 172. The crank 164 cannot be moved upward again until the lower spring of the pawl 166 engages the shoulder 173 and is forced backward into the position shown in Fig. 21, the tooth 167 snapping from the lower notch to the upper notch 168 in the catch 169.
Normally the drawer 7 is closed and latched by the bolt 69 engaging with the latch 73 as before referred to. When the reciprocating frame 27 is pushed inward and raises the bolt 69, the latch 73 is released and the spring 85 secured to shaft 84 exerts its pressure through the arm 83 and throws the drawer open at the same time raising the crank 164 and by means of the connection from the crank 163, link 162, crank 161, shaft 160, segmental gear 159 and pinion 158 rotates the cam 155 which lifts the platen member 151. As the cam rotates righthanded beyond the position shown in Fig. 16 the shoulder 154 is disengaged and the member is pulled downward by the spring 151 and the record strip is thus fed forward by the engagement of the finger 152 with the ratchet 149 which is secured to the winding hub. At the bottom of the stroke the printing takes place as will be understood hereinafter. When the crank 164 is pulled forward and downward again it moves the arm 83 to the rear. This latter by its engagement with the roller 174 at the rear of the drawer closes the drawer and at the same time releases the member 151 which is raised by the rotation of the cam 155 back to the position shown in Fig. 16 which is its normal position.
On the left of the pillow block 72 previously referred to is located a bolt 180 which has a limited forward and backward movement in or on suitable guides and is normally pressed forwardly by a spring 181 (see Fig. 3). The upright of the vertically movable frame 1 on the plllow block is provided with a shoulder 182 ada ted to engage the forward beveled end of t e bolt 180 when the frame is raised b the action of the reciprocating frame 27. s the shoulder 182 passes above the bolt 180 the bolt snaps forward beneath the shoulder and thus prevents the frame from being moved down under the impulse of the spring 183 (see Fig. 16). The rear of the bolt 180 has a shoulder 184 or lip which projects to the left and is adapted to be engaged by the arm 83 when that is moved rearwardly by the downward action of the crank 164. As the arm 83 is moved to the rear, to the rear dotted position shown in Fig. 3, the lip 184 is engaged by the arm and the bolt is retracted from beneath the shoulder 182 thus allowing the spring 183 and gravity to move the frame 71 downward. As the frame 71 moves downward the bolt 69 engages the catch .73 on the drawer and holds the drawer in its closed position. When the crank 164 is released the tension of the spring 85 rotates the shaft 84 until the arm 83 strikes the roller 86. It will thus be seen that the drawer 7 acts as a movable abutment for the arm 83. The bolt 69 serves to lock this movable abutment until the push key is operated.
Normally the platenmember 151 rests with its shoulder 154 upon the tip of the cam 155 as shown in Fig. 16. When the drawer 7, constituting the movable abutment as just mentioned, is released by the raising of the bolt 69 from the latch 73, the spring'85 turns the shaft 84 and the cam 155 through the medium of the mechanism above described. The cam thus rotates right-handed or clock-wise and the shoulder 154 of the platen member 151 is disengaged from the point of the cam, then drops to cause the printing, and is then gradually raised as the cam continues to rotate. The cam has its greatest radius at about the point 190 (see Figs. 16 and 19), which is somewhat greater than the radius of the cam at its tip directly beneath the shoulder 154 as shown in Fig. 16. A spring pressed catch 191 is adapted to snap beneath the shoulder 192 on the platen member 151 when the point 190 of the cam 155 raises the platen member to its highest position. The lower end of thecatch 191 has a projection 193 at its rear whose upper and lower faces are inclined as shown in Fig. 16. An arm 194 carried by the vertically moving frame 71 has its front end beveled to co-act with the faces of the projection 193. When the frame 71 is moved upward to the inward travel of the reciprocating frame 27 the end of the arm 194 rides up the lower inclined face of the projection 193 and tilts the catch 191 until it comes above the upper inclined face of the projection 193, at which time the nose of the catch 191 is tilted to snap beneath the shoulder 192 on the platen member when the platen member is raised to its highest position by the high point 190 of the cam 155 coming beneath the shoulder 154. When the rank 164 is pulled forward and downwar its first action is to oscillate the shaft 84 right-handed as viewed in Fig. 3 thus tween the pawl 166 and catch 169 shown in Figs. 21 and 23 and previously described.
When the lower ribbon spool becomes filled the pressure of the ribbon against the reversing arm 227 tilts the reversing device until the tooth 232 snaps from the upper to the lower notch in the catch 231 thus throwing the pawl 220 out of engagement with the ratchet 216 and throwing the awl into engagement with ratchet 215. ontinued movement of the mechanism causes the ribbon to be fed in the opposite direction and.
means of two sets of counter wheels of suitable construction, having printing type upon their faces instead of the ordinary visual display fi res. These are shown particu' larly m ig. 17. The printing wheels 235 are mounted on the shaft 236 which has a spring pressed arm 237 (Figs. 16 and 17) which is oscillated by the projection 238 on the shaft 160 attached near the left-hand end thereof. On the shaft 236 or secured to the units wheel is a bevel gear 239 meshing with the lower face of the double faced miter gear 240 whose upper face meshes with the gear 241 on the shaft of the printing wheels 242. The wheels 235 print on the upper face of the checks and the wheels 242 print upon the lower face of the record strip. The two sets of wheels being geared to gether, rotate together and exactly the same numbers are prmted upon the checks and upon the record strip. The part 243 of the platen 151 forces the record strip against the ribbon on the type segments 200, 201 and 202 and the numbering wheels 242 for printing.
.Figs. 5, 12, 16, 17 and 18 show the construction and arrangement of the dating and time printing mechanism while Fig. 20 shows the card or check 250 as it is printed on the bottom, the item being printed upon the upper surface. A series of printing wheels and segments are arranged on a com mon axis as shown in Figs. 17 and 18. YVheel 251 carries the type face for printing the numbers of the days of the months as shown at 251' in Fig. 20. The segment 252 prints the words Day of month with a pointer as shown at 252'. The segment 253 prints an index or pointer 253 for months. The wheel 254 prints a scale of minutes and names of the months as shown at 254'. The segment 255 prints the pointer 255' to indion the hollow shaft 261 is driven b cate the minute on the minutes scale. The segment 256. prints the pointer 256' for indicating the hour on the hour scale. The wheel 257 prints a scale of hours a. m. and p. m. as at 257 in Fig. 20. The pinion 260 the oscillating segment,221.previously re erred to which is in turn operated through the instrumentality of the movement of the arm 83 and shaft 84 and the link eonnection162. The printing wheel 254 is secured to shaft 261 and rotates Withdt." The segment 253. is adjustably clamped to the shaft 261 in any suitable manner so that its angular position relative to the printing wheel 254 may be variedto bringits printing pointer opposite the proper month on the months scale. This is set, every month by hand. .The printing segment 252 is securely clamped in any suitable manner upon the shaft 261 and prints the words Da of month and the pointer shown at 252 always in the same angular positionso that it will come in the center of the check. The day printing wheel 251 is secured upon the sleeve 262 which is rotatably mounted in a part of the frame 3 and has a dial 263. at the left-hand side, which dial carries numbers corresponding to the numbers of the days of the months on the type wheel as shown in Fig. 12.- A spider-like. spring 264 presses against the dial 263 and the pinion 260 so as to frictionallyhold the dial 263 and the printing wheel 251 in position. A stationary pointer 265 corresponds to the location of the pointer on the segment 252 when in its printing position, in order to set the dial 263 which is rotated in any suitable manner so that the number on the dial corresponding to the day of the month comes opposite the pointer 265. When thus arranged the corresponding number on the printing wheel 251 will be adjacent the pointer on the segment 252. This adjustment is effected when the drawer is closed and the parts of the mechanism are in their normal osition.
Any suitable orm of clock or time-piece is suitably mounted in the case 157. Preferably this clock is of the so called 24 hour type in which the hour shaft rotates once in each 24 hours. The minute shaft 267 of the clock serves as a centering and alining device for the time printing wheels and also carries the minute pointer rinting segment 255. The hour shaft 268 IS a hollow shaft as is customary in clock mechanism and carries the hour pointer printin segment 256. The hour number printing w eel 257 is car ried by the sleeve 156 which is secured to the case of the clock. When the two pinions 158 and 260 are rotated simultaneously by their respective se ental gears 159 and 221. previously descri ed, the printing wheels and segments and the time clock rotate together. The hour and minute index printing segments are rotated by the clock relative to the minute and hour printing wheels so that the time of printing of each item is accurately recorded on the check.
The type wheels and segments just described are inked in suitable manner, for instance, by means of an inking roller 270 '(see Fig. 5) carried by a pivoted spring arm or frame 271. A suitable yielding roller 272 is 'rotatably mounted in the frame of the machine made for instance, of a yielding material so. as to press yieldingly against the face of the printing wheels and segments and tocoustitute in conjunction therewith means for moving the check forwardly into a position to receive the imprint of the item and other characters as will be understood hereinafter.
The platen 275 for forcing the check up against the printing ribbon to receive the imprint of the item and other type is carried by two posts or plungers such as 276 secured to the platen in any suitable manner as for instance, in the recesses 277, 277 (see Fig.
'11). These plungers 276 are pressed downwardl'y by suitable means as for instance, springs such as 278 (see Fig. 5) and held away frdln the printing ribbon. A suitable printing plate 214 (Fig. 5) may be secured to the under side of the web 273 (Fig. 17)
to print advertisements upon the face of the check if desired. The narrow end279 of the platen extends immediately beneath the item printing segments 203, 204, 205 previously described. The broad part of the platen 275 extends rearwardly beneath the web 273 for pressing the check against the bottom of the advertisement printing plate and the consecutive numbering printing wheels previouslydescribed and the classification printing wheels hereinafter described. The plate 280 is beneath the platen 275 when'the'mechanism is in its normalposition. Thccam 281 on the shaft 160 is "adapted topress against the plate-280 and 'the latter in turn lifts the platen 275 and forces it upward so as to print the upper face of the check. This cam'281 is secured 'in such an angular position upon the shaft 160 tliat it presses against the plate 280 and raises platen 275 at the very last'part' of the oscillation of the shaft 84 and after the feeding forward of the check has been completed so that the check is in its proper position on top of the platen 275.
The checks such as 250 are suppliedin a magazine or chute 285 (see Figs. 28, 29, 30
and 32). The lower edges of the magazine are turned inwardly or flanged at 286 so 'as to support the edges of the checks. I have provided a tension or pressure device to force the checks down the magazine. A plate 287 rests upon the top of the pile'of checks. This plate carries two pulleys or rollers 288 over which passes a flexible band roller 272 and 'the time printin or cord 290. One end of this is secured as at 291 in Fig. 32 and the other end is secured to a spring winding drum 292 of any suitable character. In this way a substantially uniform pressure is maintained to hold the checks down in the magazine. The checks as they come below the edge 293 of the magazine, are fed from the bottom of the magazine intermittently by a reciprocating feed device. The body consists of the plate 295 supported on the guides 296, 296 by means of a suitable anti-friction device which preferably consists of -'a series of balls such as 297held in spaced relation by means of a perforated plate 298 through which the lower surfaces of the balls project. The engaging edge of the feed member is formed by the hp 299 which is a art of a spring device 300 secured to the lower part of the plate 295. In the rear end of this engaging member is a slot opening 301 in which a conical part 302 of a screw engages. By adjusting the screw in or out the conical surface by this engagement with the opening 301 will lower or raise the engaging lip 299 as the case may be in order to make it project above the plate-295 so as to correspond with the thickness of the check employed.
A rack 304 ipivotally secured to the feed plate 295 by means ofthe screw 305 engages the teeth ofthepinion 260 when the parts are in their feeding're'lation, the rack being held yi'eldin'gly in engagement with the 221 is -oscillated, the check feeding device is moved to the rear until the bottom check of'the'stack isengaged at-its rear edge by the-feed-lip 299. \Vhen'the'arm83 is moved to'the rear again byrneans of the operation of the crank 164 the feeddevice'moves forward'and carries the check 250 between the wheels. The continued rearward motion 0 the arm 83'rotating thetimeprinting wheels moves thech'ck forwardly on to the'platen 275.
After the operation of the platen 27 5 the check is'discharged'by a kicker 307. This 'kicker 'hasits upper end slotted as shown in l ig. '31'so as to'have a limited up and down movement on the screw or pivot bearing 308 and is under tension to be moved 'forwardby means of the spring 223 previously referredto. The lower end ofthe kicker is providedwith one or more teeth or other suitably formed engaging means'such as 309. This kicker has aproJeCtion 31-0 at the left which is in the path of movement of the two'pronged'dog 311 pivotally carried by the oscillating segment 221. The dog is nnder the impulse of the spring 312 which presses it against stop 313 on the oscillating
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