US20160074715A1 - Golf club adaptors and related methods - Google Patents

Golf club adaptors and related methods Download PDF

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Publication number
US20160074715A1
US20160074715A1 US14/852,303 US201514852303A US2016074715A1 US 20160074715 A1 US20160074715 A1 US 20160074715A1 US 201514852303 A US201514852303 A US 201514852303A US 2016074715 A1 US2016074715 A1 US 2016074715A1
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United States
Prior art keywords
golf club
body
end
aperture
shaft
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Abandoned
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US14/852,303
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Raymond D. Miele
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Raymond D. Miele
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Priority to US201462048946P priority Critical
Application filed by Raymond D. Miele filed Critical Raymond D. Miele
Priority to US14/852,303 priority patent/US20160074715A1/en
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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B53/00Golf clubs
    • A63B53/02Joint structures between the head and the shaft
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B53/00Golf clubs
    • A63B53/02Joint structures between the head and the shaft
    • A63B2053/022Joint structures between the head and the shaft allowing adjustable positioning of the head with respect to the shaft

Abstract

Golf clubs, golf club adaptors and related methods are provided. The golf club adaptor can include a body having a first end and a second end. The golf club adaptor can include a first engagement at the first end of the body for engagement of a golf club at a hosel of a head of the golf club with the head of the golf club having a face with a designated contact position for making contact with a golf ball when hitting the ball. The golf club adaptor can further include a second engagement in the second end of the body for receiving a shaft of the golf club.

Description

    RELATED APPLICATION
  • The presently disclosed subject matter claims the benefit of U.S. Provisional Patent Application Ser. No. 62/048,946, filed Sep. 11, 2014, the disclosure of which is incorporated herein by reference in its entirety.
  • TECHNICAL FIELD
  • The present subject matter relates to golf clubs and golf club adaptors that permit a golfer to hit a golf ball straighter and, in some instances, farther by changing the positioning of the shaft. Related methods for assembling golf clubs using the golf club adaptors are also provided.
  • BACKGROUND
  • Many individuals enjoy golfing and practicing golf swings and/or strokes. Golf face angles, lie angles, and face loft angles on standard golf clubs can often be incorrect and cause the ball to project in errant directions from the tee based on the position of the shaft relative to the head of the golf club. There exists a need for a device that can be utilized with a golf club and can enable a user to hit straight golf shots.
  • Devices are known that relate to methods and apparatuses for attaching a golf club head to the shaft. One device provides a method and apparatus for aligning a shaft to receive the head of a golf club and then injecting an adhesive material into the bore of the golf club head to affix the shaft thereto. Another device provides a method and apparatus for a shaft to a golf club head, comprising an alignment device that holds the club head and a means for holding and inserting the end of the shaft into a bore disposed in the golf club head. While these devices may be used to attach a shaft to a head of a golf club, if the head is designed to receive the shaft at an angle that does not permit the club to be held and swung in a manner that the face angle, lie angle, and face loft angle are in a correct position upon hitting a golf ball, the golf club will still not function as intended.
  • While these devices currently on the market are used to varying effects to improve face angles, lie angles, and face loft angles on standard golf clubs, substantial room exists for improvement.
  • SUMMARY
  • In accordance with this disclosure, the present subject matter provides golf clubs and golf club adaptors that permit a golfer to hit a golf ball straighter and, in some instances, farther by changing the positioning of the shaft. Related methods for assembling golf clubs using the golf club adaptors are also provided.
  • Some of the objects of the subject matter disclosed herein having been stated hereinabove, and which are achieved in whole or in part by the presently disclosed subject matter, other objects will become evident as the description proceeds when taken in connection with the rest of the specification and the accompanying drawings as best described hereinbelow.
  • Thus, a full and enabling disclosure of the present subject matter including the current best mode thereof to one of ordinary skill in the art is set forth more particularly in the remainder of the specification. The features and advantages of the present subject matter can be more readily understood from the following detailed description and accompanying drawings.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • The features and advantages of the present subject matter will be more readily understood from the following detailed description which should be read in conjunction with the accompanying drawings that are given merely by way of explanatory and non-limiting example, and in which:
  • FIG. 1 illustrates a side view of a golf club showing a traditional position of a shaft of the golf club shown in dashed lines and a position of the shaft using an embodiment of a golf club adaptor according to the present subject matter;
  • FIG. 2A illustrates a perspective view of a portion of a golf club that comprises an embodiment of a golf club adaptor according to the present subject matter;
  • FIG. 2B illustrates a lengthwise cross-sectional view of the embodiment of a golf club adaptor according to FIG. 2A;
  • FIG. 3A illustrates a side view of an outer portion of another embodiment of a golf club adaptor according to the present subject matter;
  • FIG. 3B illustrates a lengthwise cross-sectional view of the embodiment of the golf club adaptor according to FIG. 3A;
  • FIG. 3C illustrates a lengthwise cross-sectional view of another embodiment of a golf club adaptor according to the present subject matter that is similar to the embodiment of the golf club adaptor according to FIGS. 3A and 3B;
  • FIG. 4A illustrates a perspective view of a portion of a golf club that comprises another embodiment of a golf club adaptor according to the present subject matter; and
  • FIG. 4B illustrates a perspective view of the embodiment of the golf club adaptor according to FIG. 4A.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION
  • Reference will now be made in detail to the description of the present subject matter, one or more examples of which are shown in the figures. Each example is provided to explain the subject matter and not as a limitation. In fact, features illustrated or described as part of one embodiment can be used in another embodiment to yield still a further embodiment. It is intended that the present subject matter cover such modifications and variations.
  • Various other advantages and features will become apparent from a reading of the following description given with reference to the various figures of drawings.
  • Although the terms first, second, right, left, front, back, etc. may be used herein to describe various features, elements, components, regions, layers and/or sections, these features, elements, components, regions, layers and/or sections should not be limited by these terms. These terms are only used to distinguish one feature, element, component, region, layer or section from another feature, element, component, region, layer or section. Thus, a first feature, element, component, region, layer or section discussed below could be termed a second feature, element, component, region, layer or section without departing from the teachings of the disclosure herein.
  • Similarly, when a feature or element is being described in the present disclosure as “above”, “under”, “on” or “over” another feature or element, it is to be understood that the features or elements can either be directly contacting each other or have another feature or element therebetween, unless expressly stated to the contrary. Additionally, these terms are simply describing the relative position of the features or elements to each other and do not necessarily mean an absolute fixed position since the relative position above or below depends upon the orientation of the device to the viewer.
  • Embodiments of the subject matter of the disclosure are described herein with reference to schematic illustrations of embodiments that may be idealized. As such, variations from the shapes and/or positions of features, elements or components within the illustrations as a result of, for example but not limited to, user preferences, manufacturing techniques and/or tolerances are expected. Shapes, sizes and/or positions of features, elements or components illustrated in the figures may also be magnified, minimized, exaggerated, shifted or simplified to facilitate explanation of the subject matter disclosed herein. Thus, the features, elements or components illustrated in the figures are schematic in nature and their shapes and/or positions are not intended to illustrate the precise configuration of the subject matter and are not intended to limit the scope of the subject matter disclosed herein.
  • It is to be understood that the ranges and limits mentioned herein include all ranges located within the prescribed limits (i.e., subranges). For instance, a range from about 100 to about 200 also includes ranges from 110 to 150, 170 to 190, 153 to 162, and 145.3 to 149.6. Further, a limit of up to about 7 also includes a limit of up to about 5, up to 3, and up to about 4.5, as well as ranges within the limit, such as from about 1 to about 5, and from about 3.2 to about 6.5 as examples.
  • A golf club adaptor is disclosed herein that can be used on a golf club such as a driver to better place the head of a golf club at the right golf face angles, lie angles, and face loft angles so that a designated contact position on a face of a head can be better aligned with a golf ball to be hit and permits a contact with the ball that can provide a straighter, and in some cases, longer golf shot. The golf club assembly according to the present disclosure can comprise a body having a first end and a second end. The body can comprise, for example, at least one of aluminum or stainless steel. In some embodiments, the first end can comprise a first face and the second end can comprise a second face. The golf club adaptor can comprise a first engagement at the first end of the body for engagement of a portion of a golf club at or near a hosel of a head of the golf club. For example, in some embodiments, the first engagement can be configured to engage a shaft portion extending from the hosel. In some embodiments, the first engagement can be configured to engage a shaft portion extending from the hosel and a portion of the hosel. In some embodiments, the first engagement can be configured to engage a portion of the hosel. The body of the golf club adaptor can thereby be secured through the first engagement in an alignment with the head of the golf club so that a shaft can be secured to the body of the golf club adaptor in an alignment with the face of the golf club having the designated contact position for making contact with a golf ball when hitting the ball.
  • To accomplish this task, the golf club adaptor can also comprise a second engagement in the second end of the body. The second engagement can be configured to hold the shaft of the golf club at an angle such that, when the hosel of the head of the golf club is secured in the first engagement to the first end of the body and the shaft of the golf club is secured to the second engagement at the second end of the body, a centerline axis of the shaft intersects a centerline axis that passes through the designated contact position of the face of the head. When affixing the shaft and the head to the golf club adaptor, the correct face angle, lie angle, and face loft angle can be ensured. Without being held to any specific theory of operation, it is believed that, by ensuring that the centerline axis of the shaft intersects and aligns with the centerline axis that passes through the designated contact position of the face of the head, the power from the swing of the golf club by the golfer is better transferred from the shaft to the expected point of contact of the face of the head of the golf club with the ball at the designated contact position. It is expected that such an alignment of the shaft with the head by the golf club adaptor will result in the golf balls being hit straighter, in many cases, longer with the modified golf club. This is especially true if the alignment provides a proper face angle, lie angle, and face loft angle.
  • As stated above, in some embodiments, the first engagement can comprise a fixture shaft extending from the first end of the body for insertion into a portion of a hosel of a head of a golf club. For example, the hosel of the head can have an aperture for insertion of the fixture shaft. An epoxy or an adhesive can be used to secure the fixture shaft in the aperture of the hosel to securely hold the golf club adaptor to the head of the golf club.
  • In some embodiments, the first engagement can comprise a first aperture in the first end of the body for insertion of a shaft extending from a portion of a hosel of a head of a golf club. For example, the original shaft of the golf club can be severed near the hosel of the head of the golf club such that only a small portion of the original, or previous, shaft remains, which is termed a stem shaft. Thus, as used herein the term “stem shaft” means a short shaft that extends from the hosel that is less than about 6 inches in length. For example, the portion of the stem shaft that extends from the hosel can be between about 0.25 inches and about 3 inches in length in some embodiments. In some embodiments, the portion of the stem shaft that extends from the hosel can be between about 0.5 inches and about 2 inches in other embodiments. The stem shaft can be a stump from a previous shaft that was severed or a new stem shaft inserted into the hosel. The stem shaft can be inserted in the first aperture at the first end of the golf club adaptor to hold the head of the golf club in proper alignment with the golf club adaptor to obtain proper alignment of the head of the golf club with a new shaft secured to the second end of the body of the golf club adaptor. In this manner, the proper face angle, lie angle, and face loft angle can be obtained. An epoxy or an adhesive can be used to secure the stem shaft extending from the hosel in the first aperture in the first end of the body of the hosel to securely hold the golf club adaptor to the head of the golf club.
  • In some embodiments, the first engagement can comprise a first aperture in the first end of the body for insertion of a portion of a hosel of a head of a golf club. For example, a top portion of the hosel can be inserted in the first aperture at the first end of the golf club adaptor to hold the head of the golf club in proper alignment with the golf club adaptor to obtain proper alignment of the head of the golf club with a new shaft secured to the second end of the body of the golf club adaptor. In this manner, the proper face angle, lie angle, and face loft angle can be obtained. An epoxy or an adhesive can be used to secure the portion of the hosel in the first aperture in the first end of the body of the golf club adaptor to securely hold the golf club adaptor to the head of the golf club in a proper alignment.
  • In some embodiments, the second engagement of the body of the golf club adaptor can comprise a second aperture in the second end of the body that can be used to receive the shaft of the golf club. The second aperture can extend at an angle within the body such that when the hosel of the head of the golf club is properly secured at the first end of the body and a shaft of the golf club is secured in the second end of the body an alignment of the head and the shaft of the golf club can be accomplish so that the centerline axis of the shaft intersects the centerline axis that passes through the designated contact position of the face of the head. An epoxy or adhesive can be used to secure the shaft in the second aperture in the second end of the body of the golf club adaptor to securely hold the golf club adaptor to the shaft in a proper alignment with the head of the golf club. Thus, a proper face angle, lie angle, and face loft angle of the golf club can be achieved.
  • The body of the golf club adaptor can comprise different configurations that can meet the desired needs of the golfer who uses the golf club adaptor on his clubs. For example, for golfers who want to meet the club specifications set forth in United States Golf Association (“USGA”) regulations to be able to use the clubs in USGA sanctioned tournaments, different golf club adaptors may be used as compared to the golf club adaptors used by leisurely golfers who are not concerned with meeting USGA regulations regarding club specifications. In some embodiments, the body can have a height such that the first aperture extends above the second aperture in the body. In some embodiments, the body can have a length and a height such that the first aperture extends above the second aperture in the body. In some embodiments, the first aperture can intersect the second aperture so that the shaft of the club and the shaft extending from the hosel lock against each other. In some embodiments, the second end of the body can have a face cut or molded at about 75° as measured from a plane that runs parallel with a centerline axis of the body. In some such embodiments, the second aperture can extend into the second end of the body at the right angle to the face of the second end.
  • As another example, in some embodiments, a golf club adaptor can be provided that comprises a body having a first end and a second end. The body can comprise at least one of aluminum or stainless steel. A first aperture can be formed in the first end of the body for insertion of a portion of the golf club at or near a hosel of a head of a golf club with the head of the golf club having a face with a designated contact position for making contact with a golf ball when hitting the ball. The golf club adaptor can also comprise a second aperture in the second end of the body for receiving a shaft of the golf club. The second aperture can extend at an angle within the body such that, when the hosel of the head of the golf club is secured at the first end of the body and a shaft of the golf club is secured in the second end of the body, a centerline axis of the shaft intersects a centerline axis that passes through the designated contact position of the face of the head. Further, the centerline axis can extend about parallel with the plane of the face of the head.
  • In some embodiments, the first aperture can be configured to receive a portion of a previous shaft that extends from the portion of the hosel of the golf club. In some embodiments, the body can have a height such that the first aperture extends above the second aperture in the body. In some embodiments, the body can have a length and a height such that the first aperture extends above the second aperture in the body. In some embodiments, the first aperture can intersect the second aperture so that the shaft of the club and the shaft extending from the hosel lock against each other. In some embodiments, the second end of the body can have a face cut at about 75° as measured from a side of the body. In some such embodiments, the second aperture can extend into the second end of the body at the right angle to the face of the second end.
  • Referring now to FIG. 1, a golf club GC is provided according to present subject matter. The golf club GC can comprise a golf club adaptor 10 that comprises a body 12 having a first end 14 with a first engagement 18 and a second end 16 with a second engagement 20. The golf club GC can also comprise a head 30 having a hosel 32 with the head 30 secured to the first engagement 18 at the first end 14 of the body 12 of the adaptor 10 and a shaft 40 secured to the second engagement 20 at the second end 16 of the body 12 of the adaptor 10. The head 30 of the golf club GC can include a face 34 with a designated contact position 36 (identified here by the crosshairs) for making contact with a golf ball when hitting the golf ball.
  • The adaptor 10 can be used to secure the shaft 40 to the head 30 so that the head 30 and the shaft 40 are in proper alignment to hit to golf ball farther and straighter. For example, the adaptor 10 can be used to achieve a proper face angle, lie angle, and face loft angle for the golf club. In particular, the first engagement 18 at the first end 14 of the body 12 is secured to a portion of a golf club GC at or near a hosel 32 of a head 30 of the golf club GC. The second engagement 20 can engage an end 44 of the shaft 40. The second engagement 20 can be configured to hold the shaft 40 of the golf club GC at an angle α such that when the hosel 32 of the head 30 of the golf club GC is secured at the first engagement 18 and the shaft 40 of the golf club GC is secured to the second engagement 20 at the second end 16 of the body 12, a centerline axis CLS of the shaft 40 intersects a centerline axis CLC that passes through the designated contact position 36 of the face 34 of the head 30 (see also FIG. 4A). For example, the angle α can be measured when the club is in a proper lie angle of the head. For example, in some embodiments, the angle α can be between about 40° and about 55°. In some embodiments, the angle α can be between about 40° and about 50°. In some embodiments, the angle ε can be between about 45° and about 48°. For example, the angle ε can be about 45°, about 48°, about 48.5°, about 50°, or about 55°.
  • As shown in FIG. 1, the centerline axis CLS of the shaft 40 extends to a point that intersects the centerline axis CLC that passes through the designated contact position 36 of the face 34 of the head 30. This configuration can facilitate better transfer of power from the swing of the golfer using the club GC from the shaft 40 where the golfer holds the handle 42 of the shaft 40 to the designated contact position 36 of the face 34 of the head 30 so that the golf ball being hit flies straighter and, in most cases, farther. By having the centerline axis CLS of the shaft 40 intersect centerline axis CLC that passes through the designated contact position 36 of the face 34 of the head 30, it is believed that less torque is created on the head 30 upon contact with the golf ball being hit. This configuration of a golf club is different from the traditional position of the club shaft as shown in dashed lines as a shaft 40′ with a handle 42′. As can be seen, the shaft 40′ extends at a greater angle when the club is positioned at the correct lie angle as shown in FIG. 1. Thus, the centerline axis CLO of the shaft 40′ extends through the head 30 of the club CG, but does not extend through the centerline axis CLC that passes through the designated contact position 36 of the face 34 of the head 30. Instead, the centerline axis CLO of the shaft 40′ passes through the head 30 at position that will often cause the flight of the golf to not be straight. For example, upon contact with a golf ball during a swing, a torque is created that is likely to cause the golf ball to slice, i.e., curved to the right for a right handed golf club or curved left for a left handed golf club, during the balls flight.
  • To prevent such slicing, golfers will sometimes overcompensate on their grip which often ends up causing the golf ball to hook, i.e., curved to the left for a right handed golf club or curved right for a left handed golf club, during the balls flight. Thus, the use of the adaptor 10 allows the head 30 and the shaft 40 to be properly aligned to decrease the likelihood of such torque and increase the ability of the golfer to hit the ball straighter and oftentimes farther.
  • The adaptor 10 can thus be used to modify or refurbish golf clubs GC that have a traditional placement of the shaft as shown by shaft 40′ in dashed lines in FIG. 1. Alternatively, the adaptor 10 can be used in the assembly of new golf clubs to produce a straighter hitting golf club.
  • FIGS. 2A and 2B illustrate another embodiment of a golf club adaptor 50 that can be used to modify an existing golf club GC so that a centerline axis of a shaft intersects a centerline axis CLC that passes through a designated contact position 36 of the face 34 of the head 30 (as shown in FIGS. 1 and 4A). The golf club adaptor 50 can comprise a body 52 having a first end 54 and a second end 56. The body 52 can comprise at least one of aluminum or stainless steel. A first engagement comprising a first aperture 58 can be formed in the first end 54 of the body 52 for insertion of a portion of the golf club GC at a hosel 32 of a head 30 of the golf club GC. As above, the head 30 of the golf club GC has a face 34 with a designated contact position (not shown in FIG. 2A) for making contact with a golf ball when hitting the ball. In some embodiments, the first aperture 58 can extend completely through the body 52 as shown in FIG. 2A and shown as dashed lines 58A in FIG. 2B. In some embodiments, the first aperture 58 can extend into the body 52 from the first end 54 and terminate within the body 52 as shown in FIG. 2B. As shown in FIG. 2A, the first aperture can receive a portion of the original shaft 40′ that has been otherwise removed from the golf club GC. In some embodiments, the first aperture 58 can comprise a portion 58B for receiving a portion of the hosel 32 of the head 30. In some embodiments, the portion 58B can comprise angled walls. In some embodiments, the portion 58B can comprise cylindrical walls. An epoxy or an adhesive can be used to secure the stem shaft 40′ extending from the hosel 32 in the first aperture 58 in the first end 54 of the body 52 of the adaptor 50 to securely hold the golf club adaptor 50 to the head 30 of the golf club GC.
  • The golf club adaptor 50 can also comprise a second engagement comprising a second aperture 60 in the second end 56 of the body 50. The second aperture 60 can extend at an angle within the body 52 such that, when the head 30 of the golf club is secured at the first end 54 of the body 52 and a shaft 40 of the golf club GC is secured in the second end 56 of the body 52, a centerline axis of the shaft intersects a centerline axis that passes through the designated contact position of the face of the head (see FIGS. 1 and 4A). In such embodiments, golf club adaptor 50 can be sized to accommodate the size of the shaft and head. An epoxy or an adhesive can be used to secure the shaft 40 in the second aperture 60 in the second end 56 of the body 52 of the golf club adaptor 50 to securely hold the golf club adaptor 50 to the shaft 40 in a proper alignment with the head 30 of the golf club GC.
  • In some embodiments as shown in FIG. 2B, the body 50 can have a height such that the first aperture 58 extends above the second aperture 60 in the body 52. The first aperture 58 and the second aperture 60 can extend into the body 52 at an angle ε relative to each other that permits the centerline axis of the shaft to intersect the centerline axis that passes through the designated contact position of the face of the head. For example, in some embodiments, the angle ε can be between about 5° and about 25°. In some other embodiments, the angle ε can be between about 8° and about 20°. In some embodiments, the angle ε can be between about 10° and about 15°. For example, the he angle ε can be about 8.5°, about 10°, about 12.5°, about 15°, or about 18.5°.
  • FIGS. 3A and 3B illustrate another embodiment of a golf club adaptor 70 that can be used to modify an existing golf club or be used in the assembly of a new golf club so that a centerline axis of a shaft of the golf club intersects a centerline axis that passes through a designated contact position of the face of the head of the golf club (as shown in FIGS. 1 and 4A). FIG. 3A shows a side view perspective of the golf club adaptor 70, while FIG. 3B shows a lengthwise cross-sectional view of the golf club adaptor 70. The golf club adaptor 70 can comprise a body 72 having a first end 74 and a second end 76. As with other embodiments, the body 72 of the golf club adaptor 70 can comprise at least one of aluminum or stainless steel. A first engagement comprising a first aperture 90 (see FIG. 3B) can be formed in the first end 74 of the body 72 and a second engagement comprising a second aperture 92 (see FIG. 3B) can be formed in the second end 76 of the body 72.
  • The body 72 can be configured and sized to allow a new or modified golf club to meet the standard regulations for golf clubs set forth by the USGA. In some embodiments, the body 72 can have a cylindrical outer shape. In some embodiments, the body 72 can have a cylindrical shaped bottom portion 84A and a cylindrical shaped top portion 84B with flattened side portions 78. The flattened side portions 78 can aid in the securement of the shaft and the head to the adaptor.
  • In some embodiments, the cylindrical shaped top portion 84B can have a first section cut therefrom to form a flattened angled portion 80 that slopes toward the second end 76 of the body 72. In some embodiments, the flattened angled portion 80 that can extend at an angle β such that the flattened angled portion 80 can be at an angle β that can be parallel or about parallel with a centerline axis of the second aperture 92. In some embodiments, the angle β can be between about 5° and about 25°. In some embodiments, the angle β can be between about 8° and about 20°. In some embodiments, the angle β can be between about 10° and about 15°. For example, the angle β can be about 8.5°, about 10°, about 12.5°, about 15°, about 18.5°, or about 19.5°.
  • Similarly, a second section of the body 72 can be cut from the cylindrical shaped top portion 84B near the first end 74 of the body to form a flattened portion 82 that can extend from a middle portion of the body 72 to the first end 74. In some embodiments, the flattened portion 82 can extend parallel or about parallel with a centerline axis of the first aperture 90. The flattened angled portion 80 and the flattened portion 82 can be used to facilitate alignment of the head and shaft of the golf club that are attached to the adaptor 70 so that the head and the face of the head are at the proper lie angle, loft angle, and face angle and the centerline axis of the shaft of the golf club intersects the centerline axis that passes through the designated contact position of the face of the head of the golf club.
  • The first engagement comprising the first aperture 90 can be formed in the first end 74 of the body 72 for insertion of a portion of the golf club at or near a hosel of a head of the golf club with the head of the golf club having a face with a designated contact position for making contact with a golf ball when hitting the ball. The first aperture 90 can extend into the body 72 from the first end 74 and terminate within the body 72 as shown in FIG. 3B. The first aperture 90 can be configured to receive a portion of an original shaft of the golf club that has been otherwise removed that operates as a stem shaft, a new stem shaft inserted in the hosel of the head of the golf club, the hosel itself, or some combination thereof. Thus, in some embodiments, the first aperture 90 can comprise a section for receiving a stem shaft. In some embodiments, the first aperture 90 can comprise a section for receiving a portion (not shown) of the hosel of the head. In some embodiments, the first aperture 90 can comprise a section for receiving a stem shaft and a section for receiving a portion (not shown) of the hosel of the head. An epoxy or an adhesive can be used to secure the portion of the golf club inserted into the first aperture 90 at or near the hosel of the head of the golf club in the first aperture 90 in the first end 74 of the body 72 of the adaptor 70 to securely hold the golf club adaptor 70 to the head 70 of the golf club GC.
  • The second aperture 92 can receive the shaft of the golf club. The second aperture 92 can extend at an angle within the body 72 such that, when the head of the golf club is secured at the first end 74 of the body 72 and a shaft of the golf club is secured in the second end 76 of the body 72, a centerline axis of the shaft intersects a centerline axis that passes through the designated contact position of the face of the head (see FIGS. 1 and 4A). An epoxy or an adhesive can be used to secure the shaft in the second aperture in the second end 76 of the body 72 of the golf club adaptor 70 to securely hold the golf club adaptor 70 to the shaft in a proper alignment with the head of the golf club GC.
  • In some embodiments as shown in FIG. 3B, the first aperture 90 can intersect the second aperture 92 at intersection 94 so that the shaft of the club and the shaft extending from the hosel of the head lock against each other. In some embodiments, the second end 76 of the body 72 can have a face 88 cut or molded at an angle λ (see FIG. 3A) as measured from a plane 85 that runs parallel with a center line CLB of the body 72. For example, the angle Δ can be about 75°. In some such embodiments, the second aperture 92 can extend into the second end 76 of the body 72 at a right angle to the face 88 of the second end 76. In some embodiments, the first end 74 of the body 72 can have a face 86 cut or molded at a right angle as measured from the plane 85 that runs parallel with a center line CLB of the body 72. In some such embodiments, the first aperture 90 can extend into the first end 74 of the body 72 at a right angle to a face 86 of the first end 74.
  • FIG. 3C illustrates a cross-section of a similar embodiment of a golf club adaptor 100 to the embodiment show in FIGS. 3A and 3B, but comprising a body 102 with a different shape. For example, the body 102 can have a cylindrical shape or a rectangular box shape. The body 102 can comprise a first end 104 and a second end 106. The first end 106 can be cut or molded to have a face 108 and the second end 106 can be cut or molded to have a face 110. As with other embodiments, the body 102 of the golf club adaptor 100 can comprise at least one of aluminum or stainless steel. The golf club adaptor 100 can comprise a first engagement comprising a first aperture 112 that can be formed in the first end 104 of the body 102. The golf club adaptor 100 can also comprise a second engagement comprising a second aperture 114 that can be formed in the second end 106 of the body 102. The first aperture 112 can receive a portion of the golf club at or near a hosel of a head of the golf club while the second aperture 114 can receive a shaft of the golf club. The first aperture 112 can intersect the second aperture 114 at intersection 116 so that the shaft of the club and the shaft extending from the hosel of the head lock against each other.
  • FIGS. 4A and 4B illustrate another embodiment of a golf club adaptor 120 that can be used to modify an existing golf club GC or in the assembly of a new golf club so that a centerline axis CLS of a shaft 40 intersects a centerline axis CLC that passes through a designated contact position 36 of the face 34 of the head 30 of the golf club GC. Additionally, the centerline axis runs parallel with the plane of the face 34 of the head 30 as shown in FIG. 4A.
  • The golf club adaptor 120 can comprise a body 122 (as shown in FIG. 4B) having a first end 124 and a second end 126. The body 122 can comprise at least one of aluminum or stainless steel. The golf club adaptor 120 can comprise a first engagement comprising a fixture shaft 128 extending from the first end 124 of the body 122 for insertion into a portion of a hosel 32 (see
  • FIG. 4A) of a head 30 of a golf club GC. For example, the hosel 32 of the head 30 can have an aperture therein for insertion of the fixture shaft 128. An epoxy or an adhesive can be used to secure the fixture shaft 128 in the aperture of the hosel 32 to securely hold the golf club adaptor 120 to the head 30 of the golf club GC. As above, the head 30 of the golf club GC has a face 34 with a designated contact position for making contact with a golf ball GB when hitting the ball GB.
  • The golf club adaptor 120 can also comprise a second engagement comprising an aperture 130 in the second end 126 of the body 120. The aperture 130 can extend into the body 122 for receiving a shaft 40 of the golf club GC. An epoxy or an adhesive can be used to secure the shaft 40 in the aperture 130 in the second end 126 of the body 122 of the golf club adaptor 120 to securely hold the golf club adaptor 120 to the shaft 40 in a proper alignment with the head 30 of the golf club GC.
  • The first end 124 can extend at an angle Δ from the second end 126 of the body 122 as measured from a centerline 128A of the fixture shaft 128 and first end 124 and a plane parallel with the portion of the body 122 forming the second end 126. In some embodiments, the angle Δ can be between about 5° and about 25°. In some embodiments, the angle Δ can be between about 8° and about 20°. In some embodiments, the angle Δ can be between about 10° and about 15°. For example, the angle Δ can be about 8.5°, about 10°, about 12.5°, about 15°, about 18.5°, or about 19.5°.
  • When the golf club adaptor 120 is properly installed, the fixture shaft 128 at the first end 124 of the body 122 of the golf club adaptor 120 is secured in the hosel 32 of the head 30 and the shaft 40 is secured in the aperture 130 such that the centerline axis CLS of the shaft 40 intersects the centerline axis CLC that passes through the designated contact position 36 of the face 34 of the head 30.
  • The present subject matter provides a method and device for attaching a golf club head to a shaft. The present subject matter allows installment of a small adapter piece designed to allow golfers to hit a straighter shot off the tee with a driver. The present subject matter ensures the face of the club provides the correct loft angle thereon and assures a golf ball will project straight in flight and in the correct direction to which a golfer is aiming.
  • The present subject matter can be embodied in other forms without departure from the spirit and essential characteristics thereof. The embodiments described therefore are to be considered in all respects as illustrative and not restrictive. Although the present subject matter has been described in terms of certain embodiments, other embodiments that are apparent to those of ordinary skill in the art are also within the scope of the present subject matter.

Claims (19)

What is claimed is:
1. A golf club adaptor, comprising:
a body having a first end and a second end;
a first engagement at the first end of the body for engagement of a golf club at a hosel of a head of the golf club with the head of the golf club having a face with a designated contact position for making contact with a golf ball when hitting the ball; and
a second engagement in the second end of the body for receiving a shaft of the golf club, the second engagement extending at an angle such that, when the hosel of the head of the golf club is secured in the first engagement and the shaft of the golf club is secured to the second engagement at the second end of the body, a centerline axis of the shaft intersects a centerline axis that passes through the designated contact position of the face of the head.
2. The golf club adaptor according to claim 1 wherein the first engagement comprises a fixture shaft extending from the first end of the body for insertion into a portion of a hosel of a head of a golf club.
3. The golf club adaptor according to claim 1 wherein the first engagement comprises a first aperture in the first end of the body configured for insertion of a portion of the hosel of the head of the golf club.
4. The golf club adaptor according to claim 3 wherein the first aperture is configured to receive a portion of a stem shaft.
5. The golf club adaptor according to claim 3 wherein the second engagement comprises a second aperture in the second end of the body, the second aperture extending at an angle within the body such that when the hosel of the head of the golf club is secured in the first aperture and a shaft of the golf club is secured in the second end of the body, a centerline axis of the shaft intersects a centerline axis that passes through the designated contact position of the face of the head.
6. The golf club adaptor according to claim 3 wherein the body has a height such that the first aperture extends above the second aperture in the body.
7. The golf club adaptor according to claim 3 wherein the body has a length and a height such that the first aperture at least partially intersects the second aperture in the body.
8. The golf club adaptor according to claim 3 wherein the first aperture intersects the second aperture so that the shaft of the club and the shaft extending from the hosel lock against each other.
9. The golf club adaptor according to claim 3 wherein the second end of the body has a face cut at about 75° as measured from a plane that runs about parallel with a center line of the body.
10. The golf club adaptor according to claim 3 wherein the second aperture extends into the second end of the body at about a right angle to the face of the second end.
11. The golf club adaptor according to claim 1 wherein the body comprises at least one of aluminum or stainless steel.
12. A golf club adaptor, comprising:
a body having a first end and a second end;
a first aperture in the first end of the body for insertion of a portion of the golf club at a hosel of a head of the golf club with the head of the golf club having a face with a designated contact position for making contact with a golf ball when hitting the ball; and
a second aperture in the second end of the body for insertion of a shaft of the golf club, the second aperture extending at an angle within the body such that when the hosel of the head of the golf club is secured at the first end of the body and the shaft of the golf club is secured in the second end of the body such that a centerline axis of the shaft intersects a centerline axis that passes through the designated contact position of the face of the head.
13. The golf club adaptor according to claim 12 wherein the first aperture is configured to receive a portion of a stem shaft and a portion of the hosel of the golf club.
14. The golf club adaptor according to claim 12 wherein the body has a height such that the first aperture at least partially intersects the second aperture in the body.
15. The golf club adaptor according to claim 12 wherein the body has a length and a height such that the first aperture extends above the second aperture in the body.
16. The golf club adaptor according to claim 12 wherein the first aperture intersects the second aperture so that, upon formation of a golf club with the adaptor, the shaft of the club and the shaft extending from the hosel lock against each other.
17. The golf club adaptor according to claim 12 wherein the second end of the body has a face cut at about 75° as measured from a plane that runs parallel with a center line of the body.
18. The golf club adaptor according to claim 12 wherein the second aperture extends into the second end of the body at the right angle to the face of the second end.
19. The golf club adaptor according to claim 12 wherein the body comprises at least one of aluminum or stainless steel.
US14/852,303 2014-09-11 2015-09-11 Golf club adaptors and related methods Abandoned US20160074715A1 (en)

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