JP2006152423A - Boron-doped diamond film, and diamond-coated cutting tool - Google Patents

Boron-doped diamond film, and diamond-coated cutting tool Download PDF

Info

Publication number
JP2006152423A
JP2006152423A JP2004349151A JP2004349151A JP2006152423A JP 2006152423 A JP2006152423 A JP 2006152423A JP 2004349151 A JP2004349151 A JP 2004349151A JP 2004349151 A JP2004349151 A JP 2004349151A JP 2006152423 A JP2006152423 A JP 2006152423A
Authority
JP
Japan
Prior art keywords
boron
diamond
doped
film
doping
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Pending
Application number
JP2004349151A
Other languages
Japanese (ja)
Inventor
Hiroyuki Haniyu
博之 羽生
Original Assignee
Osg Corp
オーエスジー株式会社
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Application filed by Osg Corp, オーエスジー株式会社 filed Critical Osg Corp
Priority to JP2004349151A priority Critical patent/JP2006152423A/en
Publication of JP2006152423A publication Critical patent/JP2006152423A/en
Pending legal-status Critical Current

Links

Images

Abstract

<P>PROBLEM TO BE SOLVED: To improve oxidation resistance and lubricity of a diamond film. <P>SOLUTION: Since boron is doped in a boron-doped diamond film 20, a layer of boron oxide (such as B<SB>2</SB>O<SB>3</SB>) is deposited on the surface of the diamond film 20 when subjected to oxidation. Progress of oxidation inside the film is suppressed by the layer of the oxide, the oxidation resistance of the film 20 is improved, and the friction coefficient is reduced to improve the lubricity. In particular, the diamond film 20 of the present embodiment forms a multi-layered structure in which low-doping layers 22 and high-doping layers 24 are alternately laminated on each other. Further, the highest layer is constituted of the high-doping layer 24, the oxidation resistance and the lubricity by the boron oxide can be improved while maintaining the wear resistance or the like which is the original characteristic of the diamond film. <P>COPYRIGHT: (C)2006,JPO&NCIPI

Description

  The present invention relates to a diamond film coated on a predetermined member such as a processing tool, and more particularly to a technique for improving oxidation resistance and lubricity.
A diamond coating tool in which a surface of a base material such as cemented carbide is coated with a diamond coating has been proposed as a cutting tool such as an end mill, a bite, a tap, a drill, or other processing tools. The tools described in Patent Document 1 and Patent Document 2 are an example, and such a diamond-coated tool has a very high hardness and provides excellent wear resistance and welding resistance. In Patent Document 3 and Patent Document 4, in order to give conductivity or improve oxidation resistance, when diamond is crystal-grown by a microwave plasma CVD (chemical vapor deposition) method or the like, A technique for doping boron (boron; B) is described.
Japanese Patent No. 2519037 JP 2002-79406 A JP 2004-193522 A Japanese Patent Laid-Open No. 10-146703
  However, for diamond coatings coated on the surface of tool base materials, etc., boron doping has not yet been proposed, and since it has low oxidation resistance and poor lubricity (surface roughness), it is a ferrous material. When cutting a composite material containing or cutting a heat-resistant alloy such as a titanium alloy that has a high cutting point, the diamond coating may wear early due to oxidation, and sufficient durability may not be obtained. In addition, the heat generation due to friction may reduce the durability, and the work surface quality of the work material may be impaired.
  The present invention has been made against the background described above, and its object is to improve the oxidation resistance and lubricity of the diamond coating.
  In order to achieve such an object, the first invention is a diamond film coated on the surface of a predetermined member, in which boron is doped, and the boron doping amount changes in the film thickness direction. It is characterized by being increased on the surface of the coating.
  A second invention is the boron-doped diamond film of the first invention, wherein the boron doping amount is in the range of 0.05 to 2.0 atomic%, and the boron doping amount is 1.0 to 10 atoms. %, And a higher doping layer than the low doping layer.
  A third invention is characterized in that the boron-doped diamond film of the first invention or the second invention is composed of microcrystalline diamond having a crystal grain diameter of 2 μm or less.
  The fourth invention relates to a diamond-coated processing tool in which a diamond coating is coated on the surface of a predetermined tool base material. The diamond coating is applied to the surface of a processing portion where predetermined processing is performed according to the first to third inventions. Any boron-doped diamond film is coated.
  Boron-doped diamond is a p-type semiconductor having positively charged holes in which some carbon atoms are replaced by boron atoms. Further, the atomic% of boron is the ratio of the number of atoms replaced with boron atoms, and is examined by, for example, secondary ion mass spectrometry.
In such a boron-doped diamond film, when the surface is oxidized, a layer of boron oxide (for example, B 2 O 3 ) is formed on the surface, so that the oxide layer oxidizes the inside of the film. Is suppressed, the oxidation resistance of the coating is improved, and the coefficient of friction is reduced to improve the lubricity. In particular, in the present invention, the doping amount of boron changes in the film thickness direction and is increased on the surface of the coating, so that the wear resistance, which is an original characteristic of the diamond coating, is maintained, and the boron oxide is used. The effect of improving oxidation resistance and lubricity can be obtained. As a result, in the cutting of composite materials including iron-based materials and the cutting of heat-resistant alloys such as titanium alloys where the cutting point is high, early wear and delamination of the diamond coating due to oxidation are suppressed and excellent. Durability can be obtained. In addition, since the lubricity is improved, heat generation due to friction is suppressed. In this respect, the durability of the diamond coating is improved and the work surface quality of the work material is improved.
  In the third invention, since diamond is a microcrystal, the surface is smoother than that of a normal diamond coating, and a boron oxide layer is formed on the surface, so that the friction coefficient is further reduced. Excellent lubricity can be obtained.
  In the diamond coating tool of the fourth invention in which the boron-doped diamond film is coated on the surface of the processed part, substantially the same effect as described above can be obtained.
  The boron-doped diamond coating of the present invention is preferably applied to a processing tool such as a cutting tool that requires wear resistance, oxidation resistance, and lubricity, that is, a diamond coating processing tool. For example, it can be used as a processing tool.
  In the case of a diamond-coated tool, a superhard tool material such as a cemented carbide is suitably used as a tool base material to be coated with a boron-doped diamond coating, but other tool materials such as ceramics can also be used. In order to improve the adhesion, a predetermined pretreatment such as roughening the surface of the tool base material or providing another coating as a base can be performed.
  Further, when the film thickness of the boron-doped diamond film is less than 5 μm, sufficient wear resistance cannot be obtained. On the other hand, if it exceeds 25 μm, it is easy to peel off, and therefore it is preferably in the range of 5 to 25 μm, preferably about 10 to 20 μm. Is appropriate. When applied to other than the processing tool, it is appropriately determined according to the material and purpose of the coating target.
  A CVD method is suitably used for coating the boron-doped diamond film, and a microwave plasma CVD method is particularly desirable, but other CVD methods such as a hot filament CVD method and a high-frequency plasma CVD method can also be used. Regarding boron doping techniques, various techniques conventionally known as boron doping techniques for diamond, such as those described in Patent Document 3 and Patent Document 4, can be employed.
  The boron-doped diamond film has, for example, a low doping layer with a low doping amount and a high doping layer with a high doping amount as in the second invention, and is formed on the low doping layer provided in a portion in contact with the surface of a predetermined member. A two-layer structure in which a highly doped layer is provided, or a multilayer structure in which the outermost surface is a highly doped layer by alternately and repeatedly stacking them can be employed. In carrying out the first invention, a two-layer structure including a boron-doped diamond layer and a boron-doped boron-doped layer, a multilayer structure in which these layers are alternately laminated, a boron-undoped diamond layer, a low-doped layer, and a high-doped layer Various forms are possible, such as three types of layer structures having the above or a gradual change structure in which the boron doping amount is continuously changed (gradual increase) or increased stepwise.
  If the boron doping amount (content) is less than 0.05 atomic%, the effects of oxidation resistance and lubricity cannot be sufficiently obtained. Therefore, the boron doping layer including the outermost surface of the coating should be at least 0. It is desirable to dope at least 0.05 atomic%, and more desirably 0.5 atomic% or more.
  The microcrystalline diamond of the third invention can be formed by repeating a nucleation step and a crystal growth step as described in Patent Document 2, for example. The crystal grain size is 2 μm or less, preferably 1 μm or less. The crystal grain size is the maximum diameter in a direction perpendicular to the crystal growth direction, and the crystal grain size of all diamonds is preferably 2 μm or less, but at least 80 of the crystal grain size on the surface or a predetermined cross section. % Or more may be 2 μm or less. Further, if the length dimension in the crystal growth direction is 2 μm or less, the crystal grain size in the direction perpendicular to the crystal growth direction is generally 2 μm or less. Even if the dimension in the crystal growth direction is larger than 2 μm, the crystal grain size may be 2 μm or less. In carrying out the first and second inventions, a coarse crystal diamond film having a crystal grain size larger than 2 μm may be used.
Hereinafter, embodiments of the present invention will be described in detail with reference to the drawings.
FIG. 1 is a diagram showing an end mill 10 as a diamond coating tool to which the present invention is applied, specifically, a diamond coated cutting tool. FIG. 1 (a) is a front view seen from a direction perpendicular to the axis, and FIG. FIG. 4 is a cross-sectional view of the vicinity of the surface of the blade portion 14. The end mill 10 is a four-blade square end mill, and the tool base 12 is made of cemented carbide, and the tool base 12 is provided with a shank and a blade 14 integrally in the axial direction. Yes. The blade portion 14 corresponds to a processed portion, and includes an outer peripheral blade 16 and a bottom blade 18 as cutting edges, and a boron-doped diamond coating 20 (hereinafter simply referred to as a diamond coating 20) doped with boron on the surface of the blade portion 14. Is coated with a film thickness of about 20 μm. The hatched portion in FIG. 1A represents the diamond film 20 coated on the surface of the tool base 12.
  The diamond coating 20 is made of microcrystalline diamond having a crystal grain size of 1 μm or less, and has a boron doping amount in the range of 0.05 to 2.0 atomic%, for example, as low as about 1.0 atomic%. A multilayer in which the doping layer 22 and the high doping layer 24 having a boron doping amount in the range of 1.0 to 10 atomic% and larger than the low doping layer 22, for example, about 5.0 atomic% are alternately stacked. It has a structure. A low doping layer 22 is provided on the surface of the tool base material 12, and the uppermost layer is a high doping layer 24. Further, although the thicknesses of the low doping layer 22 and the high doping layer 24 are substantially the same in this embodiment, they can be appropriately changed, for example, the low doping layer 22 is thicker than the high doping layer 24.
  In order to improve the adhesion of the diamond coating 20 after the end mill 10 forms the tool base material 12 having the outer peripheral edge 16 and the bottom edge 18 as a cutting edge by grinding the cemented carbide or the like, The surface of the blade portion 14 of the base material 12 is roughened. As the surface roughening treatment, for example, chemical erosion such as electrolytic polishing or sand blasting with an abrasive such as SiC is suitable. Then, using the microwave plasma CVD apparatus 30 of FIG. 2, diamond particles are doped on the surface of the roughened blade portion 14 while doping boron with a vapor phase synthesis method, specifically, a microwave plasma CVD method. The diamond film 20 is formed and grown.
  The microwave plasma CVD apparatus 30 of FIG. 2 includes a reaction furnace 32, a microwave generator 34, a source gas supply device 36, a vacuum pump 38, and an electromagnetic coil 40. A table 42 is provided in the cylindrical reaction furnace 32, and a plurality of tool base materials 12 to be coated with the diamond coating 20 are supported by a work support tool 44, and each blade 14 is disposed in an upward posture. It is like that. The microwave generator 34 is a device that generates a microwave of, for example, 2.45 GHz, and the tool base material 12 is heated by introducing the microwave into the reaction furnace 32, and the microwave generator 34. The heating temperature is adjusted by controlling the electric power.
The source gas supply device 36 is for supplying source gases such as methane (CH 4 ), hydrogen (H 2 ), and carbon monoxide (CO) into the reaction furnace 32, and controls the gas cylinders and flow rates thereof. In this embodiment, in order to dope boron, for example, a liquid obtained by dissolving boron oxide in methanol can be mixed with the raw material gas and supplied into the reaction furnace 32. It is like that. The vacuum pump 38 is for sucking and depressurizing the gas in the reaction furnace 32, so that the pressure value in the reaction furnace 32 detected by the pressure gauge 46 becomes a predetermined pressure value determined in advance. The motor current of the vacuum pump 38 is feedback controlled. The electromagnetic coil 40 is arranged in an annular shape on the outer peripheral side of the reaction furnace 32 so as to surround the inside of the reaction furnace 32.
As shown in FIG. 3, the coating process of the diamond film 20 using such a microwave plasma CVD apparatus 30 is performed including a step R1 of the nucleus deposition process and a step R2 of the crystal growth process. In the nuclear attachment step of Step R1, the flow rate of methane and hydrogen is adjusted so that the concentration of methane is set within a range of 10% to 30%, and the surface temperature of the tool base 12 is 700 ° C. The microwave generator 34 is adjusted so that the set temperature is set in a range of ˜900 ° C., and the gas pressure in the reaction furnace 32 is in a range of 2.7 × 10 2 Pa to 2.7 × 10 3 Pa. The vacuum pump 38 is operated so as to reach the set pressure determined in the above, and this state is continued for 0.1 to 2 hours. As a result, a nucleus layer serving as a starting point of diamond crystal growth is attached to the surface of the tool base material 12 or the surfaces of a large number of diamond crystals that have been crystal-grown by the crystal growth process in step R2.
In the crystal growth process of Step R2, the flow rate of methane and hydrogen is adjusted so that the concentration of methane is set within a range of 1% to 4%, and the surface temperature of the tool base 12 is 800 ° C. 900 to adjust the microwave generator 34 so as to set the temperature defined in the range of ° C., ranges gas pressure in the reaction furnace 32 is 1.3 × 10 3 Pa~6.7 × 10 3 Pa The vacuum pump 38 is operated so that the set pressure is set within the predetermined range, and the state is maintained for a predetermined time so that the crystal grain size of diamond is maintained at 1 μm or less, specifically, the diamond crystal. This is continued for a predetermined processing time shorter than a predetermined time for which the length (length dimension in the crystal growth direction) is 1 μm. That is, in the crystal growth process of this embodiment, if the length dimension in the crystal growth direction is 1 μm or less, the crystal grain size in a plane substantially perpendicular to the crystal growth direction is maintained at 1 μm or less.
  Then, in the next step R3, whether or not the film thickness of the diamond coating 20 crystal-grown on the surface of the tool base material 12 has reached a predetermined set film thickness (20 μm in this embodiment), For example, the determination is made based on the number of executions of step R2, and the above steps R1 and R2 are repeated until the set film thickness is reached. During the execution of Step R1, the crystal growth of diamond is stopped, and a new nucleus layer is formed on the crystal. In the subsequent crystal growth process (Step R2), the diamond crystal below the nucleus layer is formed. The diamond film 20 is not regrown but is newly grown from a new nucleus as a starting point, so that the diamond film 20 having a multi-crystal structure with a crystal grain size and a crystal length of both 1 μm or less is formed as a tool base material. 12 surfaces are coated.
  Further, when supplying the raw material gas such as hydrogen during the coating process of the diamond film 20, a liquid obtained by dissolving the boron oxide in methanol is mixed with the raw material gas and supplied into the reaction furnace 32 at a predetermined flow rate. Thus, the diamond coating 20 is doped with boron. The doping amount of boron can be adjusted by changing the supply flow rate of the liquid in which boron oxide is dissolved, whereby the low doping layer 22 and the high doping layer 24 having different doping amounts can be alternately stacked at a predetermined thickness. The thicknesses of the low doping layer 22 and the high doping layer 24 are the same as the thickness of the microcrystalline diamond (about 1 μm in this embodiment) formed by one processing of the steps R1 and R2, or the It is set to an integral multiple, and boron is doped with a constant doping amount in a series of steps R1 and R2.
In the end mill 10 of this embodiment, since the diamond coating 20 is doped with boron, the surface of the diamond coating 20 has an oxide of boron (for example, B 2 O 3 ) when oxidized. The oxide layer suppresses the progress of oxidation into the coating, thereby improving the oxidation resistance of the diamond coating 20 and reducing the friction coefficient to improve the lubricity. In particular, the diamond coating 20 of this example has a multilayer structure in which the low doping layers 22 and the high doping layers 24 are alternately stacked, and the uppermost layer is composed of the high doping layers 24. The effect of improving the oxidation resistance and lubricity due to the oxide of boron can be satisfactorily obtained while maintaining the wear resistance, which is the original characteristic of the diamond coating. Further, since the diamond coating 20 of the present example is a microcrystal having a crystal grain size of 1 μm or less, the surface is smoother than that of a normal diamond coating, and a boron oxide layer is formed on the surface. As a result, the friction coefficient is further reduced and excellent lubricity is obtained.
  As a result, according to the end mill 10 of the present embodiment, the diamond coating 20 caused by oxidation can be used for cutting composite materials including iron-based materials and for cutting heat-resistant alloys such as titanium alloys that have high cutting points. The early wear and delamination are suppressed, and excellent durability can be obtained. Further, since the lubricity is improved, heat generation due to friction is suppressed, and in this respect as well, the durability of the diamond coating 20 is improved and the work surface quality of the work material is improved.
  Incidentally, FIG. 4A shows a diamond film having a normal crystal grain size (coarse crystal), that is, diamond is grown to a predetermined film thickness by one crystal growth process (step R2 in FIG. 3). FIG. 4B is an electron micrograph of the surface of the microcrystalline diamond coating similar to the diamond coating 20 of this example, and the difference in the crystal grain size of the diamond is clear. It is.
  FIG. 5 shows the results of examining the surface roughness (contour curve) of a diamond film and a microcrystalline diamond film having the same normal crystal grain size (coarse crystal) as in FIG. 5 (a) shows a case of a diamond film having a normal crystal grain size, and its maximum height Rz is 3.0 μm, while FIG. 5 (b) shows a microcrystalline diamond and its maximum height. Rz is 0.7 μm, and it can be seen that an extremely smooth coating surface is obtained. From this, it is estimated that the surface roughness of the work surface of the work material is greatly improved.
  FIG. 6 shows a drill coated with the same diamond film as the diamond film 20 (product of the present invention), a conventional product coated with a microcrystalline diamond film without boron doping, and boron doped with a constant doping amount (1.0 atomic%). When the durability test of the cutting process on the aluminum alloy (ADC12) was performed using the comparative product coated with the microcrystalline diamond film, (a) shows the processing conditions, and (b) shows the test results. As is apparent from the test results, the third-stage product according to the present invention has a durability about three times that of the conventional product without boron doping at the first stage and constant doping at the second stage. About 1.4 times the durability is obtained even for the comparative product doped with boron in an amount. The processing condition “Minimum Quantity of Lubricant” is the minimum amount of lubrication, and here, means processing in a mist-like lubricant atmosphere.
  FIG. 7 shows a boron-doped microcrystalline diamond having a normal crystal grain size (coarse crystal) without boron doping, a microcrystalline diamond coating without boron doping, and a multilayer boron-doped microcrystalline diamond formed under the same conditions as the diamond coating 20. In the case where the friction coefficient was examined using pins coated with the coating film, (a) is the test condition, and (b) is the test result. As is clear from this test result, according to the multilayer boron-doped microcrystalline diamond film, the coefficient of friction is smaller than that of the coarse-crystal diamond film as well as the boron-doped microcrystalline diamond film. This is presumably because a boron oxide layer is formed on the surface of the diamond coating.
  FIG. 8 shows a diamond film having a normal crystal grain size (coarse crystal) prepared by doping boron with a constant doping amount of 0.5 to 1.0 atomic% and without boron doping. This is a result of measuring only the mass loss (%) due to oxidation by measuring the mass before and after the heating and peeling the substrate from the base material. The test was heated to each test temperature (700 ° C., 725 ° C., 750 ° C., 775 ° C., 800 ° C.) at a rate of temperature increase of 15 ° C./min, held at that test temperature for 30 minutes, and then naturally cooled to room temperature. The change in mass was measured. As is apparent from FIG. 8, the oxidation starts at about 700 ° C. without boron doping, whereas the oxidation starts at about 775 ° C. with boron doping, and a difference of about 75 ° C. is recognized. This test result relates to a diamond film having a normal crystal grain size (coarse crystal) doped with boron at a constant doping amount, but the difference in oxidation resistance is considered to be due to the presence or absence of boron doping. It is presumed that the same result can be obtained for a multilayered coarse crystal or microcrystal boron-doped diamond film having different doping amounts.
  FIG. 9 shows a two-blade square end mill in which a diamond film having a normal crystal grain size (coarse crystal) doped with boron at a constant doping amount of 0.5 to 1.0 atomic% is coated with a film thickness of 20 μm. In the appearance photograph, an oxidation test was performed using this boron-doped product and a non-boron-doped product in which a diamond film having a normal crystal grain size (coarse crystal) without boron doping was coated with a film thickness of 20 μm. The results shown are obtained. In the oxidation test, the sample was heated to 750 ° C. at a heating rate of 15 ° C./min, held at 750 ° C. for 30 minutes, and then naturally cooled to room temperature to examine the state of the coating (disappeared area). The end mill on the left side of FIG. 10 is a non-boron-doped product, and the diamond film disappears by about 100% due to oxidation or peeling due to a difference in thermal expansion from the tool base material, whereas the right-side boron-doped product has a 10% Most of it remains, just disappearing. The black portion in FIG. 10 is the diamond coating, and in the boron-doped product, the diamond coating remained at a thickness of 17 to 18 μm even at the bottom edge portion at the tip. This case also relates to a diamond film having a normal crystal grain size (coarse crystal) doped with boron at a constant doping amount, but the difference in oxidation resistance is considered to be due to the presence or absence of boron doping. It is presumed that similar results can be obtained with different layers of coarse or microcrystalline boron-doped diamond coatings.
  In FIG. 8, at 750 ° C., the disappearance of the film is 0% for the boron-doped product, and the disappearance of the film is about 8 to 10% even for the non-boron-doped product. In FIG. 10, it is considered that peeling due to a difference in thermal expansion from the tool base material has an influence.
  FIGS. 11A and 11B are views for explaining a boron-doped diamond film having a structure different from that shown in FIG. 1, and are cross-sectional views corresponding to FIG. 1B, respectively. The boron-doped diamond coating 50 is made of microcrystalline diamond having a crystal grain size of 1 μm or less, and the boron doping amount is gradually increased from 0.05 atomic percent to 10 atomic percent, for example. It is. Specifically, the doping amount is increased by, for example, 0.5 atomic% for each layer of microcrystalline diamond having a thickness of about 1 μm.
  The boron-doped diamond film 60 shown in FIG. 11B is composed of microcrystalline diamond having a crystal grain size of 1 μm or less, and the boron doping amount is in the range of 0.05 to 2.0 atomic%. For example, a low doping layer 62 of about 1.0 atomic% and a high doping layer having a boron doping amount in the range of 1.0 to 10 atomic% and larger than the low doping layer 62, for example, about 5.0 atomic%. A two-layer structure consisting of 64 is formed. The thickness of the low doping layer 62 is in the range of 12 to 15 μm, and the thickness of the high doping layer 64 is in the range of 2 to 4 μm.
  As mentioned above, although the Example of this invention was described in detail based on drawing, these are one embodiment to the last, and this invention is implemented in the aspect which added the various change and improvement based on the knowledge of those skilled in the art. be able to.
BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS It is a figure which shows the end mill which is one Example of this invention, (a) is the front view seen from the direction orthogonal to an axial center, (b) is sectional drawing of the surface vicinity of a blade part. It is a schematic block diagram explaining an example of the microwave plasma CVD apparatus which coats a diamond film. It is a flowchart explaining the procedure at the time of coating a microcrystal diamond film using the apparatus of FIG. It is a figure which compares and shows the electron micrograph of the surface of the diamond film of a normal crystal grain size (coarse crystal), and the electron micrograph of the surface of a microcrystal diamond film. It is a figure which compares and shows the surface roughness (contour curve) of the diamond film of a normal crystal grain diameter (coarse crystal), and the surface roughness (contour curve) of a microcrystal diamond film. Explains the results of investigating the difference in durability between a microcrystalline diamond coating without boron doping, a microcrystalline diamond coating doped with boron at a constant doping amount, and a multi-layered microcrystalline diamond coating with different boron doping amounts In this figure, (a) shows the processing conditions and (b) shows the test results. It is a figure explaining the result of investigating the difference in the coefficient of friction of a coarse crystal diamond film without boron doping, a microcrystalline diamond film without boron doping, and a multilayer microcrystalline diamond film with different boron doping amounts. ) Is the test method and (b) is the test result. It is a figure which shows the result of having investigated the difference (change ratio of mass) of the diamond film by the presence or absence of boron dope at several test temperature. It is a figure which shows the external appearance photograph of the 2 end blade square end mill coated with the boron dope diamond film. It is a figure which shows the external appearance photograph (right side) after performing the oxidation test to the tool of FIG. 9 compared with the tool (left side) which coated the diamond film without boron dope. It is a figure explaining the other aspect of a boron dope diamond film, and is sectional drawing of the surface vicinity corresponding to (b) of FIG.
Explanation of symbols
  10: End mill (diamond coating tool) 12: Tool base material 14: Blade part (machined part) 20, 50, 60: Boron-doped diamond coating 22, 62: Low doping layer 24, 64: High doping layer

Claims (4)

  1. A diamond coating coated on the surface of a given member,
    A boron-doped diamond film characterized in that boron is doped, and the boron doping amount changes in the film thickness direction and is increased on the film surface.
  2. A low doping layer in which the boron doping amount is in the range of 0.05 to 2.0 atomic%, and a boron doping amount in the range of 1.0 to 10 atomic% and higher than the low doping layer. The boron-doped diamond film according to claim 1, further comprising a doping layer.
  3. The poron-doped diamond film according to claim 1 or 2, wherein the crystal grain size of the diamond is composed of microcrystalline diamond having a crystal grain size of 2 µm or less.
  4.   A diamond-coated machining tool according to any one of claims 1 to 3, wherein the boron-doped diamond coating according to any one of claims 1 to 3 is coated on a surface of a machining portion that performs predetermined machining.
JP2004349151A 2004-12-01 2004-12-01 Boron-doped diamond film, and diamond-coated cutting tool Pending JP2006152423A (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
JP2004349151A JP2006152423A (en) 2004-12-01 2004-12-01 Boron-doped diamond film, and diamond-coated cutting tool

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
JP2004349151A JP2006152423A (en) 2004-12-01 2004-12-01 Boron-doped diamond film, and diamond-coated cutting tool

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
JP2006152423A true JP2006152423A (en) 2006-06-15

Family

ID=36631055

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
JP2004349151A Pending JP2006152423A (en) 2004-12-01 2004-12-01 Boron-doped diamond film, and diamond-coated cutting tool

Country Status (1)

Country Link
JP (1) JP2006152423A (en)

Cited By (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
JP2011025384A (en) * 2009-07-28 2011-02-10 Kobe Steel Ltd Cutting method for difficult-to-cut material
CN105563665A (en) * 2015-12-14 2016-05-11 广东工业大学 Diamond coating cutter, and preparation method and application thereof in high speed graphite processing
WO2018131166A1 (en) 2017-01-16 2018-07-19 オーエスジー株式会社 Tool

Citations (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
JP2002079406A (en) * 2000-06-29 2002-03-19 Osg Corp Diamond-coated cutting tool and method of manufacturing it
JP2004231983A (en) * 2003-01-28 2004-08-19 Sumitomo Electric Ind Ltd Diamond coated electrode

Patent Citations (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
JP2002079406A (en) * 2000-06-29 2002-03-19 Osg Corp Diamond-coated cutting tool and method of manufacturing it
JP2004231983A (en) * 2003-01-28 2004-08-19 Sumitomo Electric Ind Ltd Diamond coated electrode

Cited By (7)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
JP2011025384A (en) * 2009-07-28 2011-02-10 Kobe Steel Ltd Cutting method for difficult-to-cut material
CN105563665A (en) * 2015-12-14 2016-05-11 广东工业大学 Diamond coating cutter, and preparation method and application thereof in high speed graphite processing
WO2018131166A1 (en) 2017-01-16 2018-07-19 オーエスジー株式会社 Tool
KR20190077475A (en) 2017-01-16 2019-07-03 오에스지 가부시키가이샤 tool
CN110072658A (en) * 2017-01-16 2019-07-30 Osg株式会社 Tool
EP3542938A4 (en) * 2017-01-16 2020-06-03 OSG Corporation Tool
KR102205933B1 (en) 2017-01-16 2021-01-20 오에스지 가부시키가이샤 tool

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
JP3590579B2 (en) Diamond coated member and method of manufacturing the same
JP5008984B2 (en) Surface-coated cutting tool and method for manufacturing surface-coated cutting tool
US7431988B2 (en) Hard coating and machining tool disposed with hard coating
KR101170396B1 (en) Hard coating and its production method
JP5098726B2 (en) Coated tool and method for producing coated tool
JP3477162B2 (en) Diamond coated tool and method of manufacturing the same
JP2006225708A (en) Wear resistant film, wear resistant film-coated cutting tool, and method for producing wear resistant film
JP2005262389A (en) Surface-coated cutting tool for processing titanium alloy
JP2006281363A (en) Surface coated member and surface coated cutting tool
JP5257750B2 (en) Surface coated cutting tool
JP2011230286A (en) Surface-coated cutting tool
JP2006150572A (en) Boron doped diamond coating film, and diamond coated cutting tool
EP2772330A1 (en) Diamond-coated tool
JP2006152423A (en) Boron-doped diamond film, and diamond-coated cutting tool
Srinivasan et al. On the development of a dual-layered diamond-coated tool for the effective machining of titanium Ti-6Al-4V alloy
JP2006152422A (en) Boron-doped diamond film, and diamond-coated cutting tool
JP5075652B2 (en) Diamond coated cutting insert and cutting tool
JP4975682B2 (en) Method for manufacturing coated cutting tool
Peng et al. Characterization and adhesion strength of diamond films deposited on silicon nitride inserts by dc plasma jet chemical vapour deposition
JP6614446B2 (en) Surface coated cutting tool with excellent chipping and peeling resistance with excellent hard coating layer
JP5321360B2 (en) Surface coated cutting tool
JP5327534B2 (en) Surface coated cutting tool with excellent chipping resistance and peeling resistance of hard coating layer
JP2005226102A (en) Hard coating, and tool coated with the hard coating
JP6525310B2 (en) Coated tools
JP6040698B2 (en) Diamond-coated cemented carbide drill

Legal Events

Date Code Title Description
A621 Written request for application examination

Effective date: 20070719

Free format text: JAPANESE INTERMEDIATE CODE: A621

A977 Report on retrieval

Free format text: JAPANESE INTERMEDIATE CODE: A971007

Effective date: 20100128

A131 Notification of reasons for refusal

Effective date: 20100202

Free format text: JAPANESE INTERMEDIATE CODE: A131

A02 Decision of refusal

Free format text: JAPANESE INTERMEDIATE CODE: A02

Effective date: 20100608