US1106655A - Telephone call-bell or ringer. - Google Patents

Telephone call-bell or ringer. Download PDF

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Publication number
US1106655A
US1106655A US33003306A US1906330033A US1106655A US 1106655 A US1106655 A US 1106655A US 33003306 A US33003306 A US 33003306A US 1906330033 A US1906330033 A US 1906330033A US 1106655 A US1106655 A US 1106655A
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armature
ringer
pole
cores
yoke
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US33003306A
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William Kaisling
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Kellogg Switchboard and Supply Co
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Kellogg Switchboard and Supply Co
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    • GPHYSICS
    • G10MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS; ACOUSTICS
    • G10KSOUND-PRODUCING DEVICES; METHODS OR DEVICES FOR PROTECTING AGAINST, OR FOR DAMPING, NOISE OR OTHER ACOUSTIC WAVES IN GENERAL; ACOUSTICS NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • G10K1/00Devices in which sound is produced by striking a resonating body, e.g. bells, chimes, gong
    • G10K1/06Devices in which sound is produced by striking a resonating body, e.g. bells, chimes, gong the resonating devices having the shape of a bell, plate, rod, or tube
    • G10K1/062Devices in which sound is produced by striking a resonating body, e.g. bells, chimes, gong the resonating devices having the shape of a bell, plate, rod, or tube electrically operated

Description

W. KAISLING.
TELEPHONE CALL BELL 0R RINGER.
APPLICATION FILED AUG.10,'1906.
1,106,655. Patented Aug:11,1914= v %z1m1 KW wm.
TIN 1T WILLIAM KAISLING, or orrIoAG ILLrNors, ASSIGNOR, BY ransnn nssremunnrs, T0
KELLOGG SWITCHBOARD c SUPPLY COMPANY,
A CORPORATION OF ILLINOIS.
TELEPHONE CALL-BELL OR BINGER.
Specification of Letters Patent.
Patented Aug. 11, 19141.
Application filed August 10, 1906. Serial No. 330,033.
To all whom it may concern;
Be it known that I, lVlLLIAM KAISLING, a citizen of the United States, residing at Chicago, in the county of Cook and State of Illinois, have invented new and useful I1nprovements in Telephone Gall Bells or Ringers, of which the following is a specification.
The present invention relates to biased bells or ringers of the type commonly employed in the telephone art.
Telephone ringers in common use consist usually of a pair of substantially parallel electromagnets projecting from a supporting frame carrying the gongs of the ringer and having their projecting cores joined by a yoke which, at an intermediate point, pivotally supports an armature which in turn carries the bell-hammer, while a permanent magnet secured to the frame and presenting a pole adjacent to the center of the armature is instrumental in polarizing the latter. In biasing such ringers, it has been the practice heretofore to employ a light spiral spring by which the armature and hammer are held in their biased position; but with such biasing means, constant trouble with a consequent loss of time and money is experienced because of the inconstancy of the tension springs and because of the tendency of troublemen to at once vary the tension of the biasing spring whenever attempting to overcome any trouble presumably associated with the ringer. 1 j
The object of the present invention is to provide some means for biasing a ringer of this type, which cannot be readily disturbed and which will be efiicient in operation and simple in construction. To this end, I replace the spring of the prior art by magnetic means which acts upon the armature, or a part movable therewith, to yieldingly hold it in its biased position.
The character and advantages of the invention will be more fully understood upon reference to the following description taken in connection with the accompanying drawing, in which- Figure 1 is a front elevation of one form of call-bell or ringer constructed in accordance with my invention; Fig. 2 is a side elevation of a portion of the same, viewed from the left; Fig. 3 is a similar elevation viewed from the right; Fig. 4: is a partial bottom plan view; Fig. 5 is a view similar to Fig.
her; and Fig.
13 and 14- at their upper ends. 7 nets extend along the electromagnets and Fig. 6 is a perspective view of a modification in which the previous polarizing and biasing magnets are united in a single mem- 7 illustrates a still further modification in which a single polarizing and biasing magnet lies distant from the magnetic circuit of the electromagnets of the ringer. Fig. 8 illustrates diagrammatically the poling of the permanent magnets, and the direction of the windings around the cores of the electromagnets.
Throughout these views, like characters refer to like parts.
The call-bell or ringer illustrated belongs in general to a well-known type and comprises electromagnets E, cooperating with an armature A to cause the hammer H, carried by the armature, to strike against the gongs G. These gongs are carried upon posts 10 projecting from a supporting plate 11, preferably of iron, to the under side of which the downwardly projecting iron mag- "net cores 12 are secured by screws 12, which also pass through the permanent magnets These magterminate near the lower ends of the cores 12 in poles 15 and 16, the pole 16 extending opposite the poleface of one of the electromagnets and beneath one end of the armature A. This pole is preferably provided with an adjustable iron pole-piece 16 by which the air-gap between the permanent magnet 14 and the armature A may be varied.
The members 13 and 14 whether pieces as in the modification of Fig. 1, or as an integral member 2 1 as in Fig. 6, may be considered as a permanent magnetic structure having its poles presented to opposite separate ends of the armature. Thus this permanent magnet performs the biasing function heretofore performed by a light spring, as previously stated. That is, the effect of this permanent magnet is to always restore the armature to a definite normal bias. The magnet spools 17 are carried upon the cores 12 and receive the magnet windings 18. The cores 12 are preferably spaced at their lower ends by means of a strip 19 of brass or other suitable material, which is suitably apertured for the reception of the lowerends of the cores. The ends of the cores projecting through this strip 19 arethreaded for the reception of the supporting and adjusting nuts preferably of brass or like material, and each of these is provided with a peripheral groove which forms a bearing for one end of a supporting yoke 21. This yoke, which is also preferably composed of brass, is provided with downwardly project- 23 which form a pivotal support for the armature A. As clearly illustrated in Fig. 4, the yoke 21 has a large central opening into which the adjusting nuts 20 may be passed, and narrower extensions of said opening whose walls are adapted to project into the grooves on the nuts 20 when the parts are assembled. In assembling, the nuts are first placed in position in the yoke. This is done by passingeach nut into the enlarged central opening in the yoke until the lane of its groove is co-incide'nt with the yoke and then shifting the nut in said plane to its final engaging position at the end of the yoke. With the nuts thus positioned in the yoke and the yoke carried to the ends of the cores, the nuts may be readily screwed into place on the core ends, and the armature A, hammer H and the permanent magnets 13 and 14 afterward put in place. By the adjustment of the nuts 20, it will be observed that any desired adjustment of the hammer 11 may be obtained, and also any desired adjustment of the armature A with respect to the pole-pieces.
In Fig. 8 I have illustrated one form of V poling the permanent magnets 13 and 14 and winding the cores 12 of the electromagnets whereby when negative pulsations are impressed upon the terminal of left hand core 12, armature A is vibrated. IVith the ringer constructed according to Fig. 8 the pole 15 of permanent magnet l3 is made a south pole, while the pole 16 of permanent magnet 14 is made a north pole. Then by impressing negative pulsations upon the terminal 'of left hand core 12 a north pole will be created at the lower end of the left core 12 as indicated by N and a south pole will be created at the lower end of right hand core 12 as indicated by S, and due to the strong north pole N of left core 12 tending to neutralize the action of north pole 16, and also due to the attraction of south pole S of right core 12, the direction of magnetic flow in the armature is reversed and it is moved responsive to each such pulsation. v
In the normal position of the parts and without "any current flowing through the electromagnet windings, the biasing magnet 13 will have the effect of holding the hammer in the position illustrated. At this time, if it be assumed that the polarizing magnet 14 presents a north pole 16, the biasing permanent magnet 13 will present a south pole 15 and the greater number of mg ears 22 carrying the pivot pins or screws v nature. gmodification of the invention in which the air-gap between the pole 15 of the biasing magnet 13 and the adjacent portion of the Zarmature .This, as will be apparent from the figure, is accomplished by arranging the pole 15 so that it will pro ar'm'atu're instead 7 of having the armature gprojeot below the end of the pole, as in the previous-form of the invention. Likewise in some instances it may be desirable to .follow the general outline of the preferred Efcrin of the invention and still combine the functions of the polarizing and biasing imagnets in a single magnet. .Such a modiification is illustrated in Fig. 6, wherein the permanent magnet 24 is ofhorseshoe shape and issecured to. a flange 25 formed on the supporting member 11 which is similar to the member 11 of the preferred form and is adapted to be associated with the other parts of the ringer in the same way. In this form, the poles of the Imagnet are adapted to occupy the same relative 'posi- -tions as those of the magnets 13. and 14 in magnetic lines of force will thread through the armature A from the north pole 16 to the southpole 15 and adj acentcore 12. 'The lines of force thus traversing the armature A tend to hold it in the position illustrated andto return it to such position whenever it is moved therefrom. If, now, current be passed through the windings of theelectro magnets so as to present a north pole at the lower end of the right-hand core-12,'and a. south pole at the lower end of the lefthand core 12, there will be no movement of the armature A and the hammer H. On the other hand, if current be passed through the winding of the electromagnets tending to produce a stronger south pole at the lower end of the right-hand core 12, and a north pole at the lower end of the left-hand core 12, the right-hand end of the armature will be drawn upwardly and the hammer will strike against theleft-hand gong. As soon as this current supply ceases, the normal efiect of the lines of force threading between the poles 16 and 15 will be free to again restore the armature to the position illustrated. In this connection, it will be noted that the nuts 20, which are composed of brass or other non'magn'etic material, eX- tend slightly beyond thejends of the cores 12, as shown in Fig. 1, thereby preventing the armature from sticking to the pole-faces.
In the form of the invention heretofore described, the air-ga between the pole 15 of the biasing magnet and the adjacent portion of the armature A is variable, be-
ing dependent up'Onthe position of the ar- In Fig. 5, I have illustrated a A is substantially constant.
ect past the edge of the Fig. 1. In still other instances,f-it may be porary magnetic circuits, to provide a structure in which the permanent magnet is located distant from the magnetic circuit of the temporary magnet cores. Such a structure is illustrated in Fig. 7 wherein the armature A is carried by a yoke 21 having the usual lugs 22 and pivot pins 23. In this instance, the heads of the spools 17 adjacent to the armature A are preferably composed of brass or other suitable nonmagnetic material and carry at their outer ends the threaded stems 26-27 which are adapted to pass through openings in the opposite ends of the yoke 21 and through similar openings in the opposite ends of the permanent magnet 245. By means of nuts 2-8, the yoke and permanent magnet are held in position on the stems and the relative position of the parts may be adjusted. As clearly illustrated, one pole 29 of the permanent magnet 24* extends beneath one end of the armature A while the other pole 30 extends adjacent to the end of said armature. In this case, in order to prevent sticking, the contacting portions of the arniatures are provided with brass or other non-magnetic projections 81 which are adapted to engage the cores 12 of the electromagnets E. The peration of this modified ringer is substantially the same as that heretofore described in connection with the preferred form of the invention.
Obviously in carrying out my invention, the magnetic circuits may be variously arranged and many other alterations and modifications may be made in the structures hereinshown and described without departing from the spirit and scope of my inven tion. I therefore do not wish to be limited to the specific disclosure, but aim to cover by the terms of the appended claims all such alterations and modifications. However, in the said claims I have used the term biased to define those bells or ringcrs which are responsive to current impulses of one direction only, whether positive or negative, in contradistinction to the term polarized which is commonly used to define bells and ringers which respond to alternating current.
What I claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent of the United States is:-
1. A biased telephone bell or ringer comprising substantially parallel electromagnets, an armature pivoted at an intermediate point between the poles of said magnets, and biasing means comprising a permanent magnet having its poles presented to the opposite ends of said armature.
2. A biased telephone bell or ringer comprising substantially parallel electromagnets having projecting cores, a yoke uniting the projecting portions of said cores, an armature pivoted at a point intermediate of its length to an intermediate point of said yoke, and a permanent magnet having its poles presented to the opposite ends of said armature so as to bias the latter.
3. A biased telephone bell 0r ringer comprising substantially parallel electromagnets having projecting cores, a yoke uniting the projecting portions of said cores, an armature pivoted at a point intermediate of its length to an intermediate point of said yoke, and a permanent magnet having one pole lying opposite the pole-face of one of said electromagnets so as to leave a space for one end of said armature and having its other pole lying adjacent to the other end of said armature.
4. A ringer comprising a pair of magnet cores, a rocking armature having its aXis between the ends 01": said cores and disposed to be magnetically controlled thereby, and biasing means including permanent magnet means imparting a preponderating normal attractive stress to said armature always at the same side of its axis.
5. A ringer comprising a pair of magnet cores, a vibratory armature supported at an intermediate point in its length and having two free ends extending from its support, one to the end of each of said cores, permanent magnet means imparting a preponderating normal stress always to the same free end of said armature whereby said ringer has a definite normal bias, and en ergizing coils for said cores for rocking said armature.
6. A biased telephone bell or ringer comprising substantially parallel electromagnets, an armature pivoted at an intermediate oint between the poles of said magnets, and biasing means for said armature comprising a permanent magnetic structure having its poles presented to the opposite ends of said armature.
In witness whereof, I hereunto subscribe my name this 7th day of August, 1906.
W ILLIAM KAISLING.
\Vitnesses L. D. Knnnoos, H. C. OLMSTEAD.
Copies of this patent may be obtained for five cents each, by addressing the Commissioner of Patents, Washington, D. G.
US33003306A 1906-08-10 1906-08-10 Telephone call-bell or ringer. Expired - Lifetime US1106655A (en)

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Cited By (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2516214A (en) * 1946-05-16 1950-07-25 Kellogg Switchboard & Supply Telephone substation ringer
US2608613A (en) * 1946-05-16 1952-08-26 Kellogg Switchboard & Supply Mounting for a telephone substation ringer
US2886808A (en) * 1954-02-11 1959-05-12 North Electric Co Volume control unit for telephone ringer

Cited By (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2516214A (en) * 1946-05-16 1950-07-25 Kellogg Switchboard & Supply Telephone substation ringer
US2608613A (en) * 1946-05-16 1952-08-26 Kellogg Switchboard & Supply Mounting for a telephone substation ringer
US2886808A (en) * 1954-02-11 1959-05-12 North Electric Co Volume control unit for telephone ringer

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