JP2007229487A - Golf club head with concave insert - Google Patents

Golf club head with concave insert Download PDF

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Publication number
JP2007229487A
JP2007229487A JP2007085624A JP2007085624A JP2007229487A JP 2007229487 A JP2007229487 A JP 2007229487A JP 2007085624 A JP2007085624 A JP 2007085624A JP 2007085624 A JP2007085624 A JP 2007085624A JP 2007229487 A JP2007229487 A JP 2007229487A
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JP
Japan
Prior art keywords
club head
insert
weight
sole
inserts
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Pending
Application number
JP2007085624A
Other languages
Japanese (ja)
Inventor
Joshua G Breier
Gregory Haralson
Scott A Rice
Peter L Soracco
ハラルソン グレゴリー
ジー ブライアー ジョシュア
エイ ライス スコット
エル ソラッコ ピーター
Original Assignee
Acushnet Co
アクシュネット カンパニーAcushnet Company
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Priority to US11/363,098 priority Critical patent/US7524249B2/en
Application filed by Acushnet Co, アクシュネット カンパニーAcushnet Company filed Critical Acushnet Co
Publication of JP2007229487A publication Critical patent/JP2007229487A/en
Application status is Pending legal-status Critical

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Abstract

A large wood-type golf club head having a concave insert is provided.
A hollow golf club head having a recess is disclosed and claimed. The club head includes a metal portion and a lightweight portion that can be formed of plastic, composite, or the like. The recess allows the club designer to make a club head with a very thin portion while maintaining the essential structural integrity. Depending on the situation, a convex bulge can be provided to accommodate weight inserts that enhance the play characteristics of the golf club. The metal part of the club head takes on the appearance of a frame in which several lightweight inserts are positioned. These lightweight inserts can be positioned within the club head crown, skirt, and sole.
[Selection] Figure 1

Description

  The present invention relates to golf clubs, and in particular, the present invention relates to large wood type golf club heads having concave inserts.

(Cross-reference to related applications)
This application is a continuation-in-part of US patent application Ser. No. 11 / 110,733, filed Apr. 21, 2005, filed Apr. 21, 2005, now pending, incorporated herein by reference in its entirety. This application is also a continuation-in-part of US patent application Ser. No. 11 / 180,406, filed Jul. 13, 2005, filed Jul. 13, 2005, hereby incorporated by reference in its entirety.

  Golf club heads come in many different forms and configurations such as wood or metal types (including driver and fairway wood), iron types (including wedge type club heads), utility or special types, and putter types. is there. Each of these styles has a defined function and configuration. The present invention primarily relates to hollow golf club heads such as wood type and utility type (generally referred to herein as wood type golf clubs).

  A wood-type golf club head generally has a front face, that is, a striking surface, a crown, a sole, and an arc-shaped skirt, and the skirt includes a heel, a toe, and a back. Crowns and skirts are often referred to as “shells”. The front face is in contact with the golf ball and hits the golf ball. A plurality of grooves, often called “score lines”, are provided on the face to help spin the ball and for decoration purposes. The crown is generally shaped to have a specific face to the golfer and provide structural rigidity to the striking surface. The golf club sole touches and interacts with the ground during a swing.

  The design and manufacture of wood-type golf clubs requires careful attention to the club head structure. Many factors to consider include material selection, material handling, structural integrity, and overall geometric design. Exemplary geometric design considerations include loft, lie, face angle, horizontal face bulge, vertical face roll, face dimensions, sole curvature, center of gravity, and total head weight. . The internal design of the club head is adapted to achieve specific characteristics such as by means of hosel or shaft attachment, club head face or body perimeter weighting, and having a filling in the hollow club head. The club head is typically made of stainless steel, aluminum or titanium, cast, stamped, forged, for example by shaping a metal plate with pressure, or any two of these methods or It is formed by more combinations. As is often the case with club heads designed to have inserts such as sole plates or crown plates, club heads are welded together or otherwise joined together to form a hollow head. Can be made from parts. The multi-part configuration facilitates access to cavities formed in the club head, thereby allowing various other parts such as internal weights and club shafts to be attached to the head. The cavity may remain empty or may be partially or completely filled with foam or the like. Adhesive can be injected into the club head to provide the proper swing weight and to collect and hold any debris that may be present on the club head. Further, due to the difficulty of manufacturing a one-piece club head with high dimensional tolerances, the use of a multi-part configuration allows the club head to be manufactured to a strict standard set.

  It is well known that wood type golf clubs are made of metallic materials. These clubs were originally made by casting a durable metal, primarily stainless steel, aluminum, beryllium copper, into a unitary structure consisting of a metal body, face, and hosel. As technology has advanced, it has become more desirable to enhance the performance of club faces, usually by using titanium materials.

  Many amateur golfers always seek to fly farther on shots, especially driver shots, so the golf industry has responded by providing golf clubs specifically designed with distance in mind. I came. The head size of a wood-type golf club is increased, which allows the club to possess a greater moment of inertia, which increases the force resisting torsion during off-center hits. As the wood-type club head grows, its center of gravity will move backwards and toward the toe away from the face, which is expected to hit the ball (in a right-handed golfer). Is higher than that and flies to the right. This can be corrected by reducing the club loft of the larger head. Larger heads also move the center of gravity further away from the hosel axis, leaving these clubs open at the time of contact, and “slicing the ball to the right in the case of right-handed golfers” Induces an effect. Offsetting the head and / or incorporating a hook face angle helps to compensate for this by “squaring” the face upon impact, but often further requires eliminating the “slicing” tendency .

  Another recent technological advance that brings more distance to average golfers is the constant weight or consistent casting of thinner shell thicknesses for titanium, magnesium and composites. Making the club head larger while making it lighter by using a lighter material like this. Also, club faces are steadily becoming thinner, because thinner faces maximize what is known as the coefficient of restitution (COR). The more the face repels on impact, the more energy is imparted to the ball, thereby increasing the flight distance.

  A known method that improves the weight distribution of a wood-type club head and helps reduce the club opening when in contact with the ball is generally to add weight to the body cast part itself. Or strategically adding weight elements at the same location in the club. Many attempts have been made to incorporate weight elements into wood-type club heads. These weight elements are typically located at specific locations that positively affect ball flight or at specific locations to overcome the disadvantages of specific golfers. As mentioned above, the main problem of golfers with a lot of golf handicap is the tendency to “slice”, which in addition to bending the ball to the right, it takes more spin on the ball and further increases the flight distance. It will decrease. To reduce this tendency, the present invention teaches placing weight elements directly into the club head. The arrangement of the weight elements is designed so that the spin of the ball is reduced and a “draw” (right-to-left ball jump in a right-handed golfer) is added to the hit ball. This ball flight pattern also helps golfers with difficulty in distance because balls with lower spin speeds generally roll longer distances after landing first than balls with higher spin speeds Designed as such.

  The present invention relates to a large wood type golf club head having a concave insert. The club head is formed by a plurality of body members that constitute an internal volume. The first body portion is made of a metallic material and includes a sole portion and a face portion. The second body member is made of a lightweight material such as a plastic, composite, or very thin plate of low density metallic material. The second body member includes one or more concave indentations that form at least a portion of the club head skirt and extend into the interior volume of the club head. These indentations provide structural integrity to the second body member, which can be a very thin panel.

  The second body member may include one or more convex bulges that typically extend away from the internal volume, depending on the circumstances. An insert such as a weight insert may be placed inside the convex bulge. Careful placement of the weight inserts allows the designer to enhance the play characteristics of the golf club and adjust the club for a particular swing type. The first body member can form the majority of the club head sole and the second body member can form the majority of the club head crown. Such weight distribution further enhances the play characteristics of the golf club.

  The club head may include a second weight positioned rearwardly extremely low from the striking surface. The center point on the sole plate constitutes the lowest point on the club head, and in one embodiment, the center point is located directly below the center of gravity of the club head when the club head is at a 59 ° lie angle. The center of gravity of the second weight is positioned at a predetermined distance from the center point. Preferably, the center of gravity of each second weight is at least 0.5 inch behind the center point, for the heel weight at least 0.75 inch from the center point toward the heel, and for the toe weight from the center point. At least 0.75 inches towards the toe and a maximum of 0.25 inches above the center point, the second weight position is the traditional of a golf club head by projecting outside the original contour of the club head Change the attitude.

  The second weight may be arranged based on a point where the hosel center line intersects the sole plate. This distance is then measured from that midpoint on the back of the striking surface to determine the intersection. Preferably, the second weights are each at least 1.50 inches behind the intersection, at least 0.75 inches on either the heel or toe, and the club head has a 59 ° lie angle. Sometimes up to 0.25 inches above the center point.

  The present invention will be described with reference to the accompanying drawings, wherein like reference numerals indicate like elements.

  Except for working examples or unless otherwise stated, all numerical ranges, quantities, values, and percentages, such as material quantities, moments of inertia, center of gravity positions, loft angles and draft angles, and others in the remainder of this specification May be read as prefixed with the term “about”, even if the term “about” does not appear expressly in terms of value, amount, or range. Accordingly, unless indicated to the contrary, the numerical parameters set forth in the following detailed description and claims are approximations that may vary depending on the predetermined characteristics believed to be obtained by the invention. It is. At least, and each numerical parameter is not intended to limit the application of the doctrine of equivalents to the claims, but at least in terms of the number of significant figures reported and applying normal rounding techniques Should be interpreted.

  Although numerical ranges and parameters indicating the broad scope of the present invention are approximations, the numerical values shown in the specific examples are reported as accurately as possible. Any numerical value, however, inherently contains certain errors necessarily resulting from the standard deviation found in their respective testing measurements. Further, when a variable range of numerical values is indicated herein, it is intended that any combination of these values, including the listed values, can be used.

  FIG. 1 shows a golf club head 1 of the present invention. The club head 1 has a body 10 that includes a striking face or face 11, a sole 12, a crown 13, a skirt 14, and a hosel 15. The body 10 constitutes a hollow internal volume 16. Foam or other material may be partially or fully filled into the internal volume 16. Depending on the situation, a weight may be placed in the internal volume 16. The face 11 can be provided with grooves of various designs, that is, score lines. The club head 1 has a toe T and a heel H.

  The club head 1 includes a plurality of main body members that cooperate to form an internal volume 16. The first main body member 101 includes a sole portion and a face portion. The first body member 101 can include a complete face 11 and a sole 12. As a modified example, either or both of the face 11 and the sole 12 may be an insert connected to the first body member 101. The club head 1 also has at least one second body member 102 coupled to the first body member 101 along the skirt 14 in a known manner. The crown 13 may be integrated with any part of the main body members 101, 102, or may be an insert connected to any one of the main body members 101, 102. The second body member 102 includes a recess 20 that extends into the interior volume 16 when the body members 101, 102 are coupled together. FIG. 2 shows an exploded view of an exemplary second body member 102.

  The first body member 101 is preferably formed of a metal material such as stainless steel, aluminum, or titanium. The material of the first body member 101 is selected so that it can withstand the stresses and strains experienced during golf swings, including those that result from hitting a golf ball or the ground. The club head 1 is designed to create a primary load bearing structure that can withstand such forces repeatedly. Other parts of the club head 1, such as the skirt 14, will experience reduced levels of stress and strain and can be advantageously replaced with a lighter, more weight efficient second material. Lighter materials such as low density metal alloys, plastics, composites, etc., with lower or equivalent density than the metal materials described so far can be used in these areas, This allows the club head designer to advantageously redistribute “waste-free” weights or weights to other more beneficial positions of the club head 1. These portions of the club head 1 can be made thinner to increase weight savings. An example of this weight redistribution application is to increase the overall size of the club head 1 and the club head “sweet spot”, a term that refers to the area of the face 11 where a desired golf shot is obtained when a golf ball is hit. , Repositioning the center of gravity of the club head 1 and / or creating a greater moment of inertia (MOI). Inertia is the property that the motion of an object remains stationary or uniform unless affected by some external force. MOI is a measure of an object's resistance to angular acceleration about a given axis and is equal to the sum of the product of each mass component of the object and the square of the distance of each component from the axis. Thus, as the distance from the axis increases, the MOI also increases, and the energy lost due to club head twisting on impact is reduced, making the club more tolerant to off-center hits. By moving or rearranging the mass to the periphery of the club head, the sweet spot is expanded and the club becomes more tolerant. Increasing the club head size and moving as much mass as possible to the outermost region of the club head 1 such as the heel H, toe T or sole 12 expands the sweet spot or creates a larger MOI. Chances are maximized and golf clubs become hotter and more forgiving.

  The second body member 102 is lightweight, which moves the club head's center of gravity downward and frees the weight to other more beneficial locations without increasing the overall weight of the club head 1. Give an opportunity. When the wall thickness of the second main body member 102 is in the minimum preferable range, a main body reinforcing layer can be added to an important region in case the member deforms. These benefits can be further increased by making the second body member 102 thinner. These thin panels preferably include a recess 20 to ensure that the structural integrity of the club head 1 is maintained. By including the recess 20, the second body member 102 is subjected to greater stress in both the longitudinal and lateral directions without undergoing permanent deformation or affecting the original surface condition. And the structural integrity of the club head 1 is reliably maintained. The preferred thickness of the second body member 102 is 0.015 inches to 0.025 inches, while the preferred thickness of the first body member 101 is 0.03 inches to 0.05 inches. Preferably, the recess 20 is at least 10 cubic centimeters. More preferably, the recess 20 is at least 25 cubic centimeters. The club head 1 can be of virtually any size, but is preferably a legal club head. A plurality of recesses 20 can be used in the club head 1. For example, a certain size or various sized recesses 20 can be placed in the toe, heel, back, and the like.

  FIG. 3 shows a cross-sectional view substantially perpendicular to the face 11 of the second golf club head 2 of the present invention, and FIG. 4 shows a bottom view of the club head 2. In this embodiment, the recess 20 is positioned on the back surface of the club head 2. The recess 20 is preferably not visible to the golfer at the time of addressing. In addition to the recess 20, the second body member 102 further includes a convex bulge 22 that extends generally away from the internal volume 16. The insert 23 may be placed in a convex bulge. The insert 23 is not visible from the outside of the club head 2 and is thus represented using a broken line. In a preferred embodiment, the insert 23 is a weight insert. The convex nature of the bulge 22 allows the weight to be positioned to maximize the mechanical benefit to the club head 2. As shown in FIG. 4, the club head 2 can have a plurality of convex bulges 22 on the heel side and the toe side of the club head 2, for example. The club designer can place the desired insert 23 in the bulge 22. The mass of the insert can be substantially equal. As a variant, one of the inserts may have a greater mass than the other. This is useful for designing clubs that modify hook swings or slice swings. A preferred mass range for the weight insert 23 is 1 to 50 grams.

  As shown in FIG. 3, the first body member 101 includes most of the sole 12, and the second body member 102 includes most of the crown 13. This has the advantage of moving most of the mass from the upper part of the club head 2. In this embodiment, the first body member 101 includes a mounting perimeter 18 that extends along its edge. The second main body member 102 is coupled to the first main body member 101 along the attachment peripheral portion 18. The first and second body members 101 and 102 cooperate to form an internal volume 16. The mounting peripheral portion 18 preferably includes stepped portions constituting the two mounting surfaces 18a and 18b. As shown, the second body member 102 can be coupled to both of these surfaces 18a, 18b to help ensure a strong bond between the body members 101, 102.

  The body members 101, 102 can be formed in a variety of ways, but in a preferred manner, a complete club head shell (first body member 101) is formed in a known manner, and the second body member 102 is Moving the material to create an opening that can be coupled. The opening can be created in any desired manner, such as using a laser. The second body member 102 can be joined to the first body member 101 in a variety of ways, such as joining or using a snap fit combined with joining. When a composite material is used for the concave insert, it is preferable to mold 6 layers of 0/90/45 / −45 / 90/0.

  5-9 illustrate additional features of the present invention. In the embodiments shown in these figures, the club head 1 comprises a crown portion 13, a sole 12, a heel portion H, a toe portion T, and a skirt portion 14 that connects the heel portion H to the toe portion T; It has a front face 11 and a hosel 24 extending from the heel portion H. The club head 1 can be formed of sheets joined together, such as by welding or preferably by casting with a titanium alloy. The crown portion 13 can be formed from a material such as carbon fiber composite, polypropylene, Kevlar, magnesium, or a thermoplastic. The hosel 24 includes a bore that forms a central axis C / L.

  As best shown in FIG. 9, the club head 1 of the present invention has a center of gravity G located at a very low rear position. The position of the center of gravity G is biased by the positions of the two second weights, the toe second weight 26 and the heel second weight 28, both of which are partly the traditional appearance of the golf club head. On the outside. As shown in FIGS. 5-9, the position of the two second weight elements 26, 28 is established by their distance relationship from the established contact point. When the club head has a lie angle φ of 59 °, the lowest contact point of the sole 12 is at the center point C just below the center of gravity G.

  One method for establishing the position of the second weights 26, 28 will now be described. As shown in FIG. 8, the center line C / L of the hosel 24 intersects the sole plate 12 at a distance D from the rear surface of the front face 11. When the line BB extends substantially parallel to the front edge of the club head (with a distance D), the line AA is perpendicular to the front face 11 and extends backward from the midpoint of the front face 11. Intersection P is formed. Line AA extends through the center of the club head 1 and passes directly below the center of gravity G of the club head. The intersection P may also be constituted by an intersection of the line AA and a vertical plane located at the intersection of the hosel center line C / L and the sole 12. The center of gravity C / G of each of the second weights 26, 28 is at a distance W of at least 1.50 inches behind the intersection P and 0.25 maximum above the lowest contact point that is the center point C of the sole plate 12 At a distance Z of inches, each second weight being at least 0.75 inches away from line AA in the opposite direction, which is distance Y1 towards toe T for toe second weight 26 The heel second weight 28 is a distance Y2 toward the heel H.

  The position of the second weights 26, 28 may also be determined by measuring from the center point C in the present invention. From center point C, the center of gravity of each second weight 26, 28 is a distance X of at least 0.50 inches rearward along line A-A and up to 0.25 inches above center point C. At a distance of Z, a minimum of 0.75 inches away from line AA in the opposite direction from line AA toward toe T for toe second weight 26 and toward heel H for heel second weight 28. Thus, each second weight 26, 28 is a minimum of 0.90 inches from the center point C.

  The second weights 26, 28 can be selected from a plurality of weights designed to provide a specified adjustment to the club head weight. The second weights 26 and 28 can be welded in place or attached with a binder. The weights 26, 28 can typically be formed from heavy weight inserts such as steel, nickel or tungsten. The body of club head 1 is preferably formed from titanium and crown portion 13 is preferably formed from a lightweight material such as carbon fiber composite, polypropylene, Kevlar, thermoplastic, magnesium, or other suitable lightweight material. The preferred volume of the club head 1 includes 350 cc to 460 cc. The mass range of the second weights 26, 28 is preferably 2 to 35 grams, more preferably 10 to 35 grams. It is well known that various golfers can be accommodated by changing parameters such as shaft bending point, weight and stiffness, face angle, and club loft. However, the present invention addresses the most important launch considerations for optimizing the mass characteristics (center of gravity and moment of inertia) of the club head by providing a lower center of gravity, rearward and wider center of gravity. The club head 1 of the present invention includes a club head region that is not normally used for weighting in order to detrimentally change the traditional appearance of the club head. This club head 1 design allows a portion of the second weights 26, 28 to protrude outside the normal profile of the club head.

  FIG. 10 is a bottom view of the golf club head 1 of the present invention. The skirt 14 includes an opening 3 that faces the rear of the club head 1. An insert 35 is positioned within the opening 30 in a known manner, such as through the mounting perimeter 18, and cooperates to form the internal volume 16. The insert 35 is preferably formed from a lightweight material such as a composite material or a polymer material. A lightweight insert 35 is used to essentially bias the mass of the club head towards the sole 12 of the club head 1. Including a weight member also allows a specified moment of inertia and / or center of gravity position to be achieved while maintaining typical values for the weight and mass of the entire club head.

  FIG. 11 shows a bottom view of the golf club head 1 of the present invention. In addition to the second weights 26, 28, the club head 1 includes an insert 27 between the toe second weight 26 and the heel second weight 28. The insert 27 may be a weight insert similar to the toe and heel second weights 26, 28 and in that case has a preferred mass range of 2 to 35 grams. Alternatively or in addition to being a weight member, the insert 27 may include one or more indicia such as a model number or a serial number. The club head 1 further has a sole insert 105, and in the illustrated embodiment, two sole inserts 105 are shown. These inserts 105 are preferably formed from a lightweight material as described above. Such a material is probably robust enough to withstand contact with the ground, such as that the sole 12 wears during normal use of the golf club. However, the arcuate shape of the sole 12 in the illustrated embodiment minimizes the risk of the insert 105 coming into contact with the ground. Inclusion of the sole insert 105 frees more mass for more beneficial positioning within the club head, such as in the toe insert 26, intermediate insert 27, and / or heel insert 28. The placement of the insert 105 towards the center of the sole 12 essentially biases the mass towards the outer portion of the club head 1 to improve the club head MOI.

  FIG. 12 shows a cross-sectional view of the club head 1 of FIG. 11 at line 12-12. Here, it can be seen that the crown 13 is an insert connected to the metal first body member 101. The crown insert 13 is preferably formed from a lightweight material that moves the center of gravity of the club head downwards and frees more weight for a more advantageous arrangement without increasing the total weight of the club head 1. Has the advantage of By including holes for positioning the crown insert 13, the skirt insert 35, the second body member insert 102, and the sole insert 105, the first body member 101 exhibits the appearance of a frame. It should be noted that in certain embodiments of the invention, it is not necessary to include all inserts 13, 35, 102, 105, but all may be present. Features such as the frame of the first body member 101 ensure that stresses and strains experienced during golf swings, including those produced when hitting a golf ball or the ground, do not adversely affect the light weight portion of the club head 1. The club head experiences a reduced level of stress and strain. These club head portions, which can include the second body member 102, crown 13, skirt insert 35, and sole insert 105, are lower than the aforementioned metal materials, such as low density metal alloys, plastics, composites, etc. Can be conveniently formed from a lighter, weight effective second material having a density or equal density, allowing the club head designer to “save” the weight or mass in other more beneficial positions of the club head 1 Have the advantage of being able to redistribute to These parts of the club head 1 can also be made thinner to increase weight savings.

  The first body member 101 preferably includes a mounting perimeter 18 for each insert (including the crown 13). These mounting perimeters 18 extend around the edges of the respective openings. Each mounting perimeter 18 preferably comprises a step that defines two mounting surfaces 18a, 18b, which provides an additional guarantee of a strong bond between the respective club head components. (Each mounting perimeter 18 in FIG. 12 comprises a step that constitutes two mounting surfaces 18a, 18b, such mounting surfaces 18a, 18b being referred to in only one position for purposes of clarity.)

  The opening in the club head 1 in which the inserts 13, 35, 102, 105 are positioned is created by forming a complete club head shell in a known manner and then forming an opening in this club head shell. It is preferable. One preferred method of creating the opening is to remove a portion of the metal material of the first body member 101 using a laser. This method gives tight tolerances. The mounting peripheral portion 18 including the mounting surfaces 18 a and 18 b may be formed in various ways such as machining the first main body member 101 after laser-cutting the opening in the club head 1.

  Each sole insert 105 preferably has a mass of 0.5 to 10 grams, more preferably 1 to 5 grams. The sole insert 305 as well as other inserts may be slightly beveled or stepped to provide a location for excess adhesive. In one embodiment, each of the toe and heel sole inserts 26, 28 has a preferred mass range of 4 grams to 7 grams, while the intermediate insert sole 27 has a preferred mass range of 2 grams to 3 grams. . In one embodiment, the club head component is tapered such that the wall is thicker toward the face 11 and is thinner toward the rear of the club head 1. Such a wall thickness taper frees more mass for more beneficial positioning within the club head 1.

  Although preferred embodiments of the present invention have been described above, it is to be understood that these embodiments are shown by way of example only and not limitation. It will be apparent to those skilled in the art that various modifications can be made in form and detail without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention. For example, although two body members have been described above, the present invention can be implemented in a club head having two or more body members. In addition, the present invention can be practiced with any type of club in addition to the wood type club shown in the illustrated embodiment. Therefore, the present invention should not be limited by the above-described exemplary embodiments, but should be construed only by the claims and their equivalents. Furthermore, although certain advantages of the present invention have been described above, it should be understood that not all of these advantages can be achieved in accordance with any particular embodiment of the present invention. Thus, for example, the invention may be embodied or practiced in a manner that achieves or optimizes one advantage or group of advantages taught herein without necessarily achieving the other advantages that may be taught or suggested herein. Those skilled in the art will understand that they can.

It is a figure which shows the golf club head of this invention. It is a figure which shows the main body member of the golf club head of FIG. It is a figure which shows the 2nd club head of this invention. FIG. 4 is a bottom view of the club head of FIG. 3. It is a bottom perspective view of the club head of the present invention. FIG. 6 is a rear elevation view of the club head of FIG. 5. FIG. 6 is a heel elevation view of the club head of FIG. 5. FIG. 6 is a schematic bottom view of the club head of FIG. 5. FIG. 6 is a front sectional view of the club head of FIG. 5. It is a bottom view of the golf club head of the present invention. It is a bottom view of the golf club head of the present invention. FIG. 12 is a cross-sectional view of the club head of FIG. 11 taken along line 12-12.

Explanation of symbols

1 golf club head 10 main body 11 striking face 12 sole 13 crown 14 skirt 15 hosel 101 first main body member 102 second main body member

Claims (19)

  1. A golf club head,
    A main body member that is formed of a metal material and that forms an opening in the crown, skirt, and sole;
    A first insert positioned in the crown opening;
    A second insert positioned in the skirt opening;
    A third insert positioned in the sole opening;
    The first, second and third inserts are formed of a material having a density smaller than the density of the metal material;
    Golf club head.
  2.   The first, second, and third inserts of claim 1, wherein the first, second, and third inserts comprise a material selected from the group consisting of composites, polypropylene, Kevlar, magnesium, thermoplastics, plastics, polymers, and low density metal alloys. Club head listed.
  3.   The club head according to claim 1, wherein the body member forms a second opening in the sole and has a fourth insert positioned in the second sole opening.
  4.   A first weight insert positioned on the toe side of the sole; and a second weight insert positioned on the heel side of the sole, wherein each of the first and second weight inserts is 2 grams to 35 grams. The club head of claim 1 having a mass.
  5.   5. The club head of claim 4, comprising a third weight insert having a mass of 2 grams to 3 grams positioned intermediate the first weight insert and the second weight insert.
  6.   The second insert comprises a convex bulge that extends generally away from the interior volume of the club head, and has a weight insert having a mass of between 1 gram and 50 grams positioned within the convex bulge. Item 5. The club head according to Item 4.
  7.   The club head of claim 1, wherein the second insert comprises a concave indentation that extends into the interior volume of the club head, the concave indentation having a volume of at least 10 cubic centimeters.
  8.   The club head of claim 7, wherein the second insert has a convex bulge that extends generally away from the internal volume.
  9.   The golf club head of claim 8, having a fourth insert positioned within the convex bulge.
  10.   The golf club head of claim 9, wherein the fourth insert is a weight insert having a mass of 1 gram to 50 grams.
  11. The convex bulge is disposed on the heel side of the club head;
    A second convex bulge disposed on the toe side of the club head;
    A second weight insert having a mass between 1 gram and 50 grams positioned within the second convex bulge.
    The golf club head according to claim 10.
  12.   The club head of claim 1, wherein each of the inserts has a thickness that is less than a thickness of the body member.
  13. The insert has a thickness of 0.015 inch (about 0.381 mm) to 0.025 inch (about 0.635 mm);
    The body member has a thickness of 0.03 inch (about 0.762 mm) to 0.05 inch (about 1.27 mm).
    The club head according to claim 12.
  14.   The club head according to claim 1, wherein the thickness of the main body member is maximized toward the hitting surface of the club head and tapers to a thinner thickness toward the rear of the club head.
  15.   The club head according to claim 1, wherein at least one of the body member openings constitutes a mounting periphery having a plurality of mounting surfaces to which the respective inserts are connected.
  16. The club head has a center of gravity;
    The center point of the sole constitutes the lowest point of the club head, and the center point is directly below the center of gravity.
    The club head according to claim 1.
  17. A first weight insert positioned on the toe side of the sole;
    A second weight insert positioned on the heel side of the sole;
    Have
    Each of the first and second weight inserts has a center of gravity,
    At least 0.5 inches behind the center point (about 12.7 mm),
    The first weight insert is 0.75 inches from the center point toward the club head toe, and the second weight insert is at least 0.75 inches from the center point toward the heel of the club head ( About 19.05mm),
    0.25 inches above the center point (approximately 6.35 mm),
    The club head according to claim 16.
  18.   The club head of claim 17, wherein each of the first and second weight inserts has a mass between 2 grams and 35 grams.
  19. Hosel,
    A line perpendicular to the midpoint of the rear surface of the front face of the club head, and an intersection formed by an intersection of a center plane of the hosel and a vertical plane located at the intersection of the sole,
    Each of the first and second weight inserts has a center of gravity,
    With respect to the first weight insert, at least 0.75 inches (about 19.05 mm) from the intersection in the direction toward the toe of the club head,
    With respect to the second weight insert, at least 0.75 inches (about 19.05 mm) from the intersection in the direction toward the heel of the club head,
    0.25 inches above the center point (approximately 6.35 mm),
    The club head according to claim 16.
JP2007085624A 2005-04-21 2007-02-28 Golf club head with concave insert Pending JP2007229487A (en)

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Cited By (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
JP2010088818A (en) * 2008-10-10 2010-04-22 Globeride Inc Golf club
US8033930B2 (en) * 2008-07-17 2011-10-11 Nike, Inc. Weight element for a golf club
US8870682B2 (en) 2006-07-21 2014-10-28 Cobra Golf Incorporated Multi-material golf club head
US20160367871A1 (en) * 2004-02-23 2016-12-22 Taylor Made Golf Company, Inc. Golf club head with vertical center of gravity adjustment
US9586104B2 (en) 2006-07-21 2017-03-07 Cobra Golf Incorporated Multi-material golf club head

Citations (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
JP2001140166A (en) * 1999-11-12 2001-05-22 Hidenori Kurihara Shrink proof processing method of wool by using titanium dioxide
JP2006025929A (en) * 2004-07-13 2006-02-02 Sri Sports Ltd Golf club head

Patent Citations (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
JP2001140166A (en) * 1999-11-12 2001-05-22 Hidenori Kurihara Shrink proof processing method of wool by using titanium dioxide
JP2006025929A (en) * 2004-07-13 2006-02-02 Sri Sports Ltd Golf club head

Cited By (7)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US10035054B2 (en) * 2004-02-23 2018-07-31 Taylor Made Golf Company, Inc. Golf club head with vertical center of gravity adjustment
US20160367871A1 (en) * 2004-02-23 2016-12-22 Taylor Made Golf Company, Inc. Golf club head with vertical center of gravity adjustment
US8870682B2 (en) 2006-07-21 2014-10-28 Cobra Golf Incorporated Multi-material golf club head
US9586104B2 (en) 2006-07-21 2017-03-07 Cobra Golf Incorporated Multi-material golf club head
US8033930B2 (en) * 2008-07-17 2011-10-11 Nike, Inc. Weight element for a golf club
US8814722B2 (en) 2008-07-17 2014-08-26 Nike, Inc. Weight element for a golf club
JP2010088818A (en) * 2008-10-10 2010-04-22 Globeride Inc Golf club

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