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US1040372A - Cornet. - Google Patents

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US1040372A
US1040372A US1906347421A US1040372A US 1040372 A US1040372 A US 1040372A US 1906347421 A US1906347421 A US 1906347421A US 1040372 A US1040372 A US 1040372A
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Prior art keywords
valve
passages
casing
crook
rod
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Z Albert Meredith
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Z Albert Meredith
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    • GPHYSICS
    • G10MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS; ACOUSTICS
    • G10DSTRINGED MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS; WIND MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS; ACCORDIONS OR CONCERTINAS; PERCUSSION MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS; MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • G10D7/00General design of wind musical instruments
    • G10D7/10General design of wind musical instruments of the type with a cupped mouthpiece, e.g. cornets, orchestral trumpet, trombone

Description

Z. A. MEREDITH.

CORNET.

APPLIGATION FILED 1330.12, 1906.

1,040,372. Patented 00t.8,1912.

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Z. A. MEREDITH.

CORNET.

APPLICATION FILED DEG. 12, 1906.

1,040,372. Patented 0@n.8,1912.

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Z. A. MEREDITH.

CORNET.

a APPLICATION I'ILED 13130.12. 1906. 1,040,372. Patented 0@t.s,1912.

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Z. ALBERT MEREDITH, OF MARION, OHIO.

CORNET.

Specification of Letters Patent.

Patented Oct. 8, 1912.

Application filed December 12, 1906. Serial No. 347,421.

To all fr0/0m t may concern Be it known that I, Z. ALBERT MEREDITH, a citizen of the United States, residing at Marion, in the county of Marion and State of Ohio, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in Cornets, of which the following is a. specification, reference being had therein to the accompanying drawings.

The present invention relates to improvements in cornets and musical instruments of the same class, in which valves are used, such as alto, bass, etc.

In instruments of this character the column of air vibrates not only as a whole but also in sections like a violin string, thereby producing a compound tone of a full rich quality. It is obvious that any interference with these vibrations, such as would be caused by obstructions or sharp turns in the course of the air through the tubing would destroy the fullness of the tone and render the same thin and stuffy in proportion to the extent of the obstruction. In the application filed by me December 4, 1901, Ser. No. 84,680, I have shown and described an instrument of this class, in which the air passage or passages have no obstructions, angles or sharp bends and in which the bends or turns in the open-'tone passage or passages with the valves in their raised or normal position are the same in curvature as the bends or turns in the valve tone passages when the valves are in their lower position and offer practically the same resistance to the air whether the valves are in their raised or lowered position. The bends or turns of all the passages being constructed in accordance with acoustic principles offer practically no interference with the vibration of the column of air in the instrument, so that all the tones may be produced with equal volume, purity and freedom, regardless as to whether the valves are up or down. This result is accomplished by providing the valve-casing with two series of air passages located one above the other, the air passages of each series lying in a common horizontal plane, and providing the valve with ports adapted to connect the air inlet passage with either t-he open tone or the valve tone passages according to the position of the valve,

the air having an open uninterrupted passage through the valve in either position thereof. The open tone passages are provided with short crooks and the valve-tone passages with long crooks, the turns of each being substantially the same, and, consequently the amount of resistance offered to the vibrations in each case is practically the same, the main difference in the resistance to the air being in the straight length of the tubing and this is very slight.

The object of the present invention is to improve the model of the cornet shown and described in the above mentioned application and to embody the essential features thereof in an instrument which will be compact in structure and improved in organization, the crooks being so located and arranged as to confine the same within a very small space and to provide an instrument of good appearance, and being so constructed, according to acoustical principles, as to change the direction of a column of air with the least possible resistance and with the least possible interference with the vibrations thereof.

A further object is to provide a valve casing in which the liability of leakage between the several passages will be reduced to a minimum and a valve operating mechanism which will be very light and easy of operation, and further to provide an improved device for actuating the valve tuning slides when the pitch of the instrument is changed.

Vith these objects in view my invention consists in certain novel features of construction to be hereinafter described, and then more fully pointed out in the claims.

In the accompanying drawings, Figure l is a side elevation of my improved instrument; Fig. 2 is a bottom plan View of a portion of the same; Fig. 3 is a detail view of two of the valve casings showing a modified form of connection between the same; Fig. l is a vertical sectional view of one of the valve casings showing the piston valve in elevation; Fig. 5 is a vertical sectional view of the valve casing and valve operating mechanism; Fig. 6 is a top plan view of the same, with the cap removed; Fig. 7 is a transverse sectional view taken on the line m--m of Fig. 4.

Tn these drawings l have shown the usual mouth pipe 1 and bell 2 which are connected, the one with the other, through a series of valve casings A, B and C. Each valve casing is provided with two series or groups of apertures or air passages lying in different horizontal planes, but having all the passages of each series lying in the same horizontal plane. These passages are three in number and are located at equal distances around the circumference of the casing, thereby providing between each of the passages an equal space, thus providing a maximum extent of valve surface between the adjacent passages and reducing to a minimum the liability of the air to escape from one passage to the other, which frequently occurs in instruments having the valve casings with the passages arranged unevenly around the same, thereby allowing between some of the passages a very narrow space. Each series of air passages includes either an air inlet or outlet passage, an open tone passage and a valve tone passage, the corresponding passages in both series being the same, save that n passages, but the angle is so slight that it does not materially affect the vibration of the air column. As in the other casings, the open tone passages 23 and 2st of this casing lare connected by a short crook 25 and the where one series has an inlet passage the corresponding passage of the other series in the same casing is an outlet passage. The inlet and outlet passages may be placed in either the upper or lower' series respectively, as may be required. In each casing the open tone passages and the valve tone passages, respectively, of each series are connected by crooks.

Tn describing the arrangement and location of the tubing or crooks l shall follow the course of the air through the instrument. The mouth pipe 1 extends longitudinally of the bell, which direction shall hereinafter be referred to as longitudinally of the instrument. The mouth pipe consists of a double crook lying in a vertical plane with a portion of its length turned at substantially right angles to the valve casing C, and provided with a tuning slide 1a in the lower crook thereof. The inner end of this shortportion in the tubing is connected to the air inlet passage 3 in the upper series of pasin said casing. The casing C has opentone passages d and 5 connected by a short crook G, extending from the side of the instrument opposite that to which the mouth pipe is connected and extending transversely of the instrument at substantially right angles thereto. This crook is of a length suflicient to enable turns having the desired degree of curvature to be formed therein. The valve tone passages 7 and S are connected one to t-he other by a crook 9 of a length greater than the length of the crook 6. The air outlet passage 10 of the lower series which corresponds to the inlet passage 3 of the upper series is connected with a bridging tube or crook 11 extending around the casing B and entering the inlet passage 12 of the casing A, which, in this instance, is in the lower series. The open tone passages 13 and 1e are connected by a short crook 15, similar in construction and location to that of the casing C, and the valve tone passages 16 and 17 are connected by a relatively long crook 18 in which the distance between the parallel arms is the same as the distance between the parallel arms of the short crook 15, and, preferably, has the upper arm thereof bent to one side, as shown at 19, to allow the same to extend past the crook of the bell tube.

rllhe air outlet passage 2O is connected by a short tube 21 with the air inlet passage 22 of the casing B, which, in this instance, is in the upper series of passages. 1f desired, the upper series of air passages in the valve casing .A may be placed farther down in the valve casing and the crooks made of less `width, as shown in dotted lines in Fig. 3.

This, of course, makes it necessary to place A the connecting tube, 21', on an incline, thereby producing an angular turn in the air valve tone passages 2G and 27 are connected lby a crook 2S, of greater length than the crook Q5, but of less length than either of the crooks 9 or 18. The crook 28 extends for the igreater vpart of its length longitudinally of the instrument and substantially parallel `:with the crook 9 but has its inner ends bent at an angle thereto and extending inward to `the passages 26 and 2'? of the casing, to perimit the crook to pass around the casing C.

rlhe outlet passage 29 of the casing B is conznected by a tube 30 with the bell of the instrument.

y It will be observed that the construction above described provides short crooks con- ;necting the open tone passages, whereas, in the ordinary construction, these passages are jconnected by a port formed within the valve. The use of this crook necessitates the lengthening of the valve tone crooks a correspond- ,ing amount to secure the proper tones. One ygreat advantage secured by this construction, in addition to the other advantages herein set forth, is that it enables the valve ,tone crook of the second valve to be made of suiiicient length and width to provide it with turns having the desired acoustical properties. This is a feature much to be `desired and to attain which many expedients have been devised, but without success, as the lengthening of the crook invariably made the t-one at. The present construction keeps vthe crook in perfect tune and further enables the same to be provided with a longer tuning slide than usual to alter the length of the tube when the pitch of the instrument is changed.

Each of the casings A, B and C is provided with a reciprocating valve piston 31. These pistons are all of a similar construction, differing only in the location of the ports relatively to the length of the piston. F or the purpose of illustration I have chosen the valve casing B, which is provided with two series of passages and has the passages 23, 22 and 26 in the upper series and the passages 27, 24 and 29 in the lower series. This piston is provided with two pairs of ports 32, the two pairs of ports being so arranged that when the piston is in its normal or raised position the passages 27 and 24, and 26 and 23 are connected by the lower pair of ports, and, when the valve is in its depressed position, the passages 27 and 29, and 22 and 26 are connected by the upper pair of ports, thereby connecting the open and valve tone crooks, respectively with the inlet and outlet passages. The ports 32 extend through the piston 31 along a curved line, thereby continuing the turn of the crooks which connect with the opposite ends thereof and forming a perfect turn having the desired acoustical properties. The piston 31 is of a sulcient length to contain the several ports and is provided at its upper end with a valve stem 33 which is reduced at the upper end thereof to form the operating stem 34 of the instrument, the stem 33 being threaded at the end adjacent to the reduced portion 34, as shown at 35. The spring barrel 36 is supported in the upper end of the valve casing by means of lugs 37 on its flanged end, said lugs engaging recesses 38 formed in the upper ends of said valve casing. This spring barrel is provided at its lower end with an inwardly extending'liange preferably in the form of a concave bottom 39, having an aperture 40 for the passage of the valve stem 33. The spring barrel 36. is also provided on opposite sides with vertical slots 41 extending through a portion of its length. A collar 42 fits loosely over the threaded portion 35 of the stem 33 and rests upon the shoulder 43 formed thereon. A lug or pin 44 inserted in the threaded portion 35 of the stem engages a recess 45 in said collar and prevents the same from turning thereon. A second collar 46 is screw threaded to engage the threaded portion 35 to secure the collar 42 in position thereon. The collar 42 is provided on its opposite sides with lugs 47 and 48, of different width, and adapted to enter the recesses 49 and 50 in fianged end of the spring barrel 36 and to slide in the slots 41 in said spring barrel. The recesses 49 and 50 are of different width to correspond with the lugs 47 and 48 respectively, thereby insuring the proper positioning of the piston valve in the casing when the stem is inserted therein. A compression spring 51 is coiled about the valve stem 33 and confined between the bottom 39 of the spring barrel and the collar 42 on the upper end of said stem and serves to hold the piston normally in its elevated position, but to allow the same to be readily depressed. In this construction of the piston and its operating mechanism `the greater part of the operating mechanism remains stationary instead of moving with the valve, thereby producing a lighter and quicker valve action, and, further, this construction provides an operating mechanism which is simple of construction and easily removable and which responds promptly and positively to the touch.

In order that the length of the tubing in the valve crooks may be varied, the crooks 9 and 18 are provided with tuning slides 52 and 53, respectively, and I have provided a device for operating these tuning slides, which device is illustrated in Fig. 4 of the drawings, which shows for the purpose of illust-ration a portion of the crook 9 and tuning slide 52. The crook is provided between the opposite branches thereof with a pair of braces or stops 54 and 55 which are rigidly supported therein and are provided with central apertures, in which is loosely mounted a. rod 57 having a head 5S and screw-threaded portion 59. rl`he forward end of the rod 57 projects beyond the brace 55 farthest from the head of said rod and engages a socket 60 carried by the tuning slide 52. A nut 61 is mounted on the screwthreaded portion 59 of the rod 57 between the braces and serves to limit the movement of the rod, and, consequently, the movement of the tuning slide 52.

In order to lengthen the tubing to properly tune the valve tones when the instrument is to be changed from a low pitch, B flat, to A, the rod 57 is moved outwardly until the nut 61 comes into engagement with the brace 55, which outward movement will carry the tuning slide 52 to its proper position when the cornet is set for A. To return the slide to its position when the cornet is set for B fia-t, the slide is moved inward until the nut '61 on the rod 57 comes in contact with the brace 54, which stops the slide in its proper position. To adjust the crook of the tuning slide to tune the valve tones for high pitch B flat, the nut 61 is advanced on the threaded portion 59 of the rod 57 to allow the slide 52 to be moved inward to its innermost position, which is the correct position when the instruinent is set for high pitch B flat. With the slide in this position, the nut 61 will be again in engagement with the brace 54 and when the rod 57 is moved outward until the nut 61 comes into Contact with the b "ace 55, the slide 52 will be moved outward the proper distance to tune the valve tones for high pitch r1. Thus, it will be seen that the movement of the slide in changing the instrument from B flat to A is positively limited, insuring accuracy of movement, and that the valve tuning slides may be set to any desired point when the pitch of the instrument is changed, as from high to low pitch, and t-hen quickly moved the proper distance when the key of the instrument is changed, as from B flat to n, or vice versa. rlhe nut G1 is preferably a split nut in order that it may be compressed upon the threaded portion 59 of the rod to give to it a proper grip to prevent loose movement thereon. rllhe forward end ofthe rod 57 fits loosely in the socket GO, thereby allowing the slide 59, to be removed from the instrument when desired. fr guard G2 is provided to prevent the rod 57 from vibrating or rattling and preferably consists of a loop of resilient wire or similar material, having its ends secured to the brace 55 at substantially right angles to the rod 57 and having v its body portion bent downward and extending beneath the rod 5J, thereby exerting a pressure on the rod and holding the saine against vibration by allowing it to move freely in a longitudinal direction. The ends of the wire loop will be secured to the brace 55 in any suitable manner, that shown in the drawings consisting of inserting the ends of the wire in holes 63 drilled in said brace.

l wish it to be understood that I do not desire to be limited to the exact details of construction shown and described, for obvious modilications will occur to a person skilled in the art.

Having thus fully described my invention, what 1 claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent, is:-

1. lin an instrument of the character described, the combination, with a mouth pipe, a bell, a valve casing connected thereto, a valve within the same, and a crook con nected with said valve casing, of a tuning slide in said crook, a pair of stops mounted in longitudinal alinement on said crook, a rod slidably mounted in said stops and having one end in engagement with sai'd tuning slide, and a projection carried by said rod and adapted to engage said stops to limit the movement of said rod in either direction, substantially as described.

2. ln an instrument of the character described, the combination, with a mouth pipe, a bell, a valve casing connected thereto, a valve therein, and a crook connected with said valve casing, of a tuning slide for said crook, a pair of stops secured in longitudinal alinement between the arms of said crook, a rod slidably mounted in said stops and having one end in engagement with said slide, said rod having a threaded portion and a nut mounted on said threaded portion between said stops and adapted to engage the same to limit the movement of said rod in either direction, substantially as described.

3. 1n an instrument of the character described, the combination, with a mouth pipe, a bell, and a valve casing connected thereto, of a spring barrel removably mounted in the upper end of said casing and having guide slots in the opposite sides thereof, an inwardly extending flange at t-he lower end of said spring barrel, a piston valve mounted in said casing and terminating beneath said spring barrel, a valve stem carried by said piston valve and extending through said spring barrel, a collar carried by said valve stem, projections on said collar adapted to engage the guide slots in said spring barrel, and a spring confined between said collar and said flange adapted to normally hold said piston in its elevated position.

4. ln an instrument of the character described, the combination, with a mouth pipe, a bell, and a valve casing connected thereto, of a spring barrel removably mounted in said casing and having recesses of ditferent widths therein, slots connected with said recesses, a flange at the lower end of said barrel, a piston valve mounted in said casing beneath said spring barrel, a valve stem carried by said piston and extending through said spring barrel, a pin carried by said valve stem, a collar having a recess adapted to engage said pinto limit the movement thereof, projections of different widths carried by said collar and adapted to engage said recesses and move in said slots, a second collar screw-threaded on said valve stem and engaging said first-mentioned collar, and a spring confined between said first-mentioned collar and said iiange, substantially as described.

5. ln an instrument of the character described, the combination, with a mouth pipe, a bell, a valve casing connected thereto, a valve within the saine, and a crook connected with said valve casing, of a tuning slide in said crook, a support carried by said crook, a rod slidahly mounted in said support land having` one end in engagement with said tuning slide, and a spring engaging said rod to hold the same against vibration, substantially as described.

G. 1n an instrument of the character described, the combination, with a mouth pipe, a bell, a valve casing connected thereto, a

valve within the same, anda crook conneoted with said valve casing, of a tuning portion bent downward and extending beslide in said crook, a support mounted in neath said rod, substantially as described. 10 said crook, a rod slidably mounted in said In testimony whereof, I aix my signature support and hau/'ing one end in engagement in presence of two Witnesses.

With said tuning slide, means for limiting Z. ALBERT MEREDITH. the movement of said rod, and a resilient Vitnesses:

Wire having its end secured to said support L. B. MCNEAL,

at right angles to said rod with its body J. F. MCNEAL.

Copies of this patent may be obtained for ve cents each, by addressing the Commissioner of Patents, Washington, D. C.

US1040372A 1906-12-12 1906-12-12 Cornet. Expired - Lifetime US1040372A (en)

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Cited By (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
USD810186S1 (en) * 2016-11-17 2018-02-13 Hoxon Gakki Corporation Mini pocket trumpet

Cited By (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
USD810186S1 (en) * 2016-11-17 2018-02-13 Hoxon Gakki Corporation Mini pocket trumpet

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