JP2012079513A - Abnormality history retention device - Google Patents

Abnormality history retention device Download PDF

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Publication number
JP2012079513A
JP2012079513A JP2010222706A JP2010222706A JP2012079513A JP 2012079513 A JP2012079513 A JP 2012079513A JP 2010222706 A JP2010222706 A JP 2010222706A JP 2010222706 A JP2010222706 A JP 2010222706A JP 2012079513 A JP2012079513 A JP 2012079513A
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Prior art keywords
secondary battery
abnormality
switching element
overdischarge
thermal fuse
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JP2010222706A
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Japanese (ja)
Inventor
Takayuki Shiraishi
剛之 白石
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Gs Yuasa Corp
株式会社Gsユアサ
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Priority to JP2010222706A priority Critical patent/JP2012079513A/en
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    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y02TECHNOLOGIES OR APPLICATIONS FOR MITIGATION OR ADAPTATION AGAINST CLIMATE CHANGE
    • Y02EREDUCTION OF GREENHOUSE GAS [GHG] EMISSIONS, RELATED TO ENERGY GENERATION, TRANSMISSION OR DISTRIBUTION
    • Y02E60/00Enabling technologies or technologies with a potential or indirect contribution to GHG emissions mitigation
    • Y02E60/10Energy storage
    • Y02E60/12Battery technologies with an indirect contribution to GHG emissions mitigation

Abstract

An abnormality history holding device for a secondary battery capable of reliably recording and holding an abnormal history such as overdischarge in a secondary battery with a simple configuration.
An abnormality history holding device according to the present invention detects an abnormality of the secondary battery E0 based on an output of a secondary battery E0, and outputs an abnormality detection circuit 2 and outputs the detection result. Accordingly, the switching element S1 that is turned on, the heating element 3 that generates heat when the switching element S1 is turned on and the discharge current I1 flows from the secondary battery E0, and the heat from the heating element 3 are blown off. And a thermal fuse 4.
[Selection] Figure 1

Description

  The present invention relates to an abnormality history holding device for a secondary battery.

  Secondary batteries (rechargeable batteries) such as lithium ion batteries are mounted on various devices such as automobiles and personal computers, and are used as power sources thereof. Some of such secondary batteries are used as a backup power source in, for example, an aircraft system. This type of power source is required to have particularly high reliability because it must be able to supply power reliably when the main power source cannot be used.

  By the way, if a secondary battery discharges beyond an allowable end voltage (discharge end voltage) (that is, overdischarges), liquid leakage, precipitation of internal substances, etc. occur, and the performance of the secondary battery is significantly reduced. It has been known. A secondary battery that has once deteriorated due to overdischarge is generally difficult to restore to a state before overdischarge. This problem is particularly noticeable in lithium ion batteries. Therefore, it is preferable that the secondary battery deteriorated by overdischarge is replaced with another new secondary battery. In particular, backup power supplies, particularly those used as backup power supplies for aviation, space, and marine systems, are required to have high reliability. Therefore, it is desirable to replace them whenever an overdischarge occurs.

  If the overdischarge record (history) is securely stored in the secondary battery to be replaced and its peripheral circuit, etc., it is easy to determine whether the secondary battery needs to be replaced.

  Patent Document 1 describes a technique for protecting a secondary battery from overdischarge using an overdischarge protection circuit. When the overdischarge protection circuit detects overdischarge based on the output voltage of the secondary battery and outputs the result to the switching element, the switching element is switched between the on state and the off state based on the detection result. This switching element is connected in series with the secondary battery between the output terminals of the secondary battery, and is turned off when overdischarge is detected as described above. When the switching element is turned off, the secondary battery is prohibited from being discharged, and the secondary battery is protected from overdischarge. Furthermore, the secondary battery described in Patent Document 1 is configured so that discharge can be started again if the output voltage of the secondary battery recovers after discharge is prohibited. And it is comprised so that a user can grasp | ascertain the overdischarge state of a secondary battery by repeating discharge prohibition and discharge restart of a secondary battery.

  However, with the technique described in Patent Document 1, no overdischarge history remains in the secondary battery and its peripheral circuits. Therefore, after an overdischarge event has occurred, it cannot be determined whether or not an overdischarge has occurred in the secondary battery based on the peripheral circuit of the secondary battery. However, it may be possible to detect that the switching element has been turned off even once, and store this in the memory to leave a history of overdischarge. Electronic storage may be lost if the power supply of the system is interrupted.

  Further, the technique described in Patent Document 1 cannot be applied to a power source (for example, a backup power source) that cannot stop the discharge even when overdischarge occurs. That is, with the technique described in Patent Document 1, it is impossible to notify the user that overdischarge has occurred without stopping the discharge of the secondary battery with respect to the load.

  Patent Document 2 describes a technique for recording a thermal history in a control device using a current fuse, although it is not an overdischarge history of a secondary battery. However, the blow time of the current fuse is long and is about several hundred milliseconds. For this reason, in the case of using a current fuse, for example, if the switching element malfunctions even for a short time due to external noise (when a circuit is erroneously detected), it will blow out immediately, so history recording The reliability cannot be increased sufficiently.

  Even if it is a current fuse, it is possible to lengthen the fusing time if it is used above the rated current and below the fusing current. However, it is difficult to accurately control a long fusing time of 1 second or more. Therefore, when a current fuse is used, it is difficult to guarantee a function in actual use.

  In order to blow the current fuse, it is usually necessary to pass a current of 1 A or more. For this reason, it may be difficult to supply a current necessary to blow the fuse from the overdischarged secondary battery (for example, when a secondary battery having a small capacity is used). In addition, a printed circuit board pattern for passing a current of 1 A or more becomes large.

JP 2007-104876 A JP 2008-305286 A

  The present invention has been completed based on the above-described circumstances, and an abnormality of a secondary battery that can reliably record an abnormal history such as overdischarge in a secondary battery with a simple configuration and can be reliably retained. An object is to provide a history holding device.

  An abnormality history holding device for a secondary battery according to the present invention detects an abnormality of the secondary battery based on an output of the secondary battery, and outputs an abnormality detection circuit, and conducts according to the detection result. And a heating element through which a discharge current flows from the secondary battery when the switching element is conductive, and a thermal fuse that is blown by receiving heat from the heating element.

  In the abnormality history holding device of the present invention, when the abnormality detection circuit detects an abnormality of the secondary battery based on the output of the secondary battery, the detection result is output to the switching element. The switching element is turned on (turned on) according to the detection result. After conduction, a discharge current flows from the secondary battery to the heating element, and the heating element generates heat. The thermal fuse is melted by receiving heat from the heating element.

According to the abnormality history holding device of the present invention, the abnormality history of the secondary battery can be reliably recorded and held by a simple method of fusing a thermal fuse. In addition, since a thermal fuse is used, even if a malfunction occurs such that the switching element conducts in a pulsed manner, the thermal fuse is not immediately blown and no erroneous history is recorded. . In addition, as abnormality of a secondary battery, illegal use etc., such as overdischarge, overvoltage, reverse connection, etc. are mentioned, for example.

  In the abnormality history holding device, the abnormality detection circuit includes, for example, an overdischarge detection circuit that detects overdischarge of the secondary battery based on the output voltage of the secondary battery and outputs the detection result. If the abnormality history holding device has such a configuration, the overdischarge history of the secondary battery can be reliably recorded and held by a simple method of fusing a thermal fuse.

  In the abnormality history holding device, it is preferable to provide a fusing detection circuit that detects fusing of the thermal fuse and notifies the outside. Thereby, it is possible to notify the user of abnormality such as overdischarge in the secondary battery.

  In the abnormality history holding device, it is preferable that the thermal fuse is provided while suppressing the thermal influence from the secondary battery. As a result, an erroneous history is not recorded due to the temperature rise of the secondary battery, and overall, the reliability of the recording of the abnormal history can be increased.

  In the abnormality history holding device, it is preferable that the thermal fuse and the secondary battery are arranged apart from each other so as not to contact each other. If the abnormality history holding device has such a configuration, the thermal fuse is suppressed from being blown by receiving heat generated from the secondary battery.

  In the abnormality history holding device, it is preferable that the thermal fuse is mounted on a substrate, and the substrate is disposed so that a gap is formed between the substrate and the secondary battery. If the abnormality history retention device has such a configuration, a gap is provided between the secondary battery and the substrate on which the thermal fuse is mounted, so that it is difficult for heat to be transmitted. It is suppressed that the heat generated from the secondary battery is blown out.

  In order to suppress the thermal influence from the secondary battery, the thermal fuse may be arranged so that the thermal fuse does not directly contact the secondary battery as described above, or It may be arranged so that a heat insulating material is interposed between them, and in short, it is arranged so that the heat from the secondary battery does not affect the fusing of the thermal fuse due to the heat from the heating element that generates heat when the switching element is conducted. do it.

  It is preferable that the abnormality history holding device has a longer fusing time of the thermal fuse in accordance with a decrease in ambient temperature of the secondary battery.

  According to the abnormality history retention device for a secondary battery according to the present invention, an abnormality history such as overdischarge in the secondary battery can be reliably recorded with a simple configuration and can be reliably retained.

1 is a block diagram showing the configuration of an abnormality history holding device according to a first embodiment. Perspective view showing a battery pack Side view of the battery pack shown in FIG. A plan view schematically showing a part of an abnormality history holding device in which a thermal fuse or the like is mounted on a substrate A block diagram showing composition of an abnormal history maintenance device concerning a 2nd embodiment.

<First Embodiment>
Hereinafter, an abnormality history holding apparatus for a secondary battery according to a first embodiment of the present invention will be described with reference to FIG. 1 records an overdischarge history of an assembled battery (secondary battery) E0 in which four unit secondary batteries (cells) E1, E2, E3, and E4 are connected in series. , A holding device. As shown in FIG. 1, the abnormality history holding device 1 mainly includes an overdischarge detection circuit (abnormality detection circuit) 2, a first switching element S <b> 1, a heating element 3, and a thermal fuse 4. The abnormality history holding device 1 of the present embodiment further includes a second switching element S2, a third switching element S3, and a fourth switching element S4. In addition, the assembled battery E0 of this embodiment is connected to the load using the wiring L20. Each unit secondary battery E1, E2, E3, and E4 of the assembled battery E0 is composed of a lithium ion battery.

  The abnormality history holding device 1 of the present embodiment is provided with four overdischarge detection circuits 2a, 2b, 2c and 2d, and each overdischarge detection circuit 2a, 2b, 2c and 2d is connected to the assembled battery E0. The unit secondary batteries E1, E2, E3 and E4 are connected in parallel. In this embodiment, each overdischarge detection circuit 2a, 2b, 2c, and 2d detects the output voltage of each corresponding unit secondary battery E1, E2, E3, and E4. That is, the overdischarge detection circuit 2a detects the output voltage V1 of the unit secondary battery E1, the overdischarge detection circuit 2b detects the output voltage V2 of the unit secondary battery E2, and the overdischarge detection circuit 2c The output voltage V3 of the secondary battery E1 is detected, and the overdischarge detection circuit 2d detects the output voltage V4 of the unit secondary battery E4.

  Each overdischarge detection circuit 2 is connected to one fourth switching element S4. The fourth switching element S4 is configured to be switched between an on state and an off state by the overdischarge detection circuit 2. When the detected output voltage V is smaller than the preset allowable voltage Vx (that is, when overdischarge occurs), the overdischarge detection circuit 2 is always in the off state. The element S4 is switched on.

  Specifically, the overdischarge detection circuit 2a turns on the fourth switching element S4a when the output voltage V1 of the unit secondary battery E1 is smaller than the allowable voltage Vx. The overdischarge detection circuit 2b turns on the fourth switching element S4b when the output voltage V2 of the unit secondary battery E2 is smaller than the allowable voltage Vx. The overdischarge detection circuit 2c turns on the fourth switching element S4c when the output voltage V3 of the unit secondary battery E3 is smaller than the allowable voltage Vx. The overdischarge detection circuit 2d turns on the fourth switching element S4d when the output voltage V4 of the unit secondary battery E4 is smaller than the allowable voltage Vx. Note that when the detected output voltage V is equal to or higher than the allowable voltage Vx, the fourth switching element S4 is maintained in the OFF state.

  The overdischarge detection circuit 2 may be configured by a general-purpose discrete component, or may be configured to include a CPU, an FPGA (Field-Programmable Gate Array), and the like.

  The fourth switching element S4 of the present embodiment is composed of a PNP transistor to which a predetermined bias resistor or the like is connected. The collector C side of each switching element S4 is combined into one signal line and connected to the base B of the third switching element S3.

  The third switching element S3 is composed of an NPN transistor to which a predetermined bias resistor or the like is connected. The emitter E side of the third switching element is connected to the negative electrode of the assembled battery E0. The collector C side of the third switching element S3 is connected to the base B of the second switching element S2. The third switching element S3 is switched between an on state and an off state based on a signal input from the base B thereof. In the present embodiment, the third switching element is turned off when overdischarge occurs in at least one of the four unit secondary batteries E1, E2, E3, and E4. It is configured to be switched from the ON state to the ON state.

  The second switching element S2 is composed of a PNP transistor to which a predetermined bias resistor or the like is connected. The emitter E side of the second switching element S2 is connected to the wiring L1 connected to the positive electrode of the assembled battery E0 (the positive electrode of the unit secondary battery E1) via the wiring L2. The collector C side of the second switching element S2 is connected to the base B of the first switching element S1. The second switching element S2 is switched between an on state and an off state based on a signal input from its base B. In the present embodiment, the second switching element S2 is turned on in conjunction with the third switching element S3 when the third switching element S3 is turned on.

  The first switching element S1 is composed of an NPN transistor to which a predetermined bias resistor or the like is connected. The collector C side of the first switching element S1 is connected to the wiring L1 via the wiring L3. The emitter E side of the first switching element S1 is grounded. The first switching element S1 is switched between an on state and an off state based on a signal input from its base B. In the present embodiment, the first switching element S1 is turned on in conjunction with the second switching element S2 when the second switching element S2 is turned on.

  In short, the first switching element S1 is configured to be turned on when an overdischarge occurs in at least one of the four unit secondary batteries E1, E2, E3, and E4. ing. The first switching element corresponds to the “switching element” of the present invention.

  The heating element 3 is an electric resistor having a predetermined resistance value provided on the wiring L3. A thermal fuse 4 is provided in the vicinity of the heat generating element 3 and on the wiring L4 extended from the contact P of the wiring L1 and the wiring L3. The thermal fuse 4 is provided apart from the battery cases of the unit secondary batteries E1 to E4, thereby suppressing the influence of heat from the unit secondary batteries E1 to E4, that is, during normal operation of the assembled battery E0. It is designed not to be melted by heat generation (including charge / discharge). The thermal fuse 4 is blown after a predetermined time T when receiving heat generated from the heating element 3. This time (melting time) T can be adjusted by appropriately setting various conditions such as the material (alloy) used for the thermal fuse 4, the electrical resistance value of the heating element 4, and the distance between the heating element 4 and the thermal fuse. . The fusing time T can usually be adjusted to several seconds to several tens of seconds. Note that the thermal fuse 4 of the present embodiment is not heated and blown by the current flowing through itself.

  A fusing detection circuit 5 is connected to one end of the wiring L4. The blow detection circuit 5 applies the output voltage of the assembled battery E0 to its input terminal 5a when the temperature fuse 4 is not blown, and stops applying the voltage when the temperature fuse 4 is blown. Based on this, the fusing of the thermal fuse 4 is detected. The fusing detection circuit 5 includes a light emitting element (not shown) such as an LED, and notifies the user of an abnormality (over discharge) by lighting the light emitting element.

  Hereinafter, the operation of the abnormality history holding apparatus 1 when an overdischarge occurs in the assembled battery E0 will be described with reference to FIG. When the assembled battery E0 falls into an overdischarged state, the output voltages of the unit secondary batteries E1 to E4 decrease. In any one of the unit secondary batteries E1 to E4, the output voltage becomes smaller than the allowable voltage Vx. For example, if the output voltage V2 of the unit secondary battery E2 detected by the overdischarge detection circuit 2b becomes smaller than the allowable voltage Vx, the overdischarge detection circuit 2b determines whether the fourth switching element S4b is in accordance with the detection result. A signal for lowering the base voltage of the fourth switching element S4b is output to switch the fourth switching element S4b from the off state to the on state.

  When the fourth switching element S4b is turned on, the third switching element S3 is switched from the off state to the on state in conjunction therewith. When the third switching element S3 is turned on, the second switching element S2 is switched from the off state to the on state in conjunction with the third switching element S3. Further, when the second switching element S2 is turned on, the first switching element S1 is switched from the off state to the on state in conjunction therewith.

  When the first switching element S1 is turned on in this way, the discharge current I1 from the assembled battery E0 flows through the heating element 3 on the wiring L3. Then, Joule heat is generated in the heating element 3, and the heat is transmitted to the thermal fuse 4 disposed in the vicinity thereof. When the thermal fuse 4 receives heat from the heating element 3, the temperature gradually increases, and when the temperature reaches the melting point (melting point of the fuse alloy), the thermal fuse 4 is blown. Once the thermal fuse 4 is blown, it does not return to the original connected state. Therefore, the record of the overdischarge generated in the assembled battery E0 is reliably left in the abnormality history holding device 1 by the blown temperature fuse 4, and an abnormality (overdischarge) is observed by observing the state of the temperature fuse 4 from the outside. It can be confirmed that there was.

  In the abnormality history holding device 1 of the present embodiment, since the fusing detection circuit 5 is connected to one end of the wiring L4, the temperature fuse is based on the fact that the output voltage of the assembled battery E0 is not applied to the input terminal 5a. 4 fusing is detected. The user can grasp the overdischarge of the assembled battery E0 based on the detection result (melting notification signal).

By the way, the secondary battery generally has a high internal resistance in a low temperature environment, and even if it is not in an overdischarged state, there is a case where the voltage drops so much that it temporarily falls below the allowable voltage during a large current discharge. . Such a voltage drop is a temporary phenomenon that occurs when the secondary battery is activated, and is usually eliminated when the secondary battery generates heat and warms up.

On the other hand, the fusing time of the thermal fuse 4 of the abnormality history holding device 1 is longer than that at normal temperature (for example, 25 ° C.) in a low temperature environment. Therefore, even if a large voltage drop not caused by overdischarge as described above occurs and the thermal fuse 4 starts to be heated by the heating element 3, the voltage drop is usually eliminated before the thermal fuse 4 is blown. The Therefore, the abnormality history holding device 1 is suppressed from erroneously detecting the voltage drop as described above.

  In the present specification, a configuration including an assembled battery (secondary battery) together with the abnormality history holding device is referred to as a battery pack. In the case of the present embodiment, the configuration including the abnormality history holding device 1 and the assembled battery E0 is a battery pack.

  Here, a battery pack including the abnormality history holding device 1 will be described with reference to FIGS. 2 to 4.

  As shown in FIG. 2, in the battery pack 100, an abnormality history holding device 1 including a heating element, a thermal fuse, etc. mounted on a substrate 10 and four unit secondary batteries E1 to E4 are connected in series. And an assembled battery E0. The external shape of the assembled battery E0 in the present embodiment is a substantially rectangular parallelepiped, and is formed by stacking unit secondary batteries E1 to E4 having the same size. The external shapes of the unit secondary batteries E1 to E4 are also substantially rectangular parallelepiped, and the unit secondary batteries E1 to E4 are arranged so that the end faces of the unit secondary batteries are arranged on the same plane. . Note that the battery pack 100 is housed in a casing 30 having a substantially rectangular parallelepiped shape.

  As shown in FIG. 3, the substrate 10 of the abnormality history holding device 1 and the assembled battery E0 are arranged apart from each other so as not to contact each other. The substrate 10 of the abnormality history holding device 1 is arranged so that at least the lower surface 12 thereof does not directly contact the upper surface 41 of the assembled battery E0. In this way, a gap D is positively provided between the substrate 10 and the assembled battery E0. Note that the lower surface 12 of the substrate 10 is not in contact with the upper surface 41 of the assembled battery E0 (gap) by a support member (not shown) connecting the side end surface and the side end surface of the assembled battery E0. To keep D).

  As shown in FIG. 4, the heating element 3 and the thermal fuse 4 of the abnormality history holding device 1 are mounted on the substrate 10 (upper surface 11) so as to be close to each other. As described above, the heat generating element 3 is arranged close to the temperature fuse 4 so that the heat of the heat generating element 3 can be easily transferred to the temperature fuse 4. As shown in FIG. 4, a connector 15 for detecting the output voltage of the unit secondary battery is disposed on the edge side of the substrate 10.

  The assembled battery (secondary battery) E0 generates heat during charging and discharging. Therefore, it is conceivable that the heat generated from the assembled battery E0 is applied to the thermal fuse 4 mounted on the substrate 10 through the substrate 10 or the like. In such a case, if the heat sufficient for fusing is applied to the temperature fuse 4, the temperature fuse 4 may be blown in addition to the overdischarge of the assembled battery E0. It is not preferable. Therefore, as shown in FIG. 3 and the like, a gap D is positively provided between the substrate 10 on which the thermal fuse 4 is mounted and the assembled battery E0, so that the assembled battery E0 is connected to the thermal fuse 4 on the substrate 10. It is preferable that heat is not easily transmitted (low thermal conductivity). In addition, what is necessary is just to adjust the distance of the clearance gap D suitably according to the objective. Further, a heat insulating material may be interposed in the gap D.

<Second Embodiment>
Next, an abnormality history holding apparatus for a secondary battery according to a second embodiment of the present invention will be described with reference to FIG. The basic configuration of the abnormality history holding device 1A shown in FIG. 5 is the same as that of the abnormality history holding device 1 of the first embodiment shown in FIG. Therefore, the same reference numerals are assigned to the same components, and descriptions thereof are omitted. The abnormality history holding device 1A of the present embodiment is different from the abnormality history holding device 1 in that a thermal fuse 4 (4b) is further provided on the wiring L1. Hereinafter, the abnormality history holding device 1 </ b> A of the present embodiment will be described focusing on this point.

  The abnormality history holding apparatus 1A of the present embodiment includes two thermal fuses 4 (4a and 4b). The thermal fuse 4b is made of the same type as the thermal fuse 4a disposed on the wiring L4. The thermal fuse 4b before being blown forms part of the wiring L1. And this thermal fuse 4b is arrange | positioned in the vicinity of the heat generating element 3 similarly to the thermal fuse 4a. The two temperature fuses 4a and 4b are arranged so as to sandwich the contact P between the wiring L1, the wiring L3, and the wiring L4.

  If overdischarge occurs in the assembled battery E0, the first switching element S1 is conducted and the discharge current I1 from the assembled battery E flows through the heating element 3 as in the first embodiment. When the discharge current I1 flows through the heat generating element 3, Joule heat is generated from the heat generating element 3, and the heat is transmitted to the two temperature fuses 4a and 4b arranged in the vicinity thereof. When the temperature of each thermal fuse 4 reaches the melting point (melting point of the fuse alloy) after a predetermined time has elapsed, the two thermal fuses 4a and 4b are blown out. Thus, also in the abnormality history holding device 1A of the present embodiment, the record of the overdischarge generated in the assembled battery E0 is reliably recorded by the blown temperature fuse 4.

  Further, when the temperature fuse 4b on the wiring L1 out of the two temperature fuses 4a and 4b is blown, the discharge current I1 from the assembled battery E does not flow to the heating element 3 on the wiring L3. That is, the heat generation of the heat generating element 3 is stopped by fusing the thermal fuse 4b.

<Other embodiments>
The present invention is not limited to the embodiments described with reference to the above description and drawings. For example, the following embodiments are also included in the technical scope of the present invention.

  (1) In the first embodiment, etc., overdischarge detection circuits (abnormality detection circuits) 2a, 2b, 2c, and 2d are connected in parallel to the unit secondary batteries E1, E2, E3, and E4 of the assembled battery E0, respectively. Then, the output voltage (overdischarge) of each unit secondary battery was detected. However, in another embodiment, a group of unit secondary batteries (unit secondary battery group) is 1 The output voltage (overdischarge) may be detected using the individual overdischarge detection circuits 2. Then, using the detection result, the first switching element S <b> 1 may be turned on to generate heat from the heating element 3 and blow the thermal fuse 4. The entire assembled battery E0 may be detected by detecting the output voltage (overdischarge) using one overdischarge detection circuit 2, and the overdischarge of the assembled battery E0 may be detected using this detection result.

  (2) In the first embodiment or the like, overdischarge of the secondary battery is detected, and the fact (history) is recorded and retained by fusing of the thermal fuse 4, but in other embodiments, A secondary battery abnormality (for example, overdischarge, overvoltage, unauthorized use such as reverse connection, etc.) other than overdischarge may be detected and the history recorded in the thermal fuse 4 by fusing.

  (3) In the first embodiment or the like, a PNP transistor or an NPN transistor is used as the first switching element S1 or the like. However, in other embodiments, as the first switching element S1 or the like, for example, a MOSFET (Metal- Oxide-Semiconductor Field-Effect Transistor may be used.

  (4) In the first embodiment and the like, the thermal fuse 4 is disposed on the wiring L4 (or wiring L1). However, in other embodiments, at least the overdischarge record (history) should be maintained. For example, the thermal fuse 4 may not be disposed on the wiring. That is, a configuration in which the discharge current from the assembled battery (secondary battery) E0 does not flow to the thermal fuse 4 when the first switching element S1 is conducted (an independent configuration that is desired to be connected to the wiring) may be employed. However, even in such a case, the thermal fuse 4 needs to be disposed in the vicinity of the heating element 3 so that it can be blown by receiving heat from the heating element 3.

(5) In the first embodiment and the like, overdischarge of the assembled battery E0 is detected by using the fusing detection circuit 5, but in other embodiments, for example, instead of the fusing detection circuit 5, an LED or the like The light emitting element may be used. That is, the overdischarge of the assembled battery E0 may be detected by causing the light emitting element to emit light when the temperature fuse 4 is not blown, and turning off the light emitting element when the temperature fuse 4 is blown.

DESCRIPTION OF SYMBOLS 1 Abnormality history holding device 2 Overdischarge detection circuit 3 Heating element 4 Thermal fuse 5 Fusing detection circuit S1 1st switching element (equivalent to the switching element of this invention)
E0 battery pack (secondary battery)
E1 unit secondary battery (cell 1)
E2 unit secondary battery (cell 2)
E3 unit secondary battery (cell 3)
E4 unit secondary battery (cell 4)
I1 Discharge current from battery pack

Claims (7)

  1. Detecting an abnormality of the secondary battery based on the output of the secondary battery, and outputting an abnormality detection circuit;
    A switching element that conducts according to the detection result;
    A heating element that generates heat when a discharge current flows from the secondary battery when the switching element is conductive;
    An abnormality history retention device for a secondary battery, comprising: a thermal fuse that is melted by receiving heat from the heating element.
  2.   2. The abnormality of the secondary battery according to claim 1, wherein the abnormality detection circuit includes an overdischarge detection circuit that detects overdischarge of the secondary battery based on an output voltage of the secondary battery and outputs the detection result. History holding device.
  3.   The abnormality history retention device for a secondary battery according to claim 1, further comprising a fusing detection circuit that detects fusing of the thermal fuse and outputs a fusing notification signal to the outside.
  4.   4. The abnormality history retention device for a secondary battery according to claim 1, wherein the thermal fuse and the secondary battery are arranged apart from each other so as not to contact each other. 5.
  5.   The abnormality of the secondary battery according to any one of claims 1 to 4, wherein the thermal fuse is mounted on a substrate, and the substrate is disposed so that a gap is formed between the substrate and the secondary battery. History holding device.
  6.   The abnormality history retention device for a secondary battery according to any one of claims 1 to 5, wherein a fusing time of the thermal fuse is increased in accordance with a decrease in ambient temperature of the secondary battery.
  7.   A battery pack comprising the abnormality history holding device according to any one of claims 1 to 6 and a secondary battery.
JP2010222706A 2010-09-30 2010-09-30 Abnormality history retention device Pending JP2012079513A (en)

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Cited By (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
CN104377402A (en) * 2014-12-02 2015-02-25 天津航空机电有限公司 Control and fault diagnosing system of battery heater
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