KR101108789B1 - A method for xylitol production using the hydrolysate containing xylose and arabinose prepared from byproduct of tropical fruit biomass - Google Patents

A method for xylitol production using the hydrolysate containing xylose and arabinose prepared from byproduct of tropical fruit biomass Download PDF

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KR101108789B1
KR101108789B1 KR1020070072682A KR20070072682A KR101108789B1 KR 101108789 B1 KR101108789 B1 KR 101108789B1 KR 1020070072682 A KR1020070072682 A KR 1020070072682A KR 20070072682 A KR20070072682 A KR 20070072682A KR 101108789 B1 KR101108789 B1 KR 101108789B1
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method
xylose
arabinose
hydrolyzed
xylitol
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KR20080074687A (en
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김성보
김정훈
김택범
박승원
송상훈
이강득
이강표
이동훈
이운화
이주항
지승배
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씨제이제일제당 (주)
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    • CCHEMISTRY; METALLURGY
    • C12BIOCHEMISTRY; BEER; SPIRITS; WINE; VINEGAR; MICROBIOLOGY; ENZYMOLOGY; MUTATION OR GENETIC ENGINEERING
    • C12PFERMENTATION OR ENZYME-USING PROCESSES TO SYNTHESISE A DESIRED CHEMICAL COMPOUND OR COMPOSITION OR TO SEPARATE OPTICAL ISOMERS FROM A RACEMIC MIXTURE
    • C12P7/00Preparation of oxygen-containing organic compounds
    • C12P7/02Preparation of oxygen-containing organic compounds containing a hydroxy group
    • C12P7/04Preparation of oxygen-containing organic compounds containing a hydroxy group acyclic
    • C12P7/18Preparation of oxygen-containing organic compounds containing a hydroxy group acyclic polyhydric
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A23FOODS OR FOODSTUFFS; THEIR TREATMENT, NOT COVERED BY OTHER CLASSES
    • A23LFOODS, FOODSTUFFS, OR NON-ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES, NOT COVERED BY SUBCLASSES A23B - A23J; THEIR PREPARATION OR TREATMENT, e.g. COOKING, MODIFICATION OF NUTRITIVE QUALITIES, PHYSICAL TREATMENT; PRESERVATION OF FOODS OR FOODSTUFFS, IN GENERAL
    • A23L27/00Spices; Flavouring agents or condiments; Artificial sweetening agents; Table salts; Dietetic salt substitutes; Preparation or treatment thereof
    • A23L27/30Artificial sweetening agents
    • A23L27/33Artificial sweetening agents containing sugars or derivatives
    • A23L27/34Sugar alcohols
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A23FOODS OR FOODSTUFFS; THEIR TREATMENT, NOT COVERED BY OTHER CLASSES
    • A23LFOODS, FOODSTUFFS, OR NON-ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES, NOT COVERED BY SUBCLASSES A23B - A23J; THEIR PREPARATION OR TREATMENT, e.g. COOKING, MODIFICATION OF NUTRITIVE QUALITIES, PHYSICAL TREATMENT; PRESERVATION OF FOODS OR FOODSTUFFS, IN GENERAL
    • A23L29/00Foods or foodstuffs containing additives; Preparation or treatment thereof
    • A23L29/30Foods or foodstuffs containing additives; Preparation or treatment thereof containing carbohydrate syrups; containing sugars; containing sugar alcohols, e.g. xylitol; containing starch hydrolysates, e.g. dextrin
    • A23L29/37Sugar alcohols
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B01PHYSICAL OR CHEMICAL PROCESSES OR APPARATUS IN GENERAL
    • B01DSEPARATION
    • B01D61/00Processes of separation using semi-permeable membranes, e.g. dialysis, osmosis, ultrafiltration; Apparatus, accessories or auxiliary operations specially adapted therefor
    • B01D61/42Electrodialysis; Electro-osmosis Electro-ultrafiltration
    • B01D61/44Ion-selective electrodialysis
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B01PHYSICAL OR CHEMICAL PROCESSES OR APPARATUS IN GENERAL
    • B01JCHEMICAL OR PHYSICAL PROCESSES, e.g. CATALYSIS OR COLLOID CHEMISTRY; THEIR RELEVANT APPARATUS
    • B01J20/00Solid sorbent compositions or filter aid compositions; Sorbents for chromatography; Processes for preparing, regenerating or reactivating thereof
    • B01J20/02Solid sorbent compositions or filter aid compositions; Sorbents for chromatography; Processes for preparing, regenerating or reactivating thereof comprising inorganic material
    • B01J20/20Solid sorbent compositions or filter aid compositions; Sorbents for chromatography; Processes for preparing, regenerating or reactivating thereof comprising inorganic material comprising free carbon; comprising carbon obtained by carbonising processes
    • CCHEMISTRY; METALLURGY
    • C01INORGANIC CHEMISTRY
    • C01BNON-METALLIC ELEMENTS; COMPOUNDS THEREOF; METALLOIDS OR COMPOUNDS THEREOF NOT COVERED BY SUBCLASS C01C
    • C01B32/00Carbon; Compounds thereof
    • C01B32/30Active carbon
    • C01B32/312Preparation
    • C01B32/318Preparation characterised by the starting materials
    • C01B32/324Preparation characterised by the starting materials from waste materials, e.g. tyres or spent sulfite pulp liquor
    • CCHEMISTRY; METALLURGY
    • C13SUGAR INDUSTRY
    • C13KSACCHARIDES, OTHER THAN SUCROSE, OBTAINED FROM NATURAL SOURCES OR BY HYDROLYSIS OF NATURALLY OCCURRING DI-, OLIGO- OR POLYSACCHARIDES
    • C13K13/00Sugars not otherwise provided for in this class
    • CCHEMISTRY; METALLURGY
    • C13SUGAR INDUSTRY
    • C13KSACCHARIDES, OTHER THAN SUCROSE, OBTAINED FROM NATURAL SOURCES OR BY HYDROLYSIS OF NATURALLY OCCURRING DI-, OLIGO- OR POLYSACCHARIDES
    • C13K13/00Sugars not otherwise provided for in this class
    • C13K13/002Xylose
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A23FOODS OR FOODSTUFFS; THEIR TREATMENT, NOT COVERED BY OTHER CLASSES
    • A23VINDEXING SCHEME RELATING TO FOODS, FOODSTUFFS OR NON-ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES
    • A23V2002/00Food compositions, function of food ingredients or processes for food or foodstuffs
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y02TECHNOLOGIES OR APPLICATIONS FOR MITIGATION OR ADAPTATION AGAINST CLIMATE CHANGE
    • Y02ATECHNOLOGIES FOR ADAPTATION TO CLIMATE CHANGE
    • Y02A20/00Water conservation; Efficient water supply; Efficient water use
    • Y02A20/10Relating to general water supply, e.g. municipal or domestic water supply
    • Y02A20/124Water desalination
    • Y02A20/126Water desalination characterized by the method
    • Y02A20/134Electrodialysis
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y02TECHNOLOGIES OR APPLICATIONS FOR MITIGATION OR ADAPTATION AGAINST CLIMATE CHANGE
    • Y02EREDUCTION OF GREENHOUSE GAS [GHG] EMISSIONS, RELATED TO ENERGY GENERATION, TRANSMISSION OR DISTRIBUTION
    • Y02E50/00Technologies for the production of fuel of non-fossil origin
    • Y02E50/10Biofuels
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y02TECHNOLOGIES OR APPLICATIONS FOR MITIGATION OR ADAPTATION AGAINST CLIMATE CHANGE
    • Y02EREDUCTION OF GREENHOUSE GAS [GHG] EMISSIONS, RELATED TO ENERGY GENERATION, TRANSMISSION OR DISTRIBUTION
    • Y02E50/00Technologies for the production of fuel of non-fossil origin
    • Y02E50/10Biofuels
    • Y02E50/16Cellulosic bio-ethanol
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y02TECHNOLOGIES OR APPLICATIONS FOR MITIGATION OR ADAPTATION AGAINST CLIMATE CHANGE
    • Y02EREDUCTION OF GREENHOUSE GAS [GHG] EMISSIONS, RELATED TO ENERGY GENERATION, TRANSMISSION OR DISTRIBUTION
    • Y02E50/00Technologies for the production of fuel of non-fossil origin
    • Y02E50/30Fuel from waste

Abstract

The present invention relates to a method for preparing xylitol using a hydrolyzed glycosylated solution including xylose and arabinose prepared by acid hydrolysis of tropical fruit biomass by-products. More specifically, the present invention is an acid (0.2-5 wt%) as a pretreatment method for the effective use of tropical fruit biomass by-products, such as coconut shells, palm peels and the Empty Fruit Bunch of Palm Trees. Method for producing xylose and arabinose by hydrolysis, electrodialysis (ED), ion purification and hydrolyzed saccharified solution containing them as carbon source to produce high yield xylitol by repeated batch fermentation process It is about how to. Additionally, the present invention relates to an active carbon prepared by carbonizing and activating a hydrolyzate residue of tropical fruit husk, which is a by-product generated in the manufacture of xylose and arabinose, at a constant temperature, and a method of manufacturing the same.
Tropical Fruit Biomass By-Product, Acid Hydrolysis, Xylose, Arabinos, Xylitol, Saccharified Liquid, Activated Carbon, Electrodialysis (ED; Electrodialysis)

Description

A method for preparing xylitol using a hydrolyzed saccharified solution comprising xylose and arabinose prepared from tropical fruit biomass by-products

The present invention relates to a method for preparing xylitol using a hydrolyzed glycosylated solution including xylose and arabinose prepared by acid hydrolysis of tropical fruit biomass by-products. More specifically, the present invention is an acid (0.2-5 wt%) as a pretreatment method for the effective use of tropical fruit biomass by-products, such as coconut shells, palm peels and the Empty Fruit Bunch of Palm Trees. Method for preparing xylose and arabinose by hydrolysis, electrodialysis (ED) and ion purification and producing high yield xylitol by repeated batch fermentation process using hydrolyzed saccharified solution containing them as carbon source It is about how to. Additionally, the present invention relates to an active carbon prepared by carbonizing and activating a hydrolyzate residue of tropical fruit husk, which is a by-product generated in the manufacture of xylose and arabinose, at a constant temperature, and a method of manufacturing the same.

Xylitol is industrially produced by chemical reduction of hemicellulose hydrolysates, such as birch and corn cobs, which are vegetable raw materials, or by biological conversion using microorganisms. However, the chemical method is difficult to separate and purify xylose or other hydrolysates generated from xylitol and hemicellulose moieties, and the yield is low as 50-60%, and the reaction of high temperature and high pressure using alkali is a risk and waste problem. There are disadvantages that exist.

One of several alternative biological methods that are expected to be cost competitive compared to current chemical process production methods. If xylitol can be produced biologically using renewable resources containing a certain amount of sugar, Although it may be spotlighted in terms of cost reduction and recycling of resources, studies on the production method of xylitol by biological methods using renewable resources have not been conducted properly. In addition, many studies have been conducted to develop a high-efficiency saccharification process from fibrous biomass, but most of the tissues use flexible rice straw and corn stalks.

Biomass is a renewable organic material derived from energy-only crops and trees, agricultural products and feed crops, agricultural wastes and debris, forest wastes and debris, aquatic plants, animal wastes, municipal waste, and other wastes. It refers to wood, plants, agricultural and forest by-products, municipal waste, and organic components in industrial waste that are used as energy sources.

Among natural fibrous biomass, the vegetation is composed of three main components of cellulose, hemicellulose, lignin, and other resins as leaves, stems, and roots. By decomposing or converting them, it is possible to obtain a fibrous glycosylated liquor, which is an economical and high xylose-rich renewable resource, and also can produce arabinose generated in xylose production. Therefore, in order to separate, decompose and use these three components, it is necessary to first perform a conversion reaction by breaking and decomposing bonds therebetween.

Until now, xylose has been manufactured by decolorization, ion purification, and crystallization process by acid hydrolysis from hemicellulose in wood, cactus or corncob. In addition to xylose and arabinose, a large amount of inorganic ions are present in the hydrolyzed saccharification liquid obtained through the acid hydrolysis, and a process for purifying these inorganic ions is required.

The conventional method for purifying the useful sugar component containing xylose from the saccharified solution is to add a neutralizing agent to the acid hydrolyzed saccharified solution to adjust the pH to 3.0 to 7.0 to form a precipitate, and the precipitated salt is filtered. After separation through the activated carbon treatment, the chromatic material is removed, and an effective sugar component including xylose is separated from the saccharified liquid by passing through an ion exchange resin column filled with a cation exchange resin, an anion exchange resin, and a mixed resin. The method of serving was commonly used.

In this process, when all the ionic components present in the hydrolyzate are bound to the ion exchange resin, acid and base are passed through to remove the ions adsorbed on the ion exchange resin and regenerate the resin. The solution containing was passed through a separation column filled with Na + ion chromatography separation resin in the form of sulfated polystyrene crosslinked with divinylbenzene, and separated into two fractions, a high content of xylose fraction and arabinose fraction. can do. The xylose and arabinose fractions were concentrated to Brix 60 to 80, and then crystallized, respectively, to obtain xylose crystals and arabinose crystals.

In the purification method, precipitation is a method of lowering the salt concentration by adding a chemical that can form an insoluble salt with inorganic ions present in the solution and then separating the precipitated salt through a filter, but forming by precipitation. However, a small amount of salt remaining in the subsequent concentration process is precipitated to form a scale, there is a problem that the productivity is lowered. In addition, as described above, purification by ion exchange resin method requires a large amount of ion exchange resin to process a sample having a high total ion content such as an acid hydrolysis solution, and a large amount of acid / alkali solution in the regeneration process of the ion exchange resin. The use of these wastes increases the burden on wastewater treatment as the generation of wastewater containing high concentrations of salts increases. Therefore, it is necessary to develop alternative technologies to reduce the amount of chemicals used and the amount of wastewater.

Another purification method is electrodialysis (ED). Electrodialysis method mainly uses an ion-exchange membrane as a method of removing and purifying impurities contained in a solution such as a colloid using a DC voltage.

Commercial use of conventional electrodialysis processes has had economic constraints such as high energy (power) costs and the use of expensive ion exchange membranes. However, since the 1980s, various ion exchange membranes have been developed. Asahi Chemical, Asahi Glass, Tokuyama Co., Japan and Ionics, Dupont, USA, etc. The production of several kinds of ion exchange membranes has made the process economical. The patented technology filed using electrodialysis technology is 『Recovery method of organic acid』 (application number: 98-0053421), 『Recovery of lysine by electrodialysis and lysine-hydrochloride preparation method』 (application number: 98-0011107), 『Method for Separation and Purification of Phenylalanine Using Electrodialysis』 (Application No .: 99-0001349), 『Lactic Acid Recovery Method by Electrodialysis Process』 (Application No. 00-0028758), 『Method of Purifying Amino Acid-Containing Solution by Electrodialysis』 (Application number: 02-7005661).

On the other hand, in general, the organic material can be burned because it contains carbon (C), any material that can be burned can be a raw material of activated carbon. Mainly used raw materials include wood, lignite, anthracite, etc., and carbonized it to produce charcoal to produce charcoal. Charcoal is composed of carbon as the main component by incomplete oxidation during the carbonization process, and the shape of the char is determined by the type of wood and the baking temperature. Wood is used as a raw material such as oak, bamboo, hardwood, palm and coconut. Especially, charcoal made of oak is purified, purified, and purified compared to charcoal made of hardwood, bamboo, palm, and coconut. It is known to have a good treatment effect on fuel, horticultural crops and the like.

In the production of activated carbon, the most important processes are the carbonization process and the activation process. The carbonization process decomposes dehydration and deoxidation when the raw material is heated to about 500 to 700 ° C, and the surface oxygen is released in the form of water, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, etc. In the process of removing volatile matter, fixed carbon remains. The activation process is a process of developing the microporous structure of the carbide by eroding the surface of the carbide by oxidation of carbon occurring in the temperature range of 800 ~ 1,000 ℃.

Patents related to the manufacture of charcoal by using biomass by-products of tropical fruits are disclosed in Korean Patent Application Publication No. 2002-0095809 and its manufacturing method, special 2000-0055003 ocher charcoal using natural coconut and its manufacturing method. 2005-0003585 Coconut charcoal and its manufacturing method, special 2000-0012825 Coconut charcoal using palm charcoal powder, 10-2005-0031310 There are patents showing that it can be used as a press-molded charcoal, but patents related to manufacturing charcoal by extracting xylose from tropical fruit by-products and using residual residues to further produce high-value activated carbon It is not yet out.

Precipitation process in the prior art may lead to a decrease in productivity due to scale generation. In addition, inorganic salts and organic acids in the acid hydrolysis liquid obtained by acid treatment are electrically charged and can be removed by ion exchange resin method, but a large amount of ionic components present in the acid hydrolysis solution are ion exchanged. In order to remove by the resin method, there are problems such as an increase in waste water treatment costs due to frequent resin regeneration and a large amount of acid / alkali regeneration waste liquid.

An object of the present invention is a method for efficiently utilizing components such as xylose present in coconut shells, palm shells and palm tree by-products, which are by-products of tropical fruit biomass, such as acid hydrolysis, electrodialysis, ion purification and decolorization of raw materials. It provides a method for producing an efficient hydrolyzed saccharified solution containing xylose and arabinose produced by the present invention, and a method for producing xylitol from the saccharified liquid by microbial fermentation.

Still another object of the present invention is to provide an activated carbon and an activated carbon manufacturing method using a carbonization process and an activation process using a hydrolysis residue which is a by-product generated in the process of preparing the saccharified solution.

The present invention comprises the steps of acid hydrolyzing a hollow fruit bunch of coconut shell, palm bark and palm tree as a by-product of tropical fruit biomass; Obtaining a hydrolyzed saccharified solution containing xylose and arabinose by the acid hydrolysis; And it provides a method for producing a hydrolyzed saccharified solution including xylose and arabinose comprising the step of separating and purification the hydrolyzed saccharified solution using an electrodialysis apparatus or an electrodialysis method.

The present invention also comprises the step of adapting the xylitol fermentation microorganism to the saccharified solution containing the xylose and arabinose; And inoculating and fermenting xylitol fermentation microorganisms into a culture medium comprising the saccharified solution as a carbon source.

The present invention also relates to a hydrolyzate of coconut shell or palm husk, which is a by-product generated in the process of preparing a saccharified solution containing xylose and arabinose by acid hydrolysis from a coconut fruit, palm husk, which is a by-product of tropical fruit biomass. The decomposition residue is used to provide a method for producing activated carbon through a carbonization process and an activation process.

In the present invention, it was confirmed that functional sugars xylose and arabinose from tropical fruit skin biomass can be efficiently produced by introducing electrodialysis. In addition, by obtaining a hydrolyzed saccharified solution containing the xylose and arabinose and using the same as a carbon source, the culture was completed, concentrated cells in a reduced pressure microfiltration bioreactor and reused the concentrated cells, from the xylose solution It was confirmed that a high yield of xylitol could be obtained repeatedly. In addition, high-quality carbides can be produced by carbonizing and activating hydrolysis residues, which are by-products of the production of xylose and arabinose, to confirm that waste disposal can be facilitated and the cost of waste disposal can be reduced. It was.

Accordingly, the present invention can efficiently produce xylose and arabinose and, moreover, xylitol, which are competitive, high value-added functional sugars, using cheap biomass.

The present invention comprises the steps of acid hydrolyzing a hollow fruit bunch of coconut shell, palm bark and palm tree as a by-product of tropical fruit biomass; Obtaining a hydrolyzed saccharified solution containing xylose and arabinose by the acid hydrolysis; And it provides a method for producing a hydrolyzed saccharified solution including xylose and arabinose comprising the step of separating and purification the hydrolyzed saccharified solution using an electrodialysis apparatus or an electrodialysis method.

Coconut husks, palm husks and hollow fruit bunches of palm tree, which are tropical fruit by-products used in the present invention, are ground to an average area of 0.5 to 5 cm 2 or an average length of 0.1 to 5 cm, and then 12 to 40 to 80 ° C. Dry for 24 hours.

Acid hydrolysis adds 0.2-5.0 wt% sulfuric acid solution 100-1,000 g to 100 g of dried coconut shell, palm bark or hollow fruit bunch of palm tree, and the ratio of acid hydrolysis solvent and biomass is 1: 1. It is carried out by reacting at 0.5 to 10 hours while stirring at 10 to 50 rpm at a reaction temperature of 100 to 200 ° C. and a reaction pressure of 0 to 10 kgf / cm 2 .

After the acid hydrolysis, the precipitate was removed to recover the soluble substance dissolved in the aqueous layer, and then the acid hydrolysis solution having pH 1.0 to 2.0 was adjusted to pH 3.0 to 7.0 with calcium carbonate, and then the temperature was 60 to 90 ° C., Stirring is carried out under conditions of a time of 30 to 120 minutes to react the sulfate ions in the acid hydrolysis solution with the calcium ions to precipitate in the form of calcium sulfate. The acid hydrolysis solution is cooled to a temperature of 30 ° C. or lower through a heat exchanger, and calcium sulfate hydrated in the reaction solution is precipitated by a difference in solubility according to temperature. The precipitated calcium sulfate is removed using a filter cloth. The filtered reaction solution is desalted to less than 1,000 μS / cm using an electrodialysis apparatus.

When using the precipitation method, a small amount of salt remaining without being formed by precipitation can be precipitated in a subsequent concentration process to form a scale, thereby reducing productivity. Therefore, the present inventors have introduced the electrodialysis (ED) method to solve this problem. In the case of electrodialysis, the problem of scale does not occur in the precipitation method, so that the productivity of xylose and arabinose is improved, and the total amount of ions remaining in the saccharified solution is reduced, so that the number of resin regeneration in the divorce exchange resin method is increased. This can significantly reduce the use of acid / alkaline solutions used in the regeneration process. When xylose and arabinose are produced using the electrodialysis method, it is also possible to expect a reduction in production costs by improving wastewater generation and productivity.

Preferably, the electrodialysis apparatus includes an ion exchange membrane, an electrode plate, a flow control pump and a rectifier.

The desalted reaction solution was concentrated in vacuo to a sugar concentration of 25 to 45 brix, and then decolorized with granular activated carbon. The discoloration condition at this time is preferably a linear velocity (LV) = 1 to 3 m / hr, temperature 70 ~ 80 ℃.

The desalted reaction solution is passed through a strong acid cation exchange resin, a weak base anion exchange resin, and a mixed resin in order to remove inorganic salts and ionic substances, mainly containing xylose component, a small amount of arabinose and 5% or less. A saccharified solution containing other monosaccharides can be obtained. Preferably, the ion exchange membrane is composed of a cationic membrane and an anion membrane.

The present invention also comprises the step of adapting the xylitol fermentation microorganism to the saccharified solution containing the xylose and arabinose; And inoculating and fermenting xylitol fermentation microorganisms into a culture medium comprising the saccharified solution as a carbon source.

The hydrolyzed saccharified solution of the present invention is obtained by the method described above, and used in addition to the microbial culture medium for xylitol production through a separate pretreatment process (neutralization and filtration, purification through a loose exchange resin). As the culture medium for fermentation it is preferable to use a culture medium containing yeast extract, malt extract, complex nitrogen source such as soybean meal and KH 2 PO 4, MgSO 4 .7H 2 O and the like.

The xylitol fermentation microorganism of the present invention is not particularly limited as long as it is a microorganism capable of fermenting xylitol, but in the present invention, it is preferable to use Candida tropicicas CJ-FID (Candida tropicalis CJ-FID) and its mutant strains. Patent Publication No. 2005-0025059.

In addition, the xylitol fermentation microorganism of the present invention is characterized by adapting to the hydrolyzed saccharified liquid by culturing the microorganism in the medium containing the hydrolyzed saccharified liquid for a long period of 10 to 30 generations. Preferably, it is possible to increase the conversion yield of xylitol using xylitol fermentation microorganisms adapted to the hydrolyzed saccharified solution through 20 passages. As shown in Figure 1, the yield of xylitol increases up to 20 times in the number of passages for adapting the xylitol fermentation microorganisms to the hydrolyzed saccharified liquid, but the yield of xylitol does not significantly increase even if cultured more than that. Therefore, it is economical to carry out passage 20 times.

As a medium for the passage culture, a conventional culture medium including the hydrolyzed glycosylated solution may be used.

Fermentation in the present invention may be carried out by batch fermentation and repeated batch fermentation process to terminate the fermentation after the input of xylose saccharified liquid of a constant concentration in the single fermentation tank is depleted.

In the batch batch fermentation process of the present invention, the microorganism capable of fermenting the xylitol is inoculated into a culture medium and cultured in a pressure-sensitive microfiltration bioreactor. Thereafter, the culture is discharged and the medium is continuously injected into the bioreactor. The discharged culture solution is separated into cells and culture filtrate using a pressure-sensitive microfiltration system (microfiltration system using vaccum pressure) or a centrifuge. In particular, in order to utilize an automated system, it is preferable to use a pressure-sensitive microfiltration tube, and the pressure-sensitive microfiltration tube can be used separately from the bioreactor and installed in the bioreactor. The isolated cells are concentrated and reinoculated to a concentration of 30 ~ 70g / l, and the cultured by recycling in a bioreactor using a hydrolyzed saccharified solution as a carbon source. Thereafter, xylitol is recovered from the culture filtrate.

In general, the method by the microorganism has a disadvantage in that the productivity can be used only once once with 2.0 to 3.0 g / l-h. As a result, there is no increase in the cost of washing and pre-culture preparation for cultivation compared to the individual batch fermentation process by using a reduced pressure microfilter that can be reused without losing the cells and yields by high concentration culture. Xylitol can be produced economically with improved productivity.

Meanwhile, the present invention also relates to coconut shells or palm husks, which are by-products generated in the process of preparing saccharified solution containing xylose and arabinose, by acid hydrolysis from coconut shells and palm husks, which are by-products of tropical fruit biomass. By using the hydrolysis residue of the present invention, there is provided a method for producing activated carbon through a carbonization process and an activation process.

More specifically, the method for preparing activated carbon of the present invention is based on coconut shell and palm husk hydrolysis residues, which are tropical fruit biomass by-products from which xylose and arabinose components are extracted and removed by hydrolysis saccharification liquid by acid hydrolysis. It comprises a method for producing activated carbon comprising activated carbon for high purity vapor adsorption through carbonization and activation for 72 to 168 hours at 500 ~ 1,000 ℃.

The hydrolysis residue can be made into high quality activated carbon such as for high purity gaseous adsorption due to the increase in carbon purity, ash content, and fine pores during the extraction process.

Activated carbon for high purity gaseous adsorption of the present invention is collected by the drying step of collecting the acid hydrolysis residue, drying for 24 to 48 hours at 40 ~ 100 ℃ and carbonizing and activating for 72 to 168 hours at 500 ~ 1,000 ℃ Are manufactured.

The activated carbon of the present invention showed much better gas adsorption capacity than the activated carbon prepared by using the coconut shell or palm shell without acid hydrolysis (see Table 6).

Hereinafter, the present invention will be described in more detail with reference to Examples. However, these examples are for illustrative purposes only and the scope of the present invention is not limited to these examples.

Example  One : Xylose  And Arabinos  Produce

Coconut husks, palm husks and corianders of tropical fruit biomass by-products were ground to an average area of 0.5 to 5 cm 2 or average length of 0.1 to 5 cm and dried at 40 to 80 ° C. for 12 to 24 hours. .

Acid hydrolysis is a mixture of acid hydrolysis solvent and biomass by adding 100 to 1,000 g of 0.2 ~ 5.0 wt% sulfuric acid solution to 100 g of dried coconut shell, palm bark or hollow fruit bunch of palm tree. After the mixture was made to be 1:20, the reaction was performed at a reaction temperature of 100 to 200 ° C. and a reaction pressure of 0 to 10 kgf / cm 2 at 10 to 50 rpm while reacting for 0.5 to 10 hours. The sugar composition ratio according to the extraction time is shown in Table 1 below.

Sugar composition ratio by extraction time (%) Item Coconut shell Palm shell (Palm by-products) Glu. Xyl. Ara. Gal. Glu. Xyl. Ara. Gal. Glu. Xyl. Ara. Gal. 0.5
time
6.4 87.7 5.9 - 8.8 88.3 2.9 - 6.7 88.8 4.5 -
1 hours 5.6 89.5 4.9 - 7.4 89.2 3.4 - 5.9 87.3 5.8 1.0 3 hours 7.9 85.6 5.5 1.0 11.9 83.1 4.1 0.9 7.9 83.2 7.4 1.5 6 hours 20.1 71.6 6.8 1.5 18.4 74.8 5.6 1.2 19.6 70.7 8.4 1.3 10
time
38.9 53.5 6.3 1.3 34.4 58.2 5.7 1.7 38.9 49.8 9.5 1.8

# Glu (glucose), Xyl (xylose), Ara (arabinose), Gal (galactose)

After removing the acid hydrolyzed foil in order to recover the soluble substance dissolved in the water layer, after adjusting the reaction solution of pH 1.0 ~ 2.0 to pH 3.0 ~ 7.0 using calcium carbonate, 30 ~ 30 ~ 60 ~ 90 ℃ After stirring for 120 minutes, the sulfate ion in the reaction solution was reacted with calcium ion to precipitate in the form of calcium sulfate. The reaction solution was cooled to a temperature of 30 ° C. or lower through a heat exchanger, and calcium sulfate hydrated in the reaction solution was precipitated by the difference in solubility according to temperature. The reaction solution was filtered through a filter press having a 0.5 μm pore to remove precipitated calcium sulfate, and then the filtered reaction solution was subjected to an electrical conductivity of 1,000 μS / cm or less using an electrodialysis (ED) device. Desalted. The measurement results of the concentrations of xylose and arabinose and the electrical conductivity before and after electrodialysis are shown in Table 2 below.

Xylose, arabinose concentration and conductivity measurement results before and after electrodialysis Item Coconut shell Palm shell Palm Tree By-Products Xyl.
(%)
Ara.
(%)
Cond.
(μS / cm)
Xyl.
(%)
Ara.
(%)
Cond.
(μS / cm)
Xyl.
(%)
Ara.
(%)
Cond.
(μS / cm)
Supply 100 100 4170 100 100 4570 100 100 3930 Permeate 100 99.9 917 99.7 99.6 918 99.5 99.7 910

# Xyl (Xylose), Ara (Arabinose), Cond. (conductivity)

The desalted reaction solution was concentrated in vacuo to Brix 25-45 and then decolorized with granular activated carbon. The discoloration condition at this time is preferably a linear velocity (LV) = 1 to 3 m / hr, temperature 70 ~ 80 ℃.

The desalted reaction solution is passed through a strong acid cation exchange resin, a weak base anion exchange resin, and a mixed resin in order to remove and purify inorganic salts and ionic substances. A hydrolyzed saccharified solution containing both components of arabinose was obtained.

The saccharified solution containing a large amount of useful saccharides obtained in this way was passed through a separation column packed with a resin for separating Na + ionic chromatography in the form of sulfated polystyrene cross-linked with divinylbenzene, thereby containing a high content of xylose. It can be separated into two fractions, the fraction and the arabinose fraction. The fractionated xylose and arabinose were concentrated to Brix 60 to 80, and then crystallized to obtain xylose crystals and arabinose crystals. Table 3 shows the recovery and purity of the obtained xylose and arabinose.

Example  2 : Xylose  And Arabinos  Manufacture (change of hydrolysing agent)

Instead of acid treatment with 0.2-5.0% sulfuric acid aqueous solution in Example 1, it was carried out in the same manner except the acid treatment with 0.2-5.0 wt% hydrochloric acid aqueous solution . Table 3 shows the recovery and purity of the obtained xylose and arabinose.

Example  3: Xylose  And Arabinos  Manufacture (change of hydrolysing agent)

Instead of acid treatment with 0.2-5.0 wt% sulfuric acid aqueous solution in Example 1, it was carried out in the same manner except the acid treatment with 0.2-5.0 wt% aqueous oxalic acid solution . Table 3 shows the recovery and purity of the obtained xylose and arabinose.

Comparative example  One : Xylose  And Arabinos  Manufacture (change of hydrolysing agent)

Instead of acid treatment with an aqueous solution of 0.2 ~ 5.0 wt% sulfuric acid in Example 1, the same process was carried out except that neutralization to pH 5.0 ~ 7.0 with hydrochloric acid after alkaline treatment with 0.2 ~ 5.0 wt% aqueous solution of caustic soda . Table 3 shows the recovery and purity of the obtained xylose and arabinose.

Recovery and purity (%) of the obtained xylose and arabinose Item Coconut shell Palm shell Palm Tree By-Products Xylose Arabinos Xylose Arabinos Xylose Arabinos Recovery water Recovery water Recovery water Recovery water Recovery water Recovery water Example 1 70.4 99.5 71.6 98.3 68.4 98.9 66.6 98.9 71.7 99.2 68.4 98.7 Example 2 68.8 98.4 71.7 97.2 69.8 98.8 68.7 98.4 70.5 99.5 69.5 98.7 Example 3 70.2 98.9 69.3 98.3 70.6 98.3 66.9 98.2 68.4 99.3 67.8 99.0 Comparative Example 1 69.6 98.9 69.8 98.8 70.6 98.1 65.2 98.6 67.2 98.4 70.1 97.6

Example  4 : The obtained  With monosaccharides Xylose  And Arabinos Saccharified Sugar composition

The sugar composition of the monosaccharides obtained in Examples 1 to 3 and Comparative Example 1, and the ion-purified sugar solution containing xylose and arabinose were investigated. The results are shown in Table 4.

Sugar Composition Distribution of Monosaccharides and Xylose and Arabinos Glycosaccharides Obtained Item Xylose Arabinos Glucose Galactose Other Example
One
Coconut shell 90.2 8.4 1.2 0.2 -
Palm shell 90.0 7.9 2.1 - - Palm Tree By-Products 84.3 9.6 4.1 1.5 0.5 Example
2
Coconut shell 86.6 7.3 4.5 1.2 0.4
Palm shell 85.9 8.1 5.3 0.7 - Palm Tree By-Products 88.4 6.9 3.7 1.0 - Example
3
Coconut shell 90.8 4.4 2.4 1.5 0.9
Palm shell 91.8 5.1 2.9 0.2 - Palm Tree By-Products 91.4 4.9 3.1 0.6 - Comparative example
One
Coconut shell 83.6 5.0 7.8 2.1 1.5
Palm shell 85.7 4.8 7.5 2.0 - Palm Tree By-Products 89.3 4.8 5.9 - -

As a result of synthesizing the results according to each example, the recovery and the recovery rate of xylose 85% or more purity 98% or more through the ion exchange resin desalination and separation crystallization in the preparation of xylose and arabinose according to the method of Example 1 It was possible to produce arabinose crystals of more than 80% purity and 98% purity.

Example  5: The obtained  Comparison of Component Contents after Carbonization of Hydrolysis Residues

The hydrolysis residues, which are by-products generated during the preparation of xylose and arabinose of Examples 1 to 3 and Comparative Example 1, were collected and dried at 40 to 100 ° C. for 24 to 48 hours, and then 500 to 500 parts based on 10 kg by weight. After carbonizing at 700 ° C. for 72 to 168 hours, the component content was examined. Coconut shells and palm shells which were not subjected to acid hydrolysis as a control were prepared in the same manner as described above, and the results were compared with those shown in Table 5 below. As can be seen in Table 5, the carbon yield and the fixed carbon increased and the ash content decreased compared to the control.

Comparison of Component Contents after Carbonization of Obtained Hydrolysis Residues Item Control Example 1 Example 2 Example 3 Comparative Example 1 Carbon yield
(%)
Coconut shell 27.7 29.5 29.0 28.1 28.9
Palm shell 25.8 27.2 26.9 27.0 26.8 Volatile components
(%)
Coconut shell 9.3 5.2 5.9 6.4 5.5
Palm shell 8.7 4.5 5.3 4.9 6.0 Ash
(%)
Coconut shell 1.1 0.4 0.4 0.5 0.4
Palm shell 1.3 0.6 0.5 0.5 0.6 Fixed carbon
(%)
Coconut shell 89.6 94.4 90.4 92.8 93.5
Palm shell 86.5 94.2 93.7 94.0 93.8

Example  6: Comparison of Component Contents after Carbonization and Activation of Hydrolysis Residues

After carbonization of the hydrolysis residue which is a by-product generated in the preparation of xylose and arabinose of Example 5, oxidation of carbon in the temperature range of 800 ~ 1,000 ℃ to produce a surface erosion of carbide and microporous structure of carbide. After that, activated carbon prepared by activating gas (oxidative gas such as water vapor, carbon dioxide, air) was used as a control, and the activated carbon was produced by using the coconut shell and palm shell without acid hydrolysis using the same method as described above. After comparing the content of the components are shown in Table 6. As shown in Table 6, the hydrolysis residues of coconut shells and palm shells, which are by-products of tropical biomass, were found to have superior gas adsorption capacity compared to the control.

Comparison of Component Contents after Carbonization and Activation of the Hydrolysis Residues Obtained Item Control Example 1 Example 2 Example 3 Comparative Example 1 Activation yield
(%)
Coconut shell 55.9 54.7 54.3 53.8 53.9
Palm shell 52.9 53.0 52.2 51.5 53.0 Gas adsorption Coconut shell 100 127 123 125 125 Palm shell 100 125 123 120 123 General attraction Coconut shell 100 100 100 100 100 Palm shell 100 100 100 100 100 Iodine adsorption
(mg / g)
Coconut shell 1400 1430 1429 1423 1427
Palm shell 1390 1407 1398 1400 1403 Methylene blue
Decolorization (mg / g)
Coconut shell 230 230 227 229 225
Palm shell 228 226 228 226 226 pH Coconut shell 10.5 9.7 9.8 9.9 9.9 Palm shell 10.3 9.9 10.1 9.9 9.8 Hardness (%) Coconut shell 98.8 96.0 95.6 95.7 95.9 Palm shell 98.0 95.7 95.1 94.9 95.5

Example  7: Xylose  Hydrolysis with content of 200 g / L Saccharification  Used Batch  Fermentation

The hydrolyzed saccharified solution contains furfural, 5-hydroxymethyl (HMF), acetate, hydroxybenzaldehyde (HBA), vanillin, etc., which inhibit microbial growth. Thus, the conversion yield of xylose so far was only 58%. Therefore, in order to improve microbial growth and xylitol yield, in the present invention, xylitol fermented microorganisms were adapted from a component that inhibits bacteria through 20 passages in a solid medium consisting of a carbon source of 20% hydrolyzed glycosylated solution. .

As a result, the yield of xylitol was found to increase to 80% (Fig. 1). Figure 1 shows the result of increasing the yield of xylitol by adapting the strain to the inhibitor in a solid medium containing a saccharified solution containing a component that inhibits microbial growth as a carbon source.

First, a preculture medium consisting of 20 g / L glucose and 5 g / L yeast extract was prepared, and 250 ml flask containing 50 ml medium was inoculated with candida tropicalis CJ FID at 240 rpm and 30 ° C. All cultures were conducted for hours.

Thereafter, the present culture medium consisting of a hydrolyzed saccharified solution having a xylose content of 200 g / L, 5 g / L yeast extract, 5 g / L Urea, 5 g / L KH 2 PO 4 , MgSO 4 ˜7H 2 O was prepared, and 5 L 2L of the main culture medium was injected into the fermenter, followed by inoculation of the microorganisms. Stirring rate was set to 500 ~ 300rpm and pH was adjusted to 5.0 during the fermentation process, the culture temperature was 30 ℃ and aeration was incubated for 54 hours while feeding at 1.0vvm (Fig. 2). Figure 2 shows the concentration changes of cell concentration (●), xylose (■), xylitol (▲) with fermentation time.

Table 7 shows the result of comparing the yield of xylitol produced by the method and the yield of xylitol produced using the purified xylitol powder. As shown in Table 7, the obtained xylitol concentration is 161g / L, it can be seen that the cell concentration is 16.5g / L, the xylitol yield is 80%. Compared with the xylitol yield produced using the purified xylose powder, it can be seen that the time required for production was increased and the yield of xylitol was slightly decreased. However, when xylitol is produced using the same strain, it is found that xylitol can be produced more economically than conventional methods because the process of purifying xylose is omitted by using hydrolyzed saccharification instead of purified xylose. Can be.

division Xylose
(gl -1 )
Cell mass
(gl -1 )
Xylitol
(gl -1 )
m max a
(h -1 )
Q p b
(gl -1 h -1 )
Y p / s c
(gg -1 )
time
(h)
Xylose powder 200 28.4 166 0.32 3.53 0.83 47 Xylose Saccharified Liquid 200 16.5 161 0.28 2.98 0.80 54

a Maximum specific growth rate

b Volumetric productivity of xylitol

c Xylitol yield from xylose

Example  8: repeat Batch  By fermentation process Xylitol  production

Culture was carried out in a biocultivator using the same medium as that of Example 7. Thereafter, just before the xylose was depleted, the reaction solution was transferred to a pressure-sensitive microfiltration tube attached to the bioreactor. After separating the used cells and the culture filtrate, the separated cells were concentrated. The concentrated cells were returned to the bioreactor to which 2 L of fresh medium was injected and cultured. Culture conditions were the same as in Example 8.

The first culture without microfiltration showed 322 g of xylitol, productivity 2.98 g / lh, and xylitol yield of 80% for xylose in 2 L of culture medium. It was confirmed that the productivity, 7.86 g / l? H, xylitol yield 88.4% is very high. Figure 3 shows the concentration changes of cell concentration (●), xylose (■), xylitol (▲) with fermentation time.

1 is a graph showing the change in conversion yield (●) according to the number of passages medium.

Figure 2 is a graph showing the concentration change of cell concentration (●), xylose (■), xylitol (▲) with fermentation time in batch fermentation.

Figure 3 is a graph showing the concentration change of the cell concentration (●), xylose (■), xylitol (▲) according to the fermentation time in repeated batch fermentation.

Claims (9)

  1. Acid hydrolysis of tropical fruit biomass byproducts;
    Obtaining a hydrolyzed saccharified solution containing xylose and arabinose by the acid hydrolysis; And
    In order to remove sulfuric acid from the hydrolyzed saccharified liquid, a precipitation method using calcium carbonate is used, wherein the pH of the precipitation reaction is adjusted to 3.0 to 7.0, and the reaction is carried out for 30 to 120 minutes at a precipitation temperature of 60 to 90 ° C. Is maintained at 30 degrees C or less,
    Calcium sulfate precipitated by the precipitation method was filtered,
    In order to desalting the filtered reaction solution using an electrodialysis method,
    The desalted reaction solution was decolorized with granular activated carbon,
    Separating and purifying by using ion exchange resin method in order to remove inorganic salts and ionic substances from the decolorized reaction solution;
    Method for producing a hydrolyzed saccharified solution comprising xylose and arabinose, characterized in that it comprises a.
  2. The method of claim 1,
    The tropical fruit biomass by-product is a coconut shell (Coconut shell) or Palm shell (Palm shell) or a method of producing a hydrolyzed saccharification liquid, characterized in that (Empty Fruit Bunch of Palm Tree).
  3. The method of claim 1,
    The acid hydrolysis is a method of producing a hydrolyzed saccharification liquid, characterized in that the acid concentration is carried out between 0.2 to 5 wt%, temperature 100 to 200 ℃ and 30 minutes to 10 hours.
  4. The method of claim 1,
    A method for producing a hydrolyzed saccharified solution, characterized in that the device used for the electrodialysis method comprises an ion exchange membrane, an electrode plate, a flow control pump and a rectifier.
  5. 5. The method of claim 4,
    Method for producing a hydrolyzed saccharification liquid, characterized in that the ion exchange membrane is composed of a cationic membrane and an anion membrane.
  6. delete
  7. delete
  8. delete
  9. delete
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MYPI20080223 MY150754A (en) 2007-02-09 2008-02-06 Method of producing xylitol using hydrolysate containing xylose and arabinose prepared from byproduct of tropical fruit biomass
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