US1140924A - Winding-machine. - Google Patents

Winding-machine. Download PDF

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US1140924A
US1140924A US79618113A US1913796181A US1140924A US 1140924 A US1140924 A US 1140924A US 79618113 A US79618113 A US 79618113A US 1913796181 A US1913796181 A US 1913796181A US 1140924 A US1140924 A US 1140924A
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winding
mandrel
strand
turn
wound
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US79618113A
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Charles R Underhill
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ACME WIRE Co
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ACME WIRE Co
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    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B65CONVEYING; PACKING; STORING; HANDLING THIN OR FILAMENTARY MATERIAL
    • B65HHANDLING THIN OR FILAMENTARY MATERIAL, e.g. SHEETS, WEBS, CABLES
    • B65H54/00Winding, coiling, or depositing filamentary material
    • B65H54/02Winding and traversing material on to reels, bobbins, tubes, or like package cores or formers
    • B65H54/28Traversing devices; Package-shaping arrangements
    • B65H54/2806Traversing devices driven by cam
    • B65H54/2809Traversing devices driven by cam rotating grooved cam
    • B65H54/2812Traversing devices driven by cam rotating grooved cam with a traversing guide running in the groove

Description

C. R. UNDERHILL.
WINDING MACHINE.
APPLICATION FILED ocT.20, 1913.
Patented May 25, 1915.
2 SHEETS-SHEET l.
C. R. UNDERHILL.
WINDING MACHINE.
APPLlcATIoN FILED ocT.20. 1913.
31.9%@99240 Patented May 25, 1915.
2 SHEETS-SHEET 2.
53 Mlm f4 fag-9.5 Ellllllllllllf narran, enanas ramena ernten@ CHARLES R. UNDERHILL, OEKNEW HAVEN, CONNECTICUT, ASSIGNOR T0 THE ACME WERE COMPANY, OF NEW HAVEN, CONNECTICUT, A CORPORATION OF CONNECTICUT.
WINDTNG-MCHINE.
Madea-i,
,Specification of Letters Patent.
Patented May 25, ilil.
Application. filed October 20, 1913. Serial No. 798,181.
To all whom zt may concern Be it known that l, CHARLES R. UNDER- HILL, a citizen of the United States, and aresident of New Haven, in the county of New Haven and State of Connecticut, have invented certain new and useful improvements in finding-Machines, of which the following is a specification.
This invention relates to a winding machine, and especially to a machine for laying the turns of a wire or other strand in close contact with one another, it being particularly adapted to the winding of insulated wires to form electromagnets.
ln `,winding magnets the maximum amount of-wire hasheretofore been coiled into a given space by the old hand method in which each turn of wire acts as a guide for locating the next succeeding turn of the strand, and in which the tension on each turnl is sufficient to 4assure the winding of a tight coil; Forthe formation of machinemade coils-it has been the practice to employ one oftwo types ofwinding mechanism. ln the first of these, which is especially adapted for the winding of bare wires, positive means, to wit, the usual screw-traverse feed mechanism, is employed to lay the successive turns in such a manner that they are' separated by definiteA intervals from one another. In this type of feed mechanism it is not possibleto produce the maximum number of turns of wire in each layer or helix, owing to the fact that the feed movement must be such asto allow for the winding of wire of the maximum diameter instead of wire of the average diameter. ln addition to this an extra allowance must be made for the end thrust of the winding mandrel. ln the second type of machine referred to, provision is made for winding the turns in contact with one another, but the control of the position of the strand during the winding of each turn is not sufficiently positive to produce the best results, particularly 'when winding at high speeds.
The principal obgect 1n thel present case is to provide for the winding'of machme-made coils at high speed and insuch a manner as to obtain the maximum number of turns or coils in each layer, substantially as in hand winding, in which for some size of insulated wire the gain with an average'coatof insulation over machine winding with machines of the type fiirst referred to 1s about ten per cent., while with other sizesof wlres the gain in turns is twenty per cent.
or more. l
ln the present machine the principal features of dierence over the machines heretofore used for winding insulated wires are greater sensitiveness and positiveness in the control of the operation of laying the strand on the winding mandrel. rlhe construction is such that at all points in the winding of a layer the position of the strand being wound is determined by a source of power outside the moving strand and adapted to exercise such control over the strand as to keep the turn being wound always in close contact with the last preceding turn of a series. The means for controlling the laying of the turns may be any power-operated means exerting a positive controlling action on the strand being wound, but preferably willy be means for positively controlling the position of the strand in such a manner as to give the strand a lag during a considerable portion of the winding of each layer or helix. To do this l prefer to employ automatic traversing means, the guide-point of which locates the strand at a suitable point in its length and has a lag during the winding operation controlled positively by means other than the moving strand. rlhe operation of this traversing means may be variable and is preferably intermittent. Normally it serves to maintain the winding strand in such a positionthat it lags not less than the predetermined amount. rlhe amount of lag is variable and when it becomes too great it is preferably reduced, as by -the controlling action of the strand itself, but this control by the strand of the extent of the lag does not interfere with the operation of the traversing means, which in the preferred construction determines that throughout or substantially throughout the winding of each `turn the strand shall lag and lag suiiiciently to assure the winding of each turn in close contact with the next preceding one. The reduction of the lag of the winding strand may be brought about by electrical means, under the control of the strand, which electrical means may be actuing so that there will be a substantially instantaneous response whenever it is desired to bring about an automatic change in the angle of lag of the strand passing to the mandrel. I prefer atI this time to employ automatic traversing means in which the traverse device normally has no movement and is caused to impart a traverse movement to the strand through the controlling action of the strand itself when the angle of lag of the strand becomes too great. An intermittently rotatable feed-screw, normally under restraint and released each time the controlling means described becomes effective, may be employed for the purpose of imparting the necessary variable or intermittent movements to the strand.
An important feature of my improved winding mechanism is the 'provision of winding and controlling mechanism for positively laying the turns in close contact withone another and lfor regulating the lag of the strand in whichever direction the helix may be wound. In order to accomplish this suitable controlling means will be employed operative in both directions of traverse, and suitable means will also be employed for reversing the direction of winding at the f end of each helix.
Other features of the invention not hereinbefore referred to Will be hereinafter described and claimed and are illustrated in the accompanying drawings, in which- Figure 1 is a sectional plan and diagram of a simple type of winding machine'embodying means for automatically laying successive turns in close contact with one another on a winding mandrel in each direction that the helices are wound, and of suitable reversing means for said winding machine; Fig. 2 is a sectional elevation of the same; Fig. 3 is a diagrammatic view of the main elements showing the operating and controlling circuits more in detail, and
Figs 4f and 5 are enlarged details illustrating the action of a pair of controlling devices governed by the lag of the strand for starting the operation of the automatic traversing means. v Y
Similar characters designate like parts "sin al1 the figures of the drawings.4 Any suitable means may be employed for porting at one end the winding mandrel to which the strand passes from a suitable supply spool, such as 8, which may be mounted I in any suitable manner on a shaft or arbor, 9, for turning movement. The rotation of this supply spool and its shaft may be controlled in any suitable manner to obtain the proper tension on the traveling strand. t The mandrel, which may be of the type shown at 10, is carried in this case by a long winding arbor, or shaft, 11, constituting in the construction shown, part of thev driving means for the mandrel, it being illustrated' guide-sheave operative for laying a strand on the mandrel in turns in close succession. This guide-sheave may be of the type indicated at 13, it being suitably mounted in this instance on a feed-nut, 14, mounted to travel back and forth along a feed-screw,15, which may be rotated by any suitable driving means, such as an electric motor, 16. 'This feed-screw 15, as here shown, constitutes an extension of the armature shaft of the motor 16 and has its free end mounted in the upright 6 for support. Separate driving means or motors are preferably employed for turning the feed-screw and the arbor of the winding mandrel respectively, in order that the work to be done in turning the winding mandrel may be reduced to the minimum and high speeds at the winding point readily obtained.
The feed-nut and feed-screw 14 and 15 are illustrated in the present case as a simple and well-known means for obtaining the desired traverse movements of the strand passing to the mandrel. Other means may of course be employed to accomplish the same result. Here these two parts constitute the main elements of the positive operating means hereinbefore referred to'for assuring the passage of the strand to the winding point of the mandrel with a lag corresponding substantially to the lag of the strand in hand-winding. Normally, however, these elements'have no movement, they being held under restraintby suitable means and released wheneverthe lag of the strand lbecomes too great. In the construction illustrated an escapement mechanism having a shiftahle pawl, such as 17 normally in position for engaging a stop,.18, carried by the feed-screw 15, is employed for the purpose i of `releasing said feed-.screw and permitting ittoturn, ,The escapement members-1.7 and rimase 18 co'perate in such a manner as to permit, in this case, only a single rotation of the feed-screw when released, the movable pawl .17 when Withdrawn from the path of the stop 18 on the collar, 19, of the feed-screw, being almost immediately returned into the path of said stop to engage it at the end of one rotation of said' screw. rThe escapement awl 17, in the construction illustrated, is carried at the end of an armature-lever, 20, pivoted at 21 on the support 7 and normally held in the path of the stop 18, as by means of a spring, 22. It is preferably retracted out of the path of the stop 18 by the action of electrical controlling means including an electromagnet, 23, the armature of which is shown at 24. A suitable back-stop, 25, limits the upward movement of the armature-lever 20. The magnet 23 is intended to be energized whenever the strand s lags too far behind the normal. It will be seen that as the winding arbor 11 turns, and with it the mandrel 10, a series of turns will be wound on the mandrel, which will cause the winding point of the strand to shift gradually from end to end of. the mandrel. lf the guide-sheave 13 is set at the beginning of the winding operation, as should be the case, in such a position that its guide-point has a slight lag with respect to the winding point at the mandrel and said guide-sheave remains stationary, it will be obvious that the angle of lag of the strand and of said guide-point will increase progressively. rlhe specific construction illustrated herein is one in which the controlling means operates intermittently VVto reduce this angle of lag Aby permitting an intermittent feed movement of the feed-screw 15 and the .guidesheave 13 carried thereby, this intermittent feed movement serving to permit the guide-point intermittently to follow up the movement of the strand at the winding point.. To bring about the release of the es v capement mechanism just described 1 have shown electrical controlling means embodying a light circuit-controlling arm in the path of the moving strand and in position to coact therewith and be shifted thereby when the angle of lag of the strand is excessive. Preferably two of these circuit-controlling arms are employed, one cooperating with the strand in one direction of wind of a helix and the other coperating with the strand when a helix is being wound in the opposite direction. These circuit-controlling arms are preferably movable in unison with the guide-sheave 13 and the feed-nut 14, they being illustrated herein as mounted on a bracket, 26, mounted to, travel back and forth on the feed-screw with an intermittent movement, and suitably guided, as by means controlling arms or switches, 30 and 31, the former of which is coperative with the strand s when the winding is proceeding inthe direction shown in Figi 1, and the other of which is coperative with said strand when the winding is in the opposite direction. Here each of these arms 30 and 31 carries preferably an antifriction roller, 32 or 33, to be engaged by the strand s, each of these being of suiicient length to coperate properly with the strand both at the beginning of the winding of the magnet and when the winding is about finished. Each arm 30 and 31 also carries a contact, such as 34 and 35, adapted to engage an insulated and preferably adjustable contact 36 and 37 on the bracket or slide 26. IThe'manner in which these controlling arms coperate with 4the strand s will be clear by reference parinstance, in parallel branches of a controlling circuit through the electromagnet 23 from a suitable source of energy, and whenever the strand forces either of these circuit-controlling arms sidewise far enough to bring either the contact 34 into engagement with the contact 36 or contact 35 into engagement with contact 37, a circuit will be closed from a source of energy 'such as 40, through the electromagnet 23.
1n the case of the controlling arm 30 the circuit is from the battery 40 through conductor 41, contacts 36 and 34, switch-arm 30, conductor 42, magnet 23, conductor 43 and conductor 44, back to the battery. ln the case of the switch-arm 31, the course is substantially the same except that from lconductor 41 the current passes by way of conductor 45, contacts 37 and 35 and switcharm 31 to the conductor 42. Whenever contact is made at the points 36 or 37 and the magnet 23 is energized the escapement will release the feed-screw and permit it to be turned instantly a single rotation by the motor 16, which will result in a single forward movement of the feed-nut 14 and the guide-sheave 13 alongv the feed-screw. As
l'often as the winding of the turns on the mandrel causes an excessive lag-in the portion of the strand between the winding point and the guide-point of the sheave 13 this feed movement will take place, and each time that it does take place the strand -will" be automatically shifted away from the antifriction roller 32 or 33 with which it is which reversing switch maybe controlled by an electric circuit including circuit-controlling arms similar to those shown at 30 and 31. The means illustrated comprises two switch-arms 47 and 48, mounted on the uprights 5 and having near their free ends l antifriction rollers, 49 and 50, and contacts,
51 and 52, corresponding to those of the switch-arms 30 and 31. A pair of contacts 53 and 54, preferably adjustable, also coperate with the contacts 51 and 52 on said switch-arms 47 and 48, said contacts 53 and 54 being mounted on the supports 4. Conductors, 55 and 56, connect the contacts 53 and 54 respectively with the conductorl 41 leading to one side of the battery 40, while conductors, 44 and 58, and 59 and 60, are shown as connecting the battery through a pair of solenoids, l61 and 62, with the respective switch-arms 48 and 47. A common core, 63, properly insulated is herein illustrated as-connected to the reversing switch 46 and controlled by both of the solenoids 61 and 62. The parts described are so combined and coperate with the strand in such a manner that when the strand arrives at the left-hand end ofthe helix being wound in Fig. 1 it will, at the proper point, engage the antifriction roller 49 and shift the same 4 to the left to bring the contact 51 of the switch-arm 47 into engagement with the contact 53; whereupon a circuit will be closed from the battery through conductors 41, 55, contacts 53, 51, switch-arm 47 and conductor 60, to the solenoid 62, the opposite side of which is connected through conductor 59 to said battery. When thus energized solenoid 62 shifts the reversing switch 46 in the usual manner to reverse the direction of iow of the current through the motor 16, and thereby reverse the direction of rotation of thel armature shaft and feedscrew 15 in a manner well understood. If the traveling strand is at the opposite end of the mandrel it will of course 'shift the switch-arm 48 instead of 47 and will close contact'at the points 52 and 56, whereupon current will flow from the battery, through conductors 41 andy 56, contacts 54 and'52, switch-arm 48 and conductor 58, through the solenoid 61, the return circuit being by way of conductors 44 and 59. This will of course result in the energization of the solenoid 61 andthe shifting of the reversing switch 46 in the opposite direction to cause feed-screw with its guide-'sheave 13 in v sition to give the guide-point of said sheave 125 a flow of current through the motor 16 in the reverse direction to bring about a reversal of the ldirection of rotation of the armature-shaft and the feed-screw 15.
At the beginning of the operation of winding a layer or helix in either direction on the mandrel it will be necessary to give the strand to be wound a suitable lag. This is preferably accomplished automatically with each layer after the rst, that is to say, by the action of the machine itself, and means are illustrated in the present case for this purpose. The means employed'may be of any proper construction and is connected in the present instance with the reversing switch 46 s'o as to be governed thereby. By referring to Fig. 1 it will be seen that the feed-screw 15 is connected with the armature shaft by a.pin-and-slotconnection, 6 4, which permits a slight longitudinal move- 85 ment of the feed-screw and the parts' carried thereby. The shifting of the feedscrew and these parts is here shown as brought about by a shifting-lever, 65,-working in the groove of a collar, 66, secured to the feed-screw and connected at its opposite end by a link, 67, to the electrical reversing switch 46. It will be obvious that on the movement of the reversing switch in one direction or the other the connections just described will serve to shift the feed-screw endwise in a corresponding manner the desired distance. The feed-screw should of course be held in the position to which it is so shifted until the end of a new layer is 100 reached and the parts are to be shifted again. For the purpose of holding said feed-screw and the parts carried thereby in either position to which it may be shifted I have shown secured to the. feed-screw a dou- 105 ble cam'wheel, 68, the circumference of which is substantially V-shaped and which coperates with a spring-pressed rock-arm,
69, the pressure of a spring, 70, serving.. through an antifriction roller, 71, to hold 110 said cam-Wheel and the feed-screw in either extreme position 'to which they may be shifted. The construction of the springpressed arm 69 is such that movement of the feed-screw to its eXtreme position in 115 veither direction will cause the wheel 71 to ride over the high point or neutral point of the periphery of the cam-wheel 68 to the opposite cam face upon which it will exert pressure in the proper direction for main- 12o taining saidfeed-screw in eitherposition to which it is shifted. These devices consti-v tutey an automatic means for setting the 190" a lag with respect to the winding point of the mandrel in veach direction of winding.
By means of thefeed mechanism disclosed herein substantially the same number of turns in each layer may be obtained that Madone are obtained in hand winding, as the turns are wound successively in close contact with one another and not at predetermined exact distances apart corresponding to the maximum diameter of the strand being wound. Moreover, there is an exceedingly sensitive control of the laying of each turn in close contact withthe next preceding one through the positive control of the .angle of lag of the strand and also a correspondingly positive control of the reversal of the direction of winding and of the setting of the parts automatically in ja position suitable for giving the strand a lag at the beginning of the winding of each helix. In addition to this the parts, being light and forming elements of electrical controlling means, are capable of coperating properly with the strand when the winding mandrel is rotated at very high speeds.
, What I claim is:
1. In a winding machine, the combination with a winding mandrel, bf automatic means controlled by the winding and including a source of power other than the strand'being wound for positively locating the winding point of the strand and laying each turn on the mandrel in close contact with the last preceding turn from end to end of a helix.
2. In a winding machine, Athe combination with a winding mandrel, of automaticv means controlled by the lag of the strand being wound and including a source of power other than said strand for laying a turn on the mandrel in close contact with the last preceding turn.
3. In a winding machine, the combination with a winding mandrel, of means having a positive power action for laying successive turns thereon, said means being intermittently turn.
4. In a winding machine, the combination turn.' y
5. In a winding machine, the combination movableduring the winding of any with a winding mandrel, of intermittentlymovable means controlled by the last turn wound for laying the next succeeding turn.V
6. In a winding machine, the comblnation with ya winding mandrel, of automaticallyoperated traversing means having a positive power action controlled by a turn that has been wound for laying a succeeding turn. z
7. In a winding machine, the combination with a winding mandrel, of automaticallyoperated traversing means having a positive power action controlled by a turn that has been wound for laying a succeeding turn in close Contact with the last turn wound. s
8. In a winding machine, the combination with a winding mandrel, of an automatic traverse device movable in parallelism withthe axis of said mandrel and the guide-point of which is located by positive power action and at times at various points in its traverse movement has a lag with respect to the winding point of the turn being wound.
9. In a winding machine, the combination with a winding mandrel, of an automatic traverse detaice movable in parallelism with the axis of said mandrel and the advancing guide-point of which is located by positive power action and has a lag. during the major portion of the winding of a helix with respect to the advancing winding point of each turn being wound.
10. In a winding machine, the combination with a winding mandrel, of automatic intermittently-movable traversing means the guide-point of which at times has a lag with respect to the winding point of the turn being wound.
V11. In a winding machine, the combination with a winding mandrel, of automatic traversing means including a source of power other than the strand being wound the guide-point of which is positively located by power rom said vsource and at times 'at various points in its traverse movel ment has a lag with respect to the winding point of the turn being wound.
12. In a winding machine, the combination with a winding mandrel, of automatic traversing means including a source of power other than the strand being wound the advancing guide-point of which is positively located by power from said source and has during the major portion of the winding of a helix a lag with respect to the advancing winding point of the turn being wound.
13. In a winding machine, the combination with a winding mandrel, of automatic traversing means for laying successive turns on the mandrel, said means having a positively intermittent progressive traverse movement corresponding to each turn of the winding. l
14. In a winding machine, the combmation with a winding mandrel, of automatic traversing means for laying successive .turns on the mandrel, said means having an intermittent progressive traverse movement corresponding to each turn of the winding.l
' 15. In a winding machine, the combination with a winding mandrel, of automatic traversing means for laying successive turns on the mandrel, said means having a positive variable traverse movement controlled 125 by a turn that has been wound.
16. In a winding machine, the comblnation with a winding mandrel, of automatic traversing means for laying. successive turns 0n the mandrel, Said means havinga posi- 130 tive variable traverse movement in which the guide-point of the traverse device vhas a normal lag with respect to the winding point of the turn being wound.
17. In a winding machine, the combination with a windingv mandrel, of automatic traversing means for laying successive turns on the mandrel, said means having a positive variable traverse movement controlled by a turn that has been wound and in which the guide-point of the traverse device has a normal lag with respect to the .winding point of the turn being wound. 18. In a winding machine, the combination with a winding mandrel, of automatic traversing means for laying successive turns on the mandrel, said means having means with a positive power action controlled by the winding for positively locating and imparting traverse movement to the guidepoint of the strand.
19. In a winding machine, the combination with a on the mandrel, said means having normally no movement and also having means for imp'arting traverse movement during the winding of any turn.
20.*In a winding machine, Athe combination with awinding mandrel, of automatic traversing means for laying succeive turns on the mandrel, said means having normally no movement and also having means controlled by the strand for imparting traverse movement.
21. In a winding machine, the combination with a winding mandrel, 4of an autoi turns on the mandrel the .guide-point of which device normally has a lag with re- .spect to the winding point'of the turn .being wound, and means controlled by a turn on said mandrel -for intermittentlyl reducing` said lag. Y
23. In a winding machine, the combina- Y tion with'a winding mandrel, of an automatic traverse device for laying successive turns on the mandrel the guide-point of which device normally has a lag .with respect to the winding point of the turn being wound and means controlled by the last turn woun for intermittently reducing said lag. 24. In a winding machine, -the combina tion with a winding mandrel, of an automatic traverse device for layingsuccessive turns on the-mandrel the guide-point'oi.E
u traversing means. winding mandrel, of automatic traversing means for laying successive turns y .turns on the mandrel the guide-point of which device normally has a lag with respect to the winding point of the turn being Wound, and means controlled by a turn wound on said mandrel for intermittently imparting feed movement to said traverse device.
26. In a winding machine,'the combination with a Winding mandrel, of automatic traversing means for laying successive-turns on the mandrel, and electrical controlling means governed by each turn wound, for governing the progressive movement of said 27. In a winding machine, the combination with a winding mandrel, of automatic traversing means for laying successive turns on the mandrel, sald means havlng an intermittent progressivetraverse movement, and
electrical controlling means governing said movement.
28.` In a winding machine, the combination with a winding mandrel, of automatic traversing means for laying successive turns on the mandrel, and electrical controlling means governing theprogressive movement of said traversing means and controlled -by each turn that has` been wound.
29. In a winding machine, the combina-v tion with a winding mandrel, of. automatic traversing means for laying successive turns on the mandrel, said means having an intermittent progressive traverse movement, and electrical controlling means governing said movement `and controlled by a turn that has'been wound.
30. In a winding machine, the combination with a winding mandrel, of a poweroperated traverse device for laying a turn on the mandrel, and means lcontrolled by each turn of the -strand being wound for governing the `movement of said power-operated device.
31. In a winding machine the combina tion with a winding mandre of a poweroperated traverse device for laying a turn on the mandrel, and means controlled by the strand being wound for starting said power.-
operated device.`
32. In a winding machine, the combination with a winding mandrel, of a poweroperated traverse device for laying a turn on the mandrel, and means controlled by each turn of the continuous strand being wound fdr stopping said power-operated devlce. y
33. In a winding machine, the combination with a winding mandrel, of a poweroperatedtraverse device for laying a turn on the mandrel, and means controlled by the strand being wound for starting andv stopping said power-operated device.
34. ln a winding machine, the combination with a winding mandrel, of a poweroperated traverse device for laying a turn on the mandrel, and means controlled by each turn of the strand being wound for bringing about a variable movement of said power-operated device.
35. In a winding machine, the combination with a winding mandrel, of a poweroperated traverse device for laying a turn on the mandrel, and means controlled by the strand being wound for intermittently starting and stopping said power-operated device.
36. ln a winding machine, the combination with a winding mandrel, of a poweroperated traverse device for laying a turn on the mandrel, and a controlling device mounted on said power-operated device and operable by each turn of the strand being wound for governing the'movement of said power-operated device.
37. 1n a winding machine, the combination with a winding mandrel, of apoweroperated traverse device for laying a turn on the mandrel, and an electrically-controlled device mounted on said power-operated device and operable by each turn of the strand being wound for governing the movement of said power-operated device.
38. In a winding machine, the combination with a winding mandrel, of a poweroperated traverse device for laying a turn on the mandrel, and electrically-controlled means including a yielding contact mounted on said power-operated device and operable by each turn of the strand being wound for governing the movement of said poweroperated device.
39. ln a winding machine, the combination with a winding mandrel, of a reciprocatory power-operated device for laying on the mandrel turns of helices rumiing alternately in opposite directions, and a pair of controlling devices operable alternately by each turn of the strand being wound for governing the movement of said power-operated device.
40. ln a winding machine, the combination with a winding mandrel, of a traverse device for-winding successive helices in opposite directions, and automatic means eEective on a change in the direction of winding for shifting the traverse device to a position in which its guide-point has a lag with respect to the winding point of the new turn to be wound.
41. ln a winding machine, the combination with awinding mandrel, of a traverse device for winding successive helices in opposite directions, and duplex automatic means effective alternately at opposite ends of the mandrel for shifting the traverse device to the right and to the left respectively to either of two positions in each of which the guide-point of said traverse device has a lag with respect to the winding point of the new turn to be wound.
In a winding machine, the combination with a winding mandrel, of a feedscrew, a traveler thereon, and automatic means effective on a change in the direction of winding for shifting the traveler to a position in which its guide-point has a lag with respect to the winding point of thenew turn to be wound.
43. ln a winding machine, the combination with a winding mandrel, of a feedscrew, a traveler mounted to move back and forth thereon, and automatic means effective at each end of the movement of said traveler for shifting said traveler to a position in which its guide-point has a lag with respect to the winding point of the new turn to be wound. l
44. ln a winding machine, the combination with a winding mandrel, of a feedscrew, a traveler thereon, automatic means eective on a change in the direction of winding for shifting the feed-screw and its traveler to a position in which the guidepoint of the traveler has a lag with respect to the winding point of the new turn to be wound, and means for holding the feedscrew in said shifted position.
45. In a winding machine, the combination with a winding mandrel, of a feedscrew, a traveler mounted to move back and forth thereon, automatic means effective at each end of the movement of said traveler for shifting said feed-screw and its traveler to a position in which theguide-point of the traveler has a lag with respect to the winding point ofthe new turn to be wound, and means for holding the feed-screw in each of said shifted positions.
46. ln a winding machine,.the combination with a winding mandrel, o-f a traverse device mounted to move back and forth for winding successive helices in opposite directions, electrical reversing means for said traverse device, and automatic means controlled by said reversing means for shifting the traverse device to a position 'in which its guide-point has a lag with respect to the winding point of the new turn to be wound.
47. ln a winding machine, the comb-ination with a winding mandrel, of a traverse trolled by seid reversing means for shifting the traverse device at each end ofits movement to a. position .inA which its guide-point hes a. lag with respect to the winding point of the new turn to be wound.
48. `In a,v Winding machine, the combination with a winding mandrel, of a. traverse device, andelectrical controlling means governed by the sidewise movement of the strand for reversing the direction of movement of said traverse device.
' 49. In a Winding machine, the combina- 'tion with a Winding mandrel, of a. traverse device, 5nd electrical controlling means governed by the sidewise movement of the' strand for reversing the direction of movement of said traverse device at each end of the range of movement of said traverse device. Y
Signed at New Haven in the county of New Haven and State of Connecticut this 17th dayof October, A. D. 1913..
CHARLES R. UNDERHILL. Witnesses:
C. R. CoNDoN, A. V. MANNING.
US79618113A 1913-10-20 1913-10-20 Winding-machine. Expired - Lifetime US1140924A (en)

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Cited By (14)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2912187A (en) * 1957-11-15 1959-11-10 Western Electric Co Traverse apparatus
US2914262A (en) * 1955-02-11 1959-11-24 Leonard E Ludvigsen Potentiometer coil winding machine
US2947487A (en) * 1955-04-29 1960-08-02 Gen Electric Machine with hydraulically actuated carriage
US2988292A (en) * 1957-04-19 1961-06-13 United States Steel Corp Method and apparatus for spooling wire
US3031153A (en) * 1958-06-24 1962-04-24 Avo Ltd Coil winding apparatus
US3038674A (en) * 1960-12-30 1962-06-12 Western Electric Co Apparatus for winding strands
US3289956A (en) * 1965-01-18 1966-12-06 Sjogren Tool & Machine Co Inc Apparatus for spooling
US3312421A (en) * 1965-06-07 1967-04-04 Northern Electric Co Delayed return distributor
US6073878A (en) * 1997-06-05 2000-06-13 Wacker Siltronic Gesellschaft Fur Halbleitermaterialien Ag Method and device for unwinding or winding up a sawing wire
EP2218532A1 (en) * 2009-02-17 2010-08-18 Applied Materials, Inc. Wire saw device and method for operating same
CN103264409A (en) * 2013-05-06 2013-08-28 苏州赫瑞特电子专用设备科技有限公司 Deflection arranging mechanism of winding-unwinding roller
CN103588025A (en) * 2013-11-21 2014-02-19 无锡盛力达科技股份有限公司 Wire arranging compensation device and wire arranging compensation method of wire cutting all-powerful winding machine
CN104692188A (en) * 2015-01-09 2015-06-10 芜湖航天特种电缆厂 Traverse
CN106429632A (en) * 2016-11-10 2017-02-22 无锡威格斯电气有限公司 Conveying mechanism capable of achieving self-adaptive tensioning

Cited By (15)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2914262A (en) * 1955-02-11 1959-11-24 Leonard E Ludvigsen Potentiometer coil winding machine
US2947487A (en) * 1955-04-29 1960-08-02 Gen Electric Machine with hydraulically actuated carriage
US2988292A (en) * 1957-04-19 1961-06-13 United States Steel Corp Method and apparatus for spooling wire
US2912187A (en) * 1957-11-15 1959-11-10 Western Electric Co Traverse apparatus
US3031153A (en) * 1958-06-24 1962-04-24 Avo Ltd Coil winding apparatus
US3038674A (en) * 1960-12-30 1962-06-12 Western Electric Co Apparatus for winding strands
US3289956A (en) * 1965-01-18 1966-12-06 Sjogren Tool & Machine Co Inc Apparatus for spooling
US3312421A (en) * 1965-06-07 1967-04-04 Northern Electric Co Delayed return distributor
US6073878A (en) * 1997-06-05 2000-06-13 Wacker Siltronic Gesellschaft Fur Halbleitermaterialien Ag Method and device for unwinding or winding up a sawing wire
EP2218532A1 (en) * 2009-02-17 2010-08-18 Applied Materials, Inc. Wire saw device and method for operating same
WO2010094355A1 (en) * 2009-02-17 2010-08-26 Applied Materials, Inc. Wire saw device and method for operating same
CN103264409A (en) * 2013-05-06 2013-08-28 苏州赫瑞特电子专用设备科技有限公司 Deflection arranging mechanism of winding-unwinding roller
CN103588025A (en) * 2013-11-21 2014-02-19 无锡盛力达科技股份有限公司 Wire arranging compensation device and wire arranging compensation method of wire cutting all-powerful winding machine
CN104692188A (en) * 2015-01-09 2015-06-10 芜湖航天特种电缆厂 Traverse
CN106429632A (en) * 2016-11-10 2017-02-22 无锡威格斯电气有限公司 Conveying mechanism capable of achieving self-adaptive tensioning

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