US1120746A - Adding-machine. - Google Patents

Adding-machine. Download PDF

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Publication number
US1120746A
US1120746A US75478913A US1913754789A US1120746A US 1120746 A US1120746 A US 1120746A US 75478913 A US75478913 A US 75478913A US 1913754789 A US1913754789 A US 1913754789A US 1120746 A US1120746 A US 1120746A
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machine
key
keys
actuators
pawl
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US75478913A
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Frank C Rinsche
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Burroughs Adding Machine Co
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Burroughs Adding Machine Co
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    • GPHYSICS
    • G06COMPUTING; CALCULATING; COUNTING
    • G06CDIGITAL COMPUTERS IN WHICH ALL THE COMPUTATION IS EFFECTED MECHANICALLY
    • G06C25/00Auxiliary functional arrangements, e.g. interlocks

Description

F. RINSGHE.

ADDING MACHINE.

APPLICATION FILED MAR. 17, 191s.

Patented Dec. 15, 1914.

1l SHEETS-SHEET 1A F. C. RINSHE.

ADDING MACHINE.

APPLICATION FILED MAR.17, 1913.

Patented Dec. 15, 1914.

1l SHEETS-SHEET 2.

Comano KEY F. C. RINSGHE.

ADDING MACHINE.

APPLICATION FILED MAR.17, 191s.

Patented Dec. 15, 1914.

ll SHEETS-SHEET 3.

P. C. RINSOHE.

ADDING MACHINE.

APPLICATION FILED 1111111.17, 191s.

Patented' Dee. 15, 1914.

11 SHEETS-SHEET 4.

am 55ML F. C'. RINSCHE.

ADDING MACHINE.

APPLICATION FILED 111.11.17, 1913.

Patented Dec. 15, 1914.

11 SHEETSHBET 5'.

F. C. RINSCHE.

ADDING MACHINE.

APPLICATION FILED MAR.17, 191s.

Patented Dec. 15, 1914.

11 SHEETS-SHEET 6.

i Jwcpn F. C. RINSCHE.

ADDING MACHINE.

APPLICATION FILED MARA?. 191s.

Patented Dec. 15, 1914.

1l SHEETS-SHEBT 7.

F. C. RINSGHE.

ADDING MACHINE.

APPLICATION FILED 1111111.17, 1913.

Patented Dec. 15, 1914.

Patented Deo. 15, 1914.

l1 SHEETS-SHEET 9` P. C. RINSGHE.

ADDING MACHINE.

I IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII AL 111111 3. I 1,120,746. Patented Dec. 15,1914

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@@@CQQQ L@ @5) y P. C. RINSCHE.

ADDING MACHINE.

APPLICATION FILED 111113.17. 1913.

1,120,746. Patented Dec. 15, 1914.

l1 SHEETS-SHEET 11.

ommen srams ramena* caricia FRANK C. RINSCHE, OF DETROIT, MICHIGAN, ASSIGNOR TO BURROU'GHS ADDING MACHINE COMPANY, OF DETROIT, MICHIGAN, A CORPORATION 0F MICHIGAN.

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Specification of Letters Patent.

Fatented Dec. i5, 19kt.

y'lpplieation led March 17, 1913. Serial No. 754,789.

To allie/10m. 'it may concern Be it known that I, FRANK C. RINSGHE, a citizen of the United States, residing at Detroit, in the county of lVayne and State of Michigan, have invented a certain new and useful Improvement in Adding-Machines, of which the following is the specification.

The object of my present invention is to facilitate the performance of multiplication by the process of repeated addition.

It is a common practice with the ordinary adding machine to perform multiplication by setting down amount keys representing the multiplicand, setting down the familiar repeat key, operating the machine a number of times corresponding with the iirst digit of the multiplier,' 'then releasing the repeat key and the amount keys and again setting down corresponding amount keys one or more orders over to correspond with the order of the next significant digit of the multiplier, again setting down the repeat key and then operating the machine a number of times corresponding with such digit of the multiplier, and so on.

My present invention provides an improved equipment whereby the resetting of amount keys for higher digits of the multiplier, as well as successive manipulation of repeat and release keys, is done away with. Thus an initial' setting up of the multiplicand by depression of amount keys suiiices for the entire process of multiplication without regard to the number of digits in the multiplier. T his I accomplish without recourse to any such scheme as a supplemental superimposed keyboard laterally shiftable over the regular keyboard, and withoutA recourse to any such scheme as pulling down higher order keys or setting their indexing devices as controlled by initial depression of lower order keys.

According to my invention the actuators for the registering wheels having first been released and operated under control of the stop devices set by the amount keys in the usual manner, an additional set of multiplier stops become eli'ective; these stops being laterally shiftable step by step so as to serve for' regulating the operation of higher order actuators when the multiplying 1s by higher order digits of the multiplier. I also provide means for suspending the usual printing and 'line spacing while the multiplication by repeated addition is in progress, and I furthermore provide improved means for automatically regulating the number .of operations of the machine accordingto the multiplier digits so that the user does not have to keep mental count of operations as is the case when the ordinary adding machine is employed for multiplication purposes.

lVith these and incidental objects in view, the invention consists in certain novel features of construction and combinations of parts, the essential elements whereof are recited in the appended claims and a preferred form of embodiment of which -is described in detail hereinafter and illustra-ted in the accompanying drawings which form part of this specification.

Of said drawings, Figure l represents in left side sectional elevation a machine of the well known Burroughs type equipped with mechanism embodying my invention; Fig. 2 is a similar right side sectional elevation; F 3 is a sectional elevation of a part ofSt-he machine viewed from the same side as Fig. l and'illust-rating the effect of depressing an amount key; Fig. et is a somewhat similar view but further sectionalized and differing also from Fig. 3, in illustrating a changed relationship of parts which comes about at the middle of a cycle of operation of the machine; Fig. Ll is a fragmentary plan view of partsappearing in sectional elevation at the upper left hand portion of F ig. 3; Fig. 5 is a. sectional rear elevation taken substantially on line 5 5 of Fig. l with parts at normal; Fig. 5a is a similar' view illustrating the effect of setting the multiplier stops in etfectivelposition and operating the machine with lower order keys depressed for setting up the multiplica nd. the condition illustrated being that which would ekist at the middle of a cycle of operation of the machine; Fig. (lisasmilar view showing the same multiplier stops in action for multiplying by the highest digit of the multiplier; Fig. 'Z is a sectional ele` ration of a limited number of parts of the machine looking from the right; Fig. 8 is a horizontal section taken on the line 8-8 of Fig. 7; Fig. 9 is another sectional elevation looking from the right but including different parts from those shown in Fig. 7; Fig. lO is a similar view illustrating a changed condition due to depression of the special key illustrated in these two figures; Fig. 11 is a sectional rear elevation of parts appearing at the right of Fig. 9; Fig. l12 is a horizontal section taken substantially on the line 12-12 of Fig. 9; Fig. 13 is a right side sectional elevation similar to the upper part of Fig. 2 but on a larger scale and disclosing additional'parts under the keyboard plates; Fig. 14 is a horizontal section taken substantially on the .line 14-14 of Fig. 13;

'Fig 15 is a view similar to Fig. 13 though further sectionalized and also differing in illustration of a changed relationship of parts due to depression of one of the mul-v tiplier keys; Fig. 16 is a fragmentary cross section taken on line `1616 of Fig. 13 with the multiplier key at normal; Fig. 17 is a similar cross section taken on line 17-17 of Fig. 15; Fig. 17a is a fragmentary horizontal section taken substantially on the line I 17a-17a of Fig. 15; Fig. 18 is a top plan View of the keyboard of the machine; Figs. 19, 20, 21 are views similar to the left hand part of Fig. 9, illustrating a modification, at normal and in two stages of operation, respectively; Fig. 22 is a horizontal section on line 22-22 of Fig..19.

Amount keys 291 are-arranged as usual in several parallel rows extending from front to rear and their stemsn slide through up-A per and lower keyboard plates 213 and 212 and operate upon the familiar bell cranks 217 which set the stop wires 270 for limiting the descent of racks 610. Said bell cranks also act as usual to slide rearwardly the detent plates 214. The racks 610 aremounted in the usual way upon the front ends of levers 611 and the latter carry lthe customary sets of type at 'the rear. The registering wheels and the controlling mechanism therefor, including the totaling system, are arranged in the usual way which is now sofamiliarthrough disclosure in many prior patents and through extensive use in machines upon the market as to require no explanation to those skilled in the art. This is also true of the shifting paper carriage at the rear and the line spacmg mechanism and likewise the hammer mechanism for driving the type against the platen, though in con nection with the line spacingand hammer mechanisms I shall have occasion hereinafter to refer specifically to some of the familial parts in connection with a description of means for suspending line spacing and printing during multiplication.

Referring first to the special equipment for facilitating control of the racks 610 in multiplicatiomuthis is located at the upper rear part of the machine and comprises a set of vertically slidable stop ngers 10, of which there are as many as there are registering levers 611 in the machine (see Figs. 5 and 6). These stop fingers are mounted in a laterally shifting carriage which comprises a bed plate 12 grooved to receive the fingers, and a cover plate 12a screwed to'the bed plate and confining the stop fingers in the grooves (see Fig. Ll). 'The carriage is mounted to slide upon cross shafts, the lower one of which, designated 207, is the familiar rock-shaft of the key releasing bail. The upper shaft 17 is especially provided and has other functions than that of merely supplying a guide for the carriage. The latter is normally held to the right by a spring 12g (Fig. 5), the position being to the left in., this figure because the same is a rear `eleva-1 tion'. In this normal position of the car-S riage the stop fingers 10 stand above spaces between the levers 611 and are themselves spaced apart so that said levers may rise bctween them when the multiplying equipment is not in use and the machine is being ein ployed in the ordinary way for adding and listing purposes.

The stop fingers are put in position for use by moving the carriage a half-step so as to bring these fingers directly over the levers 611 respectively so that any levers which move farther than to merely set up cipher type, in an o eration of the machine, will lift the stop iiigers, as illustrated in. Fig. 5a.

The multiplier stop fingers 10 are limited in their downward movement by abutment of lugs 10a at their upper ends against the horizontal edge of va cut-out portion of the plate 12a', as shown in Fig. 5, and the stop fingers in their lowest position have their lower ends spaced from the upper edges of the lever 611, a distance equivalent to the movement of said levers from normal to positions for setting upcipher type. When `the stop carriage has been moved over ahalf step and amount keys are operated'for setting up the multiplicand 4and the machine is then operated and certain of the stop fingers lifted as before stated, all of the stop fingers will be locked so that those which' have been lifted may serve to measure the movements of the registering levers in subsequent operations to just the same extent that said levers move when lifting the stop fingers,

while the balance of the stop fingers, under the condition illustrated in Fig. 5, will check any upward movement of associated levers beyond positions where they set up cipher type. As the carriage is stepped over to provide for multiplying by successive digits of the multiplier, 'it' becomes necessary to restrain levers which, in previous operations, were stopped bythe set lingers. For this purpose the'cover plate 12a of the carriage is formed witha depending portion taking the form of a comb 12b Whose tines are adapted to move over the levers, as illustrated in Fig. 6, and prevent such levers from moving at all.

1t will be understood from what has been 'thus far described that by setting the stop carriage in position over the levers 611 and then depressing lower order keys representing the multiplicand and operating the machine, certain of the stop pins 10 will be set and .locked in a position where they may constitute stops serving in the same way as the usual stop wires 270 for regulating movements of the levers. Obviously, by maintaining these stop fingers so positioned, they will serve to measure movements of the levers uniformly in the successive operations of the machine the same as in the case of operating the usual adding machine with its repeat key set and the stop wires therefore maintained in stopping position. it will further be seen that by moving the stop carriage over one order while still maintaining the set stop lingers in position, these stop fingers will similarly serve for measuring corresponding movements of stop levers one order higher, that is to say a set of levers omitting the lowest order of those first employed and including a higher order lever. Thus it will be clear that multiplication by the next higher digit of the multiplier can be performed, without setting up the multiplicandagain by depression of amount keys. It will further be manifest that this same procedure can be pursued to the limit of the denominational capacity of the machine.

The machine here shown is what is known as a fifteen bank machine, towit a machine of fifteen numerical orders. Fig. 5a shows a setting-up for a multiplicand of four orders of denominations. It is clear that the multiplicand of this denomination could be carried on through twelve denominations of a multiplier. Fig. 6 illustrates what would be the condition when multiplying by the twelfth digit of the multiplier.

Referring next to the matter of locking and unlocking the stop fingers, they are normally locked and are only unlocked as a result of depression -of amount keys and then are relocked at the end of the first half cycle. of operation of the machine. The locking device is in the form of a bail suspended from the studs 12c at the upper part of the carriage and comprising side arms 13 and cross bar 13a having a forwardly turned flange 13" to engage notches in the stop fingers, said flange occupying a slot in the cover plate 1Q, as shown in Figs. 4 and There are nine notches in each of the fingers to provide for its being locked at any one of nine different positions according to the extent of movement which the associated registering lever should have. Th; Bai;

spring 13c presses the bail forward to engage its fiange with notches of the fingers and normally the fiange is in engagement with the uppermost notches of all of the fingers, thus locking the latter in their lowermost positions, illustrated in Fig. 5. The side arms 13 swing freelyl upon the studs 12C which are screwed into ears 12d of the bed plate 12 of the carriage projecting rearwardly from the shaft 17. The latter has a spline groove engaged by keys of` apair of short arms 1-1 which carry studs-14l engaging forward edges of the arms 13, as shown in Figs. 3, 5, and/7, for the purpose of swinging the locking bail rearward and unlocking the stop fingers whenever amount keys are depressed. This is effected by rocking the shaft 17, as will presently be described.

The arms 14 must of course have a fixed s lateral relation to the carriage and to this end they are formed with clips 11 (Figs. 4 and Lia) which embrace the ears 12d of theA carriage so as to shift laterally therewith at the same time being rotatable relative thereto.

As before stated, the amount keys operate lei rearward and disengage the locking bail from the stop fingers. T ie bar 15 has an upper branch 15a at its forward end shouldered to engage the bail cross rod 402, as

shown in Fig. 3, and also has a downwardly extending branch 15 which overlies' the cross rod -902- of another familiar bail of the Burroughs machine. This latter arrangement is for the purpose of disengaging the bar from the bail cross rod 102a and thereby permitting the locking bail to reengaee and lock the stop fingers, as soon as tue registering levers have moved their full eX- tent upward in rear of their pivots.

As is usual in the Burroughs machine, the bail of which the cross rod 902 forms a part is connected by a link 929- with a lever S13 in such manner that the bail is rocked forward, as to its upper portion, just at the conclusion of the first half cycle of operation of the machine. Such forward rocking the branch 15 of said bar, whereby the shoulder 15b is lifted above the bail cross rod 4:02a, whereupon the 'bar moves forward under action of a spring 15d which connectsthe arm 16 to one of the keyboard cross rods 200, as shown in Fig. 3. This is accom` Normally the pawl rests upon the inclined back of the tooth of the rack nearest the stop fingers, spaced from the shoulder just beyond so that there is lost motion when the paWl is operated, and the result is ahalf-step movement 3of the carriage for the purpose hereinbefore stated, to wit, locating the j fingers over the levers 611. The normal position of the carriage in which this condi-` tion exists is determined by abutment of the end of the ratchet bar against a collar l7a secured to the shaft 207 (Fig. 5).

The pawl 2 0 is pivoted to the upwardly extending arm of a bell crank lever 22 and the pawl is normally retracted by a spring 22L connecting said bell crank arm to a stud upon a frame bracket 23. The bell crank isxpivoted to a lower portion of said frame bracket at 22h and its horizontal arm is slotted to receive the rear end of a lever 24 (Fig. 7) which is pivoted upon one of the cross rods 200 under the keyboard and Whose forward end is jointed to a key stem 24'r1 extending up through the keyboard plates and surmounted by a key top 24". Obviously depression of this key will rock the bell crank lever 22 and give the pawl a stroke in if direction to'shift the carriage over to the right as the parts are seen in Figs. 5, 5a and 6. A retaining pawl is pivoted upon the bracket 23 just forward of the pawl 20 and pressed by a spring 25a into engagement with the ratchet rack.

- Of course it will be understood that when themacliine is prepared for multiplication by depressing the key 24b and the Stop finger carriage is' thus shifted a half step by the pawl 20, the retaining pawl 25 drops in behind the tooth upon the inclined back on which it and the pawl 20 were previously resting, and the retaining pawl thus holds the carriage in the shifted position. Thereafter, as the multiplication proceeds from` digit to digit of the multipliei` 'the key 24"l will of course be depressed between each l series-of operations and will then shift the carriage a full step each time.

l/JVhen the multiplication has been completed, the product may be printed by way of the usual totaling operation. I provide for restoring the stop finger-carriage to normal position as an incident to such totaling operation. To this end the familiar link 226 (Fig. 1) which is as usual connected to the stud 226a for operating upon an arm 27 which is connected by a spring 27a to the said total key bell crank lever. Said arm is fastened to a rock shaft 200?t which, at a point farther over in the machine, has securedto it another arm 2'7b (Figs. 7 and 8) having a stud 27. This stud extends over the cam shaped end of a lever 28 which is pivoted to an ear on the bracket 23 and extends through a slot in said bracket to engage a stud 2Od on the pawl 20. This stud extends under the retaining'pawl 25 so that when the lever 28 is rocked by the camming action of the stud 27 upon it, in a totaling operation, both pawls will be disengaged from the ratchet rack whereupon the spring 12g will return the stop fingerl carriage to its normal position.

Referring next to the matter of releasing the usual rack-upholding latches 415, when operations are to be pursued which involve registering movements of levers 611 not indexed by the st0p wires 270 but by the stop lingers 10, I employ a special key 40 located at the lower left hand portion .of the keyboard (Fig. 18) and surmounting a stem 41V slidable through the key-board plates 212, 213, and notched like the ordinary Arepeat key so as to stay down indefinitely (Figs. 9 and 10). The key stem is jointed to an arm 42 secured to a rock shaft 200b and there is a depending arm 43 also secured to this rock shaft and carrying a pivoted hook 44 engaging over the cross rod 202- of the familiar bail which the total and subtotal .keys customarily retract fora similar purpose. To suit the present invention the side links 216 of the total key system are slotted for engagement with thecross rod 202 (Fig. 1) so as to provide for independent retraction of the latter. Obviously depression of the key 1 40 will operate through the medium of said .total key bell crank 227, is equipped with a hook 44 to retract the saidcross rod and thereby disengage the latches 415 from the racks 610. This same key 40 is utilized to disable the printing mechanism and to this end there is jointed to the arm 43 a link 60 (Fig. 9) slotted in a rearward portion to embrace a guide stud 60a on the hammer frame. This link is formed with an angular portion above said slotted portion to which -a retracting spring 60 is connectedand which angular portion has a depending lip 60b carrying a stud 60f for effecting the disablement of the hammers 715. The latter are arranged in thev usual way and adapted ordinarily to be thrown rearwardly at the close of the first half cycle of operation of the machine. This is prevented when the key 40 is down by the interposition of a comb plate 61 which is worked by the aforesaid stud 60d.

The comb plate is pivoted between side pieces 710 of the hammer frame, as shown gages a vluc,r 65a on a in Fig. 12, and is formed with a downturned side portion 61a having an inclined slot occupied by the stud d. Upon depression of thc key 40 and rearward thrust of the link 60, the stud acts with a cammingclcct upon the upper side of the slot vwhich is in rear ofthe pivot of the comb Lplate, soy that the latter' is .thrown down `from the position shown in Fig. 9 to the position shown in Fig. 10. This puts the tines of the comb plate directlyin rear of portions of the rear edges of the hammers which normally extend right angles to the comby plate when so thrown down. Obviously this effectually blocks the hammers so that though released they' are unable to do any printing. Normally the comb plate stands far enough away from the hammers and far enough above the aforesaid portions n#of the rear edges cf the hammers to permit the latter full play. The said key 40 is also utilized for disabling the line spacing mechanism. The latter comprises, as usual, apair of independently movable plates 87 and 90 mounted against the back panel of the machine and having jaws embracing the cross rod ef the line spacing bail, the plate 87 being reciprocated in every opera-tion of the machine whereas the plate 90 is reciprocated only when vcoupled to the plate 87 by the swinging dog T0 (Fig. 11). For the purpose of displacing this dog and thus suspending the line spacing, by depression ot the key 40, the link 60 has a downward extension 60e (lilig. 9) terminating in a laterally turned blade 60t (Fig. 12) having a cam nose occupying a slot in the rear panel ofthe machine. This cam nose enplate which is horizontally disposed on the back panel of the machine and is adapted to operate upon a stud a of the aforesaid swinging dog. The said plate is permitted a limited lateral movement through slot and pin mountings and would normally be held over to the left, as the parts are seen in Fig. 11, by reason of engagement between the stud 70a and the elongated vertical edge of the plate, the dog being spring-held, as usual. The dog is mounted upon a lower portion of the plate 8T and in order to preserve fthe engagement between stud 70a and the plate 65 in the reciprocation of the said plate 87, the plate 65 has an elongated end portion supplying the vertical edge before mentioned. I

Referring neXt to the matter of setting the machine in operation for repeated performances and automaticallyl discontinuing the operations according to the multiplier digit. the present invention is chiefly characterized by the employment of a series of independently operable keys, the depression ef any one of which sets the machine inopsubstantially at eration and the depression of dierent ones of which predetermines the cessation of operation after different numbers of performances. ln connection with this feature of the invention, reference may be had to Patent No. 1,033,109, issued July 23, 1912, on the invention of C. A. Lundgren. Here as there the regular electric driving equipment of the Burroughs adding machine is illustrated and the invention is shown adapted to that particular equipment.

Referring more especially to Figs. 2 and 13 to 15, the reference numeral 100 designates the series of keys which start the motor and determine the number of operations to ensue. These keys are arranged in a row, from front to rear, at the right of the keyboard (see Fig. 18) and they are numbered from'2 to 9. They are upheld" by compression springs 101 arranged in cut-out portions of their stems, and they occupy slots in the upper and lower keyboard plates 213 and 212, being vertically movable in said slots and also tiltable when depressed. All of them act upon a motorstarting device in the form of a wing or shutter 102 which is pivoted between ears 103 on the lower keyboard plate 212, as illustrated most clearly in Fig. 14:, and normally upheld by a spring 102. This shutter has a series of horizontal ngers 102a and a wider horizontal portion 1021 at the frontwith a downturned blade 102d (F ig. 13) which is adapted to act upon a stud 365 carried by one of the levers 312 of the motor-starting system. This lever and its companion lever 361 are adapted to be acted upon in the usual way by finger pressure upon the starting bar 369, but the purpose in carrying out the present invention is to start the machine without using the bar. The depression of anyone of the keys will start the motor (by swinging the wing or shutter 102 down) withjust the same eifect as finger pressure upon the bar 369. For the purpose of coperating to this end with said wing the keys numbered from 4 to 9 are cut out in their forward edges to embrace the fingers 102EL of the wing and so provide for the shoulders at the upper ends of the cut-out portions bearing down upon said fingers and thus depressing the wing. Similarly the key numbered 3 is cut out to engage the rear portion of the wide part 102b `of the wing, and furthermore that wide part is cut out in the center, as shown in 102e` and the key numbered 2 passes down through it and is also cut out in its. forward edge to act upon this wide part of the wing with the same effect as the other keys.

The above described special keys, besides operating to start the motor, serve to bring into play certain automatic counting devices which, after operation a number of times, determined by the value of the parwhereby the key becomes locked down.

ticular key depressed, effect a release of the latter and a consequent stoppage of the machine.

A detent slide strip 104 is arranged on the under side of the lower keyboard plate 212 being held thereto by screws 104a which engage longitudinal slots in the strip, and said strip is slotted for each of the key stems, the slots 104b normally alining with the slots of the lower keyboard plate so that the key stems, which occupy the latter slots, as before stated, stand ready to enter the slots of the detent strip, as illustrated in Fig. 13, where the parts are broken away. This detent strip serves to lock down any depressed key and lock up all the other keys and, furthermore, serves to lock down the starting wing or shutter 102. A spring 104c connecting a stud at the rear end of the strip with a stud on lthe keyboard plate 212, constantly exerts itself to pull the strip rearward. Normally, however, a lug 104d at the forward part of the strip engages a forward edge of the down-turned blade 102d of the wide member 102b of the shutter, as illustrated in Fig. 13. rlhere is a shoulder 102f at the upper end of this forward edge of saidblade and when the shutter is depressed by Aany one of the keys, this shoulder passes below the lug 104d and the detent strip thereupon springs forward taking the lug over the shoulder, as shown in Fig. 15, and locking down the shutter. Depression of a key carries the lower part of its stem into a slot of the detent strip and the rearwardspringing of the latter tilts the key suiciently to bring a shoulder 101d of its stem under the keyboard plate 212, as illustrated in Fig. 15,

Portions of the detent strip forward of its several slots move back, overlapping the respective slots of the said keyboard plate and consequently all the other keys are locked in their normal positions by reason of such portions of the strip moving under them, as illustrated in Fig. 15.

Referring next to the bringing into play of counting devices by depression of any oneA of .said special keys, the detent strip serves in this connection also in that it releases an actuating pawl 106 and a holding pawl 107 for coaction with a ratchet rack 105 formed upon a laterally extending portion of a slide plate 105. vThis slide plate lis arranged upon the upper side of the lower keyboard plate 212 and held thereto by screws 105b which engage longitudinal slots in the plate, as clearly shown in Fig. 14, and said' plate is formed to act upon the' several keys under differing degrees of movement in a forward direction so as to unlock the same after a number of bpera tions of the machine have occurred corresponding with the numeral of the particular ey depressed. The plate is normally held nplate serving shoulders 105d is spaced from the stud of the 9 key, a distance representing eight steps or l increments of movement of the plate under actuation by the pawl 106, the ninthstep or increment of movement forward of said to release the 9 key, if depressed, by reason of the action of the said shoulder against the said stud. The next rearmost shoulder of the plate, which is on the opposite side of the central opening thereof, is normally one step nearer the stud of the 8 key, shoulders and keys, the same alternating on opposite sides of the key stems and the central opening of the plate for the purposes of economy of space and of extent of play of the plate. This is clearly illustrated in Fig. 14 and willbe readily understood by .those skilled in the art, since in general this is a familiar expedient having been frequently resorted to in connection with differential limiting of movement of register actuating and type setting slide bars by different amount keys.

Reverting tothe matter of imparting `a forward step by step movement to the controlling plate 105'and referring more particularly to Figs. 13-15 and 17, the detent strip 104 is formed near its rear end lwith two lateral extensions 104g and 104k, the former for normally holding the pawl 106 disengaged from the ratchet rack 105, .and the and so on through the series of Y other lateral extension serving to hold the pawl 107 normally 'disengaged from said ratchet rack, as illustrated in Fig. 13. rlhis extension 1041 engages a high edge of the pawl 107 just in rear of a notch 107a in said pawl, whereas the extension 104g is in effect a shield over the rack teeth and against which the point of the pawl 106 normally strikes. The two pawls are connected by a spring 108 which tends to engage both of them with the ratchet rack.

- The pawl 107, being merely a holding or detaining pawl, is pivoted to a small bracket on the underside of the keyboard plate 212 and acts as any Ordinar)7 detaining pawl to snap over the l the same is advanced step by step, it being understood of course that upon rearward movement of the detent strip 104 the lateral extension 104h thereof moves off the high edge of this holding pawl and intothe notch thereof so that said pawl may then freely engage the ratchet Fig. 15. Similarly the other lateral extension 104g retreats from a position where it is obstructing the pawl 106 lso that the latter also moves into engagement with the rack.

teeth of the ratchet rack as rack, as illustrated in- This, being the actuating pawl, is pivoted upon the upper end of a lever 109 which is pivoted intermediate its ends on a frame stud 109fL and impelled vreaiw'vardly as to its lower arm and therefore forwardly as to its upper arm by a spring 109". There is pivoted to the lower arm of` this lever ay link 110 which is slotted at its forward end to embrace a stud .G2211 Aupon the familiar rocker piece 622. rlhe latter forms part of the usual key-releasing mechanism of a Burroughs machine (see Fig. 2), carrying the wiper pawl or cam plate 622b for acting upon the key-releasing bail 219.

Normally the pawl 10G is retracted by reason of the fact that the full stroke sector 311 is holding the upper arm of the rocker piece 622 forward as usual and the stud G22 is engaged with the forward end of the slot in the link 110, spring 109C being of course tensioned under these conditions. Upon operation of the machine the full stroke sector moves at once and the familiar spring GST thereupon rocks the piece 622 carrying its upper arm rearward, and the spring 109 vibrates the lever i059 and causes the pawl 106 to thrust the plate 105 forward one step against the tension of its spring 105c which is inferior to the spring 109C. This is repeated with each operation of the machine until one of the shoulders 1051 operates upon the stud 101e of the depressed key` whereupon the said key is forced forward asto its lower end and into alinement with the 'slot of the keyboard plate 212, carrying along with it the ietent strip 10i sol that the wing 102 is unlocked (by disengagement of the lug lOld from theI shoulder 102e). lThis of course releases the motorstarting system so that the connecting clutch between the motor and t-herf machine will be opened in the usual way at the end 'of the current operation. rlhe key of course springs up to normal'position as does also the wing, and the detent strip 10i disengages the pawls 106 and 10T from the rack 105il and the plate 105' springs rearward to normal, so that the machine is then ready for another series of multiplication additions under control oit' that key or any other ke)` of the series of keys 100, the stop linger carriage having been stepped over by depression of the key 2lb.

lnasmuch as depression of amount keys for starting a series of multiplying opera.-

tions, and the setting down of one of the keys 100 representing the unit digit of the multiplier, must not be accompanied by depression of the special key #l0 (because the latter releases all of the latches 15, and only those belonging to the numerical orders where amount keys have been depressed should be released), it becomes necessary to disable the regular key restoring mechanism so as to prevent the relatching of the racks of those orders and consequent interference with repeated registering of the multiplicand for the initial partial product. This disablement is accomplished by curtailing the vibration of the aforesaid familiar rocker piece 622. To this end the detent slide stop 10i is provided with an additional pendant lug 10P (Figs. 13 and 15) which is adapted to serve the function in question in cooperation with a lever 112. 'l`he short arm of the latter, forward of its pivot 112, has raised edge which normally engages said lug, as shown in Fig. 18, whereby this arm of thelever is depressed and its long rear arm held up. This long arm at its rear extremity takes the forni of a hook 112 which, when lowered, presents itself in the path of movement of the stud 622u in order to prevent the spring 687 from rocking said piece to the full extent. lVhen the detent strip 10i springs rearward as a result of depression of one of the keys 100` the lug' lOli moves forward of the raised edge of the short forward arm of theA lever l2 and the greater weight of the long arm of said lever lowers it into position for limiting the movement of the rocker piece 622. rlhis limitation of the latters movement prevents the wiper pawl G22" from passing the roller 219 of the key-releasing bail and consequently the bail will not partake of any key-releasing movement.

The setting up of a multiplicand by depression of amount keys and the conditioning of the multiplying equipment by depressing tlie-key 2lb and then depressing one of the multiplier keys 100, without depression of the key l0 or use of a simple non-print key such as sometimes yemployed in this class of machines, would of course result in the printing of the multiplicand in each of the initial series of operations for registering the partial product. rl`his would generally be a useless procedure and one that therefore might just as well be dispensed with as the successive printing of the multiplicand is dispensed with in subsequent series of operations when the key 40 is depressed. On the other hand it is desirable to print the multiplicand once at the beginning of the series of multiplying operations. To do this and avoid further printing of the multiplicand during the first series of operations, the first operation can be performed without depression of the multiplier key but by either pulling the handle of the machine or operating the starting bar 869. Then the key 4:0 would be depressed, disabling all of the printing hammers and disabling the line spacing mechanism, and also disabling all of the latches 415. Then that one of the multiplier keys bearing the numeral one number less than the digit of the multiplier would be. depressed and the machine would perform the proper number of operations which, added to the initial operation, would make the correct number of registrations of the multiplicand to accord with the digit of the multiplier. 1t will be understood of course that when proceeding in this manner the amount keys would be released in the initial operation in the ordinary way, but corresponding stop fingers 10 would be set in the operation so thatA in subsequent operations the actuating levers-would be properly controlled.

In order to reduce the amount of manipu-4 lation in starting a series of multiplying operations 1 have devised, as a further elaboration of my present invention, a modified construction which is illustrated in Figs. 19 to Q2. This provides for depression of the key -10 at the outset but delayed effectiveness thereof, so that the same result will lensue as just above explained, to wit, the

printing of the multiplicand'in the firstoperation but not in the rest of the operations of the first series. Referring to said Figs. 19 to i2, the depending arm 43 of the bell crank, which the key 40 operates, is not directly pivoted to the bar 60 as before, but

is connected by spring A to a forward extension of said bar, and the latter is formed with a wide slot a into which projects the stud of the arm 43 to which the spring is attached. Upon depression of the key the bar 60 is not moved but thespring A is stretched (Fig. 20) and at theclose of the operation of the machine moves the bar rearward (Fig. 22) so -that in the lensuing operations it will release the rack latches 415 and disable the printing hammers and the line spacing mechanism. The barv is normally held forward by a stud .b on the framework of the machine (Figs. 19 ,and 20). yThis stud engages an elongated notch in the under edge of the bar 60 but the width of the slot a is such as to-provide for an upward swinging of the bar suflicient to disengage it from said stud (Fig. 21). rlhe stud 43, which occupies the slot a of the bar G0, couples the arm 43 to another bar B which extends alongside the bar 60 and has a lug B1 underlying the same. There is a wiper pawl C pivoted to this bar B at c and formed with a lug CI which overlies the upper edge of the bar 60, being normally held in engagement'therewith by a spring c (Fig. l19).

When the key 40 is depressed the bar B is moved rearward so that the rear edge of` the lower part of its pawl C comes against a stud 613b upon the restoring frame 613 and is tilted thereby as shown in Fig. 20. When the frame' lowers in the first part of the operation of the machine, said stud is carried below the pawl and the latter is swung into line with the stud vby its spring o. Consequently when the restoring frame spring 6()a returns the bar C to normal together With the key and its connections. A forward extension of the bar 60 .takes the form of a hook 60d engaging over the bail cross-rod 202- to retract the same and the rack latches as does the hook 44 of the before-described construction.

1n order that the user of the machine may readily determine the stage reached in the multiplying operations, l preferably provide an index to show the numerical order of the multiplier digit or, in other words, the lateral'position of the stop carriage. To this end the. casing of the machine is provided with a transverse slot 30 just above the keyboard, as illustrated in Fig. 18, and alongside this slot is mounted an index plate 31 graduated and inscribed according to the capacity of the machine. 1n the present instance the machine is a so-called 15- bank machine, that is there are fifteen rows of amount keys. Consequently the index plate is marked from zero to 15. A pointer 32 is fastened to the stop pin carriage and projects up through the slot 30 and over the plate 31, as clearly illustrated in Fig.y

, the plate is a half space from the graduation associated with the numeral l to accord with the half step movement of the carriage, as before explained, which puts the stop fingers in line with the registering lever 611 respectively. Cf course the other graduations are spaced apart to correspond with the full step movements of the carriage and as the latter is shifted between series of multiplying operations or to take up orders where ciphers occur in the multiplier or index ingers 32, will move from registry with one numbered graduation to the next.

In addition to the speci-al keys already described and the total and subtotal keys, there are the usual elimination, correction and repeat keys which appear in plan in Fig.- 18, initialed accordingly, and which function in the usual manner through familiar connections which require no special description as they are not directly concerned with an embodiment of the present scribed, the combination ot an accumulator;

actuators for the respective members thereof; keys for releasing and limiting movement' of said actuators; normally-locked stops adapted when unlocked to be set by released actuators; means for unlocking said stops as an incident to release ofthe actuators and relooking them when set by released actuators; and a laterally-shiftable support for the stops.

2. ln a machine of the character described, the combination of an accumulator; reciprocating actuators for the respective members thereof; keys for releasing and determining the extent of reciprocating movement-of. said actuators; stops settable in line with the latter respectively and normally locked against movement thereby; means for unlocking the stops by the keys With provisions for relooking them after one or more have been moved by the actuators; and a laterally shiftable support for the stops. 3 ln a machine of the character described, the combination of an accumulator; actuators for the respective members thereof; keys for releasing and limiting movement of said actuators; stops set by released actuators; means for locking and unlocking said stops; a laterally shiitable support for the latter; means for zeroizing the accumulator; and means operated thereby for restoring the said support to normal.

4. lln a machine of the character described, the combination of an accumulator; actuators for the respective members thereof; keys for releasing and limiting movement of said actuators; stops set by released actuators; means for locking and unlocking said stops; a laterally shitable support for the latter; and manipulative means for releasing the actuators independently of the keys to provide for measuring movements of actuators by the' locked stops.

5. ln a machine of the character described, the combination of an accumulator;

actuators for the respective members thereof; keys for releasing and limiting movement of said actuators; stops set by. released actuators.; means for locking and unlocking said stops; a laterally shifitable support for the latter; manipulative means for releasing the actuators independently' of the keys to provide for measuring movements of actuators by the locked stops; printing mechanism; and means for disabling the same by said manipulative means.

6. ln ay machine of the character described, the combination or" an accumulator;

actuators for the respective members thereof; keys for releasing and limiting movement of said actuators;v stops set by released actuators; means or locking and unlocking said stops; a laterally shiftable support for the latter; manipulative means for releasing the actuators independently of the keys to provide for measuring movements of actuators by the locked stops; printing and line spacing mechanisms; and means for disabling the same by said manipulative means.

7. lny a machine of the character described, the combination of an accumulator; actuators for the respective members thereof; keys for `releasing and limiting movement of said actuators; stops set by released actuators; means or locking and unlocking said stops; 'a laterally shiftable support for the latter; manipulative means for releasing the actuators independently of the keys to provide for measuring movements of actuators by the locked stops; and means for delaying the effectiveness of said means until after initial advance of the actuators or registration of a multiplicand.

8. ln a machine of the character described, the combination of an accumulator; actuators for the respective members thereof; keys for releasing and limiting movementY of said actuators; stops set by released actuators; means or locking and unlocking said stops; a laterally shiftable support for the latter; manipulative means for releasing the actuators independently of the keys to provide for measuring movements of actuators by the locked stops; printing mechanism; means for Adisabling the same by said manipulative means; and

'means for delaying eectiveness of said latter' means until after printing of a multiplicandn i 9. ln a machine of the character de-` scribed, the combination With an accumulator, actuating levers therefor, keys and connecticns for releasing the levers and limiting' movement thereof, and operating mechanism; of a laterally shiftable carriage containing slidable pins and normally positioned with said pins out of alinement with the levers; a key and connections for shitting the carriage step by step to iirst aline its stop pins 'With the levers, and then shift them from order to order; locking devices on the carriage normally locking the stop pins against movement by the levers; means for disabling said locking'devices by operation of amount keys; means for' renabling them by the operating mechanism at an intermediate stage in the

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Cited By (13)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2438036A (en) * 1948-03-16 Plural storage device accounting
US2603414A (en) * 1946-03-26 1952-07-15 Olivetti & Co Spa Multiplier printing mechanism
US2678162A (en) * 1954-05-11 Computing machine
US2682994A (en) * 1954-07-06 Recording and paper feed control
US2833467A (en) * 1958-05-06 Calculating machine-
US2833466A (en) * 1958-05-06 Calculating machine
US2880931A (en) * 1954-11-30 1959-04-07 Wernecke Otto Control mechanism for a differential actuating device
US2898039A (en) * 1959-08-04 Constant factor storage mechanism-for
US2906454A (en) * 1959-09-29 Ten-key calculating machine
US2910230A (en) * 1959-10-27 Normal-
US2941714A (en) * 1955-11-21 1960-06-21 Ncr Co Repeat mechanism for cash registers and accounting machines
US2956741A (en) * 1960-10-18 F vvebb
US3000557A (en) * 1961-09-19 ellerbeck

Cited By (13)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3000557A (en) * 1961-09-19 ellerbeck
US2956741A (en) * 1960-10-18 F vvebb
US2678162A (en) * 1954-05-11 Computing machine
US2682994A (en) * 1954-07-06 Recording and paper feed control
US2833467A (en) * 1958-05-06 Calculating machine-
US2833466A (en) * 1958-05-06 Calculating machine
US2438036A (en) * 1948-03-16 Plural storage device accounting
US2898039A (en) * 1959-08-04 Constant factor storage mechanism-for
US2906454A (en) * 1959-09-29 Ten-key calculating machine
US2910230A (en) * 1959-10-27 Normal-
US2603414A (en) * 1946-03-26 1952-07-15 Olivetti & Co Spa Multiplier printing mechanism
US2880931A (en) * 1954-11-30 1959-04-07 Wernecke Otto Control mechanism for a differential actuating device
US2941714A (en) * 1955-11-21 1960-06-21 Ncr Co Repeat mechanism for cash registers and accounting machines

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