SK143396A3 - Method of detecting particles in a two-phase stream, vacuum cleaner and a method of controlling or adjusting a vacuum cleaner - Google Patents

Method of detecting particles in a two-phase stream, vacuum cleaner and a method of controlling or adjusting a vacuum cleaner Download PDF

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Publication number
SK143396A3
SK143396A3 SK143396A SK143396A SK143396A3 SK 143396 A3 SK143396 A3 SK 143396A3 SK 143396 A SK143396 A SK 143396A SK 143396 A SK143396 A SK 143396A SK 143396 A3 SK143396 A3 SK 143396A3
Authority
SK
Slovakia
Prior art keywords
signal
vacuum cleaner
characterized
dust
piezoelectric sensor
Prior art date
Application number
SK143396A
Other languages
Slovak (sk)
Inventor
Heinrich Iglseder
Original Assignee
Heinrich Iglseder
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Priority to DE4416428 priority Critical
Priority to DE19944425291 priority patent/DE4425291A1/en
Application filed by Heinrich Iglseder filed Critical Heinrich Iglseder
Priority to PCT/EP1995/001529 priority patent/WO1995030887A1/en
Publication of SK143396A3 publication Critical patent/SK143396A3/en

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Classifications

    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A47FURNITURE; DOMESTIC ARTICLES OR APPLIANCES; COFFEE MILLS; SPICE MILLS; SUCTION CLEANERS IN GENERAL
    • A47LDOMESTIC WASHING OR CLEANING; SUCTION CLEANERS IN GENERAL
    • A47L9/00Details or accessories of suction cleaners, e.g. mechanical means for controlling the suction or for effecting pulsating action; Storing devices specially adapted to suction cleaners or parts thereof; Carrying-vehicles specially adapted for suction cleaners
    • A47L9/28Installation of the electric equipment, e.g. adaptation or attachment to the suction cleaner; Controlling suction cleaners by electric means
    • A47L9/2894Details related to signal transmission in suction cleaners
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A47FURNITURE; DOMESTIC ARTICLES OR APPLIANCES; COFFEE MILLS; SPICE MILLS; SUCTION CLEANERS IN GENERAL
    • A47LDOMESTIC WASHING OR CLEANING; SUCTION CLEANERS IN GENERAL
    • A47L9/00Details or accessories of suction cleaners, e.g. mechanical means for controlling the suction or for effecting pulsating action; Storing devices specially adapted to suction cleaners or parts thereof; Carrying-vehicles specially adapted for suction cleaners
    • A47L9/28Installation of the electric equipment, e.g. adaptation or attachment to the suction cleaner; Controlling suction cleaners by electric means
    • A47L9/2805Parameters or conditions being sensed
    • A47L9/281Parameters or conditions being sensed the amount or condition of incoming dirt or dust
    • A47L9/2815Parameters or conditions being sensed the amount or condition of incoming dirt or dust using optical detectors
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A47FURNITURE; DOMESTIC ARTICLES OR APPLIANCES; COFFEE MILLS; SPICE MILLS; SUCTION CLEANERS IN GENERAL
    • A47LDOMESTIC WASHING OR CLEANING; SUCTION CLEANERS IN GENERAL
    • A47L9/00Details or accessories of suction cleaners, e.g. mechanical means for controlling the suction or for effecting pulsating action; Storing devices specially adapted to suction cleaners or parts thereof; Carrying-vehicles specially adapted for suction cleaners
    • A47L9/28Installation of the electric equipment, e.g. adaptation or attachment to the suction cleaner; Controlling suction cleaners by electric means
    • A47L9/2836Installation of the electric equipment, e.g. adaptation or attachment to the suction cleaner; Controlling suction cleaners by electric means characterised by the parts which are controlled
    • A47L9/2842Suction motors or blowers
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A47FURNITURE; DOMESTIC ARTICLES OR APPLIANCES; COFFEE MILLS; SPICE MILLS; SUCTION CLEANERS IN GENERAL
    • A47LDOMESTIC WASHING OR CLEANING; SUCTION CLEANERS IN GENERAL
    • A47L9/00Details or accessories of suction cleaners, e.g. mechanical means for controlling the suction or for effecting pulsating action; Storing devices specially adapted to suction cleaners or parts thereof; Carrying-vehicles specially adapted for suction cleaners
    • A47L9/28Installation of the electric equipment, e.g. adaptation or attachment to the suction cleaner; Controlling suction cleaners by electric means
    • A47L9/2857User input or output elements for control, e.g. buttons, switches or displays
    • GPHYSICS
    • G01MEASURING; TESTING
    • G01FMEASURING VOLUME, VOLUME FLOW, MASS FLOW OR LIQUID LEVEL; METERING BY VOLUME
    • G01F1/00Measuring the volume flow or mass flow of fluid or fluent solid material wherein the fluid passes through the meter in a continuous flow
    • G01F1/05Measuring the volume flow or mass flow of fluid or fluent solid material wherein the fluid passes through the meter in a continuous flow by using mechanical effects
    • G01F1/20Measuring the volume flow or mass flow of fluid or fluent solid material wherein the fluid passes through the meter in a continuous flow by using mechanical effects by detection of dynamic effects of the fluid flow
    • G01F1/206Measuring pressure, force or momentum of a fluid flow which is forced to change its direction
    • GPHYSICS
    • G01MEASURING; TESTING
    • G01FMEASURING VOLUME, VOLUME FLOW, MASS FLOW OR LIQUID LEVEL; METERING BY VOLUME
    • G01F1/00Measuring the volume flow or mass flow of fluid or fluent solid material wherein the fluid passes through the meter in a continuous flow
    • G01F1/74Devices for measuring flow of a fluid or flow of a fluent solid material in suspension in another fluid
    • GPHYSICS
    • G01MEASURING; TESTING
    • G01NINVESTIGATING OR ANALYSING MATERIALS BY DETERMINING THEIR CHEMICAL OR PHYSICAL PROPERTIES
    • G01N15/00Investigating characteristics of particles; Investigating permeability, pore-volume, or surface-area of porous materials
    • G01N15/02Investigating particle size or size distribution
    • G01N15/0255Investigating particle size or size distribution with mechanical, e.g. inertial, classification, and investigation of sorted collections

Abstract

A method of detecting particles in a two-phase stream is disclosed, as well as a vacuum cleaner and a process for controlling or adjusting a vacuum cleaner. The detection of particles, in particular dust particles, in a two-phase stream currently relies on optical detection methods. These optical methods are prone to problems and their resolution is low. With the proposed method, a piezoelectric sensor is used to determine the location and size of the particles. A charge signal generated by the piezoelectric sensor is used to represent the particles detected or for controlling or adjusting the suction power of a vacuum cleaner.

Description

Technical field

The invention relates to a method for detecting particles in a two-phase flow according to the preamble of claim 1. Further, the invention relates to a method for controlling and controlling a dust vacuum cleaner according to the preamble of claim 7 and a dust vacuum cleaner according to the preamble of claim 10.

For the purposes of the invention, vacuum cleaners are all vacuum cleaners, such as manually operated home dust vacuum cleaners, automatically operated dust clean robots for the cleanest rooms, as well as central dust extraction devices having both central machinery and a system. lines for connecting the central machinery to the extractor.

Current state

The detection of particles in a two-phase flow, in particular the detection of dust in air, is important for many industrial production processes or for integration methods. Thus, for example, the sensitive production methods of semiconductor technology, as well as the integration methods of space flight technology, must be carried out under dust-free conditions, such as in clean rooms. An important prerequisite for guaranteeing dust-free conditions is clearly proof of the particles in terms of their type and number in a predetermined volume. Devices employing optical detection methods are used. Optical detection methods have low resolution and are also very susceptible to failure.

Even in the home, determining the degree of air cleanliness, floor or carpet is important. Previously known household vacuum cleaners are not able to easily and reliably measure the degree of carpet cleanliness and reproduce it. Therefore, they are operated for all cases with very high suction power, resulting in a high noise load.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

Based on this prior art, the present invention aims to provide a simple and reliable method for detecting particles in a two-phase flow.

Further, a method for operating the vacuum cleaner as well as a vacuum cleaner is to provide a unique detection of the dust particles and / or their control which allows concentration.

In order to solve the particles in the two-phase patent claim 1 in the two-phase flow, the object of the invention is to demonstrate the features of the present invention as to the type and number of particles, particularly dust particles in air.

Preferably, the signal produced by the plezoelectric sensor is processed, in particular filtered, prior to reproduction. This has the advantage that signal disturbances, such as measurement noise, can be eliminated. The accuracy of the method is increased.

The method of controlling and controlling the dust vacuum cleaner according to the invention has the features of claim 7. The suction power of the dust vacuum cleaner has been adapted to the degree of cleanliness of the floor or carpet.

Preferably, the signal is used to control or control the power of the vacuum cleaner motor. This has the advantage that the energy consumption of the vacuum cleaner as well as the noise load resulting therefrom are reduced.

The vacuum cleaner according to the invention has the features of claim 10. It allows simple and robust detection of the seed particles.

Preferably, the piezoelectric sensor is disposed obliquely in the air flow direction in the flow path. This has the advantage that it again separates the stream of particles impinging on the piezoelectric sensor and thus allows for a still self-cleaning effect of the piezoelectric sensor.

P (j Cí 1 ä one · next one eho výtvore í “i i a v y s a, v s, č a p r a c h u by multiplied I climb them Piez oeieh.tr ické e idio located in zošhrt en i c e s t y p · Ruder i. Those lottery tickets ť d v c h e and o o o o o r - lation S S. · 7 depends on os t i 1 1 en s increases. particles

as a consequence of this, with a higher speed, they impinge on the piezoelectric sensor. As a result, the sensitivity or the resolution of the piezoelectric sensor can be increased.

Overview of the figures in the drawing

Preferred further embodiments of the invention result from

p from n · 1 : shackles and, description. The following are exemplary embodiments exclude: : u explained in more detail by means of drawings. FIG. v show: Fig. I arranging a piezoelectric sensor in the flow path according to the first embodiment, v cross section. Fig. WITH The sensor arrangement piesoelektrického the flow pathway of the second »example - of the invention in a view analogous to FIG. 1 Fig. 5 a block diagram of a measurement »circuit for processing and ruproduction of a signal produced by a sand-electric punch, and Fig. 4 the measuring insert with FIG. 3 in detail.

· Frik: in accordance with an embodiment of the invention vzducio. setting up or measuring circuits that are LOME. used to detect dust particles in the » i. TO’i.O 'device, or measurement wiring except for : others »used in household vacuum cleaners. save ;> r. 1 shows a piezo-perch spike 10 which is indicated in a two-phase flow path 11. Cesta 11 two pha: the new flow is determined by a suction tube of 1 g., fell the suction neck of a vacuum cleaner (not shown) chu.

D \ o-phase flow, namely the flow of the dust- or chi of the air cleaners 15, and is moved conditionally by the suction výkoneí with a vacuum cleaner in the direction of flow, by, arrows

The dust particles 15 having a mass m moving at the speed of flow through the suction tube 13 impinge on the piezoelectric cidio 10, which is located there, in the area of curvature 15 of the suction tube 13. On impact of the dust particles 15 on the piezoelectric of their kinetic energy, the kinetic energy of the dust agent 10 transmits a portion of the piezoelectric sensor 10, converting the piezoelectric sensor 10 into a corresponding electrical signal, namely a piezoelectric voltage. This signal is sensed through line 13,11? on the piezoelectric sensor 10 and supplied to the measurement wiring 16.

piezoelectric

curvature 15 at na Č d d 0 0 '10 is doing so suction tubes 13. sensor 10 placed indicated sinkou 14, 11 and the mixture p 1 ´ u Ct 611 í ct

the sensor 10 is located in the region of the suction pipe 13, piezoelectric mounted on the inner wall 19 As a result, the piezoelectric is obliquely to the direction of flow that the piezoelectric sensor surface 30 indicated by the arrow 14 forms at an angle of 30 °. This generates a continuous 30 piezo transducer 10.

about 5 ° to 80 °, with high surface cleaning

The piezoelectric sensor 10 is formed as a crystal 31. The crystal 31 is positioned in the flow path 11 such that the polar electric axis of the flow crystal. As a result, the dust particles can have a zelectric cidio 10 or a crystal 31 in the most sensitive axis.

pointed in direction 15 to excite pieje

In addition, ceramics, plastics as well as polymers are suitable materials for the piezoelectric sensor 10.

The piezoelectric sensor is further disposed in the suction tube 13 or has a dimension such that the entire surface of the two-phase flow is retained therein. As a result, all the dust particles 15 contained in the two-phase flow are detected by a p-10-electric sensor 10.

An alternative arrangement of the two-phase piezoelectric sensor 33 is shown in FIG. 3. The piezoelectric sensor 10 is arranged here in the throttle 33 of the suction pipe of a vacuum cleaner (not shown). In the area of trimming 35, the speed of the two-phase flow increases. As a result, the dust particles 15 impinge on the piezoelectric sensor 33 at an increased speed. This increases the sensitivity or resolution of the piezoelectric sensor 33.

Surface 34. The piezoelectric sensor 88 is arranged obliquely on. the direction of the two-phase flow indicated by the arrow 14. The piezoelectric sensor 88 is in this case formed as a foil 36 which is placed on the piezoelectric sensor 88 and only part of the thrust is detected by it. In measuring y *. ( w 4- · 4 <Ί * '7 «- 4, 1 - 4“> · \ - ♦ J * 2 pi ώ ώ u j. dimension, the cross-section of the two-phase flow then results in a corresponding cross-sectional calculation of the two-phase flow.

wiring on the whole

Preferably, the piezoelectric sensor 10, 88 is coated with a protective layer (not shown). The protective layer slows the aging of the piezoelectric sensor 10 due to a higher load and thus increases its service life.

Furthermore, the piezoelectric sensor 10, SS can be arranged in the suction tube 18 or 8i with pre-penetration. Between the sandelectric sensor 10, 88 and the suction tube 18, 84 is then resilient between the layers, by means of which the afterglow time of the piezoelectric sensor 10, 88 can be reduced.

The measurement circuit 16 for processing and reproducing the signal produced by the piezoelectric sensor 10, 88 is shown in FIG. 3, 4.

The dust particles 15 produce a charge signal 86 upon impact on the piezoelectric sensor 10, 88. The charge signal 88 is dependent on the kinetic energy of the dust particles 15. In order to increase the life or the trip time of the charge signal 86, it is fed to an impedance converter or voltage monitor 8 with an amplification factor of about 1. ä

the time-elongated downstream signal 30. 50 comprises next to the high frequency

The downstream signal of the measurement signals 51 is still a low-frequency interference signal from the downstream signal through the passage 33. The upper current of the signal 30 the filter signal

signals 58 s and o d s r r a n i a o m , that is upper- e uraiestner rá za siedo- 53 manufactures from the subsequent 34 , which contains only

required measurement signals.

The frequency of the oscillations of the measurement signals 31 is generally above 100 kHz. The frequency of the interference signals 58 is generally about 80 kHz. Therefore, a high pass filter 33 having a cutoff frequency of about 50 kHz is used. The jamming signals 38 can be filtered from the downstream signal 50 in a simple manner by means of the high pass filter 55.

After filtering the subsequent signal 50, the thus-filtered filter signal 54 is subjected to. determination of peak values. To this end, a top-level meter 55 is provided with a peak meter produced with filter values. The peak measurement meter 54 measures the peak signal 56,

Optionally, by determining the peak value, the kinetic energy of the dust particles 15 can be calibrated. The calibration measurements have shown that the maximum piezoelectric voltage 57 behaves exponentially to the kinetic energy of the dust particles 15.

The peak value signal 56 is applied to the metering or securing area 56 and then to the sensing device 59 with integrated indicating electronics 49. The sensing device 59 allows optical, acoustic and / or apparent reproduction of the detected dust particles 15.

By means of the selection circuit 56, the peak value signal 56 is converted into different input signals 41 for the sensor device 59. The signal is thereby converted. The 56 peak values are assigned to different, adjustable sensitivity ranges or measurement range limits. Areas of sensitivity or limits of measurement range are logarithmic scaled. Therefore, the selection circuit has at least one amplifier 46.

The sensing device 59 has optical indications 45 and acoustic and tactile sensing elements that are not shown.

(p X r ')

ABOUT

The optical indications 42 used are multi-position indications 45 with LEDs. Each LED is assigned its own measuring range. The detection of the dust particle 15 assigned to one measuring range signals to the short diode. If the particle 15 and further the flow velocity is predetermined by winding the corresponding dusty shape and density of the dust particles, then the particle size of the dust particles 15 can be directly determined. Accordingly, a different range of particle sizes can be assigned to each measurement range. i5.

In addition, a multimode counter (not shown) can be associated with each LED. numerical indication. Using one or more counters, the total number of dust particles i5 for the measuring range, or all, is determined. Therefore, it is possible to have a q * s * z d e i e n i e r r s, c 11 o i s i z i c i 5.

Further, the sensing device 59 has acoustic sensing elements which are not shown. Acoustic sensing has the advantage that higher resolution limits are feasible. With the acoustic sensing of the detected dust particles 15, a resolution limit of up to 10,000 particles per second can be realized.

By means of acoustic sensing elements, in addition to the number of s, the size of the dust particles to be trapped, their material properties can also be sensed. The frequency of the dust particles 15 is another criterion of the material properties of the dust particles 15. Experiments have shown that a high frequency can be detected for hard dust particles 15 and a low measurement signal 51 for soft dust particles 15. Soft dust particles 15 correspond to a dark tone, hard dust particles 15 correspond to a high acoustic sensing tone. Large dust. the particles 15 are sensed in a loud tone and the small dust particles 15 are a silent tone. The number of perceived dust particles 15 'is sensed by the frequency of the acoustic signals.

Further, a touch sensor element (not shown) is associated with the sensing device 59. By means of such a contact unit, the measuring signals 51 are converted into mechanical vibrations or pulses.

Furthermore, the measurement circuit 18 has an oscilloscope connection 44 or the like by means of which the detected peak value signals 58 can be directly shown.

In addition, the measuring signals 51 of the vacuum cleaner can be reduced. The screening of the dust particles 15 is used to control and control the suction of the dust vacuum cleaner is regulated, or the controlled dust portions of the particles 15, and the power is detected according to the number of detectors15. With a small number of dust i. vacuum cleaner, p 1 rac * huzoskri, i, ø i iz its engine power.

rv

Claims (1)

  1. PATENT
    1. A method for detecting particles in a two-phase flow, in particular, for detecting airborne dust, e.g. characterized in that at least a part of the two-phase current is allowed to fall on the 'piezoelectric' sensor (10) and a signal (charge signal 88) is produced, depending on the number and / or type of particles detected.
    Method according to claim 1, characterized in that the signal produced is sensed optically and / or acoustically and / or in contact.
    5. The method of claim 1 or claim S, wherein the signal is processed prior to scanning.
    Method according to one or more of Claims 1 to 3, characterized in that the signal for the removal of the interfering signals (31), in particular for the removal of the measurement noise, the signal of 4).
    filter (filter
    Method according to one or more of Claims 1 to 4, characterized in that the filter signal (34) is transformed into a peak value signal (36) and fed to the scanning device (39) for qualitative and / or quantitative detection.
    Method according to one or more of Claims 1 to 5, characterized in that the piezoelectric sensor (10 SS) charge signal (88) is applied to the voltage monitor (39) to extend the service life or trip time.
    7. Method, control or control of vacuum cleaner; characterized in that at least a part of the two-phase current is allowed to fall on the sand-electric sensor (10, 33) and a signal (charge signal (38)) is produced, depending on the number and / or type of dust The particle (13) and the signal (the charge signal (38)) are used to control or control the suction power of the vacuum cleaner.
    Method according to claim 7, characterized in that the signal is used to control or control the power of the vacuum cleaner motor.
    Θ. Method according to claim 7 or 8, characterized in that the charge signal (38) for removing the interfering signals (53) is filtered (filter signal (34)), then the filter signal (34) is transformed into a signal (36) peak values and this is used to control or control the vacuum cleaner.
    10. Dust vacuum cleaners, characterized in that they have at least one transducer (10, 33) which is subjected to at least part of a two-phase flow and at least one sensing device (39) for qualitatively and / or quantitatively sensing the signal (a charge signal (38)) produced by a piezoelectric sensor (10, 33).
    Dust vacuum cleaner according to claim 10, characterized in that the piezoelectric sensor (10, 83) is arranged in a two-phase flow path (11).
    Dust vacuum cleaner according to claim 10 or 11, characterized in that the piezoelectric sensor (10, 33) is arranged at an angle to the flow direction (arrow (14)).
    Dust vacuum cleaner according to one or more of Claims 10 to 18, characterized in that the piezoelectric sensor (10, 33) is arranged in the constriction (33) of the flow path (11).
    14. Vacuum cleaner pr oh u by one or more with claims 10 to 13 v y s a n u j u c i WITH & that the ace foil elec (86) shank sensor (10, 83) is created 15. Vacuum cleaner pr achu according to, one or more from claims 10 to i 3 , v y z n a, č u j ú c i s a that es es Lekt River Chidio (10, 83) is created
    measured as crystal (88).
    Dust vacuum cleaner according to one or more of Claims 10 to 15, characterized in that the piezoelectric sensor (10, 38) is located directly or indirectly in the flow path (11).
    Dust vacuum cleaner according to one or more of claims 10 to 16, characterized in that it has a measuring connection (18) for signal processing (charge signal (38)).
    Dust vacuum cleaner according to claim 17, characterized in that the measuring circuit (18) has a high-pass filter for filtering the charge signal (88) and a peak value meter (35) for determining the peak signal (36). values.
    Dust vacuum cleaner according to one of Claims 10 to 11, characterized in that the performance of the suction is controllable depending on the charge signal (88).
    WO 95/30887
    25 22 23
SK143396A 1994-05-10 1995-04-22 Method of detecting particles in a two-phase stream, vacuum cleaner and a method of controlling or adjusting a vacuum cleaner SK143396A3 (en)

Priority Applications (3)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
DE4416428 1994-05-10
DE19944425291 DE4425291A1 (en) 1994-05-10 1994-07-16 A method for detecting particles in a 2-phase flow, vacuum cleaners and methods for controlling a vacuum cleaner
PCT/EP1995/001529 WO1995030887A1 (en) 1994-05-10 1995-04-22 Method of detecting particles in a two-phase stream, vacuum cleaner and a method of controlling or adjusting a vacuum cleaner

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
SK143396A3 true SK143396A3 (en) 1997-09-10

Family

ID=25936463

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
SK143396A SK143396A3 (en) 1994-05-10 1995-04-22 Method of detecting particles in a two-phase stream, vacuum cleaner and a method of controlling or adjusting a vacuum cleaner

Country Status (9)

Country Link
EP (1) EP0759157B1 (en)
AT (1) AT182006T (en)
AU (1) AU2447795A (en)
CZ (1) CZ321296A3 (en)
ES (1) ES2134475T3 (en)
HU (1) HUT75482A (en)
PL (1) PL317056A1 (en)
SK (1) SK143396A3 (en)
WO (1) WO1995030887A1 (en)

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Also Published As

Publication number Publication date
WO1995030887A1 (en) 1995-11-16
CZ321296A3 (en) 1997-11-12
AU2447795A (en) 1995-11-29
HUT75482A (en) 1997-05-28
AT182006T (en) 1999-07-15
HU9603049D0 (en) 1997-01-28
PL317056A1 (en) 1997-03-03
EP0759157B1 (en) 1999-07-07
ES2134475T3 (en) 1999-10-01
EP0759157A1 (en) 1997-02-26

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