GB2449846A - A coalescing filter - Google Patents

A coalescing filter Download PDF

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Publication number
GB2449846A
GB2449846A GB0710151A GB0710151A GB2449846A GB 2449846 A GB2449846 A GB 2449846A GB 0710151 A GB0710151 A GB 0710151A GB 0710151 A GB0710151 A GB 0710151A GB 2449846 A GB2449846 A GB 2449846A
Authority
GB
United Kingdom
Prior art keywords
layer
oil
coalescing
drainage
filter
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Withdrawn
Application number
GB0710151A
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GB0710151D0 (en
Inventor
Deborah Michele Spence
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
PSI Global Ltd
Original Assignee
PSI Global Ltd
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Application filed by PSI Global Ltd filed Critical PSI Global Ltd
Priority to GB0710151A priority Critical patent/GB2449846A/en
Publication of GB0710151D0 publication Critical patent/GB0710151D0/en
Publication of GB2449846A publication Critical patent/GB2449846A/en
Withdrawn legal-status Critical Current

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Classifications

    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B01PHYSICAL OR CHEMICAL PROCESSES OR APPARATUS IN GENERAL
    • B01DSEPARATION
    • B01D46/00Filters, i.e. particle separators or filtering processes specially modified for separating dispersed particles from gases or vapours
    • B01D46/24Particle separators, e.g. dust precipitators, using rigid hollow filter bodies
    • B01D46/2403Particle separators, e.g. dust precipitators, using rigid hollow filter bodies characterised by the physical shape or structure of the filtering element
    • B01D46/2411Filter cartridges
    • B01D46/2414End caps including additional functions or special forms
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B01PHYSICAL OR CHEMICAL PROCESSES OR APPARATUS IN GENERAL
    • B01DSEPARATION
    • B01D39/00Filtering material for liquid or gaseous fluids
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B01PHYSICAL OR CHEMICAL PROCESSES OR APPARATUS IN GENERAL
    • B01DSEPARATION
    • B01D39/00Filtering material for liquid or gaseous fluids
    • B01D39/14Other self-supporting filtering material ; Other filtering material
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B01PHYSICAL OR CHEMICAL PROCESSES OR APPARATUS IN GENERAL
    • B01DSEPARATION
    • B01D46/00Filters, i.e. particle separators or filtering processes specially modified for separating dispersed particles from gases or vapours
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B01PHYSICAL OR CHEMICAL PROCESSES OR APPARATUS IN GENERAL
    • B01DSEPARATION
    • B01D46/00Filters, i.e. particle separators or filtering processes specially modified for separating dispersed particles from gases or vapours
    • B01D46/0027Filters, i.e. particle separators or filtering processes specially modified for separating dispersed particles from gases or vapours with additional separating or treating functions
    • B01D46/003Filters, i.e. particle separators or filtering processes specially modified for separating dispersed particles from gases or vapours with additional separating or treating functions including coalescing means for the separation of liquid
    • B01D46/0031Filters, i.e. particle separators or filtering processes specially modified for separating dispersed particles from gases or vapours with additional separating or treating functions including coalescing means for the separation of liquid with collecting, draining means
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B01PHYSICAL OR CHEMICAL PROCESSES OR APPARATUS IN GENERAL
    • B01DSEPARATION
    • B01D2265/00Casings, housings or mounting for filters specially adapted for separating dispersed particles from gases or vapours
    • B01D2265/04Permanent measures for connecting different parts of the filter, e.g. welding, glueing or moulding
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B29WORKING OF PLASTICS; WORKING OF SUBSTANCES IN A PLASTIC STATE IN GENERAL
    • B29CSHAPING OR JOINING OF PLASTICS; SHAPING OF MATERIAL IN A PLASTIC STATE, NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR; AFTER-TREATMENT OF THE SHAPED PRODUCTS, e.g. REPAIRING
    • B29C65/00Joining or sealing of preformed parts, e.g. welding of plastics materials; Apparatus therefor
    • B29C65/02Joining or sealing of preformed parts, e.g. welding of plastics materials; Apparatus therefor by heating, with or without pressure
    • B29C65/08Joining or sealing of preformed parts, e.g. welding of plastics materials; Apparatus therefor by heating, with or without pressure using ultrasonic vibrations
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B29WORKING OF PLASTICS; WORKING OF SUBSTANCES IN A PLASTIC STATE IN GENERAL
    • B29CSHAPING OR JOINING OF PLASTICS; SHAPING OF MATERIAL IN A PLASTIC STATE, NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR; AFTER-TREATMENT OF THE SHAPED PRODUCTS, e.g. REPAIRING
    • B29C66/00General aspects of processes or apparatus for joining preformed parts
    • B29C66/01General aspects dealing with the joint area or with the area to be joined
    • B29C66/05Particular design of joint configurations
    • B29C66/10Particular design of joint configurations particular design of the joint cross-sections
    • B29C66/11Joint cross-sections comprising a single joint-segment, i.e. one of the parts to be joined comprising a single joint-segment in the joint cross-section
    • B29C66/114Single butt joints
    • B29C66/1142Single butt to butt joints
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B29WORKING OF PLASTICS; WORKING OF SUBSTANCES IN A PLASTIC STATE IN GENERAL
    • B29CSHAPING OR JOINING OF PLASTICS; SHAPING OF MATERIAL IN A PLASTIC STATE, NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR; AFTER-TREATMENT OF THE SHAPED PRODUCTS, e.g. REPAIRING
    • B29C66/00General aspects of processes or apparatus for joining preformed parts
    • B29C66/40General aspects of joining substantially flat articles, e.g. plates, sheets or web-like materials; Making flat seams in tubular or hollow articles; Joining single elements to substantially flat surfaces
    • B29C66/41Joining substantially flat articles ; Making flat seams in tubular or hollow articles
    • B29C66/43Joining a relatively small portion of the surface of said articles
    • B29C66/432Joining a relatively small portion of the surface of said articles for making tubular articles or closed loops, e.g. by joining several sheets ; for making hollow articles or hollow preforms
    • B29C66/4322Joining a relatively small portion of the surface of said articles for making tubular articles or closed loops, e.g. by joining several sheets ; for making hollow articles or hollow preforms by joining a single sheet to itself

Abstract

A tubular filter 10 for coalescing droplets of oil in a stream of gas, comprises an oil coalescing layer of a microfibrous material and a second layer of an oil drainage material located downstream of the first layer. The drainage layer is a butt-welded 30 tubular structure and is for receiving oil from the coalescing layer and for providing a path for oil to flow by gravity from the filter. Preferably the drainage layer is a non-woven felt or wadding thermally bonded by fusible bi-component fibres and the butt-weld defines a seal of given width formed using an ultrasonic welding machine. Preferably the coalescing layer is of glass micofibres or other inorganic material. The filter 10 may be used as an oil-coalescing filter in a rotary vane compressor or vacuum pump.

Description

IMPROVEMENTS IN COALESCING FILTERS

FIELD OF FIlE INVENTION

The present invention relates to an improbed coalescing filter and to its use 11w the remobal or oil droplets from an airstream, for example but not limited to an airstream from an oil-lubncated compressor or bacuum pump or in an air line. It also relates to a drainage layer for a filter as aforesaid.

BACKGROUND TO THE INVENTION

In air purification systems, pnmary separation filters (coalescing filters) are commonly provided downstream of an oil lubncated compressor (see US-A-423 1768, Pall Corporation). Coalescing filters are also commonly fitted to vacuum pumps for purifying the air stream from the exhaust side of the pump. In either case, the filter is likely to be challenged by a stream of air containing oil in the form of an aerosol of particle size 0.0 1-50 pm, though the filter may also be arranged for fluid flow in an out-to-in direction. The air stream is usually passed in an in-to out direction through a tubular filter having two working components, a layer within which the oil droplets coalesce and a drainage layer which collects the oil leaving the coalescing layer and retains it until it drips by gravity from the filter. The coalescing layer may be of borosilicate glass microfibers (see GR-A-1603519, the disclosure of which is incorporated herein by reference). The drainage layer may be provided by a porous sleeve of plastics foam or by a non-woven fabnc. Coalescing filters may be used with their axes vertical or horizontal.

Coalescing filters commonly spend their service lives wetted out with oil, and the problem of production of secondary aerosols from such filters is disclosed, for example, in GB-A-2 177019 (Pall Corporation). One avenue of researeh has been to try to reduce oil-carry-over from a coalescing filter by improving the drainage layer.

A known drainage layer matenal with low carry-over is an open-celled polyurethane foam having about 60 pores/inch and a PVC coating to provide resistance to chemical attack. The layer may also be colored with a dye or pigment to indicate the grade of filter. The material has Ihe advantage that its pore structure can he made very uni lhrm which assists drainage and reduces the tendency for oil blisters to form in the exterior of the drainage layer which can he expanded and burst by the stream of compressed air. However, in other respects the propeilies of the material are poor. Its S niaximum working temperature is 60 C whereas for many appi lent ions an ability to withstand I 20 C is necessai-y. It has poor resistance to contaminants in the oil and is attacked by some of the newer diesler synthetic oils. It is easily damaged throLigh handling and becomes brittle on exposure to IJV light.

Our W() 89/07484, the contents of which are incorporated herein by reference, discloses another solution of the oil carry-over problem based on the impregnation of the drainage layer with a fluorocarbon or other low surface energy material. As a result, the region of the drainage layer that is wetted out with oil becomes smaller. Treatment of both fbaiiis and flts is disclosed. A practical embodiment of that invention employs a drainage layer of an non-woen fabric which is a 50:50 blend of nylon (3.3 d.tex) and polyester (5.3 d.tex) with an acrylic hinder and fluorochemical finish. The weight of the drainage layer is 252 g/m2 arid thickness 3.2-3.Smm. However, we have found that this material has limitations arising from the way in which it is made. During the manufacturing process, the fibers are formed into a web which is subsequently heavily needled, afler which it is dipped into an acrylic binder and finally passed through a fluorochenucal dip in order to reduce the surfhce energy of the resulting structure. The heavy needling leaves visible holes in the fihnc. In use ofthe filter, oil emerges through the holes and forms droplets at the surlhce of the!hhric which become exploded by the Ibllowing stream of air, causing oil re-entrainment and poor separation performance.

A coalescing filter whose drainage layer is simple to make, in use gives air with low oil carryover, can he operated a temperatures above 60 C, and is resistant to light and to chemical attack is disclosed in our EP-B-0 177756, the contents of which are also incorporated herein by reference. That specification dsclose a filter fbi coalescing droplets of oil in a stream of gas, comprising an oil coalescing layer of a microfibrous material and a second layer of an oil drainage material located downstream of the first layer, said drainage layer being for receiving oil from the coalescing layer and providing a path lbr oil to flow by gravity from the filter, characterited in that the drainage layer is a non-woven flt or wadding thermally bonded by Ibsible hi-component fibers.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

A problem with which the inention is concerned is to produce a further filter having a lurther advantageous conihinaiion of properties, in particular a drainage layer which is easy to nianuIictttre and has low oil carry-over.

[hat problem is solved, according to the invention, by!ro iding a tubular tiller kr coalescing droplets of oil in a stream ol gas, conlpnsing an oil coalescing layer of a iiiicrofihrous material and a second layer of an oil drainage material located downstream of the first layer, said drainage layer being for receiving oil from the coalescing layer and providing a path for oil to flow by gravity from the filter, characterized in that the drainage layer is a butt-welded tubular structure.

The invention also includes an oil-lubricated compressor or vacuum pump provided with an oil-coalescing filter as aforesaid. The invent ion further provides a process f'or puril'ing air from an oil lubricated compressor or vacuum pump which comprises passing the air through a coalescing filter as afoi-esaid. It yet further provides a drainage layer for the above filler, comprising lihric at least partially of heal-flisible material butt-welded to form a lube.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINCS

1-low the invention may he put into efThct will now he further described, by way of example only, with refrence to the accompanying drawings in which: Fig. I is a view in isometric projection and obliquely fi'oni above of a filter according to the invention: Fig. 2 is a view of the liller of Fig. I in vertical section: and Fig. 3 is a flowchart showing the steps of' manufacturing a filter using a huLl-welded drainage sleeve ol thernioplastics material.

DESCRIPTION OF PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS

The filter 10 of the invention is of generally conventional structure and comprises first and second end Caps 12, 16 with an inlet 14 in the first cud cap. First and second Ioranii nous tubular members I 7, 1 8 e.g. of steel have between a coalescing layer of pleated horosilicate glass micro fiber (see (113-A-I 557821, the disclosure of which is incorporated herein by reference) and on the outer surface C) I the outer foraminous member I 8 a drainage layer 22. The filters pretrahly have end caps I 2, I 6 which have low aIiinily for contaniinants, and glass-li lied nylon which has an undesirably high affinity for water is advantageously not used, PJfl' or other polyester or metal being preferable end cap material. The foraminous tubular members, coalescing layer and drainage layer are attached to the end caps by adhesive 24, 26 and the upper end cap is formed with a groove for receiving an 0-ring 28 for sealing to a filter housing when the cartridge is screwed into position. l'he drainage layer comprises heat-fusible fibers butt- 1 5 welded as at 30.

Coalescing layer In general, the coalescing layer 20 may he of glass microfihers or other inorganic material, e.g. horosilicate glass niicroiibers and may he moulded, wrapped or pleated. It may also he of organic micro fibers e.g. polyester fibers. In the disclosed embodiment the coalescing layer is of pleated glass microliher, but in alternative embodiment it may be a molding in horosilicate glass microlihers as described in our GB-A-1603519, the disclosure of which is incorporated herein by reIrence.

Drainage layer Ihe drainage layer may have a weight of I OO-300g/m2, typically about 200g/m2, and a thickness o fahout 2-7mm, typically about 5mm. The fibers ofthe drainage layer advantageously have minimal intra-tiher and inter-fiber affinity for oil or other contaminants, and can he formed into a dimensionally stable flt or wadding of reproducible pore Si/C with little or no needling. For reduced affinity for contaminants, nylon fibers (which absorb water) are not used and the drainage layer comprises inert e.g. polyester fibers only.

l:or satisfactory dimensional stability it has been found in an embodiment of the inbent ion that typically about I 0-15 wt% of the fibers of the drainage layer should be fibers which are wholly or partly fusible, e.g. bi-component thermally bondable fibers.

If the proportion of bi-component or other fusible fibers is less than 5%, there is little bonding, whereas if then. are more than 25% the bonded fabnc becomes very still. We have found that with minimal needling and thermal bonding the resulting fabric has a generally uniform pore site which reduces or prevents preferential local oil through-flow.

the drainage layer material may on its intended outer face be subjected to a conventional treatment intended to reduce outwardly projecting fibers which provide retum paths for oil to the air stream. Such treatments include application of resin and surface heating or singeing, but obstruction of the exit pores of the drainage layer should be avoided. The material may also incorporate a dye or pigment for identification purposes. Embodiments of the drainage layer are resistant to the stress of pulses of air and are resistant to contact e.g. from the user's fingers, whereas a foam drainage layer exhibits poor resistance to such contact.

The majority fibers of the drainage layer may comprise polyester fibers of more than about 6 d.tex, and suitable fibers currently available are of sites 7, 17 and 24 d.tex, of which the 17 d.tex site has been found in some embodiments to give the best results, the 7 d.tex fiber size giving a smaller pore structure in which oil may be retained by capillary action. Polyester fibers have been been found to combine the properties of quick absorption of oil droplets into the material, ability to absorb a large mass of oil, quick oil drainage, and low final retention mass leading to a low final wet-band height when the resulting filter is in u.se.

The bicomponent fibers which are preferred for use in the drainage layer have a relatively high-melting core and a lower-melting sheath e.g. a core which melts at above about 2OWC and a sheath which melts at about 1 10-175 C. They may comprise about 10 wt % of the fibers of the drainage layer. The felt or wadding may be obtained by forming a loose web of the fibers, and passing the loose web between heated rollers so as to form a structure of an intended thickness and pore size, and it need not contain fluorocarbon. The minority hi-component fibers may he of the same chemical Composition as the majority fibers of the drainage layer, or they may he of di lThrent Coniposfi ion. They may he of the same diameter as the majority fibers, or they may he larger or smaller, the elThcl of the relatively low proportion of thermally bondable fibers S on the ovei-al I pore structure of' the drainage layer being signi licant ly less than that of the majority fibers. ror example the hi-component thermally bondable fibers may he polyester fibers of the same diameter as the reiiai iii ng libei s. A suitable drainage layer may he made from a 200 g/m2 thermally bonded I 7 d.tex polyester needlell I (available from Lantor (UK) Limited) crushed to a thickness of 5mm and formed into a sleeve which fits over the coalescing layer. The following other heal-fusible fibers which are smaller than the majority fibers may he suitable: (a) PES/PROP 2.2d.tex x 40 mm fibers Rising at temperatures of 1 30-140 C and sold under the trade name Damaklon 1SC. Risible hi-component by Damakion Europe lid.

(b) PES 5.5 d.tex x 60 mm hi-component fibers Rising at 165-I 75 C available from EMS Criltex.

(c) PES 4.4 d.tex x 50mm bi-coniponeni T9 1 Terital fibers fusing at 110- 120 C and available from fBM.

Thus a Rthric for a drainage layer may he made from 85 Wi % of 17 d.tex polyester fibers and I 5 wt% of' any o f the fibers (a) to (c) above, the fiber mixture being carded, crossfblded, needled, sprayed by means of a spray line successively with nitrile rubber (Synthomer 5046), resin (BT 336, BIP Resins) and colourant (C.I. pigment Red 1 0 I), and passed through an oven to cure the resin. The Ribric may he formed into a tube for pulling over the interior portions of a filter using an ultrasonic welding machine e.g. a Plhf'f Seamsonic 83 10 (Trade Mark) machine.

Butt welding Ultrasonic seani welding of' thermoplastic materials has been known at least sunce the publication in 1966 of' US-A-3242029 (Deans). That specification discloses ultrasonic sealing means in the form of' a transducer element having a rotating tool operatively coupled thereto, the rotating tool heiung adapted to cooperate with an anvil which may he stationary or may rotate in synchronism with the rotating lool. The apparatus is disclosed as being suitable for use with films of plastics and also of synthetic lihrics e.g of nylon.

Application of ultrasonic seam welding in relation to wo en textile materials S made wholly or partly of thermoplastic fibers in the manner of' a sewing machine is further discussed in EJS-A-3666599 (Oheda). In an amhodiment there is provided an ultrasonic seaming apparatus comprising a seaming station including an anvil, an electro-acoustic transducer having a resonator disposed opposite the anvil and defining with the anvil a nip through which a workpiece to be seamed is led, means lbr leediiig 1 0 the workpiece through the seaming station at adjustable reed rates, and means couopl ing the leding means to a source ol' electrical energy for controlling the velocity of' the resonator in response to the Iced rate of' the workppiece.

IJS-A-3852 144 (Parry) discloses a seaming machine which ultrasonically fuses or bonds two or more layers of' thermoplastic material together in a manner similar to a sewing machine and includes means fOr cutting and f'using the material in a marginal portion adjacent the seam. In the apparatus, ultrasonic means are provided to efict a longitudinal seam and additional means are provided to simultaneously cut and fuse the material adjacent the seamed area. In this manner it is possible to fuhricatc completely finished articles wherein the fOlded seani or hem usually deemed necessary to provide 2() an acceptable finished appearance can be omitted.

The state of' the art with relrence to ultrasonic machines fOr Joining fabrics is further illustrated in US-A-65 1765 1 (Azulay) and 6099670 (Louks ci a!.).

Fo the best of' the applicant's knowledge, ultrasonic butt welding has not hitherto been applied to the nianul'aeture of drainage socks for filters.

One machine that may he used is a Piuut'!' t3 10-042 ultrasonic seam welding machine in which a workpiece is held between the sonotrode and the anvil wheel and welded continuously Llndcr prsure When welding contnuousIy by the ultrasonic niethod,The the material to be welded will he subjected to rapid changing pressure vibrations. The heat develops because of' molecular vibrations beneath the material surfhce, for thin materials within the immediate vicinity of'the actual weld. The machine further combines the physical procedures of' welding aiid cutting using a V-wheel, which seams and cuts in a single operation. The material itself' will he ftd from a roll via a ihider' (a metal, teardrop shaped device which takes the flat material, and doubles ii over to present it to the welding machine with the two edges together ready for welding).

An embodiment of the invent ion will now he described in the following

Example.

Example

A tubular micro fiber coalescing element is nade based on glass microlihers of 1 0 diameter 0.5-I 0ini and aspect ratio 500: 1 -4000: I using the moulding procedure of our GB-A-I 6035 1 9. fhe element has an inside diameter of' 75mm, an outside diameter of 9Smm and a length of' 250mm. Ii is impregnated with a pheno lie resin and cured in an oven, ailer which the ends are sanded flat. A drainage layer is formed by pulling over an outer drainage layer constructed from I antor 7239 (polyester hi-component non-woven fleece material) anti fbrnied into a lube by an ultrasonic hull weld. This gives a drainage tube with a very narrow seam width (1-3mm e.g. about 2 mm), and also siniultaneously cuts along the scam, hence removing excess material in the same operation. The drainage layer, when inspected by eye, has a uniform appearance without visible holes fl'om needling. [he resulting tubular structure is fitted with steel end caps to fOrm a filter element for in-to-out air or gas through-flow. The filter element is placed with its axis horiLontal in a filter housing and is challenged with air fI'oni an oil-lubricated rotary vane compressor. Aerosol cartyover is a measureillent of' how much contaminated air leaves the pump, hence an important factor when considering filter efficiency. From tests, it is found that the prototype described herein shows effective results The filler may also be used with its axis vertical instead of' horiLontal, e.g. as described in CB-B-226 1830.

Claims (7)

1. A tubular 1111cr for coalescing droplets of oil in a stream of gas, comprising an oil coalescing layer of' a niicrofihrous material and a second layer of an oil drainage material located downstream oft he first layer, said drainage layer being for receiving oil from the coalescing layer and prov ichiiig a path Iör oil to how by gravity from the tiller, charactericd m that the drainage layer is a butt-welded tubular structure.
2. The hilt er of cI aini I, wherein the outer drainage layer is a flofl-woven fl.lt or wadding thermally bonded by fusible hi- component fibers.
3. The 1111cr of claim I or 2, wherein the butt-weld in the drainage layer dehines a seal of width I -3 nini.
4. The tiller of claim 1, 2 or 3, wherein the coalescing layer is ofglass microhihers or oilier inorganic material.
5. A compressor or vacuuni pump provided with an oil-coalescing filler as defined in any ofclaims I-4.
6. A process for purifying air hrom a rotary vane compressor or vacuum pump which comprises passing the air through the coalescing filter of any ofclaims 1-4.
7. A cfrainage layer fbr the tiller of any of claims 1-4, comprising 1hric at least partially oh heal-hisihle material hull-welded to lbrm a tube.
GB0710151A 2007-05-29 2007-05-29 A coalescing filter Withdrawn GB2449846A (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
GB0710151A GB2449846A (en) 2007-05-29 2007-05-29 A coalescing filter

Applications Claiming Priority (2)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
GB0710151A GB2449846A (en) 2007-05-29 2007-05-29 A coalescing filter
PCT/GB2008/050387 WO2008146045A1 (en) 2007-05-29 2008-05-29 Improvements in coalescing filters

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GB0710151D0 GB0710151D0 (en) 2007-07-04
GB2449846A true GB2449846A (en) 2008-12-10

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CN102172509B (en) * 2011-01-25 2013-09-18 太原理工大学 Ultrasonic electrolysis dehydrating method for fine coal
US9144760B2 (en) 2012-07-03 2015-09-29 The University Of Akron Liquid drainage from coalescing filter medium with drainage channels
DE102014003486A1 (en) * 2014-03-14 2015-09-17 Berner International Gmbh Filter cartridge for a safety cabinet and safety cabinet with at least one filter cartridge
AT14696U1 (en) * 2014-09-15 2016-04-15 Ge Jenbacher Gmbh & Co Og filter
CN104383755A (en) * 2014-10-08 2015-03-04 何茂林 Oil gas filtering filter core and oil gas separation method
WO2017092795A1 (en) * 2015-12-01 2017-06-08 Ateliers Busch S.A. Vacuum pump with filtering element

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GB1519992A (en) * 1974-07-03 1978-08-02 Wafilin Bv Membrane filtration element porous tubes
US5910229A (en) * 1996-07-25 1999-06-08 Usf Filtration & Separation Group Inc. Apparatus and method for integrally joining preformed thermoplastic core elements especially adapted for the continuous manufacture of melt-blown filter cartridges

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GB2214837B (en) * 1988-02-17 1991-09-04 Process Scient Innovations Oil coalescing filter
EP0930926B1 (en) * 1996-09-30 2003-07-23 Pall Corporation Coalescer element
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Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
GB1519992A (en) * 1974-07-03 1978-08-02 Wafilin Bv Membrane filtration element porous tubes
US5910229A (en) * 1996-07-25 1999-06-08 Usf Filtration & Separation Group Inc. Apparatus and method for integrally joining preformed thermoplastic core elements especially adapted for the continuous manufacture of melt-blown filter cartridges

Cited By (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
WO2020174251A1 (en) 2019-02-28 2020-09-03 Psi Global Ltd Filter cartridge and casing

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date
GB0710151D0 (en) 2007-07-04
WO2008146045A1 (en) 2008-12-04

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