JP5814677B2 - Golf Club - Google Patents

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Publication number
JP5814677B2
JP5814677B2 JP2011166179A JP2011166179A JP5814677B2 JP 5814677 B2 JP5814677 B2 JP 5814677B2 JP 2011166179 A JP2011166179 A JP 2011166179A JP 2011166179 A JP2011166179 A JP 2011166179A JP 5814677 B2 JP5814677 B2 JP 5814677B2
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Prior art keywords
head
member
golf club
adjustment
adjusting mechanism
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JP2012081250A (en
Inventor
山口 哲男
哲男 山口
熊本 十美男
十美男 熊本
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ダンロップスポーツ株式会社
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Publication of JP2012081250A publication Critical patent/JP2012081250A/en
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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B60/00Details or accessories of golf clubs, bats, rackets or the like
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B53/00Golf clubs
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B53/00Golf clubs
    • A63B53/007Putters
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B53/00Golf clubs
    • A63B53/02Joint structures between the head and the shaft
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B53/00Golf clubs
    • A63B53/04Heads
    • A63B53/0466Heads wood-type
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B53/00Golf clubs
    • A63B53/04Heads
    • A63B53/047Heads iron-type
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B53/00Golf clubs
    • A63B53/04Heads
    • A63B53/06Heads adjustable
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B53/00Golf clubs
    • A63B53/08Golf clubs with special arrangements for obtaining a variable impact
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B60/00Details or accessories of golf clubs, bats, rackets or the like
    • A63B60/06Handles
    • A63B60/22Adjustable handles
    • A63B60/24Weighted handles
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B53/00Golf clubs
    • A63B2053/005Club sets
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B53/00Golf clubs
    • A63B53/02Joint structures between the head and the shaft
    • A63B2053/022Joint structures between the head and the shaft allowing adjustable positioning of the head with respect to the shaft
    • A63B2053/023Joint structures between the head and the shaft allowing adjustable positioning of the head with respect to the shaft adjustable angular orientation
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B53/00Golf clubs
    • A63B53/02Joint structures between the head and the shaft
    • A63B2053/022Joint structures between the head and the shaft allowing adjustable positioning of the head with respect to the shaft
    • A63B2053/023Joint structures between the head and the shaft allowing adjustable positioning of the head with respect to the shaft adjustable angular orientation
    • A63B2053/025Joint structures between the head and the shaft allowing adjustable positioning of the head with respect to the shaft adjustable angular orientation lie angle only, i.e. relative angular adjustment between the shaft and the club head about an axis parallel to the intended line of play when the club is in its normal address position
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B53/00Golf clubs
    • A63B53/02Joint structures between the head and the shaft
    • A63B2053/022Joint structures between the head and the shaft allowing adjustable positioning of the head with respect to the shaft
    • A63B2053/023Joint structures between the head and the shaft allowing adjustable positioning of the head with respect to the shaft adjustable angular orientation
    • A63B2053/026Joint structures between the head and the shaft allowing adjustable positioning of the head with respect to the shaft adjustable angular orientation loft angle only, i.e. relative angular adjustment between the shaft and the club head about a horizontal axis perpendicular to the intended line of play when the club is in its normal address position
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B53/00Golf clubs
    • A63B53/02Joint structures between the head and the shaft
    • A63B2053/022Joint structures between the head and the shaft allowing adjustable positioning of the head with respect to the shaft
    • A63B2053/028Joint structures between the head and the shaft allowing adjustable positioning of the head with respect to the shaft with a range of alternative attachment points for the shaft
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B53/00Golf clubs
    • A63B53/04Heads
    • A63B2053/0408Heads with defined dimensions
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B53/00Golf clubs
    • A63B53/04Heads
    • A63B2053/0408Heads with defined dimensions
    • A63B2053/0412Volume
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B53/00Golf clubs
    • A63B53/04Heads
    • A63B2053/0416Heads with an impact surface provided by a face insert
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B53/00Golf clubs
    • A63B53/04Heads
    • A63B2053/0416Heads with an impact surface provided by a face insert
    • A63B2053/042Heads with an impact surface provided by a face insert the face insert consisting of a material different from that of the head
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B53/00Golf clubs
    • A63B53/04Heads
    • A63B2053/0433Heads with special sole configurations
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B53/00Golf clubs
    • A63B53/04Heads
    • A63B2053/0433Heads with special sole configurations
    • A63B2053/0437Heads with special sole configurations with special crown configurations
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B53/00Golf clubs
    • A63B53/04Heads
    • A63B2053/0445Details of grooves or the like on impact surface
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B53/00Golf clubs
    • A63B53/04Heads
    • A63B2053/0491Heads with added weights, e.g. changeable, replaceable
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B2209/00Characteristics of used materials
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B2209/00Characteristics of used materials
    • A63B2209/02Characteristics of used materials with reinforcing fibres, e.g. carbon, polyamide fibres
    • A63B2209/023Long, oriented fibres, e.g. wound filaments, woven fabrics, mats
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B53/00Golf clubs
    • A63B53/04Heads
    • A63B53/0487Heads for putters
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B53/00Golf clubs
    • A63B53/04Heads
    • A63B53/06Heads adjustable
    • A63B53/065Heads adjustable for putters
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B53/00Golf clubs
    • A63B53/10Non-metallic shafts

Description

  The present invention relates to a golf club. Specifically, the present invention relates to a golf club having adjustability.

  A golfer selects and uses a golf club suitable for him. From the viewpoint of golf rules, the number of golf clubs that can be used during play is 14. Golfers typically select 14 clubs and round.

  However, even the same golfer can change the tone depending on the date of play. Golf course settings also affect the choice of golf clubs. The weather also affects the choice of golf club. In order to deal with a plurality of golf courses, it is advantageous to prepare a replacement golf club in addition to the 14 clubs used. Similarly, it is advantageous to have a replacement golf club to deal with weather changes. In order to increase the degree of freedom of selection, it is advantageous to prepare a replacement golf club.

  With a golf club having adjustability, the specification can be adjusted. In one golf club having adjustability, one golf club can be adjusted to a plurality of specifications. This adjustability can eliminate the need for a replacement golf club.

  Golf clubs having adjustability have been proposed. Japanese Laid-Open Patent Publication No. 9-201433 discloses a golf club with a variable loft angle. Japanese Patent Application Laid-Open No. 2004-267460 discloses a golf club capable of adjusting a hook angle. US patent application US2006 / 0293115 discloses a structure in which the head and the shaft are easily attached and detached. In FIG. 17 of this US2006 / 0293115, an embodiment in which the shaft axis is inclined with respect to the hosel axis is shown. In the embodiment of FIG. 17 of US 2006/0293115, the loft angle, the lie angle, and the hook angle change in conjunction with each other due to the circumferential position of the sleeve.

JP-A-9-201433 JP 2004-267460 A US2006 / 0293115

  It has been found that there is room for improvement in the adjustability in the above prior art.

  An object of the present invention is to provide a golf club having excellent adjustability.

  The golf club of the present invention includes at least one adjusting mechanism. In this golf club, at least two specifications can be adjusted independently of each other.

  Preferably, the head, the shaft, the grip, or a joint portion thereof has an adjustment mechanism (1), and the head, the shaft, the grip, or the joint portion further has another adjustment mechanism (2). doing. Preferably, the adjustment mechanism (1) and the adjustment mechanism (2) can be adjusted independently of each other. The said junction part means the junction part of a head and a shaft, and the junction part of a shaft and a grip.

  Preferably, the adjustment mechanism (1) or the adjustment mechanism (2) is located other than the hosel part.

  Preferably, the adjustment mechanism (1) and the adjustment mechanism (2) are located other than the hosel part.

  Preferably, all the adjustment mechanisms are located other than the hosel part.

  Preferably, in the above golf club, loft angle, lie angle, hook angle, face area, head center of gravity position, club balance, club length, club center of gravity position, club frequency, club weight, head shape, head volume, Head weight, shaft flex, shaft tone, shaft torque, shaft bending stiffness distribution, shaft torsional stiffness distribution, shaft weight, shaft weight distribution, shaft center of gravity, shaft length, grip outer diameter, grip weight 2 or more of the above specifications selected from: grip center of gravity position, grip length, face groove specification, face progression, head inertia moment, club inertia moment, head-ball rebound coefficient, and head-ball friction coefficient Are adjustable independently of each other.

  The above-mentioned specifications that can be adjusted independently from each other may be 3 or more, or 4 or more.

  Preferably, the plurality of specifications include one or more specific specifications selected from a loft angle, a lie angle, a club length, and a club weight. In all of the one or more specific specifications, the adjustment range is equal to or greater than the second-equivalent width. It is.

  The golf club set of the present invention includes a plurality of the golf clubs described above.

  The accuracy or freedom of specification adjustment can be improved. Adjustments that are convenient for golfers are possible.

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a head including an adjustment mechanism M1 (front member replacement mechanism). FIG. 2 is an exploded view of the head of FIG. FIG. 3 is a view for explaining replacement of the front member. FIG. 4 is a view of the head of FIG. 1 as viewed from the sole side. FIG. 5 is a perspective view of a head provided with an adjustment mechanism M2 (face plate exchange mechanism). FIG. 6 is a diagram for explaining the replacement of the face plate. FIG. 7 is a view showing a golf club provided with an adjusting mechanism M3 (club length adjusting mechanism). FIG. 8 is a diagram for explaining the adjustment of the club length. FIG. 9 is a view showing a golf club provided with an adjusting mechanism M4 (lie angle adjusting mechanism). FIG. 10 is a view of the golf club of FIG. 9 as viewed from the sole side. FIG. 11 is a cross-sectional view of the golf club of FIG. 12 is a cross-sectional view taken along line Cs1-Cs1, a cross-sectional view taken along line Cs2-Cs2, and a cross-sectional view taken along line Cs3-Cs3 in FIG. FIG. 13 is a diagram for explaining the adjustment of the lie angle. FIG. 14 is a view showing a golf club provided with an adjusting mechanism M4 and an adjusting mechanism M5. FIG. 15 is a view of the golf club of FIG. 14 as viewed from the sole side. FIG. 16 is a view showing a golf club provided with an adjusting mechanism M4, an adjusting mechanism M5, and an adjusting mechanism M6. FIG. 17 is a cross-sectional view of a golf club provided with an adjusting mechanism M6. FIG. 18 is a view of a golf club provided with an adjusting mechanism M7. FIG. 19 is an exploded view of the golf club of FIG. FIG. 20 is a cross-sectional view of the golf club of FIG. FIG. 21 is a perspective view of a sleeve used in the golf club of FIG. FIG. 22 is a cross-sectional view of the first sleeve. FIG. 23 is a cross-sectional view of the second sleeve. FIG. 24 is an exploded perspective view of a golf club head provided with an adjusting mechanism M8. FIG. 25 is a diagram for explaining replacement of the rear member. FIG. 26 is a view showing a golf club provided with an adjusting mechanism M9. 27 is a cross-sectional view of FIG. FIG. 28 is a cross-sectional view of the golf club along the line F28-F28 in FIG. FIG. 29 is a view showing a golf club provided with an adjusting mechanism M10. 30 is a cross-sectional view of FIG. FIG. 31 is an exploded view of FIG. FIG. 32 is an exploded view of another golf club provided with the adjusting mechanism M10. FIG. 33 is an exploded perspective view of a golf club head including the adjustment mechanism M1 and the adjustment mechanism M11. FIG. 34 is a view of the head of FIG. 33 as viewed from the crown side. FIG. 35 is an exploded perspective view of a head including the adjusting mechanism M12. FIG. 36 is an exploded view of a club provided with the adjusting mechanism M6 and the adjusting mechanism M10. FIG. 37 is a bottom view of the golf club provided with the adjusting mechanism M13. FIG. 38 is a perspective view of a golf club head provided with an adjusting mechanism M14. FIG. 39 is an exploded perspective view of the head of FIG. 40 is a cross-sectional view of the head of FIG. FIG. 41 is a plan view of a golf club head provided with an adjusting mechanism M15. 42 is a cross-sectional view taken along line F41-F41 in FIG. FIG. 43 is a bottom view of the head of FIG.

  Hereinafter, the present invention will be described in detail based on preferred embodiments with appropriate reference to the drawings.

The adjusting mechanism according to the present invention satisfies the golf rules set forth by R & A (Royal and Ancient Golf Club of Saint Andrews). In other words, the adjusting mechanism according to the present invention satisfies the requirements defined by “1b Adjustability” in “1 Club” of “Appendix Rules II Club Design” defined by R & A. The requirements defined by the “1b adjustability” are the following (i), (ii) and (iii).
(I) It cannot be easily adjusted.
(Ii) All adjustable parts are securely fastened and there is no reasonable possibility of loosening during the round.
(Iii) All shapes after adjustment conform to the rules.

  FIG. 1 shows the head 2. The head 2 includes an adjusting mechanism M1 that can be used in the present invention. Preferably, the adjustment mechanism M1 is used together with other adjustment mechanisms that are independent of each other.

  Although not shown, the golf club including the head 2 includes the head 2, a shaft, and a grip. The head 2 is a wood type golf club head.

  FIG. 2 is an exploded perspective view of the head 2. The head 2 includes a front member 4, a rear member 6, and a coupling member 8. The front member 4 and the rear member 6 are coupled by a coupling member 8. The front member 4 and the rear member 6 are joined together with substantially no gap. This connection completes the hollow head 2.

  The front member 4 has a face surface 10. The front member 4 has the entire face surface 10. Although not shown, the front member 4 has a screw hole for screwing the coupling member 8 and a thick portion for forming the screw hole. The front member 4 is substantially cup-shaped as a whole. Although not shown, the face surface 10 is provided with a face groove.

  The rear member 6 has a hosel portion 12. The hosel part 12 has a shaft hole 14. The rear member 6 has a through hole 16 through which the coupling member 8 is passed, and a thick portion 18 for forming the through hole 16. The through holes 16 are provided on the toe side and the heel side of the head 2. The thick portion 18 is also provided on the toe side and the heel side of the head 2. The positions of the through hole 16 and the thick portion 18 are not limited.

  The rear member 6 has a protrusion 20. In the present embodiment, a plurality of (two) protrusions 20 are provided. The protrusion 20 protrudes forward from the opening of the rear member 6. The protrusion 20 facilitates the alignment of the front member 4. The protrusion 20 facilitates screwing of the front member 4 and the rear member 6.

  The heel side through hole 16 is provided on the heel side of the shaft hole 14. The thick portion 18 on the heel side is provided on the heel side with respect to the shaft hole 14. This arrangement can contribute to shortening the length of the through hole 16. This arrangement can contribute to reducing the volume of the thick portion 18. This arrangement can contribute to miniaturization of the screw mechanism.

  The coupling member 8 is a screw. The front member 4 and the rear member 6 are coupled by the coupling member 8.

  The head 2 has an adjustment mechanism M1. The adjustment mechanism M1 is a screwing mechanism for the front member 4 and the rear member 6. The adjustment mechanism M1 enables the front member 4 to be replaced.

  FIG. 3 shows the replacement front member E4 together with the head 2. FIG. 3 shows a replacement front member E41 and another replacement front member E42 as the replacement front member E4. The exchange front member E41 and the exchange front member E42 are configured to be coupled to the rear member 6 by the coupling member 8. The head 2 and at least one replacement front member E4 constitute a golf club with an adjustment function.

  For example, the loft angle (real loft angle) is changed by replacing the front member 4 with the replacement front member E4. By changing the front member 4 to the replacement front member E4, for example, the hook angle is changed.

  Examples of specifications that can be adjusted by the adjusting mechanism M1 include a loft angle, a hook angle, a face area, and a face progression. In the adjustment mechanism M1, each of these specifications can be adjusted independently. Further, the adjusting mechanism M1 can adjust the coefficient of restitution between the head and the ball and the coefficient of friction between the head and the ball. The coefficient of restitution between the head and the ball can be adjusted by, for example, exchanging with a replacement front member having different rigidity. The friction coefficient between the head and the ball can be adjusted by, for example, exchanging with a replacement front member having a different surface roughness on the face surface.

The following is exemplified as the adjustment of the specification by the adjustment mechanism M1.
(Adjustment 1a) The loft angle is changed and the hook angle is not substantially changed.
(Adjustment 1b) The loft angle is changed, and the hook angle is also changed.
(Adjustment 1c) The loft angle is not substantially changed, and the hook angle is changed.
(Adjustment 1d) The face area is changed, and the loft angle and hook angle do not change.
(Adjustment 1e) The face progression is changed, and the loft angle and the hook angle are not changed.

  The adjusting mechanism M1 is applied to a wood type golf club head, but may be used for other types of golf clubs (iron type, utility type, putter type, etc.).

  FIG. 5 is an exploded perspective view of the head 30 including the adjusting mechanism M2 according to another embodiment. FIG. 6 is a cross-sectional view of the head 30. Although not shown, the golf club provided with the head 30 includes a shaft and a grip. The head 30 is an iron type golf club head. Preferably, the adjustment mechanism M2 is used together with other adjustment mechanisms.

  The head 30 includes a face plate 32, a head main body 34, and a coupling member 36. The face plate 32 and the head body 34 are coupled by a coupling member 36. The face plate 32 and the head main body 34 are joined together with substantially no gap. This connection completes the head 30 having the cavity 38 (see FIG. 6) on the back face. In the head 30, the plane p1 provided on the rear surface of the face plate 32 and the plane p2 provided on the front surface of the head body 34 are in surface contact (see FIG. 6).

  The face plate 32 has a face surface 40. The face plate 32 has the entire face surface 40. Although not shown, the face plate 32 has a screw hole for screwing the coupling member 36. The face plate 32 has a plate shape as a whole. A face groove 42 is provided in the face surface 40.

  The head body 34 has a hosel portion 44. The hosel portion 44 has a shaft hole 46. The head body 34 has a through hole 48 through which the coupling member 36 is passed. The through holes 48 are provided on the toe side and the heel side of the head body 34. The position of the through hole 48 is not limited.

  The coupling member 36 is a screw. The face plate 32 and the head main body 34 are coupled by the coupling member 36.

  The head 2 has an adjustment mechanism M2. The adjustment mechanism M2 is a screwing mechanism between the face plate 32 and the head body 34. The adjustment mechanism M2 allows the face plate 32 to be replaced.

  FIG. 6 shows a sectional view of the replacement face plate E32 together with a sectional view of the head 30. FIG. FIG. 6 shows a first replacement face plate E321 and a second replacement face plate E322 as the replacement face plate E32. The replacement face plate E32 is configured to be coupled to the head body 34 by a coupling member 36. The head 30 and at least one replacement face plate E32 constitute a golf club with an adjusting function.

  By replacing the face plate 32 with the replacement face plate E32, for example, the loft angle (real loft angle) is changed. By changing the face plate 32 to the replacement face plate E32, for example, the specifications of the face groove are changed.

  Examples of specifications that can be adjusted by the adjusting mechanism M2 include loft angle, face groove specifications, face progression, and friction coefficient between the head and the ball. In the adjustment mechanism M2, each of these specifications can be adjusted independently.

The following is exemplified as the adjustment of the specification by the adjusting mechanism M2.
(Adjustment 2a) The loft angle is changed, and the specifications of the face groove are not substantially changed.
(Adjustment 2b) The loft angle is changed, and the specification of the face groove is also changed.
(Adjustment 2c) The loft angle is not substantially changed, and the specification of the face groove is changed.
(Adjustment 2d) The face progression is changed, and the specifications of the loft angle and the face groove are not changed.

  The adjusting mechanism M2 is applied to an iron type golf club head, but may be used for other types of golf club heads (wood type, utility type, putter type, etc.).

  FIG. 7 shows a golf club 50 according to another adjusting mechanism. The golf club 50 includes a head 52, a shaft 54, a sleeve 56, and a grip (not shown). The head 52 is a wood type golf club head. The shaft 54 is tubular.

  As will be described later, the golf club 50 has an adjusting mechanism M3. Preferably, the golf club 50 has other adjustment mechanisms independent of each other together with the adjustment mechanism M3.

  The golf club 50 has a plurality of coupling members 58. The golf club 50 of the present embodiment has three coupling members 58 (see FIG. 7). The coupling member 58 includes a first coupling member 581, a second coupling member 582, and a third coupling member 583.

  FIG. 8 is a cross-sectional view of the golf club 50. In FIG. 8, a cross section of the hosel portion is shown. The left side (configuration S1) of FIG. 8 shows a state where the first coupling member 581 is used. The center (configuration S2) of FIG. 8 shows a state in which the second coupling member 582 is used. The right side (configuration S3) of FIG. 8 shows a state in which the third coupling member 583 is used.

  The head 52 has a hosel hole 60. A sleeve 56 is inserted into the hosel hole 60. The cross-sectional shape of the hosel hole 60 corresponds to the cross-sectional shape of the outer surface of the sleeve 56.

  The sleeve 56 has a shaft hole 62 and a screw hole 63. The shaft hole 62 opens upward. The screw hole 63 opens downward.

  As shown in FIG. 8, the tip of the shaft 54 is inserted into the shaft hole 62. The sleeve 56 is fixed to the tip portion of the shaft 54. The sleeve 56 is bonded to the tip of the shaft 54.

  The outer surface 66 of the sleeve 56 has a portion whose cross-sectional shape is non-circular. In this embodiment, the cross-sectional shape of the outer surface 66 of the sleeve 56 is a hexagon. On the other hand, the cross-sectional shape of the hosel hole 60 is also non-circular (hexagonal). These non-circular cross-sectional shapes restrict the sleeve 56 from rotating with respect to the hosel hole 60.

  The cross-sectional shape of the outer surface of the sleeve 56 and the cross-sectional shape of the hosel hole 60 may be circular. The restriction on the relative rotation can be achieved only by the coupling member 58.

  The coupling member 58 has a head portion r1, a shaft portion r2, and a screw portion r3. A shaft portion r2 is provided between the head portion r1 and the screw portion r3.

  The lengths of the plurality of coupling members 58 are different. The difference in length is achieved by the difference in length of the shaft portion r2.

  As shown in FIG. 8, the screw portion r <b> 3 of the connecting member 58 is connected to the screw hole 63 of the sleeve 56. This screw connection prevents the sleeve 56 from coming off from the shaft hole 62.

  As shown in FIG. 8, the insertion length Ls (see FIG. 8) of the sleeve 56 into the shaft hole 62 varies depending on which coupling member 58 is used. Due to this change, the club length is changed.

  This golf club 50 has an adjusting mechanism M3. The adjusting mechanism M3 is a mechanism for changing the shaft insertion length.

For example, the club length is changed by the adjusting mechanism M3. Further, for example, the club balance is changed by the adjusting mechanism M3. The following is exemplified as the adjustment of the specification by the adjustment mechanism M3.
(Adjustment 3a) The club length is changed, and the club balance is not substantially changed.
(Adjustment 3b) The club length is changed, and the club balance is also changed.

  As a means for realizing the above (Adjustment 3a), it is exemplified that the longer the coupling member 58 is, the lighter the weight is. As means for this purpose, it is exemplified that a material having a smaller specific gravity is used for the longer coupling member 58 and that the outer diameter of the shaft portion r2 is smaller for the longer coupling member 58.

  The adjusting mechanism M3 is applied to a wood type golf club, but may be used for other types of golf clubs (iron type, utility type, putter type, etc.).

  FIG. 9 shows a golf club 70 according to another adjusting mechanism. FIG. 10 is a view of the golf club 70 as seen from the sole side. FIG. 11 is a cross-sectional view of the golf club 70 near the hosel. FIG. 12 is a cross-sectional view at each position shown in FIG. The golf club 70 includes a head 72, a shaft 74, a sleeve 76, a coupling member 78 (see FIG. 11), and a grip (not shown). The head 72 is a wood type golf club head. The shaft 74 is tubular.

  As will be described later, the golf club 70 has an adjustment mechanism M4. Preferably, the golf club 70 further includes another adjustment mechanism independent of the adjustment mechanism M4.

  The head 72 has a hosel part 73. The hosel portion 73 has a sleeve insertion hole 75 (see FIG. 11).

  The sleeve 76 is bonded to the shaft 74. The sleeve 76 has a screw hole 77. The screw hole 77 is provided on the bottom surface 79 of the sleeve 76.

  Further, the golf club 70 has a plurality of sleeve support members 80 (see FIG. 11). The sleeve support member 80 includes a first sleeve support member 801, a second sleeve support member 802, and a third sleeve support member 803.

  The coupling member 78 is a screw. The coupling member 78 has a head portion r1 and a screw portion r3 (see FIG. 11). A head part r1 of the coupling member 78 is provided with a recess 81 for rotating the coupling member 78 (see FIG. 10). The cross-sectional shape of the recess 81 is non-circular.

  The coupling member 78 is screw-coupled with the screw hole 77. By this screw connection, the shaft 74 is prevented from coming off.

  The golf club 70 has an adjustment mechanism M4. The adjustment mechanism M4 can adjust the lie angle. The golf club 70 of this embodiment can be adjusted to three lie angles. The lie angle is adjusted by changing the direction of the shaft axis. The sleeve insertion hole 75 is configured so as not to hinder adjustment of the lie angle.

  The shaft axis in the case of the first lie angle is indicated by a symbol LS (see FIGS. 9 and 11). A shaft axis line in the case of the second lie angle is indicated by a symbol LF. The shaft axis line in the case of the third lie angle is indicated by the symbol LU.

  The head 72 has a plurality of holding holes h1. In the present embodiment, the first holding hole h11, the second holding hole h12, and the third holding hole h13 are provided. In addition to the cross-sectional view of the golf club 70, FIG. 11 shows the outline of the holding hole h1 when viewed from below the head 72. The center axis of the first holding hole h11 coincides with the shaft axis LS. The center axis of the second holding hole h12 coincides with the shaft axis LF. The central axis of the third holding hole h13 coincides with the shaft axis LU.

  Each of the holding holes h1 is positioned so that the central axis of the coupling member 78 (head r1) coincides with any one of the plurality of shaft axes.

  As shown in FIG. 11, the plurality of holding holes h1 partially overlap each other. This partial overlap can reduce the lie angle adjustment interval. This partial overlap can enable fine adjustment of the lie angle.

  The head 72 has a plurality of insertion holes h2. The coupling member 78 (the threaded portion r3 thereof) is inserted through the insertion hole h2. The insertion hole h2 does not appear in the cross-sectional view of FIG. 11 because of the cross-sectional position. In this embodiment, it has the 1st penetration hole h21, the 2nd penetration hole h22, and the 3rd penetration hole h23. The outline of the insertion hole h2 when viewed from below the head 72 is also shown. The center axis of the first insertion hole h21 coincides with the shaft axis LS. The central axis of the second insertion hole h22 coincides with the shaft axis LF. The central axis of the third insertion hole h23 coincides with the shaft axis LU.

  As shown in FIG. 11, the plurality of insertion holes h2 partially overlap each other. This partial overlap can reduce the lie angle adjustment interval. This partial overlap can enable fine adjustment of the lie angle.

  The holding hole h1 and the insertion hole h2 are continuous. The diameter of the holding hole h1 is larger than the diameter of the insertion hole h2. A step surface d1 exists at the boundary between the holding hole h1 and the insertion hole h2. The step surface d1 is in contact with the step surface d2 of the coupling member 78.

  As shown in FIGS. 11 and 12, the sleeve support member 80 has a through hole 88 and an outer surface 90. The through hole 88 of the first sleeve support member 801 corresponds to the shaft axis LS. The through hole 88 of the second sleeve support member 802 corresponds to the shaft axis LF. The through hole 88 of the third sleeve support member 803 corresponds to the shaft axis LU.

  The outer surface 90 of the sleeve support member 80 is a screw. A screw (female screw) 92 that can be coupled to the screw (male screw) of the outer surface 90 is provided on the inner surface of the sleeve insertion hole 75 (see FIG. 11). The sleeve support member 80 is fixed to the sleeve insertion hole 75 by screw connection. Note that this screw connection may be omitted. For example, the cross-sectional shape of the outer surface 90 of the sleeve support member 80 may be a non-circular shape, and the cross-sectional shape of the inner surface of the sleeve insertion hole 75 that contacts the outer surface 90 may also correspond to the cross-sectional shape of the outer surface 90. In this case, the sleeve support member 80 is prevented from rotating with respect to the sleeve insertion hole 75 due to the non-circular cross-sectional shape.

  The sleeve support member 80 supports the sleeve 76 along a predetermined axial direction. At the same time, the sleeve support member 80 inhibits relative rotation between the sleeve 76 and the sleeve insertion hole 75.

  FIG. 13 shows three lie angle states. The left side (configuration S4) of FIG. 13 is a cross-sectional view when the shaft axis LU is employed. In this case, the third sleeve support member 803 among the plurality of sleeve support members 80 is used. A holding hole h13 is used as the holding hole h1. An insertion hole h23 is used as the insertion hole h2. In this configuration S4, the lie angle is relatively upright. That is, the lie angle is relatively large.

  The center (configuration S5) of FIG. 13 is a cross-sectional view when the shaft axis LS is employed. In this case, the first sleeve support member 801 among the plurality of sleeve support members 80 is used. A holding hole h11 is used as the holding hole h1. An insertion hole h21 is used as the insertion hole h2.

  The right side (configuration S6) of FIG. 13 is a cross-sectional view when the shaft axis LF is employed. In this case, among the plurality of sleeve support members 80, the second sleeve support member 802 is used. A holding hole h12 is used as the holding hole h1. An insertion hole h22 is used as the insertion hole h2. In this configuration S6, the lie angle is relatively flat. That is, the lie angle is relatively small.

  In the golf club 70, the sleeve 76 is supported at each lie angle (each shaft axis) by the sleeve support member 80 and the holding hole h1. Support of the sleeve 76 at each lie angle may be achieved by the sleeve support member 80 alone. Support of the sleeve 76 at each lie angle may be achieved only by the holding hole h1. From the viewpoint of relaxing the dimensional accuracy of the hosel part, the support of the sleeve 76 at each lie angle may be achieved by either the sleeve support member 80 or the holding hole h1. Further, from the viewpoint of reducing the dimensional accuracy of the hosel part, it is also preferable that the material of the sleeve support member 80 is resin. The resin sleeve support member 80 is suitable for supporting the sleeve 76 while being deformed so as to absorb the dimensional deviation.

  In this golf club 70, the rotation prevention of the sleeve 76 is achieved by the sleeve support member 80 and the coupling member 78. The detent of the sleeve 76 may be achieved only by the sleeve support member 80. The detent of the sleeve 76 may be achieved only by the coupling member 78. When the coupling member 78 functions as a detent for the sleeve 76, the coupling member 78 is preferably configured to be tightened by a force received from the ball at the time of hitting. Further, when the coupling member 78 is made to function as a detent for the sleeve 76, it is preferable to make the cross-sectional shapes of the holding hole h1 and the head r1 non-circular to prevent relative rotation between the holding hole h1 and the head r1.

  14 and 15 show a golf club 100 according to another adjusting mechanism. FIG. 15 is a view as seen from the sole side. The golf club 100 includes a head 102, a shaft 74, a sleeve 76, a coupling member 78 (see FIG. 15), and a grip (not shown). The head 102 is a wood type golf club head. The shaft 74 is tubular.

  The head 102 has the adjusting mechanism M4 described above. A description of the adjustment mechanism M4 is omitted.

  Furthermore, the head 102 has an adjustment mechanism M5. The adjustment mechanism M5 is a gravity center position adjustment mechanism. The head 102 includes a weight body 104 and an arrangement hole Wh as the adjustment mechanism M5. As shown in FIG. 15, in the present embodiment, a plurality of arrangement holes Wh are provided. These arrangement holes Wh are provided in the sole 106 of the head 102.

  The arrangement hole Wh is a screw hole. The weight body 104 is a screw. The weight body 104 is screwed into the arrangement hole Wh. The position of the center of gravity of the head is adjusted depending on which arrangement hole Wh the weight body 104 is positioned in.

  Examples of specifications that can be adjusted by the adjusting mechanism M5 include the head center of gravity position and the head inertia moment.

The following is exemplified as the adjustment of the specification by the adjustment mechanism M5.
(Adjustment 5a) Although the center-of-gravity distance is changed, the center-of-gravity depth does not substantially change, and the center-of-gravity height does not substantially change.
(Adjustment 5b) The gravity center distance, the gravity center depth, and the gravity center height all change.
(Adjustment 5c) The center-of-gravity distance is changed, and one of the center-of-gravity depth and the center-of-gravity height changes, and the other does not change substantially.

  As shown in FIG. 15, in the present embodiment, the plurality of arrangement holes Wh are arranged substantially along the toe-heel direction. That is, the center axis SP1 of the first arrangement hole Wh1, the center axis SP2 of the second arrangement hole Wh2, and the center axis SP3 of the third arrangement hole Wh3 are arranged substantially along the toe-heel direction. With this arrangement, in this embodiment, when the arrangement of the weight body 104 is changed, the center-of-gravity distance mainly changes and the center-of-gravity depth hardly changes. Specifically, when the amount of change in the centroid depth is Cd (mm) and the amount of change in the centroid distance is Cs (mm), the ratio (Cd / Cs) is preferably 0.2 or less. 1 or less is more preferable. In this case, the center of gravity distance can be selectively adjusted. Selective adjustment of the center of gravity distance is useful for adjusting the orientation of the face at impact.

  The adjusting mechanism M5 is applied to a wood type golf club head, but may be used for other types of golf club heads (iron type, utility type, putter type, etc.).

  FIG. 16 shows a golf club 110 according to another adjustment mechanism. The golf club 110 includes a head 102, a shaft 74, a sleeve 76, a coupling member 78 (not shown), and a grip 112.

  The head 102 includes the adjustment mechanism M4 and the adjustment mechanism M5 described above. A description of the adjustment mechanism M4 and the adjustment mechanism M5 is omitted.

  The grip 112 includes a main body 114, a weight body Wg, and a holding body 118. Furthermore, the grip 112 has a lid 120.

  The holding body 118 has a screw hole 122. The holding body 118 is disposed inside the shaft 74. The holding body 118 is bonded to the inner surface of the shaft 74.

  The weight body Wg is detachable from the holding body 118. This attachment / detachment is achieved by a screw mechanism.

  The main body 114 is made of rubber. A recess 124 is provided near the rear end of the main body 114. The recess 124 is a circumferential groove. The lid 120 has a convex portion 126 corresponding to the concave portion 124. The convex portion 126 is a flange. By deforming the main body 114 made of rubber, the convex portion 126 can be fitted into the concave portion 124. The lid 120 is detachable.

  The grip 112 has a weight adjustment mechanism as the adjustment mechanism M6. This weight adjustment mechanism is achieved by exchanging the weight body Wg. The club balance can be adjusted by changing to a weight body Wg having a different weight. For example, the club balance is reduced by replacing the first weight body Wg1 with the second weight body Wg2 having a larger weight. For example, the club balance is increased by replacing the first weight body Wg1 with the third weight body Wg3 having a smaller weight. The adjusting mechanism M6 has at least two weight bodies Wg having different weights.

  Examples of specifications that can be adjusted by the adjusting mechanism M6 include club balance, club inertia moment, grip weight, and grip center of gravity.

  The adjusting mechanism M6 is applied to a wood type golf club, but may be used for other types of golf clubs (iron type, utility type, putter type, etc.).

  FIG. 18 shows a golf club 130 according to another adjustment mechanism. FIG. 19 is an exploded view of the golf club 130. FIG. 20 is a cross-sectional view of the golf club 130.

  As will be described later, the golf club 130 has an adjustment mechanism M7. Preferably, the golf club 130 further includes another adjustment mechanism independent of the adjustment mechanism M7.

  The golf club 130 includes a head 132, a shaft 134, a sleeve Sv, a screw cylinder 135, and a coupling member 136. A screw cylinder 135 is fixed to the tip of the shaft 134. A grip (not shown) is attached to the rear end of the shaft 134.

  The head 132 includes a head main body 138 and an engaging member 140. The head main body 138 has a hosel hole 142 for inserting the sleeve Sv, and a through hole 144 for inserting the coupling member 136. The through hole 144 passes through the bottom of the hosel hole 142. The head main body 138 has a sole hole 146 that opens to the sole (see FIG. 20). The sole hole 146 and the hosel hole 142 are continuous by the through hole 144.

  The engaging member 140 is fixed to the head body 138 (see FIG. 20). The fixing method is not limited, and examples thereof include adhesion, welding, fitting, and a combination thereof. The engaging member 140 is inserted into the hosel hole 142 from the upper opening of the hosel hole 142. The engaging member 140 is fixed to the bottom of the hosel hole 142.

  FIG. 21 is a perspective view of the sleeve Sv. FIG. 22 is a cross-sectional view of the sleeve Sv.

  The sleeve Sv has a shaft insertion hole 150 and a lower hole 152. The shaft insertion hole 150 opens upward. The lower hole 152 opens downward. A lower hole 152 is disposed below the shaft insertion hole 150.

  The sleeve Sv has an engaging portion 162. The engaging part 162 has a convex part t1. A plurality of convex portions t1 are arranged in the circumferential direction. The convex portions t1 are evenly arranged in the circumferential direction. The convex part t1 is arrange | positioned every 30 degrees.

  Although not shown, an engagement surface that can engage with the engagement portion 162 of the sleeve Sv is provided on the inner surface of the engagement member 140. The cross-sectional shape of the engaging surface corresponds to the cross-sectional shape of the outer surface of the engaging portion 162. The engagement between the engagement surface (inner surface) of the engagement member 140 and the engagement portion 162 prevents the sleeve Sv from rotating with respect to the hosel hole 142.

  The shaft insertion hole 150 is a screw hole. That is, the shaft insertion hole 150 is a female screw.

  The screw cylinder 135 has a substantially cylindrical shape as a whole. The outer surface of the screw cylinder 135 is a screw. The outer surface of the screw cylinder 135 is a male screw. An inner surface 154 of the screw cylinder 135 is a circumferential surface. The outer surface 156 of the shaft 134 is bonded to the inner surface 154 of the screw cylinder 135.

  As shown in FIG. 20, the shaft insertion hole 150 of the sleeve Sv and the screw cylinder 135 are screw-coupled. The shaft 134 is fixed to the sleeve Sv by this screw connection.

  The sleeve Sv is prevented from coming off by screw connection. As shown in FIG. 20, the lower hole 152 of the sleeve Sv is screw-coupled to the coupling member 136. This screw connection prevents the sleeve Sv from coming off. The axial force resulting from this screw connection causes the hosel end surface 158 and the stepped surface 160 of the sleeve Sv to adhere to each other. In order to secure this axial force, a gap K1 exists between the tip of the coupling member 136 and the bottom surface of the lower hole 152 in the state where the screw coupling is completed (see FIG. 20).

  In the present embodiment, a first sleeve Sv1 and a second sleeve Sv2 are prepared as the sleeve Sv (see FIG. 19). The sleeve Sv1 and the sleeve Sv2 are interchangeable. This is because, as described above, due to the screw mechanism, the sleeve Sv can be attached to and detached from the shaft 134 (screw cylinder 135).

  FIG. 22 is a cross-sectional view of the first sleeve Sv1. As shown in FIG. 22, the axis h1 of the shaft insertion hole 150 is inclined with respect to the axis z1 of the sleeve Sv. The inclination angle θ1 is the maximum value of the angle formed by the axis h1 and the axis z1. The axis line z1 of the sleeve Sv is substantially equal to the axis line of the hosel hole 142.

  FIG. 23 is a cross-sectional view of the second sleeve Sv2. As shown in FIG. 23, the axis h1 of the shaft insertion hole 150 is not inclined with respect to the axis z1 of the sleeve Sv. The axis h1 of the shaft insertion hole 150 coincides with the axis z1 of the sleeve Sv.

  Although not shown, another sleeve Sv having an inclination angle θ2 different from the inclination angle θ1 may be used.

  Variations of the sleeve Sv are not limited to the inclination angle of the shaft insertion hole 150. For example, another sleeve Sv in which the position of the shaft insertion hole 150 is changed may be used. For example, another sleeve Sv obtained by translating the shaft insertion hole 150 of the second sleeve Sv2 may be used. In this case, the axis line z1 is parallel to the axis line h1, but does not coincide with the axis line h1.

  The adjustment mechanism M7 of this embodiment is a sleeve replacement mechanism. In the adjusting mechanism M7, one or more specifications selected from the loft angle, the lie angle, and the hook angle are adjusted by exchanging the sleeve Sv.

  Specifications that can be adjusted by the adjustment mechanism M7 include face progression, lie angle, loft angle, hook angle, club balance, club length, club center of gravity, club frequency, club inertia moment, shaft tone, shaft torque, shaft bending Examples include rigidity, shaft torsional rigidity, shaft weight, shaft weight distribution, shaft gravity center position, and shaft length.

The following is exemplified as the adjustment of the specification by the adjusting mechanism M7.
(Adjustment 7a) Although the lie angle is changed, the loft angle and the hook angle are not substantially changed.
(Adjustment 7b) Although the loft angle and the hook angle are changed, the lie angle does not substantially change.
(Adjustment 7c) Although the club length is changed, the loft angle, the hook angle, and the lie angle are not substantially changed.
(Adjustment 7d) Although the tone of the shaft is changed, the loft angle, the hook angle, and the lie angle are not substantially changed.
(Adjustment 7e) The tone of the shaft is changed, but the loft angle, hook angle, and lie angle are not substantially changed.
(Adjustment 7f) Although the face progression is changed, the loft angle, the hook angle, and the lie angle are not substantially changed.
(Adjustment 7g) Although the center-of-gravity distance (distance between the shaft axis and the center of gravity of the head) is changed, the loft angle, hook angle, and lie angle are not substantially changed.

  When the inclination angle θ1 of the sleeve Sv is 0 °, the shaft can be exchanged without changing the loft angle, the lie angle, and the hook angle.

  A plurality of sleeves Sv in which the inclination angle θ1 is 0 ° and the positions of the shaft insertion holes 150 are different may be prepared. In this case, the axial movement of the shaft insertion hole 150 can be translated by exchanging the sleeve Sv. In this case, the adjustment 7d and the adjustment 7e are possible.

  FIG. 25 is an exploded perspective view of a head 170 used in a golf club according to another adjustment mechanism. FIG. 26 is a cross-sectional view of the head 170. Although not shown, the golf club includes a head 170, a shaft, and a grip. The head 170 is a wood type golf club head.

  As will be described later, the head 170 has an adjustment mechanism M8. Preferably, the golf club having the head 170 further includes another adjusting mechanism independent of the adjusting mechanism M8.

  The head 170 includes a front member 172, a rear member 174, and a coupling member 176. The front member 172 and the rear member 174 are coupled by a coupling member 176. The front member 172 and the rear member 174 are joined together with substantially no gap. By this connection, the hollow head 170 is completed.

  The front member 172 has a face surface 178. The front member 172 has the entire face surface 178. Although not shown, the front member 172 has a screw hole for screwing the coupling member 176 and a thick portion for forming the screw hole. The front member 172 has a hosel part 180. The hosel part 180 has a shaft hole 182. Although not shown, the face surface 178 is provided with a face groove.

  The rear of the front member 172 is open. An extending portion 181 that can support the edge portion 179 of the rear member 174 from the inside is provided at the edge of the opening. The extending portion 181 facilitates positioning of the rear member 174 with respect to the front member 172.

  Although not shown, the rear member 174 has a through hole through which the coupling member 176 passes and a thick portion for forming the through hole.

  The coupling member 176 is a screw. The front member 172 and the rear member 174 are coupled by the coupling member 176.

  The head 177 has an adjustment mechanism M8. The structure of the adjusting mechanism M8 is similar to the adjusting mechanism M1 described above. The adjustment mechanism M8 is a screwing mechanism. The adjustment mechanism M8 allows the rear member 174 to be replaced.

  FIG. 24 shows the replacement rear member E8 together with the head 170. FIG. 25 shows a replacement rear member E81 and another replacement rear member E82 as the replacement rear member E8. The replacement rear member E81 and the replacement rear member E82 are configured to be coupled to the front member 172 by a coupling member 176. The head 170 and at least one replacement rear member E8 constitute a golf club with an adjustment function.

  By replacing the rear member 174 with the replacement rear member E8, for example, the head shape is changed. For example, the position of the center of gravity is changed by replacing the rear member 174 with the replacement rear member E8. By replacing the rear member 174 with the replacement rear member E8, for example, the head volume is changed. Further, by replacing the rear member 174 with the replacement rear member E8, the coefficient of restitution between the head and the ball can be changed.

The following is exemplified as the specification adjustment by the adjustment mechanism M8.
(Adjustment 8a) The head shape is changed, and the center of gravity of the head is not substantially changed.
(Adjustment 8b) The head volume is changed, and the center of gravity of the head is not substantially changed.
(Adjustment 8c) The position of the center of gravity is changed, and the head shape does not change.
(Adjustment 8d) The moment of inertia is changed, and the head shape does not change.
(Adjustment 8e) Two or more selected from the head shape, the head volume, the position of the center of gravity of the head, and the moment of inertia are changed.

  From the viewpoint of maintaining club balance, it is preferable that the head weight does not change in the adjusting mechanism M8.

  The adjusting mechanism M8 is applied to a wood type golf club head, but may be used for other types of golf clubs (iron type, utility type, putter type, etc.).

  FIG. 26 shows the vicinity of a grip of a golf club according to another adjustment mechanism. This golf club has a head (not shown), a shaft 190 and a grip 192. The head is attached to one end of the shaft 190. The grip 192 is attached to the other end of the shaft 190.

  As will be described later, this golf club has an adjusting mechanism M9. Preferably, the golf club has another adjustment mechanism independent of the adjustment mechanism M9.

  27 is a cross-sectional view of FIG. FIG. 28 is a cross-sectional view of the golf club along the line F28-F28 in FIG.

  As FIG.27 and FIG.28 shows, the shaft 190 is tubular. The inside of the shaft 190 is a cavity.

  The grip 192 includes an inner grip member 194 and an outer grip member 196. The inner grip member 194 has a cylindrical shaft insertion portion 198. As shown in FIGS. 27 and 28, a shaft 190 is inserted into the shaft insertion portion 198.

  The inner grip member 194 has an end portion 200. The end surface 202 of the shaft 190 is abutted against the end portion 200. A through hole 203 is provided at the center of the end portion 200.

   The outer grip member 196 includes a first divided body 204 and a second divided body 206. The first divided body 204 is semi-tubular. The second divided body 206 is also semi-tubular. A tubular outer grip member 196 is formed by the first divided body 204 and the second divided body 206. As shown in FIG. 28, a step portion 210 is provided at the edge of the first divided body 204. As shown in FIG. 28, a step 212 is provided on the edge of the second divided body 206. Except for the shape of the stepped portion, the shape of the second divided body 206 is the same as that of the first divided body 204.

  In the outer grip member 196, the stepped portion 210 of the first divided body 204 and the stepped portion 212 of the second divided body 206 are abutted against each other. The step part 210 and the step part 212 are meshed with each other. The outer side grip member 196 has an overlapping portion where the first divided body 204 and the second divided body 206 overlap. The step portion 210 and the step portion 212 form an overlapping portion in which the first divided body 204 and the second divided body 206 overlap. The thickness of the outer side grip member 196 including this overlapping portion is constant over the entire circumference in the circumferential direction. In the outer grip member 196, there is no gap in the portion where the first divided body 204 and the second divided body 206 are abutted. Due to the combination of the first divided body 204 and the second divided body 206, the outer grip member 196 has a cylindrical shape.

  The outer grip member 196 covers the outer surface 214 of the shaft insertion portion 198. The outer grip member 196 covers at least a part of the outer surface 214. Preferably, the outer grip member 196 covers the entire outer surface 214.

  The inner surface 216 of the outer grip member 196 is composed of an inner surface 218 of the first divided body 204 and an inner surface 220 of the second divided body 206. An inner surface 218 of the first divided body 204 is attached to the outer surface 214 of the shaft insertion portion 198. The inner surface 220 of the second divided body 206 is also attached to the outer surface 214 of the shaft insertion portion 198.

  As shown in FIG. 27, the inner grip member 194 includes a first annular portion 222 that extends radially outward from the grip end side end of the shaft insertion portion 198, and a head from the radially outer edge of the first annular portion 222. And a first cylindrical portion 224 extending to the side. The first annular portion 222 is a single annular portion. The first cylindrical portion 224 is a single cylindrical portion. The first annular portion 222 and the first cylindrical portion 224 form a first recess 226 with the first annular portion 222 as a bottom.

  As shown in FIG. 27, the inner grip member 194 includes a second annular portion 228 extending radially outward from the head side end of the shaft insertion portion 198, and a grip end from the radially outer edge of the second annular portion 228. And a second cylindrical portion 230 extending to the side. The second annular portion 228 is a single annular portion. The second cylindrical portion 230 is a single cylindrical portion. The second annular portion 228 and the second cylindrical portion 230 form a second concave portion 232 having the second cylindrical portion 230 as a bottom.

  As shown in FIG. 27, the outer grip member 196 has a grip end side end 234. Each of the first divided body 204 and the second divided body 206 has a grip end side end 234. The grip end side end 234 is inserted into the first recess 226. The grip end side end 234 is covered with a first cylindrical portion 224. The grip end side end 234 is protected by the first cylindrical portion 224. Since the grip end side end 234 is not exposed to the outside, it is difficult to turn over. Therefore, the first divided body 204 and the second divided body 206 are difficult to peel off.

  The outer grip member 196 has a head side end 236. Each of the first divided body 204 and the second divided body 206 has a head-side end 236. The head side end 236 is inserted into the second recess 232. The head side end 236 is covered with the second cylindrical portion 230. The head side end 236 is protected by the second cylindrical portion 230. Since the head side end 236 is not exposed to the outside, it is difficult to turn over. Therefore, the first divided body 204 and the second divided body 206 are difficult to peel off.

  The entire inner grip member 194 is integrally formed. The first annular portion 222 and the first cylindrical portion 224 are integral with the shaft insertion portion 198. The second annular portion 228 and the second cylindrical portion 230 are integral with the shaft insertion portion 198.

  The inner peripheral surface 238 of the inner grip member 194 and the outer surface 240 of the shaft 190 are bonded with a double-sided tape. The inner grip member 194 is attached to the shaft 190 in the same manner as a general grip attachment.

  The inner surface 216 of the outer grip member 196 and the outer surface 214 of the shaft insertion portion 198 are bonded with a double-sided tape. In other words, the inner surface 218 and the outer surface 214 of the first divided body 204 are bonded by a double-sided tape, and the inner surface 220 and the outer surface 214 of the second divided body 206 are bonded by a double-sided tape.

The procedure for attaching the outer grip member 196 to the shaft insertion portion 198 of the inner grip member 194 is, for example, as follows.
(1b) A double-sided tape is affixed to the inner surface 218 of the first divided body 204. A double-sided tape is affixed to the inner surface 220 of the second divided body 206.
(2b) Affix one of the first divided body 204 and the second divided body 206 to the shaft insertion portion 198. (3b) The other of the first divided body 204 and the second divided body 206 is the shaft insertion portion. Paste it on 198. At this time, the stepped portion 210 and the stepped portion 212 are engaged with each other.

  In the steps (2b) and (3b), the grip end side end 234 is inserted into the first recess 226 and the head side end 236 is inserted into the second recess 232. Insertion into the first recess 226 is performed while turning up the first cylindrical portion 224. Insertion into the second recess 232 is performed while turning up the second cylindrical portion 230.

  The removal method of the 1st division body 204 is as follows. The first divided body 204 is removed by turning up the first cylindrical portion 224 or the second cylindrical portion 230 and pulling the grip end side end 234 or the head side end 236. The method of removing the second divided body 206 is the same as that of the first divided body 204. Thus, the removal of the first divided body 204 and the second divided body 206 is easy. The first divided body 204 and the second divided body 206 are exchangeable.

  The adjustment mechanism M9 is an outer grip member replacement mechanism. In the adjusting mechanism M9, the center of gravity position and the club balance of the club can be adjusted by exchanging the divided bodies 204 and 206 having different weights. By changing the specific gravity of the divided bodies 204 and 206, the grip weight can be changed without changing the grip outer diameter. Further, the outer diameter of the grip 192 is changed by changing the thicknesses of the divided bodies 204 and 206.

  The material of the inner side grip member 194 is not limited. Preferably, the material of the inner grip member 194 is rubber. As this rubber, natural rubber (specific gravity 0.91 to 0.93), styrene butadiene rubber (specific gravity 0.92 to 0.97), EPDM (specific gravity 0.86 to 0.87), isoprene rubber (0.92 to 0.92). 0.93) and mixtures thereof. From the viewpoint of moldability, EPDM (ethylene propylene diene rubber) and SBR (styrene butadiene rubber) are preferable. When the inner grip member 194 is rubber, the first cylindrical portion 224 and the second cylindrical portion 230 can be turned up.

  The material of the outer side grip member 196 is not limited. Preferably, the material of the outer grip member 196 is rubber. As this rubber, natural rubber (specific gravity 0.91 to 0.93), styrene butadiene rubber (specific gravity 0.92 to 0.97), EPDM (specific gravity 0.86 to 0.87), isoprene rubber (0.92 to 0.92). 0.93) and mixtures thereof. From the viewpoint of moldability, EPDM (ethylene propylene diene rubber) and SBR (styrene butadiene rubber) are preferable. From the viewpoint of facilitating weight adjustment, a rubber containing a metal powder having a specific gravity of 10 or more is preferable, and a rubber containing a metal powder having a specific gravity of 15 or more is more preferable. Examples of the metal powder include tungsten alloy powder.

The following is exemplified as the adjustment of the specification by the adjusting mechanism M9.
(Adjustment 9a) The grip thickness (grip outer diameter) is changed, and the club balance is not substantially changed.
(Adjustment 9b) The grip thickness is changed, and the club balance is also changed.
(Adjustment 9c) The grip weight and the club balance are changed, and the grip thickness is not substantially changed.
(Adjustment 9d) The grip weight and the club balance are changed, and the grip thickness is also changed.

  FIG. 29 shows the vicinity of a grip end of a golf club provided with an adjusting mechanism M10 according to another embodiment. This golf club has a head (not shown), a shaft 250 and a grip 252. The head is attached to one end of the shaft 250. The grip 252 is attached to the other end of the shaft 250.

  Preferably, the golf club further includes another adjusting mechanism independent of the adjusting mechanism M10.

  In addition, although the groove | channel is formed in the outer surface (grip grip surface) of the grip 252, description of this groove | channel is abbreviate | omitted in FIGS.

  30 is a cross-sectional view of FIG. FIG. 31 is an exploded view of FIG.

  The grip 252 has a grip body 252a and two extending members 252b. Two extension members 252b are attached to the rear end of the grip body 252a.

  The grip body 252a is fixed to the rear end portion of the shaft 250 by a double-sided tape. The method of bonding with a double-sided tape is the same as the method of bonding a normal grip.

  A first extension member 252b is attached to the rear end of the grip body 252a. A second extension member 252b is attached to the rear end of the first extension member 252b.

  The outer surface 252a1 of the grip body 252a and the outer surface 252b1 of the extension member 252b are substantially continuous without a step. Further, the outer surfaces 252b1 of the extension member 252b are substantially continuous without a step. A gripping surface 252m is formed by the outer surface 252a1 and the two outer surfaces 252b1.

  The grip body 252a has a rubber part g3 and a hard base body h3. The material of the rubber part g3 is rubber.

  The hard base body h3 is provided inside the rubber part g3. The rubber part g3 covers the hard base body h3. An outer surface 252a1 of the grip body 252a is an outer surface of the rubber part g3.

  As shown in FIGS. 30 and 31, the hard base body h3 has a screw hole sc3. The hard base body h3 has a cylindrical portion h31 and a bottom surface portion h32. The inner surface of the cylindrical portion h31 is a screw hole sc3. The screw hole sc3 is opened upward.

  The hard base body h3 is fixed to the rubber part g3. This fixing method is not limited, for example, adhesion by an adhesive.

  The first extension member 252b is located between the grip body 252a and the second extension member 252b. The first extending member 252b has a rubber part g4 and a hard connector h4. The material of the rubber part g4 is rubber. The rubber part g4 covers the upper part of the hard connector h4.

  The hard connector h4 is provided inside the rubber part g4. An outer surface 252b1 of the extending member 252b is an outer surface of the rubber part g4.

  The hard connector h4 has a cylindrical part h41 and a columnar part h42 (see FIG. 30). The inner surface of the cylindrical portion h41 is a screw hole sc4 (female screw). The outer surface of the cylindrical part h42 is a male screw. The cylindrical part h41 and the columnar part h42 are arranged coaxially. The cylindrical part h42 has an exposed part ex2 exposed from the rubber part g4 (see FIG. 31). At least a part of the cylindrical portion h42 is the exposed portion ex2. The exposed part ex2 protrudes downward.

  In the connection between the first extension member 252b and the grip body 252a, the cylindrical portion h42 (male thread) is screwed into the screw hole sc3 (female thread) of the grip body 252a. In the connection between the extension members 252b, the cylindrical portion h42 of the second extension member 252b is screwed into the screw hole sc4 of the first extension member 252b.

  All the extending members 252b are common. The screw hole sc3 and the screw hole sc4 are the same type.

  The axial length of the exposed part ex2 is shorter than the axial length of the screw hole sc3. Therefore, in the state where the grip body 252a and the extension member 252b are connected, a gap k1 exists between the bottom surface portion h32 and the cylindrical portion h42 (see FIG. 30). The gap k1 prevents a gap from occurring at the boundary between the outer surface 252a1 of the grip body 252a and the outer surface 252b1 of the extension member 252b.

  The axial length of the exposed part ex2 is shorter than the axial length of the screw hole sc4. Therefore, in a state where the extending members 252b are connected to each other, a gap k2 exists between the end surface of the columnar part h42 and the bottom surface of the cylindrical part h41 (see FIG. 30). The gap k2 prevents a gap from occurring at the boundary between the outer surfaces 252b1 of the extension member 252b.

  The second extension member 252b is located closer to the grip rear end than the first extension member 252b. The second extension member 252b is the rearmost end extension member 252b.

  The second extension member 252b is the same as the first extension member 252b described above. Therefore, the description of the second extending member 252b is omitted.

  Thus, in this embodiment, the grip body 252a and the extension member 252b can be connected by screw connection. Further, the extension members 252b can be connected to each other by screw connection.

  In the present embodiment, the extension member 252b is detachable. The extension member 252b is removed by rotating the extension member 252b to release the screw connection. The grip length can be adjusted by attaching and detaching the extension member 252b.

  In this embodiment, the case where the number of the extending members 252b is two is shown. The grip length can be further changed by changing the number of the extending members 252b. When the number of extension members 252b is zero, the grip length can be shortened. One extension member 252b may be provided.

  The number of extension members 252b may be three or more. Since the connection structures of the extension members 252b are the same, the number of extension members 252b to be connected can be freely selected.

  Thus, the adjustment mechanism M10 according to the present embodiment is a grip length adjustment mechanism. The adjustment mechanism M10 is also a club length adjustment mechanism.

  FIG. 32 is an exploded view of a grip 260 according to another embodiment using the adjusting mechanism M10. The grip 260 includes a grip body 252a, an extension member 252b, and an extension member 260b. The grip body 252a is used for the grip 252 described above. The extension member 252b is also used for the grip 252 described above.

  The extension member 260b has a rubber part g5 and a hard connector h4. The hard connector h4 of the extension member 260b is the same as that of the extension member 252b described above. The difference between the extension member 252b and the extension member 260b is only the length of the rubber part.

  In FIG. 32, a double arrow L1 indicates the length of the rubber part g4 of the extending member 252b. In FIG. 32, a double arrow L2 indicates the length of the rubber part g5 of the extending member 260b. The length L1 is different from the length L2. In the present embodiment, the length of the grip 260 can be adjusted by selecting one of the extension members 252b and 260b.

  The material of the hard base is harder than the material of the gripping surface. By using a hard base, connection reliability and rigidity inside the grip can be improved. A preferable material for the hard substrate is a metal or a resin, and a more preferable material is a metal. Examples of the resin include thermoplastic resins and carbon fiber reinforced resins. From the viewpoint of processability, examples of preferable resins include nylon, PEBAX (polyether block copolymer), and polycarbonate. Examples of the metal include stainless steel, aluminum alloy, titanium alloy and the like. From the viewpoint of club balance, high specific gravity metals (specific gravity of 12 or more) such as tungsten and tungsten alloys can also be used.

  The material of the hard connector is harder than the material of the grip grip surface. By using a hard connector, connection reliability and rigidity inside the grip can be improved. A preferable material for the hard connector is a metal or a resin, and a more preferable material is a metal. Examples of the resin include thermoplastic resins and carbon fiber reinforced resins. From the viewpoint of processability, examples of preferable resins include nylon, PEBAX (polyether block copolymer), and polycarbonate. Examples of the metal include stainless steel, aluminum alloy, titanium alloy and the like. From the viewpoint of club balance, high specific gravity metals (specific gravity of 12 or more) such as tungsten and tungsten alloys can also be used.

  The rubber that is the material of the rubber part is not limited. A preferred rubber is a rubber elastic body such as vulcanized rubber. Of course, thermoplastic elastomers are also included in the rubber. From the viewpoint of difficulty in sliding, natural rubber (specific gravity 0.91 to 0.93), styrene butadiene rubber (specific gravity 0.92 to 0.97), EPDM (specific gravity 0.86 to 0.87), isoprene rubber ( Specific gravity 0.92-0.93) and mixtures thereof are preferred.

  Examples of specifications that can be adjusted by the adjusting mechanism M10 include club length, club gravity center position, club frequency, club inertia moment, grip weight, grip gravity center position, and grip length.

The following is exemplified as the adjustment of the specification by the adjustment mechanism M10.
(Adjustment 10a) The grip length and the club length are changed, and the club balance is also changed.
(Adjustment 10b) The grip length and the club length are changed, and the club balance is not substantially changed.

  By mounting the extension member, the club length becomes longer. Increasing club length increases club balance. On the other hand, due to the mounting of the extension member, a so-called counterbalance effect occurs. This counter balance reduces the club balance. By setting the weight and length of the extension member, the cancellation of both can be promoted. This promotion can suppress an increase in club balance while increasing the club length. Furthermore, it is possible to substantially eliminate a change in club balance while increasing the club length.

  In all specifications described in the present application, “substantially does not change” means that the amount of change is less than 10%. As for the club balance, “substantially no change” means that the change is ± 1 point or less. The club balance is a 14-inch system. Club balance is also referred to as swing balance.

  FIG. 33 is an exploded perspective view of the head 268. FIG. 34 is a view of the head 268 as viewed from the crown side. The head 268 includes an adjusting mechanism M11 in addition to the adjusting mechanism M1 described above. Although not shown, the golf club provided with the head 268 includes the head 268, a shaft, and a grip. The head 268 is a wood type golf club head.

  In the present embodiment, the adjustment mechanism M1 is used as a loft angle adjustment mechanism. On the other hand, the adjustment mechanism M11 is used as a hook angle adjustment mechanism.

  The configuration of the head 268 is the same as that of the head 2 described above except for the presence of the adjusting intermediate member 270. Parts of the head 268 that are the same as those of the head 2 are denoted by the same reference numerals as those of the head 2 and description thereof is omitted.

  The adjustment mechanism M11 includes an adjustment intermediate member 270 and a replacement adjustment intermediate member (not shown). The adjustment intermediate member 270 is disposed between the front member 4 and the rear member 6. The front member 4, the adjusting intermediate member 270, and the rear member 6 are joined together with substantially no gap. The adjusting intermediate member 270 is sandwiched and fixed between the front member 4 and the rear member 6. This fixing is achieved by a screw connection of the connection-like member 8.

  The adjustment intermediate member 270 is a ring-shaped member. The adjusting intermediate member 270 has a protruding portion 272 (see FIG. 33). The protruding portion 272 protrudes toward the front member 4. The protruding portion 272 facilitates alignment between the adjusting intermediate member 270 and the front member 4.

  The hook angle can be adjusted by changing the planar shape of the adjusting intermediate member 270 (see FIG. 34). The hook angle can be adjusted by replacing the adjusting intermediate member 270 with another adjusting intermediate member (not shown).

  Thus, the head 268 has a plurality of (two) adjustment mechanisms M1 and M11. The plurality of adjusting mechanisms M1 and M11 can be adjusted independently of each other. In the head 268, the loft angle and the hook angle can be adjusted independently of each other.

  The hook angle and the loft angle are exemplified as the specifications that can be adjusted by the adjustment mechanism M11. The hook angle and the loft angle can be adjusted only by the adjusting mechanism M11 without using the adjusting mechanism M1.

The following is exemplified as the specification adjustment by the adjustment mechanism M11.
(Adjustment 11a) The hook angle is changed, and the loft angle is also changed.
(Adjustment 11b) The hook angle is changed, and the loft angle is not substantially changed.
(Adjustment 11c) The loft angle is changed and the hook angle is not substantially changed.

  FIG. 35 is an exploded perspective view of the head 280 provided with the adjusting mechanism M12. Although not shown, the golf club provided with the head 280 includes the head 280, a shaft, and a grip. The head 280 is a wood type golf club head.

  The head 280 includes a front member 282, a rear member 284, and a coupling member 8. The front member 282 and the rear member 284 are coupled by the coupling member 8. The front member 282 and the rear member 284 are joined together with substantially no gap.

  The front member 282 has a face surface 286. The front member 282 has the entire face surface 286. Although not shown, the front member 282 has a screw hole for screwing the coupling member 8. Further, the front member 282 has a thick portion 288 for forming this screw hole. Two thick portions 288 are provided.

  The front member 282 has a plate-like face portion 285, an upper rearward extending portion 287, and a lower rearward extending portion 289. The two thick portions 288 are both provided in the lower rear extending portion 289.

  The front member 282 may not have the upper rear extension 287 and the lower rear extension 289. That is, the entire front member 282 may be plate-shaped. In this case, the thick portion 288 may be unnecessary. In this case, a screw hole can be provided in the plate-like front member 282.

  The rear member 284 has a hosel part 290. The hosel part 290 has a shaft hole 292. The rear member 284 has a through hole 294 for allowing the coupling member 8 to pass therethrough and a thick portion 296 for forming the through hole 294. The thick part 296 is provided on the toe side and the heel side of the sole of the head 280.

  The rear member 284 has a protrusion 298. In the present embodiment, a plurality of (two) protrusions 298 are provided. The protruding portion 298 protrudes forward from the opening of the rear member 284. The protruding portion 298 facilitates alignment of the front member 282. The protruding portion 298 facilitates screwing of the front member 282 and the rear member 284.

  The coupling member 8 is a screw. The front member 282 and the rear member 284 are coupled by the coupling member 8. The protrusion 298 improves the reliability of this connection.

  The head 2 has an adjustment mechanism M12. The adjustment mechanism M12 is similar to the adjustment mechanism M1 described above. The main difference between the adjustment mechanism M12 and the adjustment mechanism M1 is the shape of the front member. The front member 282 has a shape such that the toe portion and the heel portion of the above-described front member 4 (see FIG. 2) are cut off. The front member 282 does not block all the openings of the rear member 284. On the toe side of the front member 282, the hollow portion of the head 280 is open to the outside. Further, on the heel side of the front member 282, the hollow portion of the head 280 is open to the outside.

  The adjustment mechanism M12 allows the front member 282 to be replaced. By exchanging the front member 282, for example, the loft angle (real loft angle) is changed. By exchanging the front member 282, for example, the hook angle is changed.

  Examples of specifications that can be adjusted by the adjusting mechanism M12 include a loft angle, a hook angle, a face area, and a face progression. In the adjustment mechanism M12, each of these specifications can be adjusted independently. Further, the adjusting mechanism M12 can adjust the coefficient of restitution between the head and the ball and the coefficient of friction between the head and the ball. The coefficient of restitution between the head and the ball can be adjusted by, for example, exchanging with a replacement front member having different rigidity. The friction coefficient between the head and the ball can be adjusted by, for example, exchanging with a replacement front member having a different surface roughness on the face surface.

  In the adjustment mechanism M12, the shape of the front member is simplified as compared with the adjustment mechanism M1 described above. With this simplification, the mold for the front member can be manufactured at low cost. This simplification of the shape reduces the manufacturing cost of the front member.

The following is exemplified as the adjustment of the specification by the adjustment mechanism M12.
(Adjustment 12a) The loft angle is changed and the hook angle is not substantially changed.
(Adjustment 12b) The loft angle is changed, and the hook angle is also changed.
(Adjustment 12c) The loft angle is not substantially changed, and the hook angle is changed.
(Adjustment 12d) The face area is changed, and the loft angle and hook angle do not change.
(Adjustment 12e) The face progression is changed, and the loft angle and the hook angle are not changed.

  The adjusting mechanism M12 is applied to a wood type golf club head, but may be used for other types of golf clubs (iron type, utility type, putter type, etc.).

  FIG. 37 is a view of the golf club 310 having the adjusting mechanism M13 as viewed from the sole side. The club 310 has a head 312. This adjustment mechanism M13 is a modification of the adjustment mechanism M4 described above. The adjusting mechanism M13 can adjust the real loft angle in addition to the lie angle. In the adjustment mechanism M4 described above, there are three selectable shaft axis positions. In the adjustment mechanism M13, the selectable shaft axis positions are five.

  The reference shaft axis is indicated by reference numeral LS1 (see FIG. 37). The second shaft axis is indicated by LF1. The third shaft axis is denoted by reference numeral LU1. The fourth shaft axis is indicated by the symbol LP1. The fifth shaft axis is indicated by the symbol LM1.

  In the adjustment mechanism M4 described above, the number of the holding holes h1 is three, but in the adjustment mechanism M13, the number of the holding holes h1 is five. That is, the head 312 has five holding holes h1. In the present embodiment, the first holding hole h11, the second holding hole h12, the third holding hole h13, the fourth holding hole h14, and the fifth holding hole h15 are provided. The golf club 310 has the same configuration except that these five holding holes h1 are provided, a space is secured so that these five types of shaft axis positions are allowed, and five types of sleeve support members 80 (described above) are provided. The adjustment mechanism M4 (golf club 70) is the same as that described above.

  In the adjustment mechanism M13, the lie angle can be adjusted in three ways. The three lie angles are achieved by the reference shaft axis LS1, the second shaft axis LF1, and the third shaft axis LU1. Further, in this adjusting mechanism M13, the real loft angle can be adjusted in three ways. The three real loft angles are achieved by the reference shaft axis LS1, the fourth shaft axis LP1, and the fifth shaft axis LM1. Compared to the reference shaft axis LS1, the real loft angle increases in the fourth shaft axis LP1. Compared to the reference shaft axis LS1, the real loft angle is reduced in the fifth shaft axis LM1.

  FIG. 38 is a perspective view of the head 320 having the adjusting mechanism M14. FIG. 39 is an exploded perspective view of the head 320. FIG. 40 is a cross-sectional view of the head 320.

  The head 320 includes a front member 322 and a rear member 324. As shown in FIGS. 39 and 40, the rear member 324 has an engagement protrusion 326. The engagement protrusion 326 has an engagement groove 328 and an inclined surface 330 (see the enlarged portion in FIG. 40). The engagement protrusion 326 is provided on each of the crown portion and the sole portion of the head 320 (see FIG. 40). On the other hand, the front member 322 has an inwardly extending portion 332. The inwardly extending portion 332 is fitted in the groove 328 of the engagement protrusion 326. The front member 322 and the rear member 324 are coupled to each other by the engagement between the engagement protrusion 326 and the inward extending portion 332. In this coupled state, the outer surface of the front member 322 and the outer surface of the rear member 324 are substantially smoothly continuous.

  The front member 322 is detachable from the rear member 324. At the time of attachment, the engagement protrusion 326 of the rear member 324 is press-fitted into the opening of the front member 322. In this press-fitting, the tip of the inward extending portion 332 can slide on the surface of the inclined surface 330. This sliding can facilitate press-fitting. If necessary, at the time of press-fitting, the crown portion and the sole portion of the rear member 324 are compressed toward the inside of the head.

  At the time of removal, the crown portion and the sole portion of the rear member 324 are compressed toward the inside of the head, and the engagement between the engagement groove 328 and the inward extending portion 332 is released. By this release, the front member 322 and the rear member 324 can be separated. The adjustment mechanism M14 allows the rear member 320 to be replaced.

  For attachment / detachment, plastic deformation of the rear member 324 is required. From the viewpoint of facilitating attachment / detachment, the material of the rear member 324 may be fiber reinforced plastic.

  By exchanging the rear member 324, for example, the position of the center of gravity is changed. By replacing the rear member 324, for example, the head volume is changed.

The following is exemplified as the adjustment of the specification by the adjusting mechanism M14.
(Adjustment 14a) The head shape is changed, and the center of gravity of the head is not substantially changed.
(Adjustment 14b) The head volume is changed, and the center of gravity of the head is not substantially changed.
(Adjustment 14c) The position of the center of gravity is changed, and the head shape does not change.
(Adjustment 14d) The moment of inertia is changed, and the head shape does not change.
(Adjustment 14e) Two or more selected from the head shape, the head volume, the center of gravity of the head, and the moment of inertia are changed.

  From the viewpoint of maintaining the club balance, it is preferable that the head weight does not change in the adjusting mechanism M14.

  The adjusting mechanism M14 is applied to a wood type golf club head, but may be used for other types of golf clubs (iron type, utility type, putter type, etc.).

  FIG. 41 is a plan view of the head 340 having the adjusting mechanism M15. 42 is a cross-sectional view taken along line F42-F42 in FIG. FIG. 43 is a bottom view of the head 340. The head 340 includes a front member 342, a rear member 344, and a spacer 346. The crown portion of the front member 342 and the crown portion of the rear member 344 are connected so as to be rotatable. A hinge 348 is used for this connection.

  The spacer 346 is disposed between the front member 342 and the rear member 344. The spacer 346 is located inside the head 340. However, the bottom surface of the spacer 346 is exposed to the outside. The bottom surface of the spacer 346 constitutes a part of the sole surface of the head 340.

  The hinge 348 allows the front member 342 to rotate with respect to the rear member 344. This rotation makes it possible to adjust the real loft angle. On the other hand, when the head 340 is used, this rotation is fixed. This fixing is achieved by the screw member 350. The screw member 350 couples the front member 342 and the rear member 344 while penetrating the spacer 346.

  On the edge of the lower end of the front member 342 (lower end of the face portion), a groove 352 opened downward and a protruding portion 354 extending downward are provided. Similarly, a groove 352 that opens downward and a protruding portion 354 that extends downward are provided at the edge of the front end of the sole portion of the rear member 344. On the other hand, a groove 356 opened upward and a protruding portion 358 extending upward are provided at the front edge of the lower surface of the spacer 346. Similarly, a groove 356 opened upward and a protruding portion 358 extending upward are provided on the rear edge of the lower surface of the spacer 346.

  As shown in the enlarged portion of FIG. 42, at the rear edge of the lower surface of the spacer 346, the protruding portion 354 is fitted in the groove 356, and the protruding portion 358 is fitted in the groove 352. Also at the front edge of the lower surface of the spacer 346, the protruding portion 354 is fitted in the groove 356, and the protruding portion 358 is fitted in the groove 352. By these fittings, the spacer 346 is fixed.

  The real loft angle may change depending on the thickness and shape of the spacer 346. By changing the spacer 346, the real loft angle can be adjusted.

[specification]
In the present invention, the specifications that can be adjusted are not limited. This specification includes loft angle, lie angle, hook angle, face area, head center of gravity position, club balance, club length, club center of gravity position, club frequency, club weight, head shape, head volume, head weight, shaft Flex (shaft hardness), shaft tone, shaft torque, shaft bending stiffness distribution, shaft torsional stiffness distribution, shaft weight, shaft weight distribution, shaft center of gravity position, shaft length, grip outer diameter, grip Examples include weight, grip center of gravity position, grip length, face groove specification, face progression, head inertia moment, club inertia moment, head-ball repulsion coefficient, head-ball friction coefficient, and the like.

  In the present invention, at least two specifications can be adjusted independently of each other. More preferably, all of the specifications that can be adjusted are adjustable independently of each other.

  The above specifications include specifications relating to the head, specifications relating to the shaft, specifications relating to the grip, and specifications relating to the entire club.

  Specifications related to the head include loft angle, lie angle, hook angle, face area, head center of gravity, head shape, head volume, head weight, face progression, head moment of inertia, head-ball rebound coefficient, head and For example, the coefficient of friction with the ball. Examples of the center-of-gravity position of the head include an actual (three-dimensional) center-of-gravity position of the head, a center-of-gravity distance (distance between the shaft axis and the head center of gravity), a center-of-gravity depth, and a sweet spot height.

  Of the above specifications, the specifications related to the shaft include: shaft flex, shaft condition, shaft torque, shaft bending stiffness distribution, shaft torsional stiffness distribution, shaft weight, shaft weight distribution, shaft center of gravity, shaft length And the like.

  Among the above specifications, the grip-related specifications include grip outer diameter, grip weight, grip center of gravity position, grip length, and the like.

  Of the above specifications, examples of the club-related specifications include club balance, club length, club center of gravity position, club vibration frequency, club weight, and club inertia moment.

  The adjustment range of the specification is not limited. From the viewpoint of the degree of freedom of adjustment, it is preferable that the adjustment range is wide. In this respect, the adjustment range of the loft angle is preferably 2 ° or more, more preferably 3 ° or more, and further preferably 4 ° or more. The adjustment angle of the hook angle is preferably 2 ° or more, more preferably 3 ° or more, and still more preferably 4 ° or more. The adjustment range of the lie angle is preferably 1 ° or more, more preferably 2 ° or more, and still more preferably 3 ° or more. The adjustment width of the center of gravity distance is preferably 5 mm or more, more preferably 10 mm or more, and further preferably 15 mm or more. The adjustment width of the club length is preferably 1 inch or more, more preferably 1.5 inches or more, and further preferably 2 inches or more. The adjustment range of the head volume is preferably 10 cc or more, more preferably 20 cc or more, and further preferably 30 cc or more. The adjustment width of the grip outer diameter is preferably 0.5 mm or more, more preferably 1 mm or more, and further preferably 1.5 mm or more. The adjustment range of the club balance is preferably 1 point or more, more preferably 2 points or more, and further preferably 3 points or more.

From the viewpoint of increasing the degree of freedom of adjustment, in the specific specification, the adjustment range is preferably equal to or greater than the second-equivalent width. The second-equivalent width is as follows. The specific specification is one or more selected from a loft angle, a lie angle, a club length, and a club weight.
[2nd equivalent width]
-Loft angle: 6 ° (degree)
・ Lie angle: 1 ° (degree)
-Club length: 1 inch-Club weight: 14g

[Adjustment mechanism]
The golf club of the present invention has one or more adjusting mechanisms. The adjustment mechanism is not limited. This adjustment mechanism enables adjustment of specifications. One adjustment mechanism enables adjustment of one or more specifications. One adjusting mechanism may be capable of adjusting two or more specifications. Two or more specifications adjusted by one adjustment mechanism may be adjusted in conjunction with each other, or may be adjusted independently without being interlocked with each other.

  Preferably, the golf club has a plurality of adjusting mechanisms. Preferably, two or more specifications can be adjusted independently of each other by a plurality of adjustment mechanisms.

  Preferably, the adjustment mechanism enables adjustment of specifications related to the head without replacement of the entire head. Preferably, this adjustment mechanism enables adjustment of the specifications related to the grip without involving the entire grip. Preferably, this adjustment mechanism enables adjustment of specifications relating to the shaft without involving the entire shaft.

  As the adjustment mechanism, the adjustment mechanism M1, the adjustment mechanism M2, the adjustment mechanism M3, the adjustment mechanism M4, the adjustment mechanism M5, the adjustment mechanism M6, the adjustment mechanism M7, the adjustment mechanism M8, the adjustment mechanism M9, The adjustment mechanism M10, the adjustment mechanism M11, the adjustment mechanism M12, the adjustment mechanism M13, the adjustment mechanism M14, and the adjustment mechanism M15 are exemplified. Moreover, the adjustment mechanism described in the above-mentioned patent document can be applied to the present invention.

  As a golf club having a plurality of adjustment mechanisms, the adjustment mechanism M1, the adjustment mechanism M2, the adjustment mechanism M3, the adjustment mechanism M4, the adjustment mechanism M5, the adjustment mechanism M6, the adjustment mechanism M7, and the adjustment mechanism M8. A golf club provided with two or more adjusting mechanisms selected from the adjusting mechanism M9, the adjusting mechanism M10, the adjusting mechanism M11, the adjusting mechanism M12, the adjusting mechanism M13, the adjusting mechanism M14, and the adjusting mechanism M15. Illustrated.

  The adjustment mechanisms described in the above embodiments can be independent of each other. That is, when a plurality of the adjusting mechanisms are provided in a single golf club, the plurality of adjusting mechanisms can function without being interlocked with each other. This independence between adjustment mechanisms increases the degree of freedom of adjustment.

  Two or more adjusting mechanisms selected from the adjusting mechanism M1 to the adjusting mechanism M15 described above can be installed in a single golf club. Except where there is a particular difficulty in providing two or more adjusting mechanisms, it is possible to install two or more adjusting mechanisms in a single golf club within the skill level of those skilled in the art.

  The head may have a plurality of adjustment mechanisms. In this case, the degree of freedom in adjusting the specifications related to the head is improved. The shaft may have a plurality of adjusting mechanisms. In this case, the degree of freedom in adjusting the specifications related to the shaft is improved. The grip may have a plurality of adjustment mechanisms. In this case, the degree of freedom in adjusting the specifications related to the grip is improved.

  When a plurality of independent adjustment mechanisms are provided, the specification adjusted by one adjustment mechanism and the specification adjusted by another adjustment mechanism can be adjusted independently of each other. This independence between specifications increases the flexibility of adjustability.

  Even if there is one adjustment mechanism, there are cases where a plurality of specifications can be adjusted independently of each other. For example, in the adjustment mechanism M1, the hook angle and the loft angle can be adjusted independently. That is, in setting the orientation of the face surface of the front member 4, the loft angle can be changed without changing the hook angle, the hook angle can be changed without changing the loft angle, and the loft angle and the hook angle can be changed. Each can be changed independently.

  Preferably, a plurality of adjustment mechanisms are provided. From the viewpoint of freedom of adjustability, when two or more adjustment mechanisms are provided, it is preferable that at least two of them can be adjusted independently of each other. For example, in the case of a golf club having three adjustment mechanisms, it is preferable that the first adjustment mechanism and the second adjustment mechanism can be adjusted independently of each other, and the first adjustment mechanism and the second adjustment mechanism are More preferably, the third adjustment mechanism can be adjusted independently of each other. That is, when two or more adjustment mechanisms are provided, it is most preferable that all the adjustment mechanisms can be adjusted independently of each other.

  In the embodiment shown in FIG. 17 of the aforementioned US patent application US2006 / 0293115, the loft angle, the lie angle and the hook angle change in conjunction with each other due to the circumferential position of the sleeve. In this case, the three specifications cannot be adjusted independently of each other. This independence reduces the degree of freedom of adjustability. The present invention can solve this problem.

  The material of the head (or the head main body) is not limited. Preferred materials include titanium alloy, stainless steel, aluminum alloy, magnesium alloy, CFRP (carbon fiber reinforced plastic) and combinations thereof. The method for manufacturing the head is not limited, and forging, casting, pressing, and combinations thereof are exemplified. A head in which a plurality of materials are combined may be used. The structure of the head body is not limited.

  The material of the shaft is not limited. Examples of the material of the shaft include CFRP (carbon fiber reinforced plastic) and metal. A so-called carbon shaft or steel shaft can be suitably used. Further, the structure of the shaft is not limited.

  The material of the sleeve is not limited. Preferred materials include titanium alloy, stainless steel, aluminum alloy, magnesium alloy and resin. As the resin, a resin excellent in mechanical strength is preferable, and for example, a resin called engineering plastic or super engineering plastic is preferable. As described above, the engaging member may be integrally formed with the head body. From the viewpoint of balance between strength and lightness, for example, an aluminum alloy and a titanium alloy are more preferable.

  The material of the engaging member is not limited. Preferred materials include titanium alloy, stainless steel, aluminum alloy, magnesium alloy and resin. As the resin, a resin excellent in mechanical strength is preferable, and for example, a resin called engineering plastic or super engineering plastic is preferable. As described above, the engaging member may be integrally formed with the head body.

  The material of the coupling member (screw) is not limited. Preferred materials include titanium alloy, stainless steel, aluminum alloy, magnesium alloy and the like.

  The material of the sleeve support member 80 is not limited. Examples of preferable materials include the above-described resins, and examples include titanium alloys, stainless steel, aluminum alloys, magnesium alloys, and the like.

  The specification can be measured by a known measuring device. As an example of a measuring device for the loft angle, the lie angle, and the hook angle, there is a Takatsuo ball head measuring table manufactured by Shoho Enterprise Co., Ltd. Some representative specifications may be found in the product catalog.

  The combination of the above specifications that can be adjusted is not limited. The number of the specifications that can be adjusted is not limited and is preferably 3 or more, more preferably 4 or more.

  The golf club A having the adjustment mechanism capable of adjusting the loft angle and the adjustment mechanism capable of adjusting the center-of-gravity distance is effective, for example, in a situation where a mistake of catching with a short iron is likely to occur. In this case, mistakes can be eliminated by increasing the loft angle and increasing the center of gravity distance. The golf club A is effective, for example, in a situation where a mistake of opening the face with a short iron is likely to occur. In this case, mistakes can be eliminated by increasing the loft angle and shortening the center of gravity distance. For windy conditions that are easy to catch, it is effective to make the loft angle small and the center of gravity distance large.

  The golf club B having an adjustment mechanism that can adjust the loft angle and an adjustment mechanism that can adjust the club length is effective in increasing the flight distance. As an example of effective adjustment in this case, the club length is increased to increase the head speed, and the loft angle is increased to increase the launch angle. Further, this golf club B is effective in improving controllability. As an example of effective adjustment in this case, the club length is shortened to reduce the flight distance, and the loft angle is increased to increase the launch angle. In this case, it is possible to achieve a ball that tends to stop at the falling point with a high trajectory. The adjustment to reduce the loft angle and increase the club length can achieve a low launch angle and an improved head speed, and is therefore effective in improving the total flight distance including the run. The adjustment that reduces the loft angle and shortens the club length can achieve a low launch angle and a reduced head speed, and is therefore effective when it is desired to increase the run with a low hit ball.

  The golf club C having an adjustment mechanism capable of adjusting the loft angle and an adjustment mechanism capable of adjusting the club balance is effective in improving controllability. As an example of effective adjustment in this case, the club balance is increased to stabilize the swing, and the loft angle is increased to increase the launch angle. Alternatively, the club balance is decreased to increase the head speed, and the loft angle is increased to increase the launch angle. In this case, it is possible to achieve a ball that tends to stop at the falling point with a high trajectory. The adjustment to reduce the loft angle and increase the swing balance can achieve a low launch angle and a stable (slow) swing, and is thus effective in obtaining a low trajectory with excellent directivity. The adjustment to reduce the loft angle and the swing balance can achieve a low launch angle and an improvement in head speed, and is effective in increasing the total flight distance by making a run with a low trajectory.

In the hosel part, impact force due to impact is concentrated. The hosel part is required to be strong. In addition, when the adjustment mechanism is located in the hosel part, the weight of the hosel part increases, so the degree of freedom in designing the center of gravity of the head decreases. The hosel part is preferably lightweight. From the viewpoint of the strength of the hosel part and the weight reduction of the hosel part, the following configuration (a) is preferable, the configuration (b) is more preferable, and the configuration (c) is more preferable.
(A) The adjustment mechanism (1) or the adjustment mechanism (2) is located other than the hosel part.
(B) The adjustment mechanism (1) and the adjustment mechanism (2) are located other than the hosel part.
(C) All the adjusting mechanisms are located other than the hosel part.

  Among the above-described embodiments, the adjustment mechanisms M3, M4, M7, and M13 are located in the hosel part. The adjustment mechanisms M1, M2, M5, M6, M8, M9, M10, M11, M12, M14, and M15 are located in areas other than the hosel part.

  Examples 2 to 11, which will be described later, can be given as examples in which an adjustment mechanism located outside the hosel part and an adjustment mechanism located in the hosel part are combined. Examples in which adjustment mechanisms located at positions other than the hosel part are combined include Example 1 and Examples 12 to 28 described later.

Examples of the configuration (a) include the following configurations (a1) to (a5).
(A1) The adjusting mechanism (1) or the adjusting mechanism (2) is located on the grip.
(A2) The adjusting mechanism (1) or the adjusting mechanism (2) is located on the shaft.
(A3) The adjusting mechanism (1) or the adjusting mechanism (2) is located at the joint between the shaft and the grip.
(A4) The adjustment mechanism (1) or the adjustment mechanism (2) is located on the sole of the head.
(A5) The adjusting mechanism (1) or the adjusting mechanism (2) is located on a head other than the hosel part.

  From the viewpoint of adjusting the mounting angle of the shaft with respect to the head, in each of the configurations (a1), (a2), (a3), (a4), and (a5), the adjustment mechanism (1) or the adjustment mechanism (2) The other of these may be located in the hosel part.

Examples of the configuration (b) include the following configurations (b1) to (b8).
(B1) The adjusting mechanism (1) and the adjusting mechanism (2) are located on the grip.
(B2) The adjusting mechanism (1) and the adjusting mechanism (2) are located on the shaft.
(B3) The adjusting mechanism (1) and the adjusting mechanism (2) are located on the head other than the hosel part.
(B4) The adjustment mechanism (1) and the adjustment mechanism (2) are located on the sole of the head.
(B5) The adjusting mechanism (1) is located on the shaft and the adjusting mechanism (2) is located on the grip.
(B6) The adjustment mechanism (1) is located on the shaft and the adjustment mechanism (2) is located on the head other than the hosel part.
(B7) The adjustment mechanism (1) is located on the grip and the adjustment mechanism (2) is located on the head other than the hosel part.
(B8) The adjustment mechanism (1) is located on the grip and the adjustment mechanism (2) is located on the sole of the head.

  The adjusting mechanism M1 is located on the head other than the hosel part. The adjusting mechanism M2 is located on the head other than the hosel part. The adjusting mechanism M3 is located in the hosel part. The adjusting mechanism M4 is located in the hosel part. The adjusting mechanism M5 is located on the head other than the hosel part, and is located on the sole of the head. The adjusting mechanism M6 is located on the grip and on the shaft. The adjusting mechanism M7 is located in the hosel part. The adjusting mechanism M8 is located on the head other than the hosel part. The adjusting mechanism M9 is located on the grip. The adjusting mechanism M10 is located on the grip. The adjusting mechanism M11 is located on the head other than the hosel part. The adjusting mechanism M12 is located on the head other than the hosel part. The adjusting mechanism M13 is located in the hosel part. The adjusting mechanism M14 is located on the head other than the hosel part. The adjusting mechanism M15 is located on a head other than the hosel part.

  When the two adjusting mechanisms interfere with each other, the mechanism becomes complicated. Complex mechanisms are prone to failure. In addition, a complicated mechanism may require high dimensional accuracy. High dimensional accuracy reduces productivity. From these viewpoints, it is preferable that the adjusting mechanism (1) and the adjusting mechanism (2) do not interfere with each other. The meaning of this “interference” is as follows. When at least one member constituting the adjustment mechanism A is involved in the adjustment mechanism B, it is defined that the adjustment mechanisms A and B interfere with each other. Even when at least one member constituting the adjustment mechanism B is involved in the adjustment mechanism A, the adjustment mechanisms A and B are defined as interfering with each other. An example of this interference is a case where, for example, a screw for fixing the adjusting mechanism A also contributes to fixing the adjusting mechanism B.

  By changing the shaft, the specification of the shaft can be adjusted. However, the cost of the shaft is high. In addition, golfers are required to adjust other specifications without changing their preferred shaft. From these viewpoints, it is preferable that the adjusting mechanism (1) and the adjusting mechanism (2) do not involve shaft replacement, and it is more preferable that all the adjusting mechanisms do not involve shaft replacement.

  On the other hand, a sleeve is preferably used in a golf club capable of exchanging shafts. This sleeve is used in the adjusting mechanisms M4 and M7, for example. As indicated by the adjustment mechanism M4, typically, the sleeve is bonded to the shaft. By using the sleeve, the shaft and the head can be attached and detached, and the shaft can be easily replaced. A greater impact force acts on the sleeve than hitting. From the viewpoint of ensuring the fixing of the sleeve, it is preferable that the sleeve can be supported by surface contact over the entire circumferential direction (360 °). In the adjustment mechanism M4 and the adjustment mechanism M7, the sleeve is supported by surface contact over the entire circumferential direction. Among these, in the adjustment mechanism M4, the sleeve support member 80 is in surface contact with the sleeve 76 over the entire circumferential direction.

  In the golf club set including a plurality of golf clubs as described above, the advantages of the respective clubs are synergistically combined, and a golf club set having excellent adjustability can be realized.

  As exemplified above, a golf club having two or more specifications that can be adjusted independently can be adjusted in accordance with the course setting, the weather, the condition of the player, and the like. Even combinations of specifications other than those described above can be adjusted for various situations.

  Hereinafter, the effects of the present invention will be clarified by examples. However, the present invention should not be construed in a limited manner based on the description of the examples. Unless otherwise specified, the adjustment mechanisms described below are the same as those described in the above embodiment.

[Example 1]
A head having the adjusting mechanism M1 (hook angle adjusting mechanism) and the adjusting mechanism M5 (head gravity center adjusting mechanism) was produced. Further, the front member 4 and the rear member 6 of the head were produced by a lost wax precision casting method using a titanium alloy (Ti-6Al-4V). The material of the coupling member 8 (screw) was a titanium alloy (Ti-6Al-4V). A screw hole for screwing the weight body 104 (screw) of the adjusting mechanism M5 is provided in the sole of the rear member 6, and is created by NC machining. A golf club according to Example 1 was obtained by attaching a shaft (carbon shaft) and a grip to the head. This golf club was Sanban Wood.

[Example 2]
A golf club having the adjustment mechanism M1 (hook angle adjustment mechanism), the adjustment mechanism M4 (lie angle adjustment mechanism), the adjustment mechanism M5 (head center of gravity position adjustment mechanism), and the adjustment mechanism M6 (club balance adjustment mechanism) is created. did. The adjusting mechanism M4 was added to the hosel part of the rear member of Example 1, and a grip with an adjusting mechanism M5 shown in FIG. The material of the sleeve 76 was an aluminum alloy. The material of the sleeve support member 80 was an aluminum alloy. Other than that, a golf club of Example 2 was obtained in the same manner as Example 1.

[Comparative Example 1]
A head of Comparative Example 1 was obtained in the same manner as Example 1 except that it did not have all the adjusting mechanisms. The head was obtained by welding the front member 4 and the rear member 6. The same shaft and grip as in Example 1 were attached to this head, and a golf club according to Comparative Example 1 was obtained.

[Comparative Example 2]
A structure similar to that of the adjusting mechanism M7 (see FIG. 20) described above was formed on the rear member 6 of the first embodiment. The same front member as in Example 1 was welded to this rear member to obtain a head. Further, the thread groove on the inner surface of the sleeve Sv in the adjusting mechanism M7 was removed to obtain a circumferential surface. The sleeve Sv was bonded to the tip of the same shaft as in Example 1. That is, the shaft was directly bonded to the inner surface of the sleeve Sv without using the screw cylinder 135. The shaft insertion hole was inclined with respect to the hosel hole 142 in the same manner as the sleeve Sv1 (see FIG. 22) described above. The inclination angle θ1 (see FIG. 22) was 1.0 °. The material of the sleeve Sv was an aluminum alloy. The material of the engaging member 140 was a titanium alloy (Ti-6Al-4V). Furthermore, the same grip as in Example 1 was attached, and a golf club according to Comparative Example 2 was obtained. In this golf club, the shaft and the head can be attached and detached by a screw mechanism. In this golf club, the loft angle, the lie angle, and the hook angle change in conjunction with each other due to the relative positional relationship between the sleeve Sv and the hosel hole in the circumferential direction.

  Using these clubs, an evaluation test was performed by hitting a tester. This tester has a head speed of about 40 m / s by a driver and is a slicer (a person who can easily slice a hit ball). The specifications and evaluation results of Examples and Comparative Examples are shown in Table 1 below.

  In “Directivity” in Table 1 and the following tables, “+” means that the target direction is shifted to the right side, and “−” means that the target direction is shifted to the left side. In Table 1 and “Side Spin” in each of the following tables, a positive value means slice rotation, and a negative value means hook rotation.

  Example 1 can be adjusted to the specifications of Comparative Example 1 shown in Table 1. This Example 1 was adjusted to the specifications shown in Table 1 above, and an evaluation test was performed.

  Example 2 can be adjusted to the specifications of Comparative Example 1 shown in Table 1. This Example 2 was adjusted to the specifications shown in Table 1 above, and an evaluation test was performed.

  Using the comparative example 2, a club in the state of comparative example 2-1 was produced and an evaluation test was performed. Next, by changing the relative positional relationship between the sleeve Sv (shaft) and the hosel hole in the circumferential direction, a club in the state of Comparative Example 2-2 was manufactured, and an evaluation test was performed.

  As Table 1 shows, in Comparative Example 2, the loft angle, the lie angle, and the hook angle were changed in conjunction with each other, so that the adjustment was insufficient. Therefore, the elimination of the slice was insufficient and the flight distance was relatively small. Example 1 and Example 2 were excellent in adjustability, and good results were obtained in eliminating slices and flying distance.

[Example 3]
A head having the adjusting mechanism M1 (hook angle adjusting mechanism) and the adjusting mechanism M4 (lie angle adjusting mechanism) was produced. Further, the front member 4 and the rear member 6 of the head were produced by a lost wax precision casting method using a titanium alloy (Ti-6Al-4V). The adjusting mechanism M4 is provided on the hosel portion of the rear member 6. A golf club according to Example 3 was obtained by attaching a shaft (carbon shaft) and a grip to the head. This golf club was Sanban Wood.

[Comparative Example 3]
A head of Comparative Example 3 was obtained in the same manner as Comparative Example 1 except that the specifications were changed to those shown in Table 2. The same shaft and grip as in Example 1 were attached to this head, and a golf club according to Comparative Example 3 was obtained.

[Comparative Example 4]
A golf club of Comparative Example 4 was obtained in the same manner as Comparative Example 2 except that the specifications were changed to those shown in Table 2. In this golf club, the shaft and the head can be attached and detached by a screw mechanism. In this golf club, the loft angle, the lie angle, and the hook angle change in conjunction with each other due to the relative positional relationship between the sleeve Sv and the hosel hole in the circumferential direction.

  Using these clubs, an evaluation test was performed by hitting a tester. This tester has a head speed of about 40 m / s by a driver and is a slicer (a person who can easily slice a hit ball). The specifications and evaluation results of Examples and Comparative Examples are shown in Table 2 below.

  Using the adjustment mechanism, the golf club of Example 3 was adjusted to the specifications of Example 3-1 shown in Table 2 and evaluated. Furthermore, using the adjusting mechanism, the golf club of Example 3 was adjusted to the specification of Example 3-2 shown in Table 2 and evaluated.

  Using the above Comparative Example 4, a club in the state of Comparative Example 4-1 was produced, and an evaluation test was performed. Next, by changing the relative positional relationship between the sleeve Sv (shaft) and the hosel hole in the circumferential direction, a club in the state of Comparative Example 4-2 was manufactured, and an evaluation test was performed.

  As Table 2 shows, in the comparative example 4, since the loft angle, the lie angle, and the hook angle were changed in conjunction with each other, the adjustment was insufficient. Therefore, the elimination of the slice was insufficient and the flight distance was relatively small. Example 3 was excellent in adjustability, and good results were obtained in eliminating slices and flying distance.

[Example 4]
A head having the adjusting mechanism M1 (loft angle adjusting mechanism) and the adjusting mechanism M4 (lie angle adjusting mechanism) was produced. Further, the front member 4 and the rear member 6 of the head were produced by a lost wax precision casting method using a titanium alloy (Ti-6Al-4V). The adjusting mechanism M4 is provided on the hosel portion of the rear member 6. A golf club according to Example 4 was obtained by attaching a shaft (carbon shaft) and a grip to the head. This golf club was Sanban Wood.

  Example 4 was compared with Comparative Examples 3 and 4 above. The specifications and evaluation results of the examples and comparative examples are shown in Table 3 below.

  Using the adjustment mechanism, the golf club of Example 4 was adjusted to the specification of Example 4-1 shown in Table 3 and evaluated. Furthermore, using the adjustment mechanism, the golf club of Example 4 was adjusted to the specification of Example 4-2 shown in Table 3 and evaluated. Example 4 was excellent in adjustability, and good results were obtained in eliminating slices and flying distance.

[Example 5]
A head having the adjusting mechanism M1 (hook angle adjusting mechanism), the adjusting mechanism M4 (lie angle adjusting mechanism), and the adjusting mechanism M5 (head center of gravity position adjusting mechanism) was produced. The front member 4 and the rear member 6 of the head were produced by a lost wax precision casting method using a titanium alloy (Ti-6Al-4V). A screw hole of the adjusting mechanism M5 is provided in the sole portion of the rear member 6. The screw hole was formed by NC machining. The adjusting mechanism M4 is provided on the hosel portion of the rear member 6. A golf club according to Example 5 was obtained by attaching a shaft (carbon shaft) and a grip to the head. This golf club was Sanban Wood.

  Example 5 was compared with Comparative Examples 3 and 4 above. The specifications and evaluation results of Examples and Comparative Examples are shown in Table 4 below.

  Using the adjusting mechanism, the golf club of Example 5 was adjusted to the specification of Example 5-1 shown in Table 4 and evaluated. Furthermore, using the adjustment mechanism, the golf club of Example 5 was adjusted to the specification of Example 5-2 shown in Table 4 and evaluated. Example 5 was excellent in adjustability, and good results were obtained in eliminating slices and flying distance.

[Example 6]
A head having the adjustment mechanism M1 (loft angle adjustment mechanism), the adjustment mechanism M4 (lie angle adjustment mechanism), and the adjustment mechanism M5 (head center-of-gravity position adjustment mechanism) was produced. The front member 4 and the rear member 6 of the head were produced by a lost wax precision casting method using a titanium alloy (Ti-6Al-4V). A screw hole of the adjusting mechanism M5 is provided in the sole portion of the rear member 6. The screw hole was formed by NC machining. The adjusting mechanism M4 is provided on the hosel portion of the rear member 6. A golf club according to Example 6 was obtained by attaching a shaft (carbon shaft) and a grip to the head. This golf club was Sanban Wood.

  Example 6 was compared with Comparative Examples 3 and 4 above. The specifications and evaluation results of Examples and Comparative Examples are shown in Table 5 below.

  The golf club of Example 6 can be adjusted to the specifications of Comparative Example 3. Using the adjusting mechanism, the golf club of Example 6 was adjusted to the specification of Example 6-1 shown in Table 5 and evaluated. Furthermore, using the adjustment mechanism, the golf club of Example 6 was adjusted to the specification of Example 6-2 shown in Table 5 and evaluated. Example 6 was excellent in adjustability, and good results were obtained in eliminating slices and flying distance.

[Example 7]
A head having the adjusting mechanism M1 (hook angle adjusting mechanism) and the adjusting mechanism M3 (club length adjusting mechanism) was prepared. The front member 4 and the rear member 6 of the head were produced by a lost wax precision casting method using a titanium alloy (Ti-6Al-4V). The adjusting mechanism M <b> 3 is provided in the hosel part of the rear member 6. A golf club according to Example 7 was obtained by attaching a shaft (carbon shaft) and a grip to the head. This golf club was Sanban Wood.

  Example 7 was compared with Comparative Examples 3 and 4 above. The specifications and evaluation results of Examples and Comparative Examples are shown in Table 6 below.

  The golf club of Example 7 can be adjusted to the specifications of Comparative Example 3. Using the adjusting mechanism, the golf club of Example 7 was adjusted to the specifications of Example 7-1 shown in Table 6 and evaluated. Furthermore, using the adjustment mechanism, the golf club of Example 7 was adjusted to the specification of Example 7-2 shown in Table 6 and evaluated. Example 7 was excellent in adjustability, and good results were obtained in eliminating slices and flying distance.

[Example 8]
A head having the adjusting mechanism M1 (loft angle adjusting mechanism) and the adjusting mechanism M3 (club length adjusting mechanism) was prepared. The front member 4 and the rear member 6 of the head were produced by a lost wax precision casting method using a titanium alloy (Ti-6Al-4V). The adjusting mechanism M <b> 3 is provided in the hosel part of the rear member 6. A golf club according to Example 8 was obtained by attaching a shaft (carbon shaft) and a grip to the head. This golf club was Sanban Wood.

  Example 8 was compared with Comparative Examples 3 and 4 above. The specifications and evaluation results of Examples and Comparative Examples are shown in Table 7 below.

  The golf club of Example 8 can be adjusted to the specifications of Comparative Example 3. Using the adjusting mechanism, the golf club of Example 8 was adjusted to the specification of Example 8-1 shown in Table 7 and evaluated. Furthermore, using the adjustment mechanism, the golf club of Example 8 was adjusted to the specification of Example 8-2 shown in Table 7 and evaluated. Also in this test, Example 8 was excellent in adjustability, and good results were obtained in terms of elimination of slices and flight distance.

[Example 9]
A club having the adjusting mechanism M1 (hook angle adjusting mechanism), the adjusting mechanism M3 (club length adjusting mechanism), the adjusting mechanism M5 (head center of gravity distance adjusting mechanism) and the adjusting mechanism M6 (club balance adjusting mechanism) is created. did. The front member 4 and the rear member 6 of the head were produced by a lost wax precision casting method using a titanium alloy (Ti-6Al-4V). The adjusting mechanism M <b> 3 is provided in the hosel part of the rear member 6. A screw hole of the adjusting mechanism M5 is provided in the sole portion of the rear member 6. A golf club according to Example 9 was obtained by attaching the shaft grip assembly having the adjusting mechanism M6 to the head. This golf club was Sanban Wood.

  Example 9 was compared with Comparative Examples 3 and 4 above. The specifications and evaluation results of Examples and Comparative Examples are shown in Table 8 below.

  The golf club of Example 9 can be adjusted to the specifications of Comparative Example 3. Using the adjusting mechanism, the golf club of Example 9 was adjusted to the specifications of Example 9-1 shown in Table 8 and evaluated. Furthermore, using the adjustment mechanism, the golf club of Example 9 was adjusted to the specification of Example 9-2 shown in Table 8 and evaluated. Also in this test, Example 9 was excellent in adjustability, and good results were obtained in terms of elimination of slices and flight distance.

[Example 10]
A club having the adjusting mechanism M1 (loft angle adjusting mechanism), the adjusting mechanism M3 (club length adjusting mechanism), the adjusting mechanism M5 (head center of gravity distance adjusting mechanism) and the adjusting mechanism M6 (club balance adjusting mechanism) is prepared. did. The front member 4 and the rear member 6 of the head were produced by a lost wax precision casting method using a titanium alloy (Ti-6Al-4V). The adjusting mechanism M <b> 3 is provided in the hosel part of the rear member 6. A screw hole of the adjusting mechanism M5 is provided in the sole portion of the rear member 6. A golf club according to Example 10 was obtained by attaching the shaft grip assembly having the adjusting mechanism M6 to the head. This golf club was Sanban Wood.

  Example 10 was compared with Comparative Examples 3 and 4 above. The specifications and evaluation results of Examples and Comparative Examples are shown in Table 9 below.

  The golf club of Example 10 can be adjusted to the specifications of Comparative Example 3. Using the adjustment mechanism, the golf club of Example 10 was adjusted to the specifications of Example 10-1 shown in Table 9 and evaluated. Furthermore, using the adjustment mechanism, the golf club of Example 10 was adjusted to the specifications of Example 10-2 shown in Table 9 and evaluated. Example 10 was excellent in adjustability, and good results were obtained in eliminating slices and flying distance.

[Example 11]
A golf club provided with the adjusting mechanism M7 and the adjusting mechanism M8 was produced.

  The adjusting mechanism M7 was provided with two sleeves Sv having the inclination angle θ1 of 0 °. The position of the shaft insertion hole 150 was made different between these two sleeves Sv. In the first sleeve Sv, the axis of the shaft insertion hole 150 is coaxial with the center axis of the outer surface of the sleeve, whereas in the second sleeve Sv, the axis of the shaft insertion hole is deviated from the center axis of the outer surface of the sleeve. That is, in the second sleeve Sv, the shaft insertion hole is eccentric.

  The adjusting mechanism M8 includes two replacement rear members E8 having different positions of the center of gravity.

  In the golf club according to Example 11, the face progression could be changed by replacing the sleeve Sv. By changing the sleeve Sv, the lie angle, hook angle and loft angle did not change. Further, in this golf club, the position of the center of gravity of the head could be changed by exchanging the replacement rear member E8. In this golf club, the face progression and the center of gravity position of the head could be adjusted independently of each other.

[Example 12]
A golf club provided with the adjusting mechanism M1 and the adjusting mechanism M9 was produced.

  The adjusting mechanism M1 was provided with two replacement front members E4 that differ only in the loft angle.

  The adjusting mechanism M9 includes two outer grip members 196 having different thicknesses.

  In the golf club according to Example 12, the loft angle could be changed by replacing the replacement front member E4. The hook angle did not change due to the replacement of the replacement front member E4. Furthermore, in this golf club, the grip thickness could be changed by replacing the outer grip member 196. In this golf club, the loft angle and the grip thickness could be adjusted independently of each other.

[Example 13]
A golf club provided with the adjusting mechanism M1 and the adjusting mechanism M10 was produced.

  The adjustment mechanism M1 was provided with two replacement front members E4 that differ only in hook angle.

  The adjusting mechanism M10 includes one extending member 252b.

  In the golf club according to Example 13, the hook angle could be changed by replacing the replacement front member E4. The loft angle did not change due to the replacement of the replacement front member E4. Further, in this golf club, the club length could be changed by attaching and detaching the extending member 252b. The hook angle and club length could be adjusted independently of each other.

[Example 14]
A golf club provided with the adjusting mechanism M1 and the adjusting mechanism M11 was produced. The exploded perspective view of the head according to the fourteenth embodiment is the same as the head 268 shown in FIGS.

  In the fourteenth embodiment, the front member can be replaced, and the adjustment intermediate member can be replaced. The hook angle and the loft angle can be adjusted by replacing only the front member. Also, the hook angle and the loft angle can be adjusted by replacing only the adjusting intermediate member. Furthermore, various adjustments can be made by combining the front member and the adjusting intermediate member.

[Example 15]
A golf club provided with the adjusting mechanism M1 and the adjusting mechanism M6 was produced.

  The adjustment mechanism M1 was provided with two front members E4 that differ only in hook angle (see FIG. 3).

  The adjusting mechanism M6 includes a plurality of weight bodies Wg having different weights (see FIG. 17).

  In the golf club according to Example 15, the hook angle could be changed by replacing the replacement front member E4. Furthermore, in this golf club, the club balance could be changed by exchanging and removing the weight body Wg. The hook angle and the club balance could be adjusted independently of each other.

[Example 16]
A golf club provided with the adjusting mechanism M1 and the adjusting mechanism M8 was produced.

  The head according to Example 16 was the same as the head 170 described above (see FIGS. 24 and 25).

  In Example 16, a plurality of front members 172 shown in FIG. 24 were prepared as the adjusting mechanism M1. The hook angles were different between the plurality of front members 172. Further, in Example 16, a plurality of rear members 174 having different volumes were prepared as the adjusting mechanism M8.

  In the golf club according to Example 16, the hook angle could be changed by replacing the front member 172. Furthermore, in this golf club, the head volume (center of gravity depth, head moment of inertia) could be changed by replacing the rear member 174. The hook angle and head volume (depth of center of gravity, head moment of inertia) could be adjusted independently of each other.

[Example 17]
A golf club provided with the adjusting mechanism M1 and the adjusting mechanism M10 was produced.

  The adjustment mechanism M1 was provided with two front members E4 that differ only in hook angle (see FIG. 3).

  The adjustment mechanism M10 was provided with two extending members 252b having the same shape (see FIG. 31).

  In the golf club according to Example 17, the hook angle could be changed by replacing the replacement front member E4. Further, in this golf club, the club length (club balance) could be changed depending on the number of the extension members 252b attached. The hook angle and club length (club balance) could be adjusted independently of each other.

[Example 18]
A golf club provided with the adjusting mechanism M5 and the adjusting mechanism M6 was produced.

  The adjusting mechanism M5 was provided with one weight body 104 (see FIG. 14).

  The adjusting mechanism M6 includes a plurality of weight bodies Wg having different weights (see FIG. 17).

  In the golf club according to Example 18, the center of gravity of the head could be changed by changing the position of the weight body 104. Furthermore, in this golf club, the club balance could be changed by exchanging and removing the weight body Wg. The head center of gravity position and the club balance could be adjusted independently of each other.

[Example 19]
A golf club provided with the adjusting mechanism M5 and the adjusting mechanism M8 was produced.

  The basic structure of the head according to Example 19 was as shown in FIG. Further, the front member 172 (see FIG. 24) of the head is provided with a plurality of arrangement holes Wh (see FIG. 15). That is, the adjustment mechanism M5 is provided on the front member 172. The adjustment mechanism M5 may be provided on the rear member 174 (see FIG. 24). That is, the rear member 174 may be provided with a plurality of arrangement holes Wh (see FIG. 15).

  The adjusting mechanism M5 was provided with one weight body 104 (see FIG. 14).

  The adjustment mechanism M8 was provided with a plurality of rear members 174 having different volumes (see FIG. 24).

  In the golf club according to Example 19, the gravity center position of the head could be changed by changing the position of the weight body 104. Further, in this golf club, the head volume could be changed by changing the rear member 174. The center of gravity of the head and the head volume could be adjusted independently of each other.

  On the other hand, the center-of-gravity position of the head was also changed by the adjusting mechanism M5 and also changed by the adjusting mechanism M8. Therefore, the position of the center of gravity of the head could be adjusted in various ways. That is, a high degree of freedom was achieved in adjusting the position of the center of gravity of the head.

[Example 20]
A golf club provided with the adjusting mechanism M5 and the adjusting mechanism M9 was produced.

  The adjusting mechanism M5 was provided with one weight body 104 (see FIG. 14).

  The adjustment mechanism M9 was provided with a plurality of outer grip members 196 having different thicknesses (see FIGS. 27 and 28).

  In the golf club according to Example 20, the position of the center of gravity of the head could be changed by changing the position of the weight body 104. Furthermore, in this golf club, the grip thickness could be changed by replacing the outer grip member 196. In this golf club, the position of the center of gravity of the head and the thickness of the grip could be adjusted independently of each other.

[Example 21]
A golf club provided with the adjusting mechanism M5 and the adjusting mechanism M10 was produced.

  The adjusting mechanism M5 was provided with one weight body 104 (see FIG. 14).

  The adjustment mechanism M10 was provided with two extending members 252b having the same shape (see FIG. 31).

  In the golf club according to Example 21, the position of the center of gravity of the head could be changed by changing the position of the weight body 104. Further, in this golf club, the club length (grip length, club balance) could be changed depending on the number of the extension members 252b attached. The position of the center of gravity of the head and the club length (grip length, club balance) were adjusted independently of each other.

[Example 22]
A golf club provided with the adjusting mechanism M6 and the adjusting mechanism M8 was produced.

  The adjusting mechanism M6 includes a plurality of weight bodies Wg having different weights (see FIG. 17).

  The adjustment mechanism M8 was provided with a plurality of rear members 174 having different shapes (see FIGS. 24 and 25).

  In the golf club according to Example 22, the club balance was changed by attaching and detaching and changing the weight body Wg. Furthermore, in this golf club, the head shape could be changed by changing the rear member 174. Club balance and head shape were adjusted independently of each other.

[Example 23]
A golf club provided with the adjusting mechanism M6 and the adjusting mechanism M9 was produced.

  The adjusting mechanism M6 includes a plurality of weight bodies Wg having different weights (see FIG. 17).

  The adjustment mechanism M9 was provided with a plurality of outer grip members 196 having different thicknesses (see FIGS. 27 and 28).

  In the golf club according to Example 23, the club balance was changed by attaching and detaching and changing the weight body Wg. Furthermore, in this golf club, the grip outer diameter was changed by changing the outer grip member 196. Club balance and grip outer diameter were adjusted independently of each other.

[Example 24]
A golf club provided with the adjusting mechanism M6 and the adjusting mechanism M10 was produced.

  FIG. 36 is an exploded view of the grip portion of the golf club according to the twenty-fourth embodiment. This golf club has the above-mentioned grip 252 (see FIG. 31). Furthermore, this golf club has two weight bodies Wg.

  The first weight body Wg1 has a head portion 300 and a main body portion 302. The head 300 has a disk shape. The main body 302 is a male screw. The head 300 and the main body 302 are coaxial. The second weight body Wg2 has a head portion 300 and a main body portion 306. The main body 306 is a male screw. The head 300 and the main body 306 are coaxial. The main body 302 and the main body 300 have different axial lengths. Due to this difference, the weight body Wg1 and the weight body Wg2 have different weights.

  The body portions 302 and 306 of the weight body Wg are adapted to the screw hole sc4 of the extension member 252b. The main body portions 302 and 306 can be screwed into the screw holes sc4.

  The adjustment mechanism M10 in Example 24 is the same as that in the embodiment of FIG. On the other hand, the adjusting mechanism M6 in Example 24 is different from the embodiment of FIG. The adjustment mechanism M6 includes a weight body Wg and an extension member 252b as shown in FIG. The club balance can be adjusted depending on which weight body Wg is attached to the extending member 252b. The club balance can be adjusted depending on whether or not the weight body Wg is attached.

  In the golf club according to Example 24, the club balance was changed by attaching and detaching and changing the weight body Wg. Further, in this golf club, the club balance and the club length are changed depending on the number of the extension members 252b attached. In Example 24, the club length can be adjusted. In Example 24, the club balance could be variously adjusted by the combination of the extending member 252b and the weight body Wg.

[Example 25]
A golf club provided with the adjusting mechanism M8 and the adjusting mechanism M9 was produced.

  The adjustment mechanism M8 was provided with two rear members 174 having different positions of the center of gravity (see FIGS. 24 and 25).

  The adjustment mechanism M9 was provided with a plurality of outer grip members 196 having different thicknesses (see FIGS. 27 and 28).

  In the golf club according to Example 25, the center of gravity of the head was changed by replacing the rear member 174. Furthermore, in this golf club, the grip outer diameter was changed by changing the outer grip member 196. The position of the center of gravity of the head and the outer diameter of the grip were adjusted independently of each other.

[Example 26]
A golf club provided with the adjusting mechanism M8 and the adjusting mechanism M10 was produced.

  The adjustment mechanism M8 was provided with two rear members 174 having different positions of the center of gravity (see FIGS. 24 and 25).

  The adjustment mechanism M10 was provided with two extending members 252b having the same shape (see FIG. 31).

  In the golf club according to Example 26, the center of gravity of the head was changed by replacing the rear member 174. Further, in this golf club, the club balance and the club length are changed depending on the number of the extension members 252b attached. The position of the center of gravity of the head and the club balance (club length) were adjusted independently of each other.

[Example 27]
A golf club provided with the adjusting mechanism M6 and the adjusting mechanism M12 was produced.

  The adjusting mechanism M6 includes a plurality of weight bodies Wg having different weights (see FIG. 17).

  The adjustment mechanism M12 includes a plurality of front members 282 having different loft angles (see FIG. 35).

  In the golf club according to Example 27, the club balance was changed by exchanging the weight body Wg. Further, in this golf club, the loft angle was changed by replacing the front member 282. Club balance and loft angle were adjusted independently of each other.

[Example 28]
A golf club provided with the adjusting mechanism M10 and the adjusting mechanism M12 was produced.

  The adjustment mechanism M10 was provided with two extending members 252b having the same shape (see FIG. 31).

  The adjustment mechanism M12 includes a plurality of front members 282 having different loft angles (see FIG. 35).

  In the golf club according to the example 28, the club length (club balance) was changed depending on the number of the extension members 252b attached. Further, in this golf club, the loft angle was changed by replacing the front member 282. Club length (club balance) and loft angle were adjusted independently of each other.

  The combination of adjustment mechanisms is not limited to the combination in these embodiments. The number of adjustment mechanism combinations is not limited. For example, any two selected from the adjusting mechanisms M1 to M12 can be combined. Further, any three or more selected from the adjusting mechanisms M1 to M12 can be combined.

  The invention described above can be applied to all golf clubs such as wood type, utility type, hybrid type, iron type, and putter type.

DESCRIPTION OF SYMBOLS 2 ... Head 4 ... Front member 6 ... Back member 8 ... Connection member 10 ... Face surface 12 ... Hosel part 14 ... Shaft hole 16 ... Through-hole 18 ..Head hole E4 ... Replacement front member 30 ... Head 32 ... Face plate 34 ... Head body 36 ... Connecting member E32 ... Replacement face plate 50 ... Golf club 52 ... head 54 ... shaft 56 ... sleeve 58 ... coupling member 70 ... golf club 72 ... head 74 ... shaft 75 ... sleeve insertion hole 76 ... sleeve 78 ... Connecting member 80 ... Sleeve support member 88 ... Through hole 100 ... Golf club 102 ... Head 104 ... Weight body Wh ... Arrangement hole (screw hole)
DESCRIPTION OF SYMBOLS 110 ... Golf club 112 ... Grip Wg ... Weight body 118 ... Holding body 130 ... Golf club 132 ... Head 134 ... Shaft 135 ... Screw cylinder 140 ... Engagement Joint member Sv ... Sleeve Sv1 ... First sleeve Sv2 ... Second sleeve 170 ... Head 172 ... Front member 174 ... Rear member E8 ... Rear member for replacement 192 ..Grip 194 ... Inner grip member 196 ... Outer grip member
204: first divided body 206: second divided body 252: grip 252a: grip body 252a
252b ... Extension member M1 ... Adjustment mechanism (Loft angle and / or hook angle adjustment mechanism)
M2 ... Adjustment mechanism (Loft angle adjustment mechanism)
M3 ... Adjustment mechanism (club length adjustment mechanism)
M4 ... Adjustment mechanism (Lie angle adjustment mechanism)
M5 ... Adjustment mechanism (head center of gravity position adjustment mechanism)
M6 ... Adjustment mechanism (club balance adjustment mechanism)
M7 ... Adjustment mechanism (sleeve exchange mechanism)
M8 ... Adjustment mechanism (Head shape adjustment mechanism)
M9 ... Adjustment mechanism (grip outer diameter adjustment mechanism)
M10 ... Adjustment mechanism (grip length adjustment mechanism)
M11 ... Adjustment mechanism (hook angle adjustment mechanism)
M12 ... Adjustment mechanism (Loft angle and / or hook angle adjustment mechanism)
M13 ... Adjustment mechanism (Adjustment mechanism for lie angle and loft angle)
M14: Adjustment mechanism (head shape adjustment mechanism)
M15 ... Adjustment mechanism (Loft angle adjustment mechanism)

Claims (4)

  1. At least one adjustment mechanism,
    A golf club wherein at least two specifications are adjustable independently of each other ,
    It has a head, shaft and grip,
    The head has a front member, a rear member having a hosel part, and an adjusting intermediate member.
    The adjusting intermediate member is disposed between the front member and the rear member;
    The above specifications include the loft angle and the hook angle,
    A golf club in which the loft angle and hook angle can be adjusted independently of each other due to the replacement of the adjusting intermediate member.
  2. The golf club according to claim 1, wherein the adjustment intermediate member is sandwiched and fixed between the front member and the rear member.
  3. The golf club according to claim 2, wherein the adjusting intermediate member has a ring shape.
  4. Golf club set comprising a plurality of golf club according to any one of claims 1 to 3.
JP2011166179A 2010-09-17 2011-07-29 Golf Club Active JP5814677B2 (en)

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JP2011166179A JP5814677B2 (en) 2010-09-17 2011-07-29 Golf Club
US13/234,208 US20120071258A1 (en) 2010-09-17 2011-09-16 Golf club
US14/581,777 US20150111658A1 (en) 2010-09-17 2014-12-23 Golf club
US15/406,200 US20170128788A1 (en) 2010-09-17 2017-01-13 Golf club

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US20170128788A1 (en) 2017-05-11
US20120071258A1 (en) 2012-03-22
US20150111658A1 (en) 2015-04-23

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