RU2331112C2 - Slot machine with the device of giving lottery tickets - Google Patents

Slot machine with the device of giving lottery tickets Download PDF

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Publication number
RU2331112C2
RU2331112C2 RU2005108664/09A RU2005108664A RU2331112C2 RU 2331112 C2 RU2331112 C2 RU 2331112C2 RU 2005108664/09 A RU2005108664/09 A RU 2005108664/09A RU 2005108664 A RU2005108664 A RU 2005108664A RU 2331112 C2 RU2331112 C2 RU 2331112C2
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RU
Russia
Prior art keywords
lottery
gaming
game
controller
player
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Application number
RU2005108664/09A
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Russian (ru)
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RU2005108664A (en
Inventor
Стивен Дж. ЛЕМЭЙ (US)
Стивен Дж. ЛЕМЭЙ
Двэйн Райли НЕЛЬСОН (US)
Двэйн Райли НЕЛЬСОН
Original Assignee
Ай Джи Ти
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Priority to US10/230,604 priority Critical patent/US20030186734A1/en
Priority to US10/230,604 priority
Application filed by Ай Джи Ти filed Critical Ай Джи Ти
Publication of RU2005108664A publication Critical patent/RU2005108664A/en
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Publication of RU2331112C2 publication Critical patent/RU2331112C2/en

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    • GPHYSICS
    • G07CHECKING-DEVICES
    • G07FCOIN-FREED OR LIKE APPARATUS
    • G07F17/00Coin-freed apparatus for hiring articles; Coin-freed facilities or services
    • G07F17/32Coin-freed apparatus for hiring articles; Coin-freed facilities or services for games, toys, sports, or amusements
    • GPHYSICS
    • G07CHECKING-DEVICES
    • G07FCOIN-FREED OR LIKE APPARATUS
    • G07F17/00Coin-freed apparatus for hiring articles; Coin-freed facilities or services
    • G07F17/32Coin-freed apparatus for hiring articles; Coin-freed facilities or services for games, toys, sports, or amusements
    • G07F17/3202Hardware aspects of a gaming system, e.g. components, construction, architecture thereof
    • GPHYSICS
    • G07CHECKING-DEVICES
    • G07FCOIN-FREED OR LIKE APPARATUS
    • G07F17/00Coin-freed apparatus for hiring articles; Coin-freed facilities or services
    • G07F17/32Coin-freed apparatus for hiring articles; Coin-freed facilities or services for games, toys, sports, or amusements
    • G07F17/3244Payment aspects of a gaming system, e.g. payment schemes, setting payout ratio, bonus or consolation prizes
    • G07F17/3248Payment aspects of a gaming system, e.g. payment schemes, setting payout ratio, bonus or consolation prizes involving non-monetary media of fixed value, e.g. casino chips of fixed value
    • GPHYSICS
    • G07CHECKING-DEVICES
    • G07FCOIN-FREED OR LIKE APPARATUS
    • G07F17/00Coin-freed apparatus for hiring articles; Coin-freed facilities or services
    • G07F17/32Coin-freed apparatus for hiring articles; Coin-freed facilities or services for games, toys, sports, or amusements
    • G07F17/326Game play aspects of gaming systems
    • G07F17/3262Player actions which determine the course of the game, e.g. selecting a prize to be won, outcome to be achieved, game to be played
    • GPHYSICS
    • G07CHECKING-DEVICES
    • G07FCOIN-FREED OR LIKE APPARATUS
    • G07F17/00Coin-freed apparatus for hiring articles; Coin-freed facilities or services
    • G07F17/42Coin-freed apparatus for hiring articles; Coin-freed facilities or services for ticket printing or like apparatus, e.g. apparatus for dispensing of printed paper tickets or payment cards

Abstract

FIELD: physics.
SUBSTANCE: invention relates to slot machines with different accessory functions. The slot machine can have a printer or a device for giving out lottery tickets, capable of providing a player with lottery tickets. At different moments of time in the process of functioning of the slot machine, the slot machine through prompts on the screen can request the player whether it is desirable for him/her to get lottery tickets, which are then given by the slot machine to the player. Lottery tickets can be tickets for a lottery inside a casino, a lottery between casinos, state lotteries or a lottery of several states. The payment for the lottery can be deducted from the sum that the player has in the slot machine.
EFFECT: expansion of the functional possibilities of slot machines due to integrating them into the lottery system.
43 cl, 18 dwg.

Description

Related Application Details

This application is an application filed in partial continuation of US patent application No. 10 / 097,507, dated March 12, 2002.

State of the art

There are various types of gaming machines, such as, for example, slot machines, video poker machines, video game machines, blackjack machines, and the like. Usually, taking into account the various preferences of customers, casinos and other entertainment complexes have numerous electronic slot machines of various types. For example, a casino may have a variety of electronic gaming machines, which may, although not necessarily, be connected to each other through a network.

In one embodiment, lotteries, which may be managed by state or other public or private organizations, are arranged in the form of various procedures called lotteries. For example, a state lottery may have a weekly or daily draw and, therefore, there is a chance of a new lottery winner every week or every day, respectively. Before the lottery draw, lottery tickets that bear numbers, letters or other signs are sold to those who wish to participate in the specified lottery draw. After all tickets for the drawing have been sold, balls, tags or other objects with numbers, letters or other signs printed on them are randomly drawn from the drum or from several reels. After being pulled out of the drum or drums, the marks on each of the items are recorded, and the holder of the ticket having the marks corresponding to each of the marks on the items drawn from the drum or drums becomes the winner. For example, a ticket with the numbers 11-24-35-46-52 printed on it will be a winning ticket if five items are pulled from a drum or several reels, each of which has one of the signs 11, 24, 35, 46 and 52.

For draws with lower payouts, tickets usually have fewer characters and fewer items are pulled from the drum. In addition, for draws with lower payout amounts, the number of possible characters can be quite small (for example, from 1 to 10). For example, a daily lottery, in which money of the order of thousands or tens of thousands of dollars can be paid out, can have only four signs (for example, from 1 to 10) printed on each ticket, and items that are marked with signs can be drawn from one and the same drum.

Conversely, for raffles with higher payout amounts, there may be many marks on the ticket, each of the ticket marks must coincide with the marks on the items drawn from the drum or several reels. Draws with higher payouts can have a large number of possible signs (for example, from 1 to 50 or from 1 to 100). For example, a Powerball® type lottery, which is a lottery for up to several states, can have six or more characters (for example, 1 to 49) on a ticket and can have a payout amount of the order of millions of dollars. In addition, tickets for large-scale lotteries, such as the Powerball® lottery, can also have an additional marking or mark (for example, a Powerball® number), which must coincide with the marking or mark on an item pulled from a special drum.

Along with lotteries that determine the winner based on the outcome of the draw, many states or other public or private organizations also provide instant lottery tickets, commonly referred to as “clear”. Instant lottery is carried out by pre-printing tickets that contain the necessary information about whether the ticket is a winning one. The information may be coated with opaque material that may be cleared from the ticket to open the information. Winning information is usually displayed in numerical form or by using other signs that allow the player to conclude whether he won. The player usually concludes whether he won by evaluating a combination of several characters. For example, in an Illinois Change to Go® instant lottery, a player is required to combine six different money values. If the combined value values add up to more than $ 1.00, then the player wins the prize printed on the ticket. When buying a ticket, information about the win and prize is obscured by opaque material until the material is removed. The varieties of games using the “clear” technology are endless, and in addition, various types of characters can be used.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

In one aspect, the invention is directed to a gaming device comprising a display module capable of generating video images, a value input device, and a controller operatively coupled to a display module and a value input device. The controller further comprises a processor and a memory operatively coupled to the processor, the controller being programmed to allow a player to place a bet and cause generation of a video image on a display module, where the video image represents a game. The controller is programmed to determine, after displaying the video image, the value of the payout associated with the outcome of the game represented by said video image. The gaming device further comprises a lottery ticket issuing device programmable for dispensing lottery tickets that bear lottery signs generated in response to a signal received from the controller. Additional aspects of the invention are defined by the claims.

Brief Description of the Drawings

The invention is further explained in the description of specific variants of its embodiment with reference to the drawings, in which:

FIG. 1 is a block diagram of an embodiment of a gaming system,

FIG. 2 is a general view of an embodiment of one of the game modules schematically shown in FIG. one,

FIG. 2A is an embodiment of a control panel for a gaming module,

FIG. 3 is a block diagram of the electronic components of the gaming module of FIG. 2

FIG. 4 is a block diagram of an embodiment of a main routine that can be executed during operation of one or more game modules,

FIG. 5 is a block diagram of an alternative embodiment of a main routine that may be executed during operation of one or more game modules,

FIG. 6 is an embodiment of a visual display that may be displayed during execution of the video poker routine of FIG. 8,

FIG. 7 is an embodiment of a visual display that may be displayed during execution of the video blackjack routine of FIG. 9,

FIG. 8 is a block diagram of an embodiment of a video poker routine that may be executed by one or more game modules,

FIG. 9 is a block diagram of an embodiment of a video blackjack routine that may be executed by one or more game modules,

FIG. 10 is an embodiment of a visual display that may be displayed during execution of a slot game routine of FIG. 12,

FIG. 11 is an embodiment of a visual display that may be displayed during the execution of the video subroutine of FIG. 13,

FIG. 12 is a block diagram of an embodiment of a slot game routine that may be executed by one or more game modules,

FIG. 13 is a block diagram of an embodiment of a video cassette routine that can be executed by one or more game modules,

FIG. 14 is an embodiment of a visual display that may be displayed during the execution of the video bingo routine of FIG. fifteen,

FIG. 15 is a block diagram of an embodiment of a video bingo routine that may be executed by one or more game modules,

FIG. 16 is a block diagram of a lottery ticket subroutine that can be executed by one or more game modules,

FIG. 17 is a block diagram of a lottery ticket subroutine that can be executed by one or more game modules,

FIG. 18 is a block diagram of a lottery ticket redemption routine that may be executed by one or more game modules.

Detailed Description of Preferred Embodiments

Although the following is a detailed description of many different embodiments of the invention, it should be understood that the actual scope of the invention is defined by the claims set forth at the end of the present patent description. The detailed description should be construed only as illustrative, which does not describe every possible embodiment of the invention, since a description of each possible embodiment would be impossible or impossible. Various alternative embodiments may be implemented using either modern technologies or technologies developed after the date of registration of this patent, which will also fall within the scope of the claims defining the invention.

It should also be clear that unless the term is explicitly defined in this patent using the sentence: “the term used here '' should mean here ..." or a similar sentence, there is no intention to limit the meaning of the term either explicitly or indirectly beyond its simple or ordinary meaning, and such a term should not be interpreted as limiting the scope of the invention on the basis of any statement made in any section of the patent (other than the language of the claims). To the extent that any term cited in the claims is referred to in the present patent in accordance with a single meaning, this is done only for clarity and not to be misleading, and it is not meant that such a term of the claims is limited by an implicit meaning or otherwise , this single meaning. Finally, unless an element of a claim is defined by means of a “means” and function without a detailed description of any structure, it is not intended that the scope of any element of a claim should be interpreted based on the application of 35 U.S.C. § 112, sixth paragraph.

As shown in FIG. 1, the casino gaming system 10 may comprise a first group or network 12 of casino gaming modules 20 operably connected to a network computer 22 via a network data line or bus 24. The casino gaming system 10 may comprise a second group or network 26 of casino gaming modules 30 connected to the network computer 32 via a network data line or bus 34. The first and second gaming networks 12, 26 can be operatively connected to each other via a network 40, which may include, for example, the Internet, wide area network (WAN) or local area network et (LAN), via communication lines 42 and 44 of the first and second networks.

A first network 12 of gaming modules 20 may be provided in a first casino, and a second network 26 of gaming modules 30 may be provided in a second casino located in a separate geographical location relative to the first casino. For example, two casinos may be located in different areas of the same city or may be located in different states. Network 40 may comprise a plurality of networked computers or servers (not shown), each of which may be operatively connected to others. In cases where the network 40 contains the Internet, data can be exchanged over communication lines 42 and 44 via the Internet communication protocol. In other examples, network 40 may be, but is not limited to, a private and / or specialized network, a traditional lottery network, a casino network, or a financial network. Likewise, other types of protocols can be used for communication over communication lines 42, 44, including, but not limited to, specialized serial communication protocols.

The network computer 22 may be a server computer and may be provided for accumulating and analyzing data related to the operation of the game modules 20. For example, the network computer 22 may continuously receive data from each of the game modules 20 characterizing dollar amounts or the number of bets made on each of game modules 20, data characterizing how much each of the game modules 20 pays wins, data related to the identification or gaming habits of players playing on each of the game modules 20, and the like. The network computer 32 may be a server computer and may be used to perform the same or different functions with respect to the gaming modules 30 as the network computer 22 described above.

A player tracking module 45, which may be located in or adjacent to the game module 20, may be used to exchange lottery information between the lottery system 46 and the game module 20. The lottery system 46 may comprise several components (not shown), including a controller, which may comprise program memory, microcontroller or microprocessor, random access memory (RAM) and input / output circuit (I / O), all of which can be interconnected via an address bus / data bus. Professionals should be clear that the controller may contain additional microprocessors. Similarly, the controller memory may contain multiple RAM and multiple memory programs. It should also be understood that an I / O circuit may contain several different types of I / O circuits. RAM and memory programs can be performed in the form of, for example, a semiconductor memory, magnetically readable memory and / or optically readable memory.

Along with the lottery system 46, the host system or network computer 22 may be associated with various game modules 20. Due to the fact that the game modules 20 can be manufactured by different manufacturers, the game modules 20 and the host system 22 may be incompatible, and therefore difficulties may arise. exchange of information. To solve the communication problems, the player tracking module 45 can be integrated into the network 12, 26 and 40, thereby providing, among other possibilities, the possibility of establishing communication between the game modules 20 and 30 and the network computers 22 and 32. The player tracking module 45 can be implemented as a physical device on the game module 20 or can be performed as a physical device in the composition of the game module 20.

In another example, the network computer 22 may be able to communicate directly with the gaming module 20, and the gaming module 20 may have a virtual player tracking system 47 associated therewith, as shown in FIG. 3. An illustrative virtual player tracking system 47, such as developed by the assignee of this patent, is disclosed in US Patent Application No. 09/642192 on “A Slot Machine with Virtual Player Tracking and Related Services” of August 18, 2000, incorporated herein by reference. The virtual player tracking system 47 can perform a wide range of functions. For example, the virtual player tracking system 47 enables printing of tickets authorized by the host system 22 and containing individual authorization numbers. Through the use of virtual player tracking systems 47, the game module 20 can exchange the necessary information with the host system, including, for example, authorization, verification and sign information, to provide security and efficient distribution of lottery tickets from the game modules 20. As shown in FIG. 3, the virtual player tracking system 47 may optionally or alternatively be located in the gaming module 20, however, the virtual player tracking system 47 may reside in one or more network computers 22, 32. In yet another embodiment, the lottery system 46 may communicate directly with the gaming module 20 so that the gaming module 20 essentially becomes a lottery terminal, providing the issuance of lottery tickets.

Although each network 12, 26 shown in FIG. 1 contains one network computer 22, 23, four game modules 20, 30 and four player tracking modules 45, it should be understood that a different number of computers, game modules and tracking devices can be used. For example, the network 12 may contain many network computers 22 and tens or hundreds of game modules 20, interconnected by a data transmission line 24. Data line 24 may be provided in the form of a dedicated wired communication line or a wireless communication line. Although the data line 24 is shown as one data line 24, it may comprise a plurality of data lines.

Also in FIG. 1 shows blocks of a lottery system 46, which represent different places where each network 12, 26 can be connected to a lottery system 46. For example, a lottery system 46 can be connected to any of various network computers 22, 23, to a network 40 or a gaming module 20. For example, the lottery system 46 may comprise a lottery system of a state or many states. Such lottery systems can coordinate lottery drawings, provide information exchange related to prize numbers, monitor the distribution of prizes and perform any relevant functions.

Lottery system 46 may also include lottery systems between casinos and within casinos. For example, a lottery system within a casino may be responsible for lotteries in the casino where the lottery system 46 is located. It is easy to understand that a casino can conduct a lottery having lotteries that take place at regular intervals, for example, every hour, twice a day, or any other suitable interval. Additionally, a plurality of casinos may cooperate to implement an inter-casino lottery system in which a plurality of casinos sell raffle tickets and support one draw or multiple draws to determine the numbers that determine the winning ticket.

FIG. 2 depicts a general view of one possible embodiment of one or more of the game modules 20. Although the following description relates to the design of the game modules 20, it should be understood that the game modules 30 may also have the same structure as the game modules 20 described below. It should be understood that the design of one or more gaming modules 20 may differ from the design of other gaming modules 20 and that the design of one or more gaming modules 30 may differ from the design of other gaming modules 30. Each gaming module 20 may be any type of casino gaming module and may have various structures and modes of action. For purposes of illustration, various constructions of game modules 20 are described below, but it should be understood that various other constructions may be used.

As shown in FIG. 2, the casino gaming module 20 may comprise a cabinet or cabinet 50 and one or more input / output devices, which may have a coin acceptor 52, a paper money receiver 54, a ticket reader / printer 56, a lottery ticket dispenser 57, and a card reader 58 which can be used to enter the value in the gaming module 20. In practice, the reader / ticket printer 56 can be implemented as a ticket printer and / or bill validator that use Sya in the modern casino system EZ Pay. The value input device may include any device that can receive a value from a consumer. As used herein, the term “value” may encompass gambling tokens, coins, paper money, ticket vouchers, credit or debit cards, and any other value characterizing object.

With a ticket reader / printer 56, it can be used as a device for verifying the authenticity of bills and / or can be used to read, print, or otherwise encode lottery tickets that can be purchased by the user. For example, after winning a Jackpot game or a card game, the game module 20 through the display unit 70 may ask the user whether it is desirable for him to purchase lottery tickets. After indicating that the user wants to purchase lottery tickets, the ticket reader / printer 56 may print a ticket having random or user-defined lottery numbers on it. The fee associated with the purchased lottery tickets can be deducted from the credits that the user has in the game module 20. It is easy to understand that the lottery tickets can be lottery tickets for one or several states. In addition, the lottery tickets can be lottery tickets for the lottery within the casino or between the casinos in which the casino supports the lottery on a regular basis (for example, daily or hourly). The functionality of the ticket and printer can be combined into a single ticket reader / printer 56 or, alternatively, can be implemented in a separate physical device, one of which reads tickets and the other prints tickets.

In another example, the game module 20 and the ticket reader / printer 56 may be adapted to redeem and / or legalize lottery tickets. A player who has already received a lottery ticket can check if the lottery ticket is winning and / or how much the lottery ticket won. Similarly, the player can redeem the ticket value on the game module 20. For example, the player can insert the lottery ticket into the ticket reader / printer 56 to determine if the ticket is a winning one. If the lottery ticket is a winning one, the player may be given the option of redeeming the value of the lottery ticket. If the player decides not to redeem the value of the lottery ticket, then the ticket reader / printer 56 may return the lottery ticket to the player. However, if the player decides to redeem the value of the lottery ticket, then the player may be prompted through the game module 20 through the display 70 or otherwise press a button, for example, the "cash out" button. After pressing the button, the value of the lottery ticket can be added to the player’s credit, or to the value in the game module 20, or the player may decide not to play on the game module 20, but rather pay off the credits for another value, such as cash or vouchers. In another example, the game module 20 may comprise a separate lottery ticket issuing device 57 for dispensing lottery tickets. The lottery ticket issuing device 57 can perform all the functions that the ticket reader / printer 56 can perform.

Alternatively or additionally, a ticket reader / printer 56 may be used to read and / or print or otherly encode ticket vouchers 60. Ticket vouchers 60 may be paper or contain other printable or encoded material and may have one or more of the following types of information printed or encoded on them: the name of the casino, type of ticket voucher, authentication number, barcode with management and / or protection data, date or time of issue of the ticket voucher, instructions Is redemption restrictions, description of payment and any other information that may be necessary or desirable. Various types of ticket vouchers can be used, such as prize ticket vouchers, pay-off ticket vouchers, casino ticket voucher chips, additional game ticket vouchers, commodity ticket vouchers, restaurant ticket vouchers, spectacle ticket vouchers, etc. Ticket vouchers 60 may be printed using optically readable material, such as ink, or the data on ticket vouchers 60 may be magnetically encoded. The ticket reader / printer 56 can either read or print ticket vouchers 60, or it can only read, or only print, or encode ticket vouchers 60. For example, in the latter case, some of the game modules 20 may have a reader / printer 56 tickets, which can be used to print ticket vouchers 60, which should then be used by the player in other game modules 20 having a reader / printer 56 tickets.

With a card reader 58, it can include any type of card reader, such as a magnetic card reader or optical card reader, or can be used to read data from cards offered by a player, such as a credit card or player tracking card. If the card reader 58 is provided for tracking players, it can be used to read data from cards or write data to player tracking cards, which can store data representing a player’s identity, casino identity, player’s playing habits, and the like. Like the card reader 58, other gaming devices associated with the gaming module 20 may be used for many purposes, including but not limited to a ticket reader / printer 56 and a display module 70. For example, the display module 70 may be a liquid crystal display or a cathode ray tube, and the display module 70 may perform touch screen functions that allow the display module to be used in various ways. More specifically, the touch screen of the display module 70 can be used to select the type of game to play on the game module 20, if necessary, it can be used to select a set of lottery numbers, or the game module 20 can be adapted to function as an ATM, in which the touch screen display module 70 may function as an ATM keypad. To provide flexibility in the use of various devices, the gaming module 20 may include a peripheral control device.

Game module 20 may include one or more speakers 62, coin payout tray 64, input control panel 66 and color video monitor module 70 for displaying images related to a game or games provided by game module 20. Loudspeakers 62 may generate sounds representing sound images such as the noise of the spinning reel of a slot machine, the voice of a dealer, music, messages or any other sound image related to a casino game. The input control panel 66 may be provided with a plurality of buttons or touch screen portions that the player can click to select games, bet, select lottery numbers or information, decide on a game, and the like.

FIG. 2A illustrates one possible embodiment of a control panel 66 that can be used in cases where the gaming module 20 is a slot machine having a plurality of mechanical or virtual reels. In FIG. 2A, the control panel 66 may have a Payout View button 72, which, when activated, causes the display module 70 to generate one or more display screen images showing odds or payout information for a game or games provided by the gaming module 20. The term “button” as used herein covers any device that allows the player to make an input, such as, for example, an input device that must be activated in order to select an input or a portion of the display that the player can simply touch, for example, switch, touch screen, etc. The control panel 66 may have a Cash Out button 74 that can be activated when the player decides to end the game on the game module 20, while the game module 20 can return the amount to the player, for example, returning several coins to the player through the coin payout tray 64.

The control panel 66 may also have a “Lottery Purchase” button 73, which can be activated when the player decides to end the game on the game module 20, while the game module 20 can issue the desired number of lottery tickets upon request of the user. Alternatively, when the player decides to end the game on the game module 20, the player may press the Cash Out button 74, after which the player may be offered several options, including whether to pay off all or part of the redeemable lottery ticket values. The player can then press the button "Purchase lottery" to redeem all or part of the redeemable value of the lottery tickets.

If the game module 20 provides the ability to play on a slot machine having a plurality of reels and a plurality of paylines that define winning combinations of reel symbols, the control panel 66 may be provided with a plurality of selection buttons 76, each of which allows the player to select different payline numbers before spinning the reels. For example, 5 buttons 76 may be provided, each of which may allow the player to select one, three, five, seven, or nine paylines. Additionally, the control panel 66 may be provided with a plurality of selection buttons 78, each of which allows the player to determine a bet amount for each selected pay line. For example, if the smallest bet accepted by game module 20 is a quarter dollar ($ 0.25), then game module 20 may be provided with five selection buttons 78, each of which may allow the player to choose one, two, three, four or five quarters for a bet for each selected payline. In this case, if the player activated button 76 "5" (meaning that five pay lines should participate in the game on the next spin of the reels), and then activated button 78 "3" (meaning that three pay lines should be placed on each pay line coins), then the full rate would be $ 3.75 (assuming the minimum rate was $ 0.25).

The control panel 66 may have a button "Maximum bet" 80, allowing the player to make the maximum bet allowed for this game. In the above example, up to nine paylines were provided and up to five quarters or $ 11.25 could be put on each selected pay line. The control panel 66 may have a “Rotate” button 82, allowing the player to initiate the rotation of the reels of the slot machine after the bet has been placed.

In FIG. 2A shows a rectangle around buttons 72, 74, 76, 78, 80, 82. It should be understood that for ease of reference, the rectangle simply indicates the area in which buttons 72, 74, 76, 78, 80, 82 can be located. Therefore, the term “control panel” should not be interpreted as a panel or plate separate from the housing 50 of the game module 20, and the term “control panel” may encompass a plurality or group of player-activated buttons.

Although a possible control panel 66 has been described above, it should be understood that various other buttons may be used in the control panel 66 and that the particular buttons used may depend on a game or games that can be played on the game module 20. Although the control panel 66 is shown separate from of the display unit 70, it should be understood that the control panel 66 may be generated by the display unit 70. In this case, each of the buttons of the control panel 66 may be a color area generated by the display unit 70, and some type of mechanism for detecting the touch of each of the buttons, such as a touch screen, may be associated with the display unit 70.

Game Module Electronics

FIG. 3 is a block diagram of a set of components that can be included in the game module 20. As shown in FIG. 3, the game module 20 comprises a controller 100, which may comprise a program memory 102, a microcontroller or microprocessor 104, an RAM 106, and an input / output (I / O) circuit 108, all of which can be interconnected via an address / data bus 110 It should be understood that although only one microprocessor 104 is shown, the controller 100 may include additional microprocessors. Similarly, the memory of the controller 100 may comprise a plurality of RAM 106 and a plurality of program memories 102. Although the input / output circuitry 108 is shown as one unit, it should be understood that the input / output circuitry 108 may include several different types of input / output circuitry. The RAM 104 and the memory 102 of the programs can be executed, for example, as a semiconductor memory, magnetically readable memory and / or optically readable memory.

FIG. 3 illustrates that a player tracking module 45, a control panel 66, a display 70, a coin acceptor 52, a bill acceptor 54, a card reader 58, and a ticket reader / printer 56 can be operatively connected to an input / output circuit 108, each of which connected by unidirectional or bidirectional one or more data lines, which may depend on the design of the component used. The loudspeaker 62 may be operatively coupled to a sound generation circuit 112, which may comprise a speech and sound synthesis circuit or may comprise a control circuit. Sound generating circuit 112 may be coupled to input / output circuitry 108.

As shown in FIG. 3, components 45, 52, 54, 56, 58, 66, 70, 112 may be connected to the input / output circuit 108 via an appropriate forward link or conductor. Various connection schemes may be used. For example, one or more of the components shown in FIG. 3 can be connected to an input / output circuit 108 via a shared bus or other data line that is shared by a set of components. In addition, some of the components can be directly connected to the microprocessor 104 without passing through the input / output circuit 108.

The general principle of the game module

One of the ways in which one or more game modules 20 (and one or more game modules 30) can act is described below in connection with a set of procedural flowcharts representing several parts or routines of one or more computer programs that can be stored in one or several storage devices of the controller 100. Computer programs or parts thereof can be stored remotely outside the game module 20 and can control the action of the game module 20 from a remote location. Such remote control may be facilitated by the use of a wireless connection or an Internet interface that connects the game module 20 to a remote computer (such as, for example, one of the network computers 22, 23 shown in FIG. 1) having a memory in which parts of the computer program are stored . Parts of a computer program may be written in any high-level language, such as C, C #, C +, C ++, or the like, or in any low-level language, assembly language, or machine language. The various parts of the storage devices 102, 106 are physically and / or structurally arranged according to computer program instructions by storing parts of computer programs therein.

FIG. 4 depicts a procedural block diagram of a main operating routine that can be stored in the memory of controller 100. As shown in FIG. 4, the main routine 200 starts an action in block 202, during which a series of demonstration actions can be carried out to attract a potential casino player to play on the gaming module 20. The demonstration sequence may be performed by showing one or more video images on the display module 70 and / or generating one or more sound segments, such as speech or music, through speakers 62. The demonstration sequence may include scrolling schiysya list of games that may be played on the gaming unit 20 and / or video images of various possible games, such as video poker, video blackjack, video slots, video keno, video bingo, etc. A demo sequence may include promoting or advertising a casino property and / or a sequence of attracting a player to a game or purchasing one or more lottery games.

During the execution of the demo sequence, if the potential player made any input to the game module 20, as defined in block 204, the demo sequence can be completed, and in block 206, a game selection image may be generated on the display module 70 to allow the player to select a game available on the game module 20. The game module 20 may, in block 204, detect input in various ways. For example, the game module 20 may detect if a player has pressed a button on the game module 20; the game module 20 may determine whether the player has invested one or two coins in the game module 20; the game module 20 may determine whether the player has invested paper money in the game module 20; etc.

The image of the game selection on the display in block 206 may include, for example, a list of video games that can be played on the game module 20, and / or a visual message inviting the player to put a value in the game module 20. While a game selection image is generated on the display of the game module 20 may wait for a player to make a game choice. Immediately after selecting a game in block 208, the controller 100 can start the execution of several routines that allow you to start the selected game. For example, gaming routines may include a video poker routine 210, a video blackjack routine 212, a video slot routine 230, a videofilm routine 240, and a videobingo routine 250. At block 208, if a game selection is not made within a predetermined time, then the action may go back to block 202.

After the routines 210, 220, 230, 240, 250 are completed, which allows the player to play one of the games, block 260 can determine whether the player wants to end the game on the game module 20 or select another game. If the player wants to stop the game on the game module 20, which can be expressed, for example, by selecting the "Cash out" button or by selecting the "Buy lottery" button, control passes to blocks 261A or 261B of the lottery ticket subroutine. The lottery ticket routine blocks 261A or 261B, which are described in detail below with reference to FIG. 16 and FIG. 17, respectively, may give a hint to the user regarding the purchase of lottery tickets and issue them. Those skilled in the art will appreciate that the lottery ticket routine 261A or 261B need not be placed as shown in FIG. 4, but can fit between routines 210-250 and block 260.

Alternatively or additionally, the lottery ticket routines 261A or 261B may be used in one or more of the 210-250 routines. For example, if the lottery ticket routines 261A or 261B are in the poker routine 210 (FIG. 8), they can be anywhere between blocks 394 and 400. More specifically, the lottery ticket routines 261A or 261B can be between block 396 and block 398, so that game module 20 may encourage a player to purchase lottery tickets immediately after he has won a jackpot or card game. Consequently, a player may have one or more opportunities to buy or redeem lottery tickets within the subroutine 200 and 210. The subroutines 261A or 261B of the lottery tickets may also be located in the blackjack subroutine 220 (Fig. 9), anywhere between blocks 438 and 444. More specifically, the lottery ticket routine 261 may be between block 440 and 442, offering the player to purchase lottery tickets immediately after he has won a card game. Therefore, winning once, the player has one or more opportunities to buy or redeem lottery tickets within the subroutines 200 and 220. Similarly, subroutines 261A or 261B of lottery tickets can be between blocks 494 and 504, between blocks 578 and 584 and between blocks 640 and 646 in the routine 230 slots (FIG. 12), the routine 240 keno (FIG. 13) and the routine 250 bingo (FIG. 15), respectively. Alternatively, the lottery ticket routines 261A or 261B should be available based on an interrupt caused by pressing the “Lottery Purchase” button 73.

After the action returns to the main routine 200 from the lottery ticket routine 261A or 261B, the controller 100 may issue a value to the player in block 262 based on the outcome of the game the player was playing. Then, the action can return to block 202. If the player does not want to exit, which is determined in block 260, then the subroutine can return to block 208, where the image of the game selection on the display can again be generated, allowing the player to select another game.

Although in FIG. 4 shows five game routines, a different number of routines may be included to play a different number of games. Game module 20 can also be programmed, providing the ability to play various games.

FIG. 5 depicts a block diagram of an alternative main operating routine 300 that can be stored in the memory of the controller 100. The main routine 300 can be used for game modules 20 that are designed for only one game or for one type of game. As shown in FIG. 5, the main routine 300 may start at block 302, during which a demonstration sequence may be performed to attract a potential casino player to play on the gaming module 20. The demonstration sequence may be performed by displaying one or more video images on the display module 70, and / or generating through loudspeakers 62 one or more sound segments, such as speech or music.

When the demo sequence is executed, if the potential player has entered the game module 20, as defined in block 204, the demo sequence can be completed, and in the block 306, a game selection image may be generated on the display module 70. The image of the game selection on the display, formed in block 306, may include, for example, an image of a casino game that can be played on the game module 20, and / or a visual message prompting the player to enter a value in the game module 20. In block 308, the game module 20 may determine whether the player has requested information regarding the game, and the requested information may be shown in block 310. Block 312 may be used to determine whether the player requested the initiation of the game, and in this case, the game sub can be executed. Ramm 320. The game routine 320 could be any of the five game routines 210, 220, 230, 240, 250, or another game routine.

After the subroutine 320 is executed to allow the player to play the selected game, in block 322 it can be determined whether the player wants to leave the game on the game module 20. If the player wants to leave the game on the game module 20, which can be expressed, for example, by selecting the "Cash withdrawal" button or by selecting the "Lottery purchase" button, control passes to the lottery ticket subroutine 261A or 261B, which provides the user with the option of purchasing lottery tickets before the controller 100 issues a value to the player in Loka 324 based on the outcome of the game in which the game player. Alternatively, as discussed above, lottery tickets could be issued at any time when the button 73 "Purchase lottery" is pressed. Additional details regarding the lottery ticket routines 261A or 261B are provided as shown in FIG. 16 and FIG. 17, respectively. Alternatively or additionally, the lottery ticket routines 261A or 261B may be between blocks 312 and 322, so that the player can buy or redeem the lottery tickets in routine 300 before deciding to leave the game in block 322. Then, after block 324 is completed, the procedure can return to block 302. However, if the player does not wish to leave the game, then, as determined in block 322, the procedure may return to block 308.

Video poker

In FIG. 6 shows an illustrative display screen 350 that can be shown on the display unit 70 during execution of the video poker routine 210, schematically depicted in FIG. 4. As shown in FIG. 6, the display screen image 350 may include video images 352 of a plurality of playing cards representing a player card layout, for example, five cards. To provide the player with the ability to control a poker game, a plurality of player-selectable buttons are displayed. The buttons may contain a “Leave” button 354, located immediately below each playing card image 352, a “Cash withdrawal” button 356, a “Payout preview” button 358, a 360 “Bet on one credit” button, a 362 “Bet on maximum credits” button, and Button 364 "Distribute / Extend." The display screen image 350 may also have an area 366 in which the number of remaining credits or value is displayed. If the display module 70 is provided with a touch screen, then the buttons 354, 356, 358, 360, 362, 364 may form part of the display screen image 350. Alternatively, one or more of these buttons may be provided as part of a control panel that is provided separately from the display module 70.

FIG. 8 is a block diagram of a video poker routine 210 schematically shown in FIG. 4. As shown in FIG. 8, in block 370, the subroutine can determine whether the player requested payment information, for example, by activating the Payout View button 358, in which case, in block 372, the subroutine may cause one or more payout tables to be displayed on the display unit 70. In block 374, the subroutine can determine whether the player has made a bet, for example, by pressing the 360 “One Credit Bet” button, while in block 376, the bet data corresponding to the bet made by the player can be stored in the memory of controller 100. In block 378, the subroutine can determine whether the player has pressed the button "Bet on maximum credits" button 362, while in block 380 the bet data corresponding to the maximum allowable bet can be stored in the memory of the controller 100.

In block 382, the subroutine may determine whether a change is desired for a new card lot by the player, which may be determined by determining whether the “Deal / Extend” button 364 is activated after the bet has been placed. After that, in block 384, the "card" can be dealt out by generating an image of 352 playing cards on the display unit 70. After the cards are dealt in block 386, the subroutine can determine whether the player has activated any of the “Leave” buttons 354, while data related to which of the 352 playing card images should be “left” can be stored in the controller 100 in the block 388. If the “Deal / Extend” button 364 is activated again, as defined in block 390, each of the 352 playing card images that is not “left” can be removed from the video image 350 and replaced with a new, randomly selected 352 playing card image in the block 392.

At block 394, the subroutine can determine whether the winning combination of poker cards represented by the currently displayed image of 352 playing cards is a winning one. This determination can be made by comparing the data representing the currently displayed combination of poker cards with the data representing all possible winning combinations that can be stored in the memory of the controller 100. If a winning combination is received, the value can be determined in block 369. payouts corresponding to the winning combination. After completion in block 369, or if it is determined in block 394 that the user does not have a winning combination, control proceeds to block 398. In an alternative example, before block 398 takes control, the control may go to the lottery ticket routine 261A or 261B. In the lottery ticket routine 261A or 261B, the player is given a hint or option to purchase or redeem the lottery tickets, as shown in FIG. 16 and FIG. 17 respectively. After the completion of subroutine 261A or 261B, control passes to block 398. In block 398, the accumulated value of the player or the number of credits can be updated by subtracting the bet made by the player, or by adding the value of the payout determined in block 396 in case of a winning combination. The accumulated value or number of credits can also be displayed in the display area 366 (FIG. 6).

After block 369 is executed, control proceeds to block 400, which determines whether it is desirable for the user to exit the poker game. If the user wishes to exit the game, then the execution of the subroutine 210 ends, and control returns to the subroutine that called the subroutine 210 (for example, subroutine 200 of Fig. 4). Alternatively, if the user wishes to continue playing poker, control passes from block 400 back to block 370.

Although the video poker routine 210 is described above in connection with one five-card poker card combination, the routine 210 can be modified to allow playing other versions of poker. For example, you can play poker with seven cards or in "stud" poker. Alternatively, you can play simultaneously with several poker combinations. In this case, the game may begin by giving out one poker hand of cards, and the player may save some cards. After deciding which cards to save, the saved cards can be duplicated in many different poker combinations with the rest of the cards for each of the mentioned poker combinations determined at random.

Blackjack

In FIG. 7 shows an illustrative display screen 400, which may be shown on the display unit 70 during execution of the video blackjack routine 220, schematically shown in FIG. 4. As shown in FIG. 7, the display screen image 400 may include video images 402 pairs of playing cards representing a combination of dealer cards, with one of the cards shown open and the other closed, and video images 404 pairs of playing cards representing a combination of player cards, both of which are shown in open. The "dealer" may be a game module 20.

To enable the player to control the progress of the video blackjack, a plurality of player-selectable buttons are displayed. The buttons may contain a button 406 "Cash withdrawal", a button 408 "View payouts", a button 410 "Enough", a button 412 "Another", a button 414 "Bet on one loan" and a button 416 "Bet on a maximum loan". The image 400 of the display screen may also have an area 418, which displays the number of remaining credits or value. If the display module 70 is provided with a touch screen, then the buttons 406, 408, 410, 412, 414, 416 may form part of the image 400 of the display screen. Alternatively, one or more of these buttons may be provided as part of a control panel that is provided separately from the display module 70.

FIG. 9 is a block diagram of a video blackjack routine 220 schematically shown in FIG. 4. As shown in FIG. 9, video blackjack routine 220 may begin at block 420, where it is determined whether a player has made a bet. This can be determined, for example, by detecting the activation of either the button 414 "Bet on one loan" or the button 416 "Bet on maximum loans". In block 422, the bet data corresponding to the bet made in block 420 can be stored in the memory of the controller 100. In block 424, combinations of dealer and player cards can be “dealt” by the appearance of images 402, 404 of playing cards on the display module 70.

In block 426, the player is allowed to “take” another card, while in block 428, the player is dealt another card by displaying another playing card image 404 on the display screen image 400. If a player draws a card, then block 430 may determine if the player has "bust", i.e. excess of 21 points. If the player has no busting, then blocks 426 and 428 can be executed again to allow the player to draw another card again.

If the player decides not to take the card, then in block 432, the subroutine can determine whether the dealer should take the card. Whether the dealer takes another card is determined according to the given rules, for example, the dealer always takes a card if the dealer’s card combination is 15 or less. If the dealer takes the card, then in block 434 the dealer is issued another card by the appearance of another image 402 of the playing card in the image 400 of the display screen. At block 436, the subroutine can determine if the dealer has "bust". If the dealer has no busting, then blocks 432 and 434 can be executed again to allow the dealer to draw the card again.

If the dealer does not take the card, then in block 436 the result of the blackjack game and the corresponding payout can be determined, for example, based on that the player or dealer has a higher value of the card combination, not exceeding 21. If the player has a winning combination, then in block 440 a payout value corresponding to a winning combination can be determined. Once the value of the payout is determined in block 440, control proceeds to subroutine 220, or if block 442 determines that the player has not won, then block 442 updates the accumulated value of the player or the number of credits by subtracting the bet made by the player or by adding the value the payout value determined in block 440 if the player won. The accumulated value or number of credits may also be displayed in the display area 418 (FIG. 7). In one example, before block 442 takes control, control may go to the lottery ticket routine 261A or 261B. In the lottery ticket routine 261A or 261B, the player is given a hint or selection options to purchase or redeem the lottery tickets, as shown in FIG. 16 and FIG. 17, respectively. After the completion of routine 261A or 261B, control proceeds to block 442.

After execution of block 442, control proceeds to block 444, which determines whether the user wishes to leave the blackjack game. If the user wishes to exit the game, then control returns to the subroutine that called subroutine 220 (for example, subroutine 200 of FIG. 4). Alternatively, if block 444 determines that the user does not want to leave the blackjack game, then control passes from block 444 back to block 420, which starts the game again.

Slot game

In FIG. 10 shows an illustrative display screen 450, which may be shown on the display unit 70 during execution of the slot game routine 230, schematically shown in FIG. 4. As shown in FIG. 10, a display screen image 450 may include video images 452 of a plurality of reels of a slot machine, each of which has a plurality of reel symbols 454 associated therewith. Although the display screen image 450 shows images 452 of five reels, each of which may have three reel symbols 454 that are visible at the same time, other reel configurations may be used.

To enable the player to control the game in the slot, a plurality of player-selectable buttons are displayed. The buttons may comprise a Cash Out button 456, a plurality of payline selection buttons 460, each of which allows the player to select a different number of paylines before the reels spin, a plurality of betting buttons 462, each of which allows the player to set a bet amount for each selected paylines, button 464 "Rotation" and button 466 "Maximum bet", which allows the player to make the maximum bet.

FIG. 12 is a block diagram of a slot game routine 230 schematically shown in FIG. 10. As shown in FIG. 12, in block 470, the subroutine can determine whether the player requested payment information, for example, by activating the Payout View button 458, while in block 472, the subroutine can cause one or more payout tables to be displayed on the display unit 70. In block 474, the subroutine can determine whether the player pressed one of the payline selection buttons 460, while in block 476, data corresponding to the number of paylines selected by the player can be stored in the memory of the controller 100. In block 478, the subroutine can determine whether the player has one of the bet selection buttons 462, while in block 480 the data corresponding to the value of the bet per line can be stored in the memory of the controller 100. In block 482, the subroutine can determine whether the player has pressed the “Maximum bet” button 466, while in block 484 data one ki (which may include both payline data and data on the amount bet per line) corresponding to the maximum allowable bet may be stored in a memory controller 100.

If the “Spin” button 464 is activated by the player, as defined in block 486, then in block 488, the subroutine causes the image 452 of the reels to “spin”, simulating the appearance of a plurality of rotating mechanical reels of the slot machine. At block 490, the subroutine can determine the positions at which the drum images will stop, or the specific symbol images 454 that will be displayed when the drum images 452 stop rotation. At a block 492, the routine can stop the rotation of the drum images 452 by displaying still images of the reels 452 and images of three symbols 454 for each stopped reel image 452. Virtual reels can be stopped from left to right, from the point of view of the player, or in some other way, or in some other sequence.

The subroutine may provide a chance of a bonus game or round occurring if certain conditions are satisfied, for example, the display of a particular symbol 454 in the stopped images 452 of the reels. If the indicated prize condition is determined in block 494, then the subroutine may proceed to block 496, where the prize round is played. The bonus round may be a game other than a slot game, and other types of bonus games may be provided. If a player wins the bonus round, or receives additional credits or points in the bonus round, then the value of the prize can be determined in block 498. The value of the payout corresponding to the outcome of the game in the slot and / or prize round can be determined in block 500.

After the value of the payment is determined in block 500, control proceeds to block 502. In an alternative example, before transferring control to block 502, it may go to the lottery ticket subroutine 261A or 261B. In the lottery ticket routine 261A or 261B, the player is given a hint or option to purchase or redeem the lottery tickets, as shown in FIG. 16 and FIG. 17, respectively. After the completion of subroutine 261A or 261B, control passes to block 502. At block 502, the player’s accumulated value or number of credits can be updated by subtracting the bet made by the player or by adding the value of the payout defined in block 500 when winning the game in the slot and / or in the prize round.

After execution of block 502, control proceeds to block 504, which determines whether the user wishes to exit the slot routine 230. If the user wishes to exit the slot routine 230, control returns to the main routine from which the slot routine was called. Alternatively, if the user does not wish to exit the slot routine 230, then control passes from block 504 back to block 470.

Although the subroutine is described above as a subroutine of a virtual slot machine, in which the reels of the slot machine are represented as images on the display unit 70, instead, real reels of the slot machine that can be rotated can be used.

Video keno

In FIG. 11 is an illustrative display screen 520 that can be shown on the display module 70 when the video routine routine 240 shown schematically in FIG. 4. As shown in FIG. 11, the display screen image 520 may include video images 522 of a plurality of numbers selected by a player prior to the start of a keno game, and video images 524 of a plurality of numbers randomly selected during a keno game. Randomly selected numbers can be displayed in the grid configuration.

To provide the player with the ability to control the video game, a plurality of player-selectable buttons are displayed. The buttons may contain a button 526 "Cash withdrawal", a button 528 "View payouts", a button 530 "Bet on one loan", a button 532 "Bet on a maximum of loans", a button 534 "Choose a ticket", a button 536 "Choose a number" and a button 538 "Play." The display screen image 520 may also have an area 540 in which several remaining credits or value are displayed. If the display module 70 is provided with a touch screen, then the buttons may form part of the video image 520. Alternatively, one or more of these buttons may be provided as part of a control panel that is provided separately from the display module 70.

FIG. 13 depicts a block diagram of a video cinema routine 240 schematically shown in FIG. 4. The video subroutine 240 may be used in conjunction with one game module 20 when one player plays the video, or the video subroutine 240 may be used in conjunction with many game modules 20 when many players play the video game. In the latter case, one or more of the actions described below can be performed either by the controller 100 in each game module, or by one of the network computers 22 and 32, to which many game modules 20 are operatively connected.

As shown in FIG. 13, in block 550, the subroutine can determine whether the player requested payment information, for example, by activating the Payout View button 528, while in block 552, the subroutine can cause one or more payout tables to be displayed on the display unit 70. In block 554, the subroutine can determine whether the player has made a bet, for example, by pressing the button 530 “Bet on one credit” or the button 532 “Bet on maximum credits”, while in block 556 the bet data corresponding to the bet made by the player can be remembered in the memory of the controller 100. After the player has made a bet, in block 558, the player can select a video ticket, and in block 560, the ticket can be shown on the display screen image 520. In block 562, the player may select one or two game numbers, which may be within the range established by the casino. After selection, the player’s game numbers in block 564 can be stored in the memory of the controller 100 and in block 566 can be included in the image 522 on the display screen image 520. After some time, additional players can connect to the video game (where several players play the video game in the same game using many game modules 20).

If the video game is to start, as defined in block 568, then in block 570, a game number within the range set by the casino can be randomly selected by the controller 100 or a central computer operatively connected to the controller, for example, one of the network computers 22 32. At a block 572, a game number selected at random may be displayed on the display unit 70 and the display units 70 of other game units 20 (if any) that are participating in the same video game. At a block 574, a controller 100 (or the aforementioned central computer) provides an increment of a count tracking the number of game numbers selected at block 570.

At a block 576, the controller 100 (or one of the network computers 22, 32) may determine whether the maximum number of game numbers within the range has been selected. If not, then in block 570 another game number is randomly selected. If the maximum number of game numbers is selected, then at block 578, the controller 100 (or central computer) determines whether there are a sufficient number of matches between the game numbers selected by the player and the game numbers selected in block 570 for the player to win. The number of matches may depend on how many numbers the player has chosen and the particular video game rules used.

If there are a sufficient number of matches, then in block 580, a payout to the player for winning the game can be determined. The payout may depend on the number of matches between the game numbers selected by the player and the game numbers randomly selected in block 570.

After block 580 determines the value of the payout, control proceeds to block 582 of changing the value. In an alternative example, before transferring control to block 582, control may go to routine 261A or 261B of lottery tickets. In the lottery ticket routine 261A or 261B, the player is given a hint or option to purchase or redeem the lottery tickets, as shown in FIG. 16 and FIG. 17, respectively. After the completion of subroutine 261A or 261B, control passes to block 582. At block 582, the player’s accumulated value or number of credits can be updated by subtracting the bet made by the player and adding the payout value determined in block 580 if the video game was won. The accumulated value or number of credits may also be displayed in the display area 540 (FIG. 11).

After block 582 is executed, control proceeds to block 584, which determines whether the user wishes to exit video camera routine 240. If the user wishes to exit the video clip routine 240, control returns to the main routine from which the video clip routine 240 was called. Alternatively, if the user wishes to continue playing the video, the control from block 584 returns to block 550.

Video bingo

In FIG. 14 is an illustrative display screen 600 that can be shown on display module 70 when executing video bingo routine 250, schematically shown in FIG. 4. As shown in FIG. 14, the display screen image 600 may include one or more video images 602 of bingo cards and images of bingo numbers selected during a game. Images of 602 bingo cards may have a grid configuration.

To enable the player to control the bingo game, a plurality of player-selectable buttons are displayed. The buttons may contain a button 604 "Cash withdrawal", a button 606 "View payouts", a button 608 "Bet on one loan", a button 610 "Bet on a maximum of loans", a button 612 "Choose a card" and a button 614 "Play". The display screen image 600 may also have an area 616 in which the number of remaining credits or value is displayed. If the display module 70 is provided with a touch screen, then the buttons may form part of the video image 600. Alternatively, one or more of these buttons may be provided as part of a control panel that is provided separately from the display module 70.

FIG. 15 is a block diagram of a video bingo routine 250 schematically shown in FIG. 4. The video bingo routine 250 can be used in conjunction with one game module 20, where one player plays video bingo, or the video bingo routine 250 can be used in conjunction with many game modules 20, where many players play a single video bingo. In the latter case, one or more of the actions described below can be performed by the controller 100 in each game module 20 or by one of the network computers 22, 32 to which many game modules 20 are operatively connected.

As shown in FIG. 15, in block 620, the subroutine may determine whether the player requested payment information, for example, by activating the Payout View button 606, while in block 622, the subroutine may cause one or more payout tables to be displayed on the display unit 70. In block 624, the subroutine can determine whether the player made a bet, for example, by pressing the button 608 "Bet on one credit" or button 610 "Bet on maximum credits", while in block 626 the bet data corresponding to the bet made by the player can be stored in the memory of the controller 100.

After the player has made a bet, in block 628, the player may select a bingo card that may be randomly generated. A player may select more than one bingo card and there may be a maximum number of bingo cards that a player may select. After the start of the game, as determined in block 632, in block 634, a bingo number is randomly generated by the controller 100 or a central computer, for example, one of the network computers 22, 32. In block 636, the bingo number is displayed on the display module 70 and the display modules 70 of any of the other game modules 20 participating in the same video bingo game.

In block 638, the controller 100 (or the central computer) determines whether the player has won the video bingo game. If no player has won, then in block 634, a different number of bingo can be randomly selected. If any player has a bingo, as defined in block 638, then the subroutine may determine in block 640 whether the player playing the game module 20 won. If so, then a payout for the player can be determined in block 642. The payout may depend on the number of random numbers that were drawn out before the player won, on the total number of winners (if there were more than one player) and on the amount of money that was put on the game. Upon completion of block 642, or if block 640 determines that the user has not won, block 644 updates the accumulated value of the player or the number of credits by subtracting the bet made by the player and adding the value of the payout determined in block 642 if the video bingo game was winning. The accumulated value or number of credits may also be displayed in the display area 616 (FIG. 14). In an alternative example, control may be transferred to the lottery ticket routine 261A or 261B before transitioning to block 644. In the lottery ticket routine 261A or 261B, the player may be given a hint or option to purchase or redeem the lottery tickets, as shown in FIG. 16 and FIG. 17, respectively. Upon completion of routine 261A or 261B, control proceeds to block 644.

Lottery tickets

Illustrative flowcharts for lottery ticket routines mentioned in connection with FIG. 4 and 5 are shown in FIG. 16 and FIG. 17 at 261A or 261B, respectively. Subroutine 261A begins to operate at block 682, where the user is prompted to purchase a lottery ticket. Such an offer may be an image on the display screen of the text asking the user whether it is desirable for him to purchase a lottery ticket, or the corresponding prompt may be a flashing button, giving the user the option to receive lottery tickets. In response to the prompt, the user can show whether he wants to purchase lottery tickets.

After requesting at block 682 whether it is desirable for the user to purchase lottery tickets, control proceeds to block 684, where the indication provided by the user in response to the prompt is read. If lottery tickets are needed, then control passes from block 684 to block 686. At block 686, the user is prompted to enter the desired number of lottery tickets. After the user has entered the number of lottery tickets, control proceeds to block 688.

At a block 688, the gaming machine 20 subtracts the value of the lottery tickets from the accumulated value of the user. Essentially, block 688 offers the user tickets that the user purchases by subtracting the cost of tickets from the user's winnings. For example, if a user has $ 100 of accumulated value in the gaming machine, and a user buys ten lottery tickets at a price of one dollar each, then $ 10 will be deducted from the accumulated value of $ 100, thereby leaving the user with a cumulative value of $ 90.

After completion in block 688 and subtraction of the value of the lottery tickets from the accumulated value of the player, control proceeds to block 690.

At a block 690, the gaming machine 20 issues several tickets selected by a user at a block 686. The lottery tickets can be printed using a ticket reader / printer 56, or the tickets can be pre-printed and issued by the lottery ticket issuing device 57 of FIG. 2.

After completion in block 690, or if it is determined in block 684 that it is not desirable for the user to purchase lottery tickets, control returns to the block following the block that called routine 261A. For example, with reference to FIG. 4 and 5, then control will return to blocks 262 and 324, respectively.

Another illustrative flowchart for the lottery ticket routine mentioned in connection with FIG. 4 and 5, shown in FIG. 17 at 261B. Subroutine 261B begins to operate at block 782, where the user is prompted to purchase a lottery ticket. Such an offer may be an image on the display screen of the text asking the user whether it is desirable for him to purchase a lottery ticket, or the corresponding prompt may be a flashing button, giving the user the option to receive lottery tickets. In response to the prompt, the user can indicate whether he wants to purchase lottery tickets.

After requesting at block 782 whether it is desirable for the user to purchase lottery tickets, control proceeds to block 784, where the indication provided by the user in response to the prompt is read. If lottery tickets are needed, then control passes from block 784 to block 786. At block 786, the user is prompted to enter the desired number of lottery tickets. The number of lottery tickets that the user can receive depends on the value of the value that the user has accumulated on the game module 20, but the user can also receive additional lottery tickets by adding the value to the game module 20 if the cost of the desired lottery tickets exceeds the cost value available in the game module 20. For example, the user may be interested in receiving lottery tickets worth $ 50, but only a loan of $ 40 is available. Then the user can put an additional cost value of $ 10 in the game module 20, so that in combination with a $ 40 credit, he will receive a cost value sufficient to receive lottery tickets worth $ 50. After the user enters in block 786 the desired number of lottery tickets, control proceeds to block 788, and the subroutine asks if it is desirable for the user to enter lottery numbers for the desired lottery tickets. If the user has decided to enter the lottery numbers, control will go to block 790. At block 790, the user can enter the desired lottery numbers into the game module 20 by various means, including using the touch screen keyboard, numeric keypad, or the like. However, the user may have pre-selected lottery numbers stored on the card, such as, for example, credit card numbers or player tracking cards, which can be read by the card reader 58 of FIG. 2. After the user has entered the number of lottery tickets and preferred lottery numbers, control proceeds to block 792.

If the user has decided not to enter the lottery numbers in block 788, then control passes to block 794, where the controller 100 is programmed to either receive lottery numbers from the lottery system 46, or the controller 100 is programmed to independently generate lottery numbers. If the controller 100 is programmed to generate lottery numbers, control proceeds to block 796. At block 796, the controller 100 may generate one or more sets of random or pseudo random lottery numbers for each of the lottery tickets. If the controller 100 is programmed to receive lottery numbers from the lottery system 46, then control passes to block 798. At block 798, the volumes and types of data transmitted between the game module 20 and the lottery system 46 can vary significantly. Different states and casinos may have local rules or systems, thereby determining the amount or type of data that can be transferred between this gaming module 20 and the lottery system 46. For example, the lottery system 46 under the control of the gaming module 20 may randomly generate lottery numbers. However, the game module 20 may store one or more sets of lottery numbers provided by the lottery system 46 and use the stored numbers as necessary. Similarly, there may be one or more intermediate devices or systems through which lottery numbers can be transmitted and / or stored. For example, lottery numbers can be transmitted and stored in a network server or in a host system, such as, for example, a network computer 22, where lottery numbers can be stored until the game module 20 is needed.

In block 792, the game module 20 subtracts the value of the lottery tickets from the accumulated value of the user. Essentially, block 792 charges the user for tickets that the user purchases by subtracting the cost of tickets from the user's winnings. For example, if a user has $ 100 of accumulated value in the gaming machine, and a user buys ten lottery tickets at a price of one dollar each, then $ 10 will be deducted from the accumulated value of $ 100, thereby leaving the user with a cumulative value of $ 90.

After block 792 subtracted the value of the lottery tickets from the accumulated value of the player, control proceeds to block 800. At block 800, game module 20 issues several tickets selected by the user in block 786. Issued tickets have lottery numbers that are generated by the user by the game module 20 or the lottery system 46. Lottery tickets may be printed using a ticket reader / printer 56, or tickets may be pre-printed and issued by the dispenser 58 ticket tickets of FIG. 2.

After completion in block 800, the game module establishes communication with the lottery system 46 in block 802. After the lottery numbers are generated by either the user or the lottery system 46 or the game module 20, the game module 20 can send lottery information, for example, lottery numbers being played, the number of won money, ticket identification, etc., to the lottery system 46 for recording. However, the game module 20 can store all the lottery information for a certain time, after which the game module 20 can transfer all the information to the lottery system 46. Similarly, there can be one or more devices or systems through which the lottery information can be transmitted and / or in which it can be saved. For example, lottery information can be transmitted after and / or during each lottery transaction to a network server or main system, for example, to a network computer 22, where the lottery information can be stored for a certain time, or from where the lottery information can be transferred to the lottery system 46 or other intermediate device.

After completion of execution in block 802 or in block 784 it is determined that the user does not want to purchase lottery tickets, control returns to the block following the block that called routine 261B. For example, with respect to FIG. 4 and 5, control will return to blocks 262 and 324, respectively.

Additionally or alternatively, to receive lottery tickets from the game module 20 during and / or after the game, the player can redeem the value of the winning lottery ticket through the game block 20 before the game, during and / or after the game. For example, a player may have a lottery ticket prior to playing on the game module 20. The player may or may not know whether the lottery ticket is a winning one and, therefore, it may be desirable for him to determine the winning status of the lottery ticket. As shown in FIG. 18, routine 900 allows a player to redeem the value of a lottery ticket. In this example, block 902 may prompt the player to insert a lottery ticket into the gaming module 20. The corresponding prompt to the player may be presented in the form of a sign or image on the screen showing that the gaming module 20 may redeem the tickets, or the prompt may be in the form of any sound and / or visual indication. Then, the player in block 904 can insert the lottery ticket into the game module 20. More specifically, the player can insert the lottery ticket into a lottery ticket reader, for example, a ticket reader / printer 56 or a lottery ticket dispenser 57.

At block 906, the game module 20 may confirm the authenticity of the ticket to determine, among other information, that the ticket is a valid ticket and / or that the ticket has not yet been redeemed. The authenticity of the ticket can be confirmed by reading the identification information of the ticket from the lottery ticket itself, such as a barcode, and by comparing this information with the data of the lottery system 46. If the lottery ticket has not been authenticated, then in block 908, the game module 20 can display the ticket from game module 20, and the routine may end. However, if the lottery ticket has passed authentication, the game module 20 determines in block 910 whether the lottery ticket is a winning one. Alternatively, the gaming module 20 may confirm the authenticity of the ticket after determining that the lottery ticket is a winning one. If it is determined in decision block 912 that the lottery ticket is not winning, then control is transferred to block 914, where the user is informed of the non-winning status of the lottery ticket. Game module 20 may inform the user of non-winning status through the display 70 or through alternative means, such as speakers, print a ticket, etc. As soon as the user is informed of the non-winning status, control may be transferred to block 908 for displaying a ticket from the game module 20.

If it is determined in decision block 912 that the lottery ticket is winning, then control can be transferred to block 916, where the user can be informed of the winning status of the lottery ticket. The information may include information that the lottery ticket is a winning one and how great the value of the prize is, but is not limited to this. Game module 20 can inform the user of the winning status through the display 70 or through alternative means, such as using speakers, by printing a ticket, etc. Once the user is informed of the winning status, control may be transferred to block 918 to provide the user with options for choosing how to pay off the value of the lottery ticket. If in decision block 920 the user chooses to repay the winnings in the form of credit in the game module 20, then control proceeds to block 922 to add the value of the lottery ticket winnings to the credits of the game module 20. Therefore, if the user is already playing on the game module 20 before checking that if the ticket is a winning one, then the value of the lottery ticket can be added to the already confirmed user credit. However, if the user did not play on the game module 20 before checking whether the ticket is a winning one, then the value of the lottery ticket may be the initial credit of the player in the game module 20. Then control can go to block 924, where the player can continue to play on the game module 20, as described in routines 200 and 300 of FIG. 4 and 5, respectively.

If in block 920 the user chooses to pay off the winnings in a form different from the credit for the game module 20, then control may go to block 926 to issue the value of the lottery ticket to the user. In block 926, the user can redeem the value of the lottery ticket in various forms, including cash, vouchers or credit, such as a card or account, through electronic money transfer (EFT) or the like.

Claims (43)

1. A gaming device comprising
a display module for generating video images;
value input device;
lottery selection input means configured to receive input indicative of a player selecting a purchase option for one or more lottery tickets from said gaming device;
a controller operatively connected to the display module, the value input device and said lottery selection input means, the controller comprising a processor and a storage device operatively associated with said processor;
the controller is programmed to enable the player to make a bet, as well as to create a video image; representing a game that is generated on a display module, the video image representing one of the following games: video poker, video blackjack, video game in a slot, video clip or video bingo;
wherein the video image contains an image of at least five playing cards, if the game is a video poker, the video image contains an image of a plurality of simulated reels for playing a slot, if the game is a video game in a slot, the video image contains an image of a plurality of playing cards, if the game is a video blackjack ;
the video image contains an image of a plurality of keno numbers if the game is a video keno;
the video image contains a bingo grid image if the game is a video bingo;
moreover, the controller is programmed to determine the payment of the value associated with the result of the game;
the controller is programmed to receive said input from the lottery selection input means indicating the player has selected the option of purchasing one or more lottery tickets;
the controller is programmed to output a lottery ticket issuing signal in response to receiving said instruction to select a player to purchase one or more lottery tickets and is connected to the lottery system with the possibility of information exchange; and
a lottery ticket issuing device operatively associated with the controller and configured to issue said one or more lottery tickets that bear lottery signs in response to receiving a lottery ticket issuing signal from the controller.
2. The gaming device according to claim 1, wherein the controller is programmed to receive lottery ticket signs from a player or from a lottery system.
3. The gaming device according to claim 1, wherein the controller is programmed to randomly select the numbers of said lottery ticket signs.
4. The gaming device according to claim 1, wherein the lottery tickets are printed by a lottery ticket issuing device or a lottery ticket reader / printer.
5. The gaming device according to claim 1, wherein the lottery ticket issuing device and the controller read and validate the lottery tickets.
6. The gaming device according to claim 1, in which the controller is programmed to subtract from the user’s winnings the cost associated with the issued lottery tickets.
7. The gaming device according to claim 1, in which the controller is programmed to access the lottery system and ensure that the display module displays information corresponding to the result of the lottery game for the player.
8. The gaming device according to claim 1, wherein said lottery tickets are associated with a casino lottery, or a state lottery, or a multiple state lottery.
9. The gaming device according to claim 1, wherein the controller is programmed to issue instant lottery lottery tickets.
10. The gaming device according to claim 1, wherein the controller is further programmed to effectively provide the player with a choice for purchasing said one or more lottery tickets when the controller determines a winning result for a game in which the player has made a bet.
11. A gaming system comprising a plurality of gaming devices according to claim 1, wherein the gaming devices are interconnected to form a network of gaming devices.
12. The gaming system according to claim 11, in which the gaming devices are interconnected via the Internet.
13. A gaming device comprising
a display module for generating video images;
value input device;
lottery selection input means configured to receive input indicative of a player selecting a purchase option for one or more lottery tickets from said gaming device;
a controller operatively connected to the display module, the value input device and said lottery selection input means, the controller comprising a processor and a storage device operatively associated with said processor;
the controller is programmed to enable the player to make a bet, as well as to create a video image that is generated on the display module, the video image representing the game;
the controller is programmed to determine, after displaying said video image, payment of a value associated with the result of the game represented by the video image;
the controller is programmed to receive said input from the lottery selection input means, indicating the player has selected the option of purchasing one or more lottery tickets, and is associated with the possibility of information exchange with the lottery system;
the controller is programmed to output a lottery ticket issuing signal in response to receiving said indication of a player choosing a purchase option for one or more lottery tickets; and
a lottery ticket issuing device programmable for issuing said one or more lottery tickets that bear generated lottery signs in response to receiving a lottery ticket issuing signal from the controller.
14. The gaming device according to item 13, in which the controller is programmed to receive signs of lottery tickets from the player or from the lottery system.
15. The gaming device according to item 13, in which the controller is programmed to randomly select the numbers of the mentioned signs of the lottery tickets.
16. The gaming device of claim 13, wherein the lottery tickets are printed by the lottery ticket issuing device or the lottery ticket reader / printer.
17. The gaming device according to item 13, in which the controller is programmed to subtract from the user’s winnings the cost associated with the issued lottery tickets.
18. The gaming device according to item 13, in which the controller is programmed to access the lottery system and inform the player of the previous winning lottery signs.
19. The gaming device of claim 13, wherein said lottery tickets are associated with a casino lottery, or a state lottery, or a multiple state lottery.
20. The gaming device according to item 13, in which the controller is programmed to issue lottery tickets instant lottery.
21. A gaming system comprising a plurality of gaming devices according to claim 13, wherein the gaming devices are interconnected to form a network of gaming devices.
22. The gaming system according to item 21, in which gaming devices are interconnected via the Internet.
23. A gaming device containing
a display module for generating video images;
value input device;
lottery selection input means configured to receive input indicative of a player selecting a purchase option for one or more lottery tickets from said gaming device;
a controller operatively connected to a display module, a value input device, and said lottery selection input means, the controller comprising a processor and a storage device operatively associated with the processor;
while the controller is programmed to enable the player to make a bet;
the controller is programmed to allow the player to make a choice of the pay line;
the controller is programmed to create a video image that is generated on a display module, the video image comprising a plurality of simulated reels of a slot machine, each of which has a plurality of symbols of a slot machine;
the controller is programmed to determine the payment of the value associated with the result of playing the slot based on the configuration of said symbols of the slot machine;
the controller is programmed to receive, from the input means of the lottery selection, said input indicating that the player has selected the option of purchasing one or more lottery tickets, the controller being associated with the possibility of information exchange with the lottery system;
the controller is programmed to output a lottery ticket issuing signal in response to receiving said indication of a player choosing a purchase option for one or more lottery tickets; and
a lottery ticket issuing device operatively connected to the controller and configured to issue said one or more lottery tickets to which formed lottery signs are applied in response to receiving a lottery ticket issuing signal from the controller.
24. The gaming device according to item 23, in which the controller is programmed to enable the player to select the signs of the paylines.
25. A gaming device according to claim 23, wherein the lottery tickets are printed by the lottery ticket issuing device or the lottery ticket reader / printer.
26. The gaming device according to item 23, in which the controller is programmed to subtract from the user’s winnings the cost associated with issued lottery tickets.
27. The gaming device according to item 23, in which the controller is additionally programmed to subtract the cost of said one or more lottery tickets from said payment amount associated with a game result or credit associated with said player.
28. A gaming system comprising a plurality of gaming devices according to claim 23, wherein the gaming devices are interconnected to form a network of gaming devices.
29. A gaming system according to claim 28, wherein the gaming devices are interconnected via the Internet.
30. A game method comprising
providing the formation of a video image representing the game, and the video image represents one of the following games: video poker, video blackjack, video game in a slot, video clip or video bingo;
wherein the video image contains an image of at least five playing cards, if the game is a video poker;
the video image comprises an image of a plurality of simulated reels of a slot machine if the game is a video game in a slot;
the video image comprises an image of a plurality of playing cards, if the game is a video blackjack;
the video image contains an image of a plurality of keno signs if the game is a video keno;
the video image contains a bingo grid image if the game is a video bingo;
determining a result of a game represented by said video game image;
determination of the payment of the value associated with the result of the game;
receiving input indicating that the player has selected the option of purchasing one or more lottery tickets; and
after an information exchange with the lottery system, the issuance of a lottery ticket that is marked with lottery signs in response to an input indicating that the player has chosen the option of purchasing one or more lottery tickets.
31. The method of claim 30, further comprising determining whether it is desirable for the user to receive a lottery ticket.
32. The method of claim 30, further comprising requesting the user to provide a plurality of lottery signs.
33. A gaming device comprising a controller programmed to play the first game and enable the user to bet on the result of the first game, the controller being further programmed to receive requests to purchase lottery tickets from the gaming device and, in response to receiving requests to purchase lottery tickets , to send signals to the lottery ticket issuing device, operatively connected to the controller associated with the lottery system, and configured to issue one or more lotteries tickets, each of which has lottery marks, to enter the second game, in response to a signal received from the controller.
34. A gaming device according to claim 33, wherein the controller is programmed to issue instant lottery lottery tickets.
35. A gaming device according to claim 33, wherein the lottery ticket issuing device and the controller read and validate the lottery tickets.
36. A gaming system comprising a plurality of gaming devices according to claim 33, wherein the gaming devices are interconnected to form a network of gaming devices.
37. The gaming system according to clause 36, in which gaming devices are interconnected via the Internet.
38. A method for determining a winning status of a lottery ticket, comprising
providing a gaming device configured to play one of the following games: video poker, video blackjack, video game in a slot, video clip or video bingo, the gaming device having a display module for generating video images, a controller operatively connected to the display module, and a reader / printer lottery tickets, operatively connected to the controller associated with the lottery system;
inserting a lottery ticket purchased from said gaming device or from another gaming device into a lottery ticket reader / printer;
an assessment of whether the lottery ticket is a winner; and telling the player whether the lottery ticket is a winning one.
39. The method of claim 38, further comprising verifying the authenticity of the lottery ticket.
40. The method of claim 38, further comprising redeeming the value for the lottery ticket.
41. A gaming device comprising a controller programmable for playing the first game and providing the user with an opportunity to bet on the result of the first game, the controller being connected to the lottery system with the possibility of information exchange and is additionally programmed to receive requests for the purchase of lottery tickets issued from the said game devices and a lottery ticket reader, operatively connected to the controller and configured to read a lottery ticket issued by said gaming device or other gaming device, wherein said lottery ticket carries lottery ticket identification information.
42. The gaming device according to paragraph 41, wherein the lottery ticket reader and the controller are configured to confirm the authenticity of the lottery tickets.
43. A gaming system comprising a plurality of gaming devices according to claim 41, wherein the gaming devices are interconnected to form a network of gaming devices.
RU2005108664/09A 2002-03-12 2003-07-11 Slot machine with the device of giving lottery tickets RU2331112C2 (en)

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US20030186734A1 (en) 2003-10-02
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RU2005108664A (en) 2005-09-10
AU2003251941B2 (en) 2007-12-20
AU2003251941A1 (en) 2004-03-19

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