US1192833A - Sound-box. - Google Patents

Sound-box. Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US1192833A
US1192833A US6212615A US6212615A US1192833A US 1192833 A US1192833 A US 1192833A US 6212615 A US6212615 A US 6212615A US 6212615 A US6212615 A US 6212615A US 1192833 A US1192833 A US 1192833A
Authority
US
United States
Prior art keywords
diaphragm
disk
metallic
sound
sound box
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Expired - Lifetime
Application number
US6212615A
Inventor
John A Steurer
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
Individual
Original Assignee
Individual
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Application filed by Individual filed Critical Individual
Priority to US6212615A priority Critical patent/US1192833A/en
Priority to US101252A priority patent/US1192834A/en
Application granted granted Critical
Publication of US1192833A publication Critical patent/US1192833A/en
Anticipated expiration legal-status Critical
Expired - Lifetime legal-status Critical Current

Links

Images

Classifications

    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04RLOUDSPEAKERS, MICROPHONES, GRAMOPHONE PICK-UPS OR LIKE ACOUSTIC ELECTROMECHANICAL TRANSDUCERS; DEAF-AID SETS; PUBLIC ADDRESS SYSTEMS
    • H04R7/00Diaphragms for electromechanical transducers; Cones

Definitions

  • I employ a non-metallic diaphragm, preferably of mica, and I adhesively secure to one face of the diaphragm a disk of thin sheet material which is non-absorbent, waterproof, unaffected by heat or cold, and which will therefore never warp or crack, and preferably of material which combines the qualities of a solid quasi-vitreous base with those of a fibrous material.
  • the specific material which as a result of many experiments I have found to give the best results, is what is known in the trade as bakelite dilecto which is a composite body comprising sheets of paper impregnated with bakelite or com- Specification of Letters Patent.
  • the size of the disk may be varied from a disk of comparatively small diameter to a disk of substantially the same diameter as the diaphragm according to the particular amplifying devices of the phondgraph or other talking machine with which the sound box is used.
  • the effect of this disk is to clarify the tone produced by the diaphragm eliminating substantially all metallic resonance and also eliminating the muliled effect usually produced in talking machines, render.- ing with perfect clarity both the tones and over-tones of the human voice and the vari ous musical instruments whether used separately or in concerted music.
  • Figure 1 represents a front elevation of a sound box or reproducing device constructed accord ing to and embodying my invention.
  • Fig. 2 is a vertical sectional view of the same.
  • Figs. 3 and l are detail yiews of a portion of the device showing slightly modified arrangements for mounting the stylus arm.
  • Fig. 5 is a magnified partial section of the diaphragm and disk.
  • 1 represents the body of the sound box which is of the usual form and is preferably formed of nonmetallic material, preferably a combination of quasi-vitreous material and fibrous material. and for this purpose I prefer to employ bakelite dileeto which is turned from a solid block so as to provide the rear wall, 2, the diaphragm recess and av recess, a, of larger diameter to receive the diaphragm retaining ring, 5, which is also preferably made of the same material. All the parts of the sound box which are formed of bake lite dilecto ha we the strata of fibrous material extending in planes parallel with the diaphragm.
  • the rear wall, 2 is proyided with the usual aperture 6 to communicate with the collar or fitting, T, proyided with a lateral flange, 8, which is secured to the body of the sound box, the said collar, 7, being adapted to be connected to the portion of the phonograph or other instrmnentleading to the amplifying horn o1 mechanism in the usual manner, and being preferably provided with the usual locking stud, 9.
  • the collar, 7, with its flange, 8, of baltelite dilecto may be formed of metal or other material if desired.
  • Jl'ho washers, l and 11 may be of rubber or I may employ bahelite dilecto for this purpose also, and the clamping ring, 12, is prefe ably of balrelite dilecto or other non-metallic material, although in some instances I may employ a. metal clamping ring in which case I prefer to make the inner diameter of the ring of such a size that it will not come in contact with the collar. 7, as shown.
  • 1 represents the diaphragm which is preferably non-metallic and preferably formed of mica. the outer edges of the diaphragm being supported by the usual cushion rings, 10 and 1?. held in place by the retaining ring, 5, which is connected to the body of the sound box by the screws, 1 f, or otherwise.
  • the diaphragm is proyided with the clariihingr disk, 20.
  • the claritying disk as extending over the central portion of the diaphragm only and located conce trically therewith. It is to be understood that it may extend a greater or distance from the center to the periphe of the diaphragm according to the conoitions under which it is to be used, and in some instances may be co-extensire with the diaphragm although prefer to have it of less diameter than the diaphragm.
  • its a matter of experienc I have found that the size of the disl: which giyes the est results varies somewhat with the size and character of the amplifying horn or other amplifying mechanism. employed in the in trmnent with which the srund box is used, a compaia tiyely small disk gi ing good results with a large horn and rice yersa.
  • the stylus arm is of the usual or an ⁇ - preferred form, the upper end having a shoulder portion and a threaded portion of similar diameter extending through a central aperture in the clarifying disk, and through the diaphragm and being secured in position by a nut in the usual manner. a minute quantity of wax being applied around the nut, and the stem of the styhis arm on the inner face of the diaphragm, and on the exterior face of the disk in the usual manner as shown.
  • the stylus arm is provided with a pivot engaging portion, 26, which is preferably engaged by two pivot screws. 27, extending through ears. and provided with set nuts, 29, although other forms of mountings or the stylus arm may by substituted for those herein shown and described.
  • the ears which are preferably formed of non metallic material. for example baltelite dilecto. made integral with or s cured to the retaining ring. 5, so as to avoid the possibility of any metallic resonance from the pivotal connection of the styli'is arm.
  • 1 may form a notch or re cess in the retaining ring, 5, as shown in Fig. and provide a mounting, 30, having ears, 28", formed thereon. said mounting being directly connected to the non-metallic body, 1, of the sound box so as to transfer the support for the stylus arm from the retaining ring to the body of the sound box as shown in said figure.
  • the mounting might be made of metal although I prefer that it should be of nonunetallic material.
  • Fig. l I have shown another slight modification in which the body here indicated at 1 of the sound box is provided with a recess or notch in which is located a block, 31, preferably of non-metallic material, and prefer ably of bakelite dilecto, provided wlth the ears, 28 said block fitting in said notch and extending through a corresponding recess in the retaining ring and being secured to the body of the sound box by screws, 32.
  • the stylus arm is provided with the usual needle recess and clamping screw 35, a needle being shown in position at, 36.
  • the clarifying disk of bakelite dilecto modifies the delicately responsive non-metallic mica diaphragm to which it is so intimately connected, in such manner as to eliminate all metallic Sounds and prevent the blending or mufiling of tones, all the tones as well as the most minute over-tones being rendered with perfeet clarity and distinctness and resulting in the perfect versimilitude of the human voice or voices or musical instrument or instruments the tones of which are reproduced.
  • the non-metallic body of the sound box also preferably of bakelite dilecto, and the mount ing of tie stylus arm directly thereupon preferably without the intervention of any direct metallic contact in the manner described also coeperates with the clarifying disk in more perfectly eliminating the me tallic resonance and clarifying the tone reproduced.
  • I attribute the results obtained by my improved sound box to the use of the clarifying disk and body composed of quasi-vitreous material combined with fibrous material, the best form of which I consider to be bakelite dilecto.
  • quasi-vitreous I mean a material like bakelite which is hard, glasslike and of uniform density, while at the same time it is tough and not so brittle as glass, and is not under any internal or external stress, as truly vitreous material is apt to be.
  • This peculiarity in combination with the fibrous material causes a resultant material which possesses the desired quality of resonance together with the requisite flexibility and at the same time is incapable of warping and is not affected by atmospheric conditions of any kind.
  • the clarifyink disk of bakelite dilecto on account of its peculiar qualities also cooperates with the non-metallic mica disk in preventing the splintering or separation of the almost infinitesimally thin strata along their planes of cleavage of the mica at and adjacent to the center of the diaphragm where the stylus arm is connected, and thus prevents the deterioration of the mica diaphragm which otherwise is extremely likely to result with continued use.
  • bakelite as used in the foregoing specification and in the following claims I mean a phenolic condensation prodnot formed by combining a phenolic body with formaldehyde, which isbest known by one of its trade names bakelite.
  • a concentric clarifying disk composed of bakelite having embodied therein strata of fibrous material parallel with the diaphragm, said disk being cemented to the diaphragm throughout their adjacent surfaces.

Description

J. A. STEURER.
SOUND BOX.
APPLICATION FILED Nov, I8. 1915.
Patented July 25, 1916.
A TTOR NE YS UNITED sTAT s PATENT OFFICE.
JOHN A. STEURER, OF NEW YORK, N. Y.
SOUND-BOX.
Application filed November 18, 1915.
To all whom it may concern:
Be it known that I, JOHN A. STEURER, a citizen of the United States, residing at New York, in the county of New York and State of New York, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in Sound-Boxes; and I do hereby declare the following to be a full, clear, and exact description of the in vention, such as will enable others skilled in the art to which it appertains to make and use the same.
My invention consists in the novel features hereinafter described reference being had to the accompanying drawing in which is shown one embodiment of my invention selected by me for purposes of illustration together with several slight modifications of the same, and said invention is fully disclosed in the following description and claims.
In the use of the reproducing devices or sound boxes of talking machines two objectionable features stand out prominently. One is the metallic resonance which is usu ally produced in a greater or lesser extent in practically all sound boxes, and another is the mufl'ling of certain sounds which I attribute to the interference with the vibration of the diaphragm at and adjacent to the point of connection between the stylus arm and the diaphragm, that is to say at its central portion. This latter mufl'ling or damping of the tone at the center of the diaphragm is also observed in the use of practically all forms of sound boxes with which I am familiar, and produces a muddiness or lack of clarity of tone which seriously mars the perfection of reproduction and is perhaps especially noticeable in reproducing from records of the human voice and'of the concerted instrumental selections.
According to my invention I employ a non-metallic diaphragm, preferably of mica, and I adhesively secure to one face of the diaphragm a disk of thin sheet material which is non-absorbent, waterproof, unaffected by heat or cold, and which will therefore never warp or crack, and preferably of material which combines the qualities of a solid quasi-vitreous base with those of a fibrous material. The specific material, which as a result of many experiments I have found to give the best results, is what is known in the trade as bakelite dilecto which is a composite body comprising sheets of paper impregnated with bakelite or com- Specification of Letters Patent.
Patented July 25, 1916.
Serial No. 62,126.
ing a greater or lesser distance toward the extreme marginal portions of the diaphragm. I have found in practice that the size of the disk may be varied from a disk of comparatively small diameter to a disk of substantially the same diameter as the diaphragm according to the particular amplifying devices of the phondgraph or other talking machine with which the sound box is used. The effect of this disk is to clarify the tone produced by the diaphragm eliminating substantially all metallic resonance and also eliminating the muliled effect usually produced in talking machines, render.- ing with perfect clarity both the tones and over-tones of the human voice and the vari ous musical instruments whether used separately or in concerted music. I have also found that in connection with the non-metallie diaphragm provided with the described clarifying disk the beneficial results are obtained more certainly and to a more perfect degree by employing the diskin connection with a sound box having a non-metallic body and in which the supports for the stylus arm are connected directly to the nonmetallic body instead of to any metallic portion of the sound box, and in the preferred form of my invention herein illustrated and described I form the body of the sound box also of bakelite dilecto, thus not only eliminating still further the tendency to metallic resonance but providing a support for the diaphragm, and stylus arm having similar characteristics to those of the clarifying disk, and cooperating therewith in producing pure tones and over-tones.
In the accompanying drawings: Figure 1 represents a front elevation of a sound box or reproducing device constructed accord ing to and embodying my invention. Fig. 2 is a vertical sectional view of the same.
Figs. 3 and l are detail yiews of a portion of the device showing slightly modified arrangements for mounting the stylus arm. Fig. 5 is a magnified partial section of the diaphragm and disk.
Referring to the drawings, 1 represents the body of the sound box which is of the usual form and is preferably formed of nonmetallic material, preferably a combination of quasi-vitreous material and fibrous material. and for this purpose I prefer to employ bakelite dileeto which is turned from a solid block so as to provide the rear wall, 2, the diaphragm recess and av recess, a, of larger diameter to receive the diaphragm retaining ring, 5, which is also preferably made of the same material. All the parts of the sound box which are formed of bake lite dilecto ha we the strata of fibrous material extending in planes parallel with the diaphragm. The rear wall, 2, is proyided with the usual aperture 6 to communicate with the collar or fitting, T, proyided with a lateral flange, 8, which is secured to the body of the sound box, the said collar, 7, being adapted to be connected to the portion of the phonograph or other instrmnentleading to the amplifying horn o1 mechanism in the usual manner, and being preferably provided with the usual locking stud, 9.
1 prefer to form the collar, 7, with its flange, 8, of baltelite dilecto although it may be formed of metal or other material if desired. I also prefer to introduce a washer, 10, between the flange, 8, of the collar and the rear wall of the sound box, and to provide another washer, 11, surrounding the collar, 7, on the exterior face of the flange, 8, and to proride a clamping ring, 12, engaging the last mentioned washer, the clamping ring being connected to the sound box by suitable connections as the screws, 13, pass ing through apertures in the washers, 10, and 11. and the flange, 8, of the collar to secure the parts together in proper relation to the sound box. Jl'ho washers, l and 11, may be of rubber or I may employ bahelite dilecto for this purpose also, and the clamping ring, 12, is prefe ably of balrelite dilecto or other non-metallic material, although in some instances I may employ a. metal clamping ring in which case I prefer to make the inner diameter of the ring of such a size that it will not come in contact with the collar. 7, as shown.
1 represents the diaphragm which is preferably non-metallic and preferably formed of mica. the outer edges of the diaphragm being supported by the usual cushion rings, 10 and 1?. held in place by the retaining ring, 5, which is connected to the body of the sound box by the screws, 1 f, or otherwise. The diaphragm is proyided with the clariihingr disk, 20. which is formed of a thin sheet of balielite dilecto with the fibrous material 21 thereof lying in planes parallel to the plane of the diaphragm, and cemented to the diaphragm throughout the contacting surfaces thereof by a cement which is not a l'l'ected by heat, cold or moisture or other atmospheric cmulitions, which is also true of the clarifying disk itself.
In the drawing 1 have shown the claritying disk as extending over the central portion of the diaphragm only and located conce trically therewith. It is to be understood that it may extend a greater or distance from the center to the periphe of the diaphragm according to the conoitions under which it is to be used, and in some instances may be co-extensire with the diaphragm although prefer to have it of less diameter than the diaphragm. its a matter of experienc I have found that the size of the disl: which giyes the est results varies somewhat with the size and character of the amplifying horn or other amplifying mechanism. employed in the in trmnent with which the srund box is used, a compaia tiyely small disk gi ing good results with a large horn and rice yersa.
The stylus arm, is of the usual or an}- preferred form, the upper end having a shoulder portion and a threaded portion of similar diameter extending through a central aperture in the clarifying disk, and through the diaphragm and being secured in position by a nut in the usual manner. a minute quantity of wax being applied around the nut, and the stem of the styhis arm on the inner face of the diaphragm, and on the exterior face of the disk in the usual manner as shown. The stylus arm is provided with a pivot engaging portion, 26, which is preferably engaged by two pivot screws. 27, extending through ears. and provided with set nuts, 29, although other forms of mountings or the stylus arm may by substituted for those herein shown and described.
In Figs. 1 and i l ha e shown the ears. which are preferably formed of non metallic material. for example baltelite dilecto. made integral with or s cured to the retaining ring. 5, so as to avoid the possibility of any metallic resonance from the pivotal connection of the styli'is arm. In some instances 1 may form a notch or re cess in the retaining ring, 5, as shown in Fig. and provide a mounting, 30, having ears, 28", formed thereon. said mounting being directly connected to the non-metallic body, 1, of the sound box so as to transfer the support for the stylus arm from the retaining ring to the body of the sound box as shown in said figure. In such case the mounting might be made of metal although I prefer that it should be of nonunetallic material.
In Fig. l I have shown another slight modification in which the body here indicated at 1 of the sound box is provided with a recess or notch in which is located a block, 31, preferably of non-metallic material, and prefer ably of bakelite dilecto, provided wlth the ears, 28 said block fitting in said notch and extending through a corresponding recess in the retaining ring and being secured to the body of the sound box by screws, 32. In all of these constructions it will be noted that there can be no metallic vibration at the point of pivoting to communicate itself to the diaphragm through the stylus arm or through the non-metallic body of the sound box. The stylus arm is provided with the usual needle recess and clamping screw 35, a needle being shown in position at, 36.
In the use of my improved sound box it will be found that the clarifying disk of bakelite dilecto modifies the delicately responsive non-metallic mica diaphragm to which it is so intimately connected, in such manner as to eliminate all metallic Sounds and prevent the blending or mufiling of tones, all the tones as well as the most minute over-tones being rendered with perfeet clarity and distinctness and resulting in the perfect versimilitude of the human voice or voices or musical instrument or instruments the tones of which are reproduced. The non-metallic body of the sound box, also preferably of bakelite dilecto, and the mount ing of tie stylus arm directly thereupon preferably without the intervention of any direct metallic contact in the manner described also coeperates with the clarifying disk in more perfectly eliminating the me tallic resonance and clarifying the tone reproduced.
I attribute the results obtained by my improved sound box to the use of the clarifying disk and body composed of quasi-vitreous material combined with fibrous material, the best form of which I consider to be bakelite dilecto. By the term quasi-vitreous I mean a material like bakelite which is hard, glasslike and of uniform density, while at the same time it is tough and not so brittle as glass, and is not under any internal or external stress, as truly vitreous material is apt to be. This peculiarity in combination with the fibrous material causes a resultant material which possesses the desired quality of resonance together with the requisite flexibility and at the same time is incapable of warping and is not affected by atmospheric conditions of any kind. The clarifyink disk of bakelite dilecto on account of its peculiar qualities also cooperates with the non-metallic mica disk in preventing the splintering or separation of the almost infinitesimally thin strata along their planes of cleavage of the mica at and adjacent to the center of the diaphragm where the stylus arm is connected, and thus prevents the deterioration of the mica diaphragm which otherwise is extremely likely to result with continued use.
In the practical use of sound boxes in which my improved clarifying disk is used, I find that a greater volume of sound is obtained with a smaller or lighter needle than is possible with other forms of sound boxes and this in itself is a desirable feature of my invention as it materially lessens the wear on the grooves of the records.
The beneficial results obtained by my improved clarifying disk herein described are also obtained in a considerable degree in connection with metallic diaphragms or diaphragms having metallic portions such as are used for example in telephonic apparatus. In connection with these diaphragms also the provision of the concentric clarifying disk results in eliminating muddy and confused tones and rendering the reproduction clear, and in which the metallic resonance is greatly reduced.
By the term bakelite as used in the foregoing specification and in the following claims I mean a phenolic condensation prodnot formed by combining a phenolic body with formaldehyde, which isbest known by one of its trade names bakelite.
My improved sound reproducing box is not specifically claimed herein as it forms the subject matter of a separate application for Letters Patent of the United States filed by me on or about June 2, 1916, and given Serial No. 101,252, the same being a division of this application.
IV hat I claim and desire to secure by Letters Patent is:
1. In a sound reproducing apparatus, the combination with a diaphragm of a concentric clarifying disk of a phenolic condensation product having embodied therein strata of fibrous material, parallel with the diaphra m, the said disk being adhesively secured to the diaphragm throughout their adjacent surfaces.
2. In a sound reproducing apparatus, the combination with a diaphragm of a concentric clarifying disk composed of bakelite having embodied therein strata of fibrous material parallel with the diaphragm, said disk being cemented to the diaphragm throughout their adjacent surfaces.
3. In a sound reproducing apparatus, the combination with a diaphragm of a concentric clarifying disk composed of bakelite dilecto cemented to the diaphragm throughout their adjacent surfaces.
In testimony whereof I afiix my signature.
JOHN A. STEUBER.
Copies of this patent may be obtained for five cents each, by addressing the Commissioner of Patents, Washington, D. C.
US6212615A 1915-11-18 1915-11-18 Sound-box. Expired - Lifetime US1192833A (en)

Priority Applications (2)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US6212615A US1192833A (en) 1915-11-18 1915-11-18 Sound-box.
US101252A US1192834A (en) 1915-11-18 1916-06-02 Sound-reproducing box.

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US6212615A US1192833A (en) 1915-11-18 1915-11-18 Sound-box.

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US1192833A true US1192833A (en) 1916-07-25

Family

ID=3260784

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US6212615A Expired - Lifetime US1192833A (en) 1915-11-18 1915-11-18 Sound-box.

Country Status (1)

Country Link
US (1) US1192833A (en)

Cited By (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4026384A (en) * 1974-12-17 1977-05-31 Okabe Mica Co., Ltd. Reconstituted mica acoustic diaphragm

Cited By (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4026384A (en) * 1974-12-17 1977-05-31 Okabe Mica Co., Ltd. Reconstituted mica acoustic diaphragm

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US1192833A (en) Sound-box.
US1459803A (en) Diaphragm for sound-reproducing apparatus
US786347A (en) Record for sound-reproducing machines.
US1091202A (en) Sound-box diaphragm.
US1194056A (en) Diaphragm fob phonoobaphs and taiiking-machines
US960021A (en) Diaphragm for talking-machines.
US1277538A (en) Diaphragm.
US916976A (en) Sound-reproducing box for disk talking-machines.
US648975A (en) Diaphragm for sound recording, reproducing, and transmitting instruments.
US930715A (en) Sound-box for recording and reproducing machines.
US1401143A (en) Sound-box diaphragm
US1380498A (en) Phonographic reproducer
US1084573A (en) Talking-machine.
US759639A (en) Horn for talking-machines.
US855562A (en) Diaphragm for talking-machines.
US1446911A (en) Mounting for diaphragms for acoustical instruments
US1081719A (en) Tone-clarifying attachment for sound reproducing or transmitting instruments.
US1455942A (en) Phonograph sound box
US822024A (en) Phonograph, gramophone, and other similar sound-reproducing machines.
US1046554A (en) Telephone-receiver.
US1065212A (en) Phonograph-reproducer.
US1415361A (en) Reproducer
US1330402A (en) Talking-machine
US1170803A (en) Sound-reproducing apparatus.
US1757091A (en) Diaphragm for acoustic instruments or apparatus